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The Mental Elf

The Origins of Happiness: can we predict life satisfaction?

 

The prospect of this book did make me happy. The idea that a group of well-respected, eminent economists would be making the case that government should focus its efforts on increasing the happiness and life satisfaction of the population, rather than just focussing on money and Gross Domestic Product, is something to warm the heart on a cold winters evening. The book begins by quoting Thomas Jefferson “the care of human life and happiness… is the only legitimate object of good government” and the authors then set out their main purpose as to “lay out in quantitative terms what is known about the causes of well-being”. The authors do this by undertaking a series of analyses of data from longitudinal studies of human development (mostly from the UK), and they base their conclusions predominantly on this form of evidence. Related publications

The Origins of Happiness by Andrew Clark, Sarah Flèche, Richard Layard, Natavudh Powdthavee and George Ward is published by Princeton University Press, January 2018

 

   


Related Links:
The Mental Elf - The Origins of Happiness: can we predict life satisfaction?

CEP Wellbeing

George Ward webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 22/01/2018      [Back to the Top]

CEP/LSE Press Release

The Origins of Happiness: A book on the science of wellbeing over the life course

Schools and individual teachers have a huge effect on the happiness of their children. Indeed, the school that children attend affects their happiness nearly as much as it affects their academic performance. What’s more, if we wish to predict which children will lead satisfying adult lives, the best indicator is their emotional health at age 16. This is more important than their academic qualifications right up to the age of 25 – and more important than their behaviour in childhood. These are among the findings of a new book by Professor Richard Layard and colleagues, which presents evidence on the origins of happiness drawing on unique survey data on over 100,000 individuals in Australia, Germany, the UK and the United States.  


Related Links:
CEP/LSE Press Release - The Origins of Happiness: A book on the science of wellbeing over the life course

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

George Ward webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 22/01/2018      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Times

Does Ireland need a dedicated minister for loneliness?

He told The Irish Times that the impact of loneliness on physical health was “equivalent to 15 cigarettes a day and a study by the London School of Economics found that it cost the UK state an average of £6,000 per person per year”.

Related publications

The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders, A report by the Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group, 18 June 2006

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/special/depressionreport.pdf


Related Links:
The Irish Times - Does Ireland need a dedicated minister for loneliness?

Tackling Depression and Anxiety Disorders

The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 18/01/2018      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Second-generation family CEOs: are they up to the task?

Research shows the first causal evidence that dynastic family firms have worse management practices, writes Daniela Scur

We push the literature forward in two main ways: first, we show the first causal evidence that dynastic family CEO successions lead to worse management. Second, we go beyond the usual suggestions of improving information and skills, and suggest that the specific labour context that family firms act in is important. We propose that the implicit employment commitments between family managers and their workers should factor into both how management upgrading projects are presented to prospective firm managers as well as into the expected take-up and long-term adherence of such improvements. This is a key consideration as many organisations push forward in enacting management upgrading projects around the world.

Related publications

‘All in the family? CEO choice and firm organization’, Renata Lemos and Daniela Scur, mimeo, January 2018

http://www.danielascur.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/danielascurjmp_allinthefamily.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Second-generation family CEOs: are they up to the task?

CEP Growth

Daniela Scur webpage

Renata Lemos webpage


News Posted: 18/01/2018      [Back to the Top]