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Wellbeing Seminar Series


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Organised by Dr Christian Krekel, Professor Richard Layard and Dr Jan-Emmanuel De Neve

Unless stated otherwise, seminars are held on Thursdays from 1:00pm - 2:15pm

Seminars are free and open to all


The CEP Wellbeing Programme holds regular seminars in its Enjoyment of Life series. The aim is to foster an interdisciplinary debate involving economists, psychologists, other social scientists, epidemiologists and clinical scientists to evaluate the strength of evidence linking wellbeing, biology, and health, the suitability of different research paradigms, and the social and health implications of this work. Each seminar will consist of a research presentation followed by discussion, with refreshments. [Past seminars]
All seminars, unless otherwise stated, will be held at CEP, 2nd floor meeting room (2.04), 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, WC2A 3PH. If you are an external visitor to LSE, please bring a copy of the email reminder with you.

For any enquiries, please contact Tajender Sagoo, either by email: t.sagoo@lse.ac.uk or telephone: +44(0)20 7955 6648

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Thursday  14 November 2019  13:00 - 14:15

How do buildings affect our wellbeing?

Koen Steemers (Cambridge)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Thursday  17 October 2019  13:00 - 14:15

Body movement as a rich modality to capture and regulate emotional experiences and support wellbeing

Nadia Berthouze (UCL)

With the emergence of full-body sensing technology come new opportunities to support people’s affective experiences and wellbeing. In my talk, I will present our work on technology for chronic pain management and discuss how such technology can lead to more effective physical rehabilitation through integrating it in everyday activities and support people at both physical and affective levels. I will also discuss how this sensing technology enables us to go beyond simply measuring one’s behaviour by exploiting embodied bottom-up mechanisms that enhance the perception of one’s body and its capabilities.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Thursday  24 October 2019  13:00 - 14:15

Is there really loss aversion?

Cahal Moran (LSE)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Thursday  31 October 2019  13:00 - 14:15

Can people remember how happy they were?

Alberto Prati (AMSE)

Studies have shown evidence of recollection biases in a variety of situations, where some objective information is learned and subsequently forgotten or distorted in a predictable way. Yet, little is known about memory of subjective states, such as past subjective well-being. We uncover biases in recalled well-being: happy people tend to overstate the improvement in their well-being over time, and unhappy ones tend to exaggerate its worsening. It thus seems that feeling happy today implies perceiving to be happier than before, and feeling unhappy implies feeling less happy than before. These findings are based on the British Household Panel Survey, where, for a decade, over 27,000 people were asked if they were more, less, or as satisfied with life as compared with the previous year. We compare this perceived change with their yearly life satisfaction reports. Inconsistencies are widespread and follow a regular pattern, which cannot be solely explained by features of the satisfaction scale.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Thursday  07 November 2019  13:00 - 14:15

Developing technologies for health, mental health and wellbeing

Rafael Calvo (Imperial)

Substantial investment from government and commercial organisationsin health technology reflects the opportunities to promote uniquely tailored, data-rich and autonomy-supportive tools at scale. Still many digital technologies for health and wellbeing go un-evaluated, lack an evidence base, or fall short of achieving the impact intended. Among the challenges to success is achieving the deep interdisciplinarity involved, which often requires continuous collaboration among medical professionals, psychologists, HCI researchers, user experience designers, software developers and end-users. While some projects lack theoretical grounding or an evidence-base, others fail to involve users effectively in order to understand their needs, perceptions and contexts, resulting in technologies that go unused. Working together, researchers in HCI, health and the social sciences can improve the processes by which digital technologies are developed and distributed for the benefit of population-wide health and wellbeing. In this presentation, I will share some of the multidisciplinary evidence-based approaches to the development of health technologies formerly taken at the Wellbeing Technologies Lab in Sydney, Australia, and now starting at Imperial college London. I will describe some ideas on the contributions HCI can make to this field, and share a number of case studies in the domains of chronic illness, sleep, mental health and doctor-patient communication.


32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
calendar
Thursday  14 November 2019  13:00 - 14:15

How do buildings affect our wellbeing?

Koen Steemers (Cambridge)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Thursday  21 November 2019  13:00 - 14:15

Economic analysis of happiness data: a simple truth about happiness scales

Ekaterina Oparina (University of Surrey)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Thursday  28 November 2019  13:00 - 14:15

All I have to do is dream? The role of aspirations for intergenerational mobility and wellbeing

Warn Lekfuangfu (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH