CEP LSE RSS Contact Us YouTube Facebook Twitter

cover
CEP Discussion Paper
Technical Change and Superstar Effects: Evidence from the Roll-Out of Television
Felix Koenig
November 2019
Paper No' CEPDP1663:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: superstar effect; inequality; top incomes; technical change
cover
CEP Discussion Paper
The Intellectual Spoils of War? Defense R&D, Productivity and International Spillovers
Enrico Moretti, Claudia Steinwender and John Van Reenen November 2019
Paper No' CEPDP1662:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: defense; r&d; productivity
cover
CEP Discussion Paper
Measuring the Gains from Labor Specialization
Decio Coviello, Andrea Ichino and Nicola Persico
November 2019
Paper No' CEPDP1661:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: labor specialization; productivity of workers; judges
cover
CEP Discussion Paper
Spillover Effects from New Housing Supply
Nicolás González-Pampillón
November 2019
Paper No' CEPDP1660:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: housing supply; house prices; neighborhood change; crime; difference-in-differences; housing policies
cover
CentrePiece Article
In brief...Big city, bright future: why birthplace matters so much
Clément Bosquet and Henry Overman
November 2019
Paper No' CEPCP567:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: place of birth; spatial sorting; lifetime mobility
cover
CentrePiece Article
Generation gap: young Brits less likely to 'do better' than their parents
Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman
November 2019
Paper No' CEPCP566:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: intergenerational mobility; inequality; generation gap
cover
CentrePiece Article
In brief...The long-term effects of financial distress in childhood
Marta Barazzetta, Andrew Clark and Conchita D'Ambrosio
November 2019
Paper No' CEPCP565:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: income; financial problems; child outcomes; subjective well-being; behaviour; education; alspac
cover
CentrePiece Article
Business benefits of local universities: more skills and better management
Andy Feng and Anna Valero
November 2019
Paper No' CEPCP564:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: management practices; human capital; universities; complementarities
cover
CentrePiece Article
Structured management: how firms can hire and keep the best people
Christopher Cornwell, Ian M. Schmutte and Daniela Scur
November 2019
Paper No' CEPCP563:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: labor allocation; managers; management practices; productivity
cover
CentrePiece Article
Between communism and capitalism: long-run inequality in Poland
Pawel Bukowski and Filip Novokmet
November 2019
Paper No' CEPCP562:
Read Abstract | Full Paper (pdf)

Tags: income inequality; transformation; poland

Monday  18 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Scaling Up Agricultural Policy Interventions: Theory and Evidence from Uganda

Benjamin Faber (University of California, Berkeley)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars
Tuesday  19 November 2019  12:45 - 14:00

Job Search Assistance for Refugees in Jordan: An Adaptive Field Experiment

Stefano Caria (Bristol)

32L 2.04, 2nd Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH


CEP Labour Market Workshop
Monday 11 November 2019

Investorschronicle.co.uk: Labour and sterling

Not quite. The problem is uncertainty. A Corbyn government would break with the economic policies we have been accustomed to since the 1980s. This alone generates uncertainty. And the clichè is right; markets really do hate uncertainty. We can measure policy uncertainty by an index constructed by Nick Bloom, Scott Baker and Steven Davis. Since this index began in 1998 it has been significantly negatively correlated with the real $/£ rate. Higher uncertainty, then, means a weaker pound.

Related Links:

Investorschronicle.co.uk - Labour and sterling

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

Monday 11 November 2019

The Independent: Just believing you are trapped by a lack of opportunity can impact economic growth

If, as Aiyar and Ebeke argue, low intergenerational mobility is a good proxy for inequality of opportunity, then its steep decline in Britain has alarming implications for the economy. According to researchers at the University of Surrey and the London School of Economics, in 2005, 62 per cent of people aged between 28 and 32 earned as much or more than their fathers did at the same age. But by 2018, that share had fallen to 36 per cent.
Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman

This blog post is based on 'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

Related Links:

The Independent - Just believing you are trapped by a lack of opportunity can impact economic growth

CEP Education and Skills

CEP Labour Markets

CEP Wellbeing

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage