CEP LSE RSS Contact Us YouTube Facebook Twitter

News and Press

CEP in the News 2017     feed/rss

CNN

CNN Live

Dennis Novy gave a live TV interview to CNN (host: Rosemary Church). The topic was the economic impact of Brexit, in particular a potential brain drain from the UK jobs market and the proposed post-Brexit customs arrangement with the European Union.


Related Links:
CNN - CNN Live

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call for mobile phone ban in Scottish primary schools

Mobile phones should be banned from primary schools, according to the Scottish Conservatives.

Scottish Conservative MSP Michelle Ballantyne urged the government to overhaul this guidance, calling for an outright ban on phones in primary schools and the introduction of restrictions on their use in secondary schools if head teachers deem it necessary. The South Scotland MSP highlighted research from academics at the London School of Economics into the impact of banning phones in high schools in England.


Related Links:
BBC News - Call for mobile phone ban in Scottish primary schools

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Times of Tunbridge Wells

Report claims Brexit will sting whatever guise it comes in…

THE economies of both Tunbridge Wells and Tonbridge will suffer in the coming years due to Brexit, a new report by the London School of Economics claims. Titled The Local Economic Effects of Brexit, the study shows every authority in the UK will see its prosperity curtailed regardless of whether it is a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit. According to the report, if the UK was to undertake a ‘hard Brexit’, then in the ten years after crashing out of the EU the economy of Tunbridge Wells will be 2.6 per cent smaller than if it had stayed in. … The report’s authors, who work for the university’s Centre for Economic Performance, state they have modelled their estimates on ‘medium to long run impact of changes to trade costs’, and have ignored effects on innovation, immigration and inward investment.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Times of Tunbridge Wells - Report claims Brexit will sting whatever guise it comes in…

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Scottish Daily Mail

Heads 'need to be able to ban phones'

Snippet: ...Scottish MSP Michelle Ballantyne highlighted research by academics at the London School of Economics into the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restrict access to mobile phones ‘subsequently experience an improvement in test scores’ and it ‘improves outcomes for the low-achieving students the most’.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

 


Related Links:
Scottish Daily Mail - Heads 'need to be able to ban phones'

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC TV

Victoria Derbyshire

Dr Swati Dhingra talks about the customs union plan.

Related links

Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=dhingra


Related Links:
BBC TV - Victoria Derbyshire

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News online

How low can you go? Economists game out U.S. unemployment bounds

Grandma got replaced by a robot

Old, lower-skilled manufacturing employees lose jobs to robots amid minimum wage increases, new research from the University of California at Irvine’s David Neumark and London School of Economics’ Grace Lordan shows. It’s a well-told story that sudden wage hikes spur job loss, and the innovation here is that the authors dig into just where those cuts happen. A $1 increase in the minimum wage decreases the share of low-skilled automate-able jobs by 0.43 percentage point, the authors find, but in manufacturing that jumps to 0.99 percentage point, and the share of older workers declines most sharply (women and black workers also post big drops).

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Bloomberg News online - How low can you go? Economists game out U.S. unemployment bounds

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Fox Business

U.K. proposes broad customs deal with EU after Brexit – 2nd update

Also, the U.K. paper isn't a negotiating document and presented technical ideas that weren't fully developed and lacked significant detail. The two long-term approaches "are worth exploring further, but the hard work of assessing whether these ideas could work in practice has yet to be done," wrote Thomas Sampson of the London School of Economics in a blog.

Related article

LSE Brexit blog

UK government’s customs position paper fails to answer key questions

The UK government’s new position paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2017/08/15/uk-governments-customs-position-paper-fails-to-answer-key-questions/


Related Links:
Fox Business - U.K. proposes broad customs deal with EU after Brexit – 2nd update

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

4-traders

U.K. proposes broad customs deal with EU after Brexit – 2nd update

LONDON -- The U.K. government proposed a far-reaching customs arrangement with the European Union that it said would eliminate the need for border checks on imports and exports after Brexit. The "new customs partnership" with the EU was one of two suggestions the government put forward on Tuesday in a paper detailing its thinking on customs before resuming talks with Brussels this month over terms of Britain's withdrawal from the EU. … Also, the U.K. paper isn't a negotiating document and presented technical ideas that weren't fully developed and lacked significant detail. The two long-term approaches "are worth exploring further, but the hard work of assessing whether these ideas could work in practice has yet to be done," wrote Thomas Sampson of the London School of Economics in a blog.

Related article

LSE Brexit blog

UK government’s customs position paper fails to answer key questions

The UK government’s new position paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2017/08/15/uk-governments-customs-position-paper-fails-to-answer-key-questions/


Related Links:
4-traders - U.K. proposes broad customs deal with EU after Brexit – 2nd update

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Brexit blog

UK government’s customs position paper fails to answer key questions

The UK government’s new position paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

 

Related article

LSE Brexit blog

UK government’s customs position paper fails to answer key questions

The UK government’s new position paper on future customs arrangements sets out its objectives for how goods trade with the EU will be governed following Brexit. However, as Thomas Sampson from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance outlines below, the proposal is incomplete and leaves unanswered five key questions about the UK’s position.

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/brexit/2017/08/15/uk-governments-customs-position-paper-fails-to-answer-key-questions/


Related Links:
LSE Brexit blog - UK government’s customs position paper fails to answer key questions

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

CNBC online

One US factory goes global, while Trump shrinks the world

"Altering Nafta could fundamentally change the production of the economy — for the U.S., as well as for Mexico — and that will be very disruptive," said Swati Dhingra, an economist at the London School of Economics. "Many of the policies being proposed could end up hurting the people who are being left behind."

Related links

Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=dhingra


Related Links:
CNBC online - One US factory goes global, while Trump shrinks the world

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Honolulu Star Advertiser

One U.S. factory goes global while Trump shrinks world

The latest concern unfolds this week, as the Trump administration begins to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, redrawing the terms of commerce with Mexico and Canada. “Altering NAFTA could fundamentally change the production of the economy — for the U.S., as well as for Mexico — and that will be very disruptive,” said Swati Dhingra, an economist at the London School of Economics. “Many of the policies being proposed could end up hurting the people who are being left behind.”

Related links

Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=dhingra


Related Links:
Honolulu Star Advertiser - One U.S. factory goes global while Trump shrinks world

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

One U.S. factory goes global while Trump shrinks world

The latest concern unfolds this week, as the Trump administration begins to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, redrawing the terms of commerce with Mexico and Canada. “Altering NAFTA could fundamentally change the production of the economy — for the U.S., as well as for Mexico — and that will be very disruptive,” said Swati Dhingra, an economist at the London School of Economics. “Many of the policies being proposed could end up hurting the people who are being left behind.”

Related links

Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=dhingra


Related Links:
New York Times - One U.S. factory goes global while Trump shrinks world

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Scotsman

MSP wants headteachers to be allowed to ban mobiles in school

Headteachers should have the power to ban mobile phones in schools, a Tory MSP has said. South Scotland MSP Michelle Ballantyne has urged the Scottish Government to overhaul its 2013 guidance on the use of mobile devices in schools. She wants a ban on phones in primary schools and the introduction of restrictions on their use in secondary schools if headteachers deem it necessary. Ms Ballantyne highlighted research by academics at the London School of Economics which explored the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restrict access to mobile phones “subsequently experience an improvement in test scores”.


Related Links:
Scotsman - MSP wants headteachers to be allowed to ban mobiles in school

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

MIT Technology Review

Increasing Minimum Wage puts more jobs at risk of automation

When the minimum wage goes up, the robots come for people's jobs. That's the upshot of a paper published today on the National Bureau of Economic Research's website (abstract, full PDF paywalled), which analyzed how changes to the minimum wage from 1980 to 2015 affected low-skill jobs in various sectors of the U.S. economy. … Interestingly, a study of Seattle's new law, released in June, suggested that cuts to working hours meant people were actually losing as much as $125 a month. The new analysis, by Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark at the University of California, Irvine, suggests that there's a similar negative effect among people who work minimum-wage jobs that machines can do. The researchers found that across all industries they measured, raising minimum wage by $1 equates to a decline in "automatable" jobs—things like packing boxes or operating a sewing machine—of 0.43 percent.


