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ISQOLS

Richard Layard wins Distinguished Researcher award

Professor Lord Richard Layard has been given the 2020 Distinguished Quality-of-Life Researcher Award for his substantial contribution to wellbeing research. 

The award was given to Professor Layard by the International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies (ISQOLS) in an online ceremony. 

Accepting the award, Professor Layard said that he felt huge progress had been made towards embedding wellbeing as a public policy priority. He added that Covid-19 pandemic had made people think about what really matters.  

The video recording of the whole event is available here.

Professor Layard is one of the first economists to have worked on wellbeing. His 2005 book Happiness: Lessons from a new science, which was translated into 20 languages, kick-started the debate on the importance of prioritising wellbeing as a way of measuring how well a country was doing - rather than simply looking at GDP. 

His work since then has included helping to establish the NHS service Improving Access to Psychological Therapies, co-founding the movement Action for Happiness and co-editing the World Happiness Report.

His most recent book Can We Be Happier? Evidence and Ethics was published in January 2020. 

ISQOL, based in Arizona, USA, is a professional organisation which promotes and encourages research in the field of quality-of-life, happiness and wellbeing studies. 


Related Links:
ISQOLS - Richard Layard wins Distinguished Researcher award

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 21/09/2020      [Back to the Top]

TES

'Big concerns’ over Covid catch-up tutors shortage

Lee Elliot Major, who used to head up the Sutton Trust, which is helping to deliver the scheme, said there were now "big concerns" over whether there was sufficient capacity to support the hundreds of thousands of pupils who will need it. Additionally, that the scheme might not work because there are not enough high-quality tutors available.


Related Links:
TES - 'Big concerns’ over Covid catch-up tutors shortage

Covid-19 and social mobility

CEP Education and Skills

Lee Elliot major webpage


News Posted: 09/09/2020      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

How coronavirus piled misery on India's workers

Shania Bhalotia, Swati Dhingra and Fjolla Kondirolli examine the impact of lockdown imposed in late March on more than 8,500 urban workers, finding 52% went without work or pay during lockdown, while less than a quarter had access to government or employer financial assistance.


Related Links:
The Guardian - How coronavirus piled misery on India's workers

City of Dreams No More: The Impact of Covid-19 on Urban Workers in India

CEP Labour Markets

CEP Trade

Shania Bhalotia webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Fjolla Kondirolli webpage


News Posted: 06/09/2020      [Back to the Top]

Blogs: LSE Business Review

Why we need to do something about the monopsony power of employers

Why we need to do something about the monopsony power of employers - Alan Manning writes about how monopsony lowers worker mobility and wages, in this new blog article at LSE.


Related Links:
Blogs: LSE Business Review - Why we need to do something about the monopsony power of employers

CEP Community Wellbeing

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 26/08/2020      [Back to the Top]