Skip to main content

Public Events

Lionel Robbins Memorial Lectures: Poverty, Inequality and the Political Economy of Measurement - "Papal infallibility? Global poverty and the mystery of global inequality"

Angus Deaton (Princeton University)


Thursday 11 December 2014 18:30 - 19:45

Old Theatre, Ground Floor, Old Building, LSE, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

About this event

In this year's Lionel Robbins Lectures, Professor Angus Deaton will discuss 'Poverty, Inequality and the Political Economy of Measurement'.

CEP / STICERD / LSE Conference

Honouring Richard Layard - Celebrating 50 years at the London School of Economics

Date: Thursday 11th December 2014
Time: 09:00 - 17:30
Venue: 32L. 1.04, 1st Floor, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
Speakers include: Olivier Blanchard (IMF), David M. Clarke (Oxford), Angus Deaton (Princeton), Richard Freeman (NBER & CEP), Daniel Kahneman (Princeton), Steve Nickell (Oxford), Steve Machin (LSE & UCL).

This year marks the 50th Anniversary of Richard Layard's career at the LSE thus far.

In honour of his achievements we are hosting a celebratory conference at the LSE featuring a wealth of high profile speakers. These guests have known and worked with Richard extensively over the years and will join together to discuss the key economic matters that have been the cornerstones of his research career, namely; Unemployment; Inequality; Human Capital and; Happiness and Wellbeing.

Attendance at the conference is primarily by invitation only, however there will be some spaces available for faculty and students/staff. Please contact Jo Cantlay (j.m.cantlay@lse.ac.uk) for more information.

Download Programme (PDF)

About Richard:

Richard has experienced the LSE from all perspectives. Firstly, as a student - receiving his Masters in 1967, then as Lecturer, Reader and Professor. He has been an integral part of the research programme at the LSE, working in the Higher Education Research Unit, the Centre for Labour Economics and as Founder-Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, where he is now the Director of the Wellbeing Programme.

His influence in public policy is far reaching too. Richard advocated many of the policies which characterised the New Labour government, particularly the New Deal, and in 2000, he was made a Labour life peer in the House of Lords. He has worked as an advisor for numerous organisations and government institutions both in the UK and internationally, bringing forward policies on Skills and Apprenticeships and Mental Health.