Related Links:
MIT Technology Review - Increasing Minimum Wage puts more jobs at risk of automation

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage



News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

HowlingPixel

Technological unemployment

Some recent studies however, such as a 2015 paper by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, found that at least in the area they studied – the impact of industrial robots – innovation is boosting pay for highly skilled workers while having a more negative impact on those with low to medium skills.

 


Related Links:
HowlingPixel - Technological unemployment

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mortgage Introducer online

Our great housing problem

A recent paper by Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics suggests that stamp duty reduces the rate of home moving by about a fifth.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Mortgage Introducer online - Our great housing problem

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Today’s Conveyancer

Stamp duty under new scrutiny

Academics have claimed that the housing market is being adversely affected by stamp duty. According to research from the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, the duty is deterring households from moving, especially where the distance between properties is small.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf

 


Related Links:
Today’s Conveyancer - Stamp duty under new scrutiny

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Booth Review

A global measure of uncertain economic times

Uncertainty about a nation’s economic policies can influence both politics and financial markets, and the effects often spread beyond the country’s borders. Building on his research with Northwestern’s Scott R. Baker and Stanford’s Nick Bloom measuring policy uncertainty in the world’s major economies, Chicago Booth’s Steven J. Davis has constructed an index that combines data from 18 countries to provide a global measurement of uncertainty from 1997 to present.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016


Related Links:
Chicago Booth Review - A global measure of uncertain economic times

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Forsal.Pl (Poland)

What about international trade after brexit? Here are the possibilities and their consequences

The Center for Economic Performance estimated that in the case of such a scenario over the decade, trade would have fallen by 40 percent and average income by 2.6 percent.


Related Links:
Forsal.Pl (Poland) - What about international trade after brexit? Here are the possibilities and their consequences

BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Perspectiva.com

Wealth or wellbeing?

According to a study by the London School of Economics (LSE), with the participation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, most human misery is not due to economic factors, but to failed relationships and physical and mental illness . … According to Richard Layard, one of those responsible for the study, "the evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness and misery are social relationships and mental and physical health." In his view, this demands a new role for the state, but not in the sense of "wealth creation", but in the sense of "welfare creation."

Associated article

Vox Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications  Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward.


Related Links:
Perspectiva.com - Wealth or wellbeing?

CEP Wellbeing

George Ward webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage



News Posted: 13/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

The regions can be our road to revival, but only if transport links are improved

A rebalancing is long overdue. “Regional disparities are wider in the UK than other western European countries,” according to the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance. One reason why London’s productivity, and hence wealth, is so much greater than Britain’s other cities is the sophistication of the commuter network. Studies have shown that people tolerate roughly an hour’s travel but much more than that and the pool of labour available to an employer shrinks. With such a shallow pool of talent in sites as stranded as Cheshire science park, business would have to think twice about putting down roots.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017 

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Times - The regions can be our road to revival, but only if transport links are improved

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 12/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Time to sound the horn for council tax reform

By raising the costs of moving home, stamp duty is likely to have “very substantial detrimental effects” on the property market, according to research released this week by academics from the London School of Economics and Finland’s VATT Institute.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Financial Times - Time to sound the horn for council tax reform

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 11/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Investor Today

Cut stamp duty to free up mobility, says report

Current stamp duty rates are deterring older buyers from downsizing and therefore freeing up homes for those further down the housing ladder, but the research from the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, says that moving levels would increase by over a quarter if the tax was scrapped.

Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report, commented: “The key message is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly, it create a mismatch and distortions in the housing market. Our analysis suggests that mobility would be 27% higher if stamp duty was abolished or replaced with an annual tax on the value of property.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017 http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Investor Today - Cut stamp duty to free up mobility, says report

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 11/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

KentLive

Thanet is predicted to be the worst affected area in Kent by a ‘soft Brexit’

Experts have predicted that Thanet would be the hardest hit area of Kent in a 'soft Brexit' scenario. A new study by the London School of Economics revealed that Thanet could lose £27.2 million – based largely on the assumption the UK could still negotiate access to the EU single market.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
KentLive - Thanet is predicted to be the worst affected area in Kent by a ‘soft Brexit’

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Is this the way to beat stamp duty? Savvy widower, 82, with a 10 room property 'downsizes' by splitting his home in HALF to live in one side and let the other

Snippet: ... A report by the London School of Economics also claimed that stamp duty is making the housing crisis worse because it is deterring older homeowners from downsizing. 

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Daily Mail - Is this the way to beat stamp duty? Savvy widower, 82, with a 10 room property 'downsizes' by splitting his home in HALF to live in one side and let the other

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Taizhou (China)

British latest research: stamp duty into the real estate market stumbling block

Snippet: ... "The important message for our paper is that the taxation has significantly hurt the liquidity," said Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Taizhou (China) - British latest research: stamp duty into the real estate market stumbling block

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

David Stevenson goes into EPIC meltdown after he's cruelly dumped from Make Or Break

Snippet: ... Behavioural expert Paul Dolan tried to remain positive as he told the camera: "They've broken up but they've got an escape plan and they can find someone better."


Related Links:
Mirror - David Stevenson goes into EPIC meltdown after he's cruelly dumped from Make Or Break

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Derby Telegraph

Stamp duty should be abolished to boost housing market, new report says

Co-author of the report, Professor Christian Hilber, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly’…

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Derby Telegraph - Stamp duty should be abolished to boost housing market, new report says

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Politics

Britain’s Not-So-Sweet Options for an EU Trade Deal

What if there is no deal?

A “very, very bad outcome,” in the words of Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond. The U.K. would regain control of laws, money, immigration and ability to negotiate trade pacts. If pushed it could even slash taxes and regulations to create a Singapore-style economy focused on drawing investment. (Embracing fully free trade could increase the U.K.’s long-term gross domestic product by 4 percent, according to Patrick Minford of Cardiff Business School.) But U.K. exporters would be subject to World Trade Organization duties and multiple non-tariff barriers. A hard border with Ireland would be needed, Britain-based airlines might not be able to land on the continent and the transportation of nuclear material would be impeded. The Center for Economic Performance estimated trade would fall 40 percent over a decade and average income by 2.6 percent in the no-deal scenario.


Related Links:
Bloomberg Politics - Britain’s Not-So-Sweet Options for an EU Trade Deal

The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

John Van reenen webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Prospect magazine

Hard or soft, Brexit will hit every British city—and pro-Leave areas will find it hardest to recover

People up and down the country can ill afford for silly season squabbles to distract us from the complexity of Brexit

…amidst the summer politicking and parties, a new report by Centre for Cities should make for sobering reading for Government ministers, particularly those pushing for a hard Brexit. The report (published in partnership with the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE) charts for the first time the likely impact of both a hard or soft Brexit on UK cities in the decade after new trade arrangements with the EU are put in place - and in both scenarios, the news isn’t good.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf

 


Related Links:
Prospect magazine - Hard or soft, Brexit will hit every British city—and pro-Leave areas will find it hardest to recover

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

SKY News

Stamp duty causing bottleneck in housing market, report says

The tax is stopping young families from moving to a larger home, a report says, and deterring older people from downsizing.

Snippet: ...Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report, said: "The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.....

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf

'Transfer taxes and household mobility: Distortion on the housing or labor market?' Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen Journal of Urban Economics , 2017. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094119017300542

 

 


Related Links:
SKY News - Stamp duty causing bottleneck in housing market, report says

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Property Industry Eye

LSE academics become the latest to call for Stamp Duty to be scrapped

A study by the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research found Stamp Duty, or property transfer taxes, were making households less likely to move, particularly over shorter distances.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Property Industry Eye - LSE academics become the latest to call for Stamp Duty to be scrapped

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC News (blog/TV)

Newspaper headlines: The Papers

Snippet: ... Prof Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics, tells the paper the key message from the research is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
BBC News (blog/TV) - Newspaper headlines: The Papers

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

STAMP IT OUT Steep stamp duty is making the housing crisis WORSE because older homeowners are put off downsizing, new report claims

Snippet: ... Prof Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
The Sun - STAMP IT OUT Steep stamp duty is making the housing crisis WORSE because older homeowners are put off downsizing, new report claims

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

London Loves Business

Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis and impacting economic growth

Snippet: ... Professor Christian Hilber, who co-authored the report told the Daily Telegraph: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
London Loves Business - Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis and impacting economic growth

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Property118

LSE call on Chancellor to reform Stamp duty

Snippet: ... Co-author of the report, Professor Christian Hilber, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Property118 - LSE call on Chancellor to reform Stamp duty

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Express

‘Draconian’ Stamp Duty will trigger HUGE house price CRASH by stopping elderly downsizing

Snippet: ... LSE Professor Christian Hilber said: "If you are a young family and you have an additional child, you'll need an additional room, but the stamp duty is discouraging this kind of move because of the additional cost and lack of available homes to move into."

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Express - ‘Draconian’ Stamp Duty will trigger HUGE house price CRASH by stopping elderly downsizing

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

CityAM

Stamp duty "hampers mobility" as pensioners cling onto family homes

The academic paper, published jointly by the London School of Economics and the VATT Institute for Economic Research, estimates the level of home moving would increase by 27 per cent if the levy was abolished outright.

Professor Christian Hilber, co-author of the report, said: “The key message of our paper is that stamp duty hampers mobility significantly.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
CityAM - Stamp duty "hampers mobility" as pensioners cling onto family homes

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

Who are Make or Break's Stephen and Abbi? The Vegas party boy who wants to shake off his playboy image for his loyal girlfriend

Snippet: ... What was going through your mind when Paul (Paul Dolan – Happiness expert and Professor of Behavioural Science) told you what would be happening? 


Related Links:
Mirror - Who are Make or Break's Stephen and Abbi? The Vegas party boy who wants to shake off his playboy image for his loyal girlfriend

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

OK!

Make Or Break: David Stevenson reveals the heartbreaking reason behind his quest for love as Beth Matkin relationship spirals

Snippet: ... Things went from bad to worse in Tuesday night's episode of Make Or Break as David broke down in tears once again after finding out some home truths during a task with behavioural expert Paul Dolan.


Related Links:
OK! - Make Or Break: David Stevenson reveals the heartbreaking reason behind his quest for love as Beth Matkin relationship spirals

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Credit Crunch Anniversary: Why Pay Is A ‘Long Way’ From Recovering And How Brexit Is Making It Worse

A London School of Economics report in June showed that Britain was one of just three out of 28 countries that saw wages fall in real terms between 2007 and 2015.

The only country where wages fell more was Greece, which has suffered economic catastrophe in the years since the crisis.

 


Related Links:
Huffington Post - Credit Crunch Anniversary: Why Pay Is A ‘Long Way’ From Recovering And How Brexit Is Making It Worse

#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election

CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage

Romesh Vaitilingam webpage



News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Review of Environmental Economics and Policy

‘The Impacts of Environmental Regulations on Competitiveness’

Antoine Dechezleprêtre and Misato Sato, Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Volume 11, Issue 2, July 2017


Related Links:
Review of Environmental Economics and Policy - ‘The Impacts of Environmental Regulations on Competitiveness’

CEP Growth

Antoine Dechezleprêtre webpage



News Posted: 08/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Liberation.fr (France)

Sorti de l’UE: l’orchestre cacophonique de Londres/Exit of the EU: the cacophony orchestra of London

Theresa May on vacation, the ministers of soft and hard Brexit clash in the most perfect disorder. Economists, on the other hand, predict a decline in growth.

The government's hesitations have an impact on the economy. Time is of the essence, as uncertainty hangs over investment, warns Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England. Pessimistic, the institution has lowered its growth forecasts to 1.7% for 2017 and 1.6% for 2018. According to it, growth is penalized by the decline in the purchasing power of households. "The depreciation of the pound [which is worth 1.1 euro against 1.3 before the referendum] has led to an increase in inflation, which has reduced wage growth. Consumption has not yet declined, but households are saving less, "says Thomas Sampson, a professor of economics at the London School of Economics.

Related links

Thomas Sampson CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=sampson


Related Links:
Liberation.fr (France) - Sorti de l’UE: l’orchestre cacophonique de Londres/Exit of the EU: the cacophony orchestra of London

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 08/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Cambridge Network

Mobile telecoms consolidation means higher prices but greater investment

A new study forthcoming in the journal Economic Policy, based on a trove of data from 33 OECD countries over a 12-year period (2002-2014), finds that prices paid by consumers are higher in more concentrated markets (by an estimated average of 16.3 per cent in a four-to-three operator merger, according to the study’s model), while at the same time investment per operator increases when the number of providers is reduced (by an estimated 19.3 per cent in a four-to-three merger). The effect of such consolidation on total investment by all operators does not appear significant, but those findings are not conclusive. The authors – from Cambridge Judge Business School, Imperial College London, and the University of Leuven in Belgium – argue that regulators have so far focused hard on consumer pricing implications of mobile consolidation, while paying little attention to the impact of mergers on efficiencies and investment.  “The study says that regulators and policymakers should consider investment more seriously, and weigh more fully the trade-off between consumer pricing and operator efficiency and investment in order to reach the best decisions,” says Dr Christos Genakos, University Senior Lecturer in Economics at Cambridge Judge Business School.

 


Related Links:
Cambridge Network - Mobile telecoms consolidation means higher prices but greater investment

Evaluating Market Consolidation in Mobile Communications

CEP Growth

Christos Genakos webpage



News Posted: 08/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis by stopping elderly from moving, warns Cabinet minister

Snippet: ... A report from academics said stamp duty reduces the rate of home moving by nearly a third and meant that large homes were not being freed up for young, growing families.

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Stamp duty exacerbating housing crisis by stopping elderly from moving, warns Cabinet minister

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 08/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

Make Or Break's David Stevenson breaks down in tears AGAIN after hearing shocking truths about girlfriend Beth

Snippet: ... As part of a challenge, behavioural expert Paul Dolan read out a series of shocking confessions and the contestants had to guess who they related to.


Related Links:
Mirror - Make Or Break's David Stevenson breaks down in tears AGAIN after hearing shocking truths about girlfriend Beth

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 08/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Higher Education Policy Institute

Measuring teaching intensity: the authors respond to the critics

In research just published in the journal Fiscal Studies, we examine teaching at UK universities in more detail than any study since the 1963 Robbins Report. We compared the teaching of Economics, History and Physics across 67 universities. We also made a historical comparison with 1963, using data drawn from the appendices to the Robbins Report prepared by Richard Layard and Claus Moser.


Related Links:
Higher Education Policy Institute - Measuring teaching intensity: the authors respond to the critics

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Make or Break? is nasty TV with Love Island cast-offs laid on for sadistic voyeurs - review

The host presiding over this bedlam is someone called Paul Dolan, billed as a “behavioural scientist”, one of those odd job descriptions like horse whisperer and cat burglar. 


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Make or Break? is nasty TV with Love Island cast-offs laid on for sadistic voyeurs - review

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Time

14 Ways to Squeeze More Joy Out of Every Day

Gold, natural gas and your attention: they’re all scarce resources. Allocate wisely so you can max out time for pleasure, recommends Paul Dolan in his book Happiness by Design. “Every tweet, text or email distracts us from the good experiences and people in our lives,” he says. 


Related Links:
Time - 14 Ways to Squeeze More Joy Out of Every Day

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Consultancy UK

Real pay growth to stagnate in 2017 and 2018

Private sector workers too have seen a significant drop in real term wages in recent years, with an LSE study estimating an effective 10% decrease since the financial crisis to 2015.


Related Links:
Consultancy UK - Real pay growth to stagnate in 2017 and 2018

CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Is it a bad idea to buy a property in London if it's not home for life?

Recent claims – made by Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics – of an impending crash and a 40% fall in property values are “quite frankly outrageously unrealistic” according to Russell Quirk, founder and chief executive of online estate agent, eMoov.co.uk. “The reality is that the rate of house-price growth has slowed in the past few months, yet property prices remain higher than a year ago” although Quirk does concede, as do other commentators, that there is “a potential prolonged flat rate of growth” in house prices.


Related Links:
Guardian - Is it a bad idea to buy a property in London if it's not home for life?

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Metro

Love Island with more tears

Snippet: ... New Channel 5 show Make or Break puts couples through various tests - their first being to choose someone from another couple to share a bedroom with. Paul Dolan, a professor of behavioural science at the LSE who leads the show, explains…


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

CityMetric

Which British cities will be hit hardest by Brexit?

A lot of my time at work is given over to worrying fitfully about two things. One is cities policy. The other is Brexit. What could be more thrilling, then, than a report which combines those two topics into a single piece of research? The answer, as it turns out, is almost anything, because this report is one of the most depressing things I’ve seen in ages. The study, a joint effort between the Centre for Cities and LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, looks at what both “Hard” and “Soft” Brexit would do to the economies of 62 British cities. (In the unlikely event you’re unsure, “soft” Brexit means we stay in a free trade area with the EU, but have to content with new non-tariff barriers; “hard” Brexit means we have to deal with tariffs as well.)

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
CityMetric - Which British cities will be hit hardest by Brexit?

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

The ‘haves and have-mores’ in digital America

Research from the Bonn-based Institute of Labor Economics shows that the differences in individual workers’ pay since the 1970s is associated with pay differences between — not within — companies. Another piece of research, from the Centre for Economic Performance, shows that this pay differential between top-tier companies and everyone else is responsible for the vast majority of inequality in the US.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016


Related Links:
Financial Times - The ‘haves and have-mores’ in digital America

Fluctuations in Uncertainty

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty

Policy uncertainty: a new indicator

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 06/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Citizens Voice online

England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense. “We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,” Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
The Citizens Voice online - England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 06/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Wales online

Top economists have calculated the impact of a soft or hard Brexit on Swansea

Their research found that every local authority would be negatively affected under either scenario but concluded that the economic impact of leaving the single market and customs union would be around twice as severe as a milder Brexit. The academics said they were surprised that the additional cost of a hard Brexit was significantly higher in some areas than others – and cited the nature of industry and employment in those areas as the reason.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Wales online - Top economists have calculated the impact of a soft or hard Brexit on Swansea

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 06/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Spirit FM

West Sussex town ranked ‘second most affected' area post-Brexit

A new report by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) predicts Worthing will be on the places hit hardest by an expected downturn in trade after the country leaves the EU.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Spirit FM - West Sussex town ranked ‘second most affected' area post-Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 06/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

A spanner in the works for Britain's growth

Snippet: Philip Hammond has said that if every region of the UK could match the productivity of London and southeast England, there would not be a productivity problem. The London School of Economics, which recently published its Growth Commission update, is doing some good work on this....

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.

 

Related links

LSE Growth Commission webpage:  http://www.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/units/growthCommission/home.aspx


Related Links:
The Sunday Times - A spanner in the works for Britain's growth





News Posted: 06/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mediapart

Marx, Piketty et Aghion sur la productivité, par Michel Husson / Marx, Piketty and Aghion on Productivity, by Michel Husson

A recent critical work on a study by Philippe Aghion [1] suggests a parallel (heroic) with Marx's considerations on innovation. This contribution, after having quickly pointed out the contradictions stated by Thomas Piketty, recalls the way in which Marx posed the question of technological progress.


Related Links:
Mediapart - Marx, Piketty et Aghion sur la productivité, par Michel Husson / Marx, Piketty and Aghion on Productivity, by Michel Husson

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 05/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Sun

The New Love Island?

Snippet: ... "I felt like I was sold the dream, but entered a nightmare^” And you may also recognise a familiar voice on the show, as it’s narrated by MasterChef’s voiceover artist India Fisher. Leading the activities of Channel 5’s new ‘Love Island’ is London School of Economics’ Professor Paul Dolan.


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 05/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Economist

A little-noticed change in Britain's housing market spells trouble for everybody

A little-noticed change in Britain’s housing market spells trouble for everybody

Snippet: ...n has risen by 30% in real terms (though recent changes have lightened the load slightly). The need to pay thousands of pounds upfront makes upping sticks harder. According to a recent paper from Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics and Teemu Lyytikäine...

Related publications

‘Transfer Taxes and Household Mobility: Distortion on the Housing or Labor Market?’, Christian A.L. Hilber and Teemu Lyytikäinen, SERC Discussion Paper No.216, June 2017

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0216.pdf


Related Links:
Economist - A little-noticed change in Britain's housing market spells trouble for everybody

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 05/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Slough Express

Slough to be among top urban areas to feel negatie impact of Brexit, study says

New research suggests that Slough will be among the top five UK urban areas to be negatively impacted by Brexit. A report by the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and think tank Centre for Cities says the South-east of England and urban areas will be hit the hardest. The paper, titled ‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, assesses the impact of trade barriers associated with 'soft' and 'hard' Brexit scenarios.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Slough Express - Slough to be among top urban areas to feel negatie impact of Brexit, study says

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 05/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

DeathRattleSports.com

William Hague: Brexit disaster can be averted thanks to Philip Hammond’s transition plan

Number 10 said on 31 July that it would be “wrong” to suggest that EU free movement to the UK would “continue as it is now” after 2019. But Home Secretary Amber Rudd has said that EU nationals will be able to continue to come to the UK during a post-March 2019 transition period so long as they go through a “registration and documentation” process. The senior Conservative has also commissioned a group of top economists, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), to investigate how the UK’s future immigration system “should be aligned with a modern industrial strategy”. The MAC, which is chaired by Professor Alan Manning, has been given a deadline of September 2018 to report back to Rudd.


Related Links:
DeathRattleSports.com - William Hague: Brexit disaster can be averted thanks to Philip Hammond’s transition plan

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Laundry and Cleaning News International

TSA appeals to membership to respond to Migration Advisory Committee

MAC chairman, Professor Alan Manning, has been asked to produce interim reports to guide Home Office officials attempting to draw up a post-Brexit immigration regime that will bring an end to free movement but will not cause economic damage or vital skills shortages. 


Related Links:
Laundry and Cleaning News International - TSA appeals to membership to respond to Migration Advisory Committee

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Move over Love Island… Here are 10 reasons why Make or Break? is our new obsession

Snippet: ... Leading the activities is London School of Economics’ Professor of Behavioural Science Paul Dolan. He’s previously appeared on other TV shows, including Lose Weight For Love and This Morning.


Related Links:
The Sun - Move over Love Island… Here are 10 reasons why Make or Break? is our new obsession

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Press and Journal (Scotland)

‘Labour created the welfare state and will always fight to protect it'

Britain’s most successful cities with large high-skilled service sectors will be hit hardest by the expected downturn in trade after the UK leaves the EU. Sadly, that means bad news for Aberdeen. A report from the think-tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance placed the Granite City at the top of the list of “most affected” cities.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Press and Journal (Scotland) - ‘Labour created the welfare state and will always fight to protect it'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Expert panel: unemployment hurts the wellbeing of men more than that of women

Researchers are divided on whether bad jobs are worse for wellbeing than unemployment, write Tony Beatton, Paul Frijters and Nattavudh (Nick) Powdthavee

Given a generally stronger social norm for men to be working in paid employment than for women, unemployment is typically worse for the wellbeing of men than women. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. But the experts are divided on whether unemployment is better for an individual’s happiness than being employed in a bad job.

Link to press release:

Monday 31 July 2017

WORK AND UNEMPLOYMENT: Evidence of the impact on the wellbeing of men and women

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/_new2014/news/releases/2017_07_31_i151.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Expert panel: unemployment hurts the wellbeing of men more than that of women

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage



News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

UOL.com

Inglaterra oferece terapia gratuita para tratar depressão e ansiedade /England offers free therapy to treat depression and anxiety

… David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that offering therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense..


Related Links:
UOL.com - Inglaterra oferece terapia gratuita para tratar depressão e ansiedade /England offers free therapy to treat depression and anxiety

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 03/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Bulletin

England’s mental health experiment: free talk therapy

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.

“We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,” Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
The Bulletin - England’s mental health experiment: free talk therapy

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 03/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Trump wants to protect American jobs. His immigration bill would make us poorer.

Basically the only American-born group that you could even plausibly argue are harmed is high school dropouts. This is a fairly tiny group, but it’s not even clear they are harmed. Research by the University of Bologna's Gianmarco Ottaviano and UC Davis's Giovanni Peri finds that immigrants help the wages of even low-skilled American workers.

Related publications

‘Rethinking The Effect Of Immigration On Wages’. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano, Giovanni Peri, 2011. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1542-4774.2011.01052.x/full


Related Links:
Vox - Trump wants to protect American jobs. His immigration bill would make us poorer.

Immigration, Offshoring and American Jobs

CEP Trade

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage



News Posted: 03/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Somerset County Gazette

Taunton Deane economy could take a Brexit hit of 1.2% to 2.3%

BREXIT will damage the economic performance of Taunton Deane, according to new report. The Centre for Economic Performance believes the economy in the district will take a 1.2 per cent hit under a sort Brexit - that is to say if Britain remains in the single market and the customs union. But a hard Brexit - leaving the two organisations - would see the economy suffer to the tune of 2.3 per cent. Molly Scott Cato, Green MEP for the South West, said: “This new study shows that both a hard and soft form of Brexit will have a devastating impact on the economic performance of our towns and cities across the South West.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Somerset County Gazette - Taunton Deane economy could take a Brexit hit of 1.2% to 2.3%

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 03/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Heart Berkshire (Radio)

[06:00:00]

Snippet: ... Reading has come out third on a list of 10 towns in the UK most likely to be hit hardest by Brexit report of the London School of Economics says Dorsey a fall i...

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Heart Berkshire (Radio) - [06:00:00]

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 02/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harper's Bazaar (Spain)

La felicidad no depende del dinero sino del amor/ Happiness does not depend on money but on love

A survey of 200,000 people at the London School of Economics in the United Kingdom revealed that personal satisfaction is more about finding love, even having more impact than increasing salary.

Associated article

Vox Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications  Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
Harper's Bazaar (Spain) - La felicidad no depende del dinero sino del amor/ Happiness does not depend on money but on love

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 02/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Getreading

Reading has been named as one of the areas likely to be hit hardest by Brexit

A new report put Reading in third place of areas worst hit by a hard Brexit

A new report by the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics reveals the cities and towns most affected by a soft leaving of the European Union and a hard exit.

Professor Stephen Machin, from the Centre for Economic Performance, added: “This research shows that focusing on the likely local economic impacts of Brexit will be a critical ingredient for policymakers when thinking about how to offset the negative economic effects that loss of trade due to Brexit will bring.”

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Getreading - Reading has been named as one of the areas likely to be hit hardest by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 02/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

FXdailyreport

The Past, Present, and Future of Brexit

Snippet: Many journalists have said the floodgates are now open for a lot of other countries to try and exit the EU including a big country like Spain. John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics called Brexit “a drumbeat of anti-foreigner sentiment. The only question is which other countries will now be swept along in this poisonous flood.”


Related Links:
FXdailyreport - The Past, Present, and Future of Brexit

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 02/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSEIQ podcast

Episode 2 | What's the future of work?

Tackling the question, ‘What’s the future of work’, are: Professor David Graeber of LSE’s Department of Anthropology; Dr Aleks Krotoski, social psychologist, technology journalist and former visiting fellow in LSE’s Media and Communications Department ; Dr Guy Michaels, LSE Associate Professor of Economics; and Leslie Willcocks , Professor of Technology, Work and Globalisation at LSE. 


Related Links:
LSEIQ podcast - Episode 2 | What's the future of work?

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 01/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Pie News

UK Home Secretary calls for report on EU migration

The UK’s Home Secretary Amber Rudd has commissioned a report on the impact Brexit will have on the UK labour market. A key sector for enquiry will be higher education, where 17% of academic staff are EU nationals and a further 12,490 of EU staff are in non-academic positions. Despite the 2018 deadline, Rudd has requested interim reports, and MAC chair Alan Manning said the committee will “consider the possibility of producing interim responses”.


Related Links:
The Pie News - UK Home Secretary calls for report on EU migration

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 01/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

This is Wiltshire

Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The authors of the report, Naomi Clayton and Professor Henry Overman of the LSE’s Centre For Economic Performance, said: “All British cities are set to be negatively affected as a result of higher trade costs between the UK and EU, and this impact will be greater in the scenario of a ‘hard’ Brexit.”

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
This is Wiltshire - Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 01/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Robotiq

5 shocking statistics from manufacturers who turned to robotics

Research done by Graetz and Michaels has shown that robots are contributing to historic production growth since their entrance into the manufacturing industries. Overall, it shows that between 1993 and 2007, robots accounted for 16% of labor productivity. While IT tech has been leading the world in labor productivity, robotics are a close second, and already ahead of the steam engine, which revolutionized manufacturing in the 19th and early 20th centuries.


Related Links:
Robotiq - 5 shocking statistics from manufacturers who turned to robotics

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Only health more important than happiness

Snippet: ... MORE should be done to promote health and well-being rather than worrying excessively about wages and careers, Prof Paul Dolan, a specialist in behavioural science at the London School of Economics, has said.

[No link]


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage



News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Zdravie.Pravda (Slovakia)

Bezplatná terapia cez telefón. Britský experiment funguje/ Free phone therapy. The British experiment works

The British health experiment began in 2008. In the first wave, 35 clinics were created with a total of thousands of workers, but the system was immediately overwhelmed by huge floods of interest. Now a project with a much higher budget is working, and the UK government's goal is to cover the entire territory of the United Kingdom.

Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, however, says that the project can earn itself, thanks to the greater work performance of cured people. "If someone has a broken leg, he will get immediate help. But if it has a broken soul, it's not so much, "he said. The Czech Republic is also planning to transfer mental health care from hospitals to special centers and home environments.

Also in

El Periodico de Mexico

Un experimento mental único: psicoterapia gratuita / A unique mental experiment: free psychotherapy

….David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, came to the conclusion that offering therapy to people like Oliver was most logical in economic terms.

http://elperiodicodemexico.com/nota.php?id=863158


Related Links:
Zdravie.Pravda (Slovakia) - Bezplatná terapia cez telefón. Britský experiment funguje/ Free phone therapy. The British experiment works

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

International Business Times

What Number 10 really said about ending free movement from the EU

…Rudd has commissioned a group of top economists, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), to investigate how the UK's future immigration system "should be aligned with a modern industrial strategy".

The MAC, which is chaired by Professor Alan Manning, has been given a deadline of September 2018 to report back to Rudd.


Related Links:
International Business Times - What Number 10 really said about ending free movement from the EU

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Swindon Advertiser

Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The London School of Economics has published an analysis of the possible effects of a ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ Brexit on towns and cities all over the country.

The report predicts that Swindon’s GVA will decline by 2.8 per cent under a hard Brexit and 1.5 per cent under a soft Brexit.

The authors of the report, Naomi Clayton and Professor Henry Overman of the LSE’s Centre For Economic Performance, said: “All British cities are set to be negatively affected as a result of higher trade costs between the UK and EU, and this impact will be greater in the scenario of a ‘hard’ Brexit.”

But Ian Larrard, the director of the Swindon and Wiltshire Initiative at Business West, shrugged off the findings and said there was good reason to be optimistic.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Swindon Advertiser - Business leaders optimistic despite shock statistics that put Swindon among hardest hit by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

America's uncompetitive markets harm its economy

New research suggests that too little competition deters investment

Concentration may also hurt workers. Recent research by David Autor of MIT and four co-authors finds that “superstar” firms pay out less of their profits in wages. As these firms have grown in importance, labour’s overall share of GDP has fallen. Other research suggests that these firms nonetheless pay more, in gross terms, than ordinary firms, so their rise has directly contributed to inequality. This does not chime exactly with what Democrats claimed this week—that America’s firms have too much power over workers—but the end result, greater inequality, is similar.

 


Related Links:
The Economist - America's uncompetitive markets harm its economy

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Valenciaplaza

el peor de los tiempos OPINIÓN Sectarismo, género y números / the worst of times OPINION - Sectarianism, gender and numbers

snippet… As can be seen, at the end of all this we have fallen into the trap, after accounting for the number of men and women.  Is this relevant when it comes to funding an international scientific meeting, with a tradition of 20 editions and attracting 200 researchers from 64 different institutions and from more than 30 countries?  There is no point in evaluating the work anonymously, nor that invited speakers are prestigious figures in International Economics like Gianmarco Ottaviano , professor at the London School of Economics, probably the most important university in Europe in Economics…


Related Links:
Valenciaplaza - el peor de los tiempos OPINIÓN Sectarismo, género y números / the worst of times OPINION - Sectarianism, gender and numbers

CEP Trade

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage



News Posted: 30/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Columbus Despatch

Burgeoning talk-therapy program free for all in England

LONDON — England is in the midst of a unique national experiment, the world’s most ambitious effort to treat depression, anxiety and other common mental illnesses.

…In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.

″We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,″ Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.

Also in

Siglo.21 (Guatemala)

La paz y la felicidad… ¿se puede? / Peace and happiness ... can you?

Economist Richard Layard of the London School of Economics said that although in recent decades we have doubled our economic levels, many surveys show that we are no happier than our predecessors, although we now have more means to know what provides happiness to the people. And he pointed out that it is not necessarily money that provides greater happiness; And that family-founded in marriage, the one of always, since creation-constantly appears as an element that increases happiness. http://s21.gt/2017/07/29/la-paz-la-felicidad-se-puede/

 

Clarin Sociedad (Argentina)
Depresión y ansiedad, en la mira de un ambicioso proyecto inglés /Depression and anxiety, in the sights of an ambitious English project

In 2005, David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, came to the conclusion that it made economic sense to provide therapeutic treatment to people like Oliver. "We argued that, just in terms of job loss, the program would pay for itself," said Dr. Layard in his London School of Economics. https://www.clarin.com/sociedad/depresion-ansiedad-mira-ambicioso-proyecto-ingles_0_ByqqnY5LZ.html


Related Links:
The Columbus Despatch - Burgeoning talk-therapy program free for all in England

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 30/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gazette Live

Hard or soft Brexit? This is what experts think the impact could be on Middlesbrough either way

Middlesbrough has been singled out as one of the places which could be hardest hit by Brexit.

As the debate over the terms of the UK’s exit of the European Union continue to be debated, the potential impact on regional economies have been analysed by a think tank.

Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at London School of Economics said wealthy Southern cities will be hit hardest by both a ‘soft’ or ‘hard’ Brexit - but are also best placed to adapt to economic shocks ahead.

                  Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Gazette Live - Hard or soft Brexit? This is what experts think the impact could be on Middlesbrough either way

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 30/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

Dr Max talks depression and BBC's Panorama programme

A horrifying study by the London School of Economics a few years ago showed that while mental illness accounts for nearly half of all ill health in the under-65s, only 25 per cent of those in need of treatment get it.

Related publications

‘The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders’, The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2006

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/research/mentalhealth/DEPRESSION_REPORT_LAYARD.pdf


Related Links:
Mail online - Dr Max talks depression and BBC's Panorama programme

How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 29/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Journal (Newcastle)

Brexit recovery harder for North East – study

…Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London…

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Journal (Newcastle) - Brexit recovery harder for North East – study

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 29/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

How the rise of the service sector boosted the demand for women workers

The historical growth in the service sector has created jobs for which women have a natural comparative advantage, write Rachel Ngai and Barbara Petrongolo

..There has been a vast amount of research on the causes and consequences of the rise in women’s involvement in the labour market. Proposed explanations include growing investment in human capital, medical advances, technological progress in the household, wider availability of child care, and evolving gender norms. Our research puts forward a new and complementary explanation based on the rise of the service economy and its role in boosting the demand for female work.

Related publications

‘Gender Gaps and the Rise of the Service Economy’, L. Rachel Ngai and Barbara Petrongolo. American Economic Journal, forthcoming https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257/mac.20150253


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - How the rise of the service sector boosted the demand for women workers

Gender Gaps and the Rise of the Service Economy

CEP Labour Markets

Barbara Petrongolo webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mortgage Strategy

Fill the information void for FTBs, writes Bamford

To the outsider (that is, the consumer), the property market is issuing mixed messages. In fact these are simply differences of opinion.

Take, for instance, Professor Paul Cheshire at the London School of Economics, who recently made headlines by suggesting not only that house prices were due to collapse but that the drop could be as much as 40 per cent.


Related Links:
Mortgage Strategy - Fill the information void for FTBs, writes Bamford

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Get Surrey

How much of Surrey's land is taken up by fairways and putting greens

Woking has the highest density of golf courses of anywhere in the UK at more than 10%

According to The Guardian , Surrey has more land for golf courses than homes thanks to planning policies that ensure the land stays cheap for the courses and prevents housing competing.

Quoting Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at LSE who produced the set of data, the article adds that around 2.65% of Surrey is now under golf courses.


Related Links:
Get Surrey - How much of Surrey's land is taken up by fairways and putting greens

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

City AM

These are the six UK cities that will suffer most from a 'hard' Brexit

The study by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic performance at the London School of Economics found that cities with large high-skilled service sectors, such as business and financial services, are expected to be worst hit by potential tariff changes.

"This research shows that focusing on the likely local economic impacts of Brexit will be a critical ingredient for policymakers when thinking about how to offset the negative economic effects that loss of trade due to Brexit will bring," said Stephen Machin, from the Centre for Economic Performance.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
City AM - These are the six UK cities that will suffer most from a 'hard' Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Click Lancashire

Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

Smaller cities Crawley and Barnsley are predicted to have the lowest downturn in economic output of either a "hard" or "soft" Brexit, alongside cities like Hull and Wakefield. A new report today named Aberdeen as the United Kingdom city predicted to be the worst-hit by a so-called hard Brexit.

 

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Click Lancashire - Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newburgh Gazette (Illinois, USA)

Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

Aberdeen and Edinburgh are the cities set to take the biggest financial hit when the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, according to a think tank that predicts a downturn in trade even if ministers strike a “soft Brexit” deal. A new report from the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said all cities would see a fall in output due to increasing trade costs. Cities such as London, Aberdeen and Edinburgh voted against Brexit in last June’s referendum, the report pointed out.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Newburgh Gazette (Illinois, USA) - Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Energy Voice

Brexit's impact on Aberdeen ‘not as bad as thought', minister says

The impact of Brexit on Aberdeen’s economy will not be as bad as predicted, according to junior Brexit minister Robin Walker. Mr Walker was responding to a bombshell report from the Centre for Cities, whose analysis showed the Granite City’s economy would take the hardest hit in the UK from leaving the EU. The Conservative will visit Aberdeen today to meet oil and gas bosses as well as fishermen and listen to their views on negotiations with the EU.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Energy Voice - Brexit's impact on Aberdeen ‘not as bad as thought', minister says

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The National (Scotland)

Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp: Scotland WILL bear the brunt of Brexit recession

…Evidence again that any form of Brexit will do more damage to Scotland’s farming sector than it will to the UK as a whole. At least the city economies will be OK though? Not a chance. The report from the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has predicted Aberdeen to suffer the most economic damage of all UK cities from Brexit and placed Edinburgh 6th on the hit list.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The National (Scotland) - Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp: Scotland WILL bear the brunt of Brexit recession

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Aberdeen Evening Express

Aberdeen's politicians and businesses remain upbeat despite prediction City will suffer most from Brexit

Aberdeen can rise to the challenge of finding news ways to boost the economy, politicians and industry leaders said today. The confident comments come despite a report yesterday that predicts Brexit will hit Aberdeen’s economy the hardest of any UK city. Written by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School Economics, the report predicts Aberdeen’s economic output will shrink by up to 3.7%. Centre for Cities chief executive Andrew Carter said: “The challenge for Aberdeen will be to diversify its industrial structure in the years ahead, so that it is less reliant on one sector (oil and gas). “This will be crucial for the city to thrive after we leave the EU.” Aberdeen City Council leader, Cllr Jenny Laing, admitted there were “huge challenges” ahead, but said positive strides are being taken.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Aberdeen Evening Express - Aberdeen's politicians and businesses remain upbeat despite prediction City will suffer most from Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Shropshire Star

Telford less likely to be hit by hard Brexit than other UK towns and cities

Telford will be among the UK towns least-affected by a hard Brexit, a report claims – although economists today denied its suggestion that a lack of skills in the town will cushion the blow.

Researchers at the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics published the report into the effect of Brexit on local economies.

In it, the think tank claims areas with greater skills bases will also be those that are hit the hardest by withdrawing from access to the European single market.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Shropshire Star - Telford less likely to be hit by hard Brexit than other UK towns and cities

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Chronicle Live

All areas of North East will be hit by Brexit, new study shows

All areas of the North East would be hit by Brexit and may take longer to recover than other parts of the country, a new study says. The study by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics predicts that economic output in the North East would be between 1.1% and 1.4% lower in the event of a “soft” brexit , but this would almost double to 2%-2.6% if the Government opts for a “hard” Brexit.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Chronicle Live - All areas of North East will be hit by Brexit, new study shows

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider UK

The 6 UK cities that will suffer most from a ‘hard' Brexit

Wealthy Southern cities are predicted to be hardest hit by Brexit, according to a new report. The study, by the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that cities with large high-skilled service sectors, such as business and financial services, are expected to be worst hit by potential tariff changes.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Business Insider UK - The 6 UK cities that will suffer most from a ‘hard' Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Blackpool Gazette

Resort named in Brexit hit list

A think tank analysed the potential impact of both a “hard” and “soft” Brexit on British cities in the 10 years following the implementation of new trade arrangements with the EU. It is the most prosperous UK cities which will be hit hardest by the downturn ahead, but poorer places across the North and Midlands will find it tougher to adapt.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Blackpool Gazette - Resort named in Brexit hit list

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sputnik (Romania)

EU citizens will have the right to work in the UK after Brexit – under certain conditions

She [Amber Rudd] told committee chairman, Professor Alan Manning, that during the transition period a “simple system for registering and documenting new arrivals” will be in place.


Related Links:
Sputnik (Romania) - EU citizens will have the right to work in the UK after Brexit – under certain conditions

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

International Business Times

Eurosceptics plot mass leaflet drive to stop Tony Blair ‘hijacking' Brexit

Elsewhere, the UK government announced on Thursday that it has commissioned a group of top economists to investigate the financial benefits of migration from the EU. The independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), chaired by Professor Alan Manning, will make a "detailed assessment" of the issue as the two-year-long Brexit negotiations between the UK and the EU continue. "This is an important and extensive commission and the MAC welcome the opportunity to contribute to the UK's knowledge base in this area at this critical time," Manning said.

 


Related Links:
International Business Times - Eurosceptics plot mass leaflet drive to stop Tony Blair ‘hijacking' Brexit

Academy schools and pupil outcomes

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement - TES

More autonomy turned out to be mere rhetoric

The rise of academies promised more power for schools - but, with government still clinging to the reins, heads haven't been able to raise standards as expected. However, this system may yet deliver - if ministers ring the changes, writes James Croft.

The Academies Act of 2010 purported to take school autonomy to a new level. The jury is still out on whether this could make a difference for pupil outcomes, but doubts have, justifiably, begun to emerge. While there is evidence of a positive impact in pre-2010 sponsored academies, recent research from the London School of Economics finds no trace of post-conversion improvement in previously "good", "satisfactory" or "inadequate" converters, as well as a concerning degree of heterogeneity.


Related Links:
Times Educational Supplement - TES - More autonomy turned out to be mere rhetoric

Academy schools and pupil outcomes

Academies 2: The New Batch

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Olmo Silva webpage



News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Economia

How businesses can seek sustainable growth


Related Links:
Economia - How businesses can seek sustainable growth

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Herald (Scotland)

Scottish cities to pay highest price for Brexit


Related Links:
The Herald (Scotland) - Scottish cities to pay highest price for Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The National

Britain to ask committee to assess impact of migration from EU


Related Links:
The National - Britain to ask committee to assess impact of migration from EU

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sputnik News

UK Business Sectors That will suffer the most if EU migration is restricted


Related Links:
Sputnik News - UK Business Sectors That will suffer the most if EU migration is restricted





News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yorkshire Evening Post

'Leeds could be among hardest-hit by Brexit'


Related Links:
Yorkshire Evening Post - 'Leeds could be among hardest-hit by Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

New road infrastructure: The effects on firms


Related Links:
Vox - New road infrastructure: The effects on firms

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Steve Gibbons webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Rosa Sanchis-guarner webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

nrc.nl

Willen de Tories migranten nog toelaten? / Will the Tories still allow migrants?


Related Links:
nrc.nl - Willen de Tories migranten nog toelaten? / Will the Tories still allow migrants?

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bez (Spain)

Sin impulsos públicos en I+D, este capitalismo nos condena a la barbarie /Without public impulses in R and D, this capitalism condemns us to barbarism


Related Links:
Bez (Spain) - Sin impulsos públicos en I+D, este capitalismo nos condena a la barbarie /Without public impulses in R and D, this capitalism condemns us to barbarism





News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Brexit EU migration study examines if British workers are at a disadvantage to foreign labour


Related Links:
The Telegraph - Brexit EU migration study examines if British workers are at a disadvantage to foreign labour

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

(17:10:06)


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Tyden.cz (Czechoslovakia)

Bezplatná terapie po telefonu: britský experiment zatím funguje/Free therapy by phone: British experiment yet works


Related Links:
Tyden.cz (Czechoslovakia) - Bezplatná terapie po telefonu: britský experiment zatím funguje/Free therapy by phone: British experiment yet works





News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Periodico de Mexico

Reino unido elaborara un informe sobre el impacto de la inmigracion europea en el pais/United Kingdom will produce a report on the impact of European immigration in the country


Related Links:
El Periodico de Mexico - Reino unido elaborara un informe sobre el impacto de la inmigracion europea en el pais/United Kingdom will produce a report on the impact of European immigration in the country

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newstalk.com (Ireland)

UK orders study looking at impact of ending free EU movement

A major study has been ordered by the British government to look at the economic impact of ending free movement of EU workers.

The UK Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, wants to know whether some parts of Britain will be affected more than others, whether there will be skills shortages and the impact on seasonal jobs. The study will be carried out by the UK's Migration Advisory Committee, a quango that advises the government there on immigration issues. It is set to report by September next year. In a letter to the committee's chairman, Professor Alan Manning, Ms Rudd said the government continues "working towards the goal of achieving sustainable levels of net migration".


Related Links:
Newstalk.com (Ireland) - UK orders study looking at impact of ending free EU movement

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror online

Tories mocked for deciding to ask experts about EU migration… a year after the referendum

The Migration Advisory Committee will embark on a major study into the role of 3.2million EU nationals in Britain's economy and society. Its "extremely important" work will look at patterns of migration from Europe, regional distribution, skill levels and seasonal workers. But it will only report back in September 2018 - just six months before the deadline for Brexit on 29 March 2019. And its chairman played down Tory claims it would produce interim reports in the meantime. Professor Alan Manning said only that his committee will "consider the possibility" of doing so.


Related Links:
Mirror online - Tories mocked for deciding to ask experts about EU migration… a year after the referendum

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sky News online

Businesses clamour for clarity from ‘long overdue' migration study

Companies have been clamouring for clarity from the Government on the issue as the academic sector, agriculture, manufacturing and the hospitality trade all rely on large influxes of people to operate. The Confederation of British Industry says employers "urgently" need answers while the Institute of Directors calls the report "long overdue". Consider the timescale: the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) is made up of one chairman (Professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics) and three independent economists who now have to commission data and solicit responses from industry and Government.


Related Links:
Sky News online - Businesses clamour for clarity from ‘long overdue' migration study

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Public Sector Executive

Economy and infrastructure

All cities in the UK are looking set to see a fall in economic output regardless of whether a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit is delivered, experts have today warned – but more prosperous regions will be hit harder than others. In findings released by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the potential impact of either Brexit ‘type’ on major cities in the UK was analysed for the first time.


Related Links:
Public Sector Executive - Economy and infrastructure

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

STV online

News: Aberdeen ‘will be UK city worst hit by hard Brexit'

London and Edinburgh also ranked in the top ten list compiled by researchers at the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
STV online - News: Aberdeen ‘will be UK city worst hit by hard Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Insider.co.uk

Aberdeen ‘worst affected city in UK if there's a hard Brexit'

Centre for Cities and Centre for Economic Performance analysis also places Edinburgh sixth in a top ten of urban conurbations hit most if the country fails to strike a deal with the EU.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Insider.co.uk - Aberdeen ‘worst affected city in UK if there's a hard Brexit'

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

International Business Times

Revealed: the cities Brexit will hit hardest

Aberdeen will be the hardest hit city in the UK by Brexit, according to a new report on the economic impact of withdrawal from the European Union (EU). Other cities or urban areas such as London, Slough and Edinburgh are in the top ten of a list compiled by researchers at the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
International Business Times - Revealed: the cities Brexit will hit hardest

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Worthing Herald

Study reveals Worthing will suffer from Brexit

Worthing is among the top ten towns that will suffer the most by Britain’s exit from Europe, according to a study that overturns assumptions that poorer areas of the UK will suffer the most. For the first time, research by the Centre for Cities think-tank and the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics has analysed the likely impact of both hard and soft Brexit in the decade after any trade deal is done with Europe.

Also in:  Littlehampton Gazette, Study reveals Worthing will suffer from Brexit

Related publications:  ‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017;

Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017


Related Links:
Worthing Herald - Study reveals Worthing will suffer from Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Growth CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Planner

Brexit will hit southern UK cities hardest – report

Cities that are successful and have large high-skilled service sectors, mainly located in the south of England, will be hit the hardest by Brexit, whether it is ‘hard’ or ‘soft’. A report by think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics (LSE) also says these cities are better placed to adapt to the economic shocks ahead compared with less affluent places that are less directly affected by Brexit. The report considers the impact both a soft and hard Brexit might have on British cities in the 10 years following new trade arrangements with the EU being implemented. Researchers say a hard Brexit would bring an average reduction of 2.3 per cent in economic input across all UK cities compared with a soft Brexit, which would result in a 1.2 per cent decrease. Whether the UK gets a hard or soft Brexit, the report suggests, cities that are doing economically well – predominantly in the south of England – would be hit the most directly and the hardest.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Planner - Brexit will hit southern UK cities hardest – report

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Aberdeen Evening Express

Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

A new report today named Aberdeen as the UK city predicted to be the worst-hit by a so-called hard Brexit. London and Edinburgh also ranked in the top 10 list compiled by researchers at the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics. They analysed the potential impact of both a “hard” and “soft” Brexit on British cities in the 10 years following the implementation of new trade deals with the EU.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Aberdeen Evening Express - Aberdeen will be hit hardest by Brexit deals

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Commonspace

Brexit will hit Aberdeen harder than any other city in UK, report says

Research done by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and the Centre for Cities predicted an economic downturn of 3.7 per cent for Aberdeen and 2.7 per cent in Edinburgh in the event of a hard Brexit. For a soft Brexit, the report expects the drop off to be 2.1 per cent for Aberdeen and 1.4 per cent in Edinburgh.

 

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Commonspace - Brexit will hit Aberdeen harder than any other city in UK, report says

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bristol Post

Bristol to be one of the UK's cities worst hit by Brexit

The joint Centre for Cities and Centre for Economic Performance study predicts that Bristol’s economic output will decrease by up to 2.6 per cent – the 11th worst-hit city in the country. However, the report also states that Bristol will be well equipped to weather the downturn, due to its skilled and adaptable workforce. Published today, the report compares the fall in economic output of 63 cities across the UK depending on whether central government opts for a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Bristol Post - Bristol to be one of the UK's cities worst hit by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Politics

Here are the places in the UK that will be hit hardest by Brexit

Brexit will hit Scottish oil capital Aberdeen the hardest of all Britain’s cities, with London also ranking highly and facing a medium-term blow to economic output of as much as 2.6 percent, academics at the London School of Economics said. The researchers estimated that output in U.K. cities -- using a measure called gross value added -- will decline 2.3 percent on average, assuming a hard Brexit in which Britain trades with the European Union under World Trade Organization rules and tariffs. The drop under a soft Brexit, with a negotiated zero-tariff free-trade area but an increase in border controls and customs checks, was projected to be 1.2 percent lower.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
Bloomberg Politics - Here are the places in the UK that will be hit hardest by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE EUROPP (European Politics and Policy) blog

CEP study: the UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (working with the Centre for Cities think tank) has carried out a study shedding light upon the local economic impact of Brexit. Henry G. Overman writes that it is the richer cities, predominantly in the south of England, that will be hit hardest by Brexit, with this effect particularly apparent in areas specialised in services.

Our research (with Swati Dhingra and Stephen Machin) looks at the difference in predicted effects across all Local Authority Areas and across Primary Urban Areas under a ‘soft’ and a ‘hard’ Brexit scenario (the former involves zero tariffs, but increased non-tariff barriers with the EU, the latter involves non-zero tariffs and even higher non-tariff barriers). It also provides some initial analysis on whether these predicted impacts are likely to exacerbate or alleviate existing disparities, and looks at how the predicted economic impacts of Brexit correlate with voting patterns from the referendum.

Related publications

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
LSE EUROPP (European Politics and Policy) blog - CEP study: the UK areas that will be hit most (and least) by Brexit

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Wiltshire

(06:01:57)

Snippet: News that Swindon could be one of the cities worst hit by Brexit
Click to open

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

RES (Royal Economic Society) Newsletter

Conference Report 2017 'Divided we fall'

Perhaps the public knew that Brexit would drain their wallets, but voted for it anyway. Sometimes it’s not the economy, stupid. But Simon Wren-Lewis, of Oxford University, rubbished this idea, pointing out that those who voted for Brexit said they were unwilling to pay to reduce immigration. Instead, people seemed misinformed. Not only did those who voted to leave the EU think that they would be no worse off as a result, they thought that lower immigration would improve their access to public services. The problem, Mr Wren-Lewis argued, was with the media. Dismissing a large fraction as producers of propoganda, he reserved most disappointment for the BBC. It failed to communicate the consensus among economists, he said, treating it as opinion rather than knowledge. Swati Dhingra, of the London School of Economics, agreed, saying that the BBC’s quest to generate balance gave the false impression that there was a meaningful debate between economists. (Depressingly, she noted that this false balance had oozed into policymaking, as select committees are being stacked with pro-Brexit voices.)

Breakfast means breakfast

Amid the pastries, the presentations and the self-flagellation, it might have been easy to forget what the point of it all. An article in The Independent, previewing the conference, and highlighted by Paul Johnson on the first day of the conference, provided a helpful reminder. ‘Economics research can really improve people’s lives’, wrote Hamish McRae. While the public associates economics with GDP and abstract equations, much of the research presented at the conference was focused on how to make people’s lives better. Examples I saw included a paper presented by Christine Farquharson of the IFS, which suggested that free school breakfasts are a cheap way to help children do better in school. A panel discussion on re-skilling the UK between Steve Machin, Kirabo Jackson, Richard Burgess and Sandra McNally tossed around tax credits for investment in skills and training, a plea for more thinking about teacher quality, and from Kirabo Jackson, to think about the education system as a whole, rather than separate, substitutable stages. Football scheduling was on the list too: boys perform worse in exams when they coincide with international football tournaments.


Related Links:
RES (Royal Economic Society) Newsletter - Conference Report 2017 'Divided we fall'

CEP Trade CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration – a year after referendum

The home secretary, Amber Rudd, is to commission the independent Migration Advisory Committee to carry out a detailed analysis of the economic and social contributions and costs of EU citizens in Britain. The MAC’s chairman, Prof Alan Manning, has been asked to produce interim reports to guide Home Office officials attempting to draw up a post-Brexit immigration regime that will bring an end to free movement but will not cause economic damage or vital skills shortages.


Related Links:
Guardian - Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration – a year after referendum

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde (France)

Rythmes scolaires : « Le retour à la semaine de quatre jours risque de se faire aux dépens des femmes/School rythms : « The return to the four-day week may be at the expense of women

The two economists, Emma Duchini and Clémentine Van Effenterre, who speak in the "World", believe that this reform did not take into account the interest of parents, especially mothers.


Related Links:
Le Monde (France) - Rythmes scolaires : « Le retour à la semaine de quatre jours risque de se faire aux dépens des femmes/School rythms : « The return to the four-day week may be at the expense of women

CEP Education and Skills

Clementine Van effenterre webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Scottish Sun

BREX HIT New report names Aberdeen as UK city predicted to be worst-hit by so-called hard Brexit

A NEW report has named Aberdeen as the UK city predicted to be the worst-hit by a so-called hard Brexit. Edinburgh also ranked in the top 10 list compiled by researchers at the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Scottish Sun - BREX HIT New report names Aberdeen as UK city predicted to be worst-hit by so-called hard Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

i paper

New study finds towns in South hit worst after Brexit

Towns and cities in the South of England will be hit hardest by Britain’s exit from Europe, according to a study that overturns assumptions that poorer areas of the UK will suffer the most. Researchers at the Centre for Cities think-tank and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that all British cities are set to see a drop in economic output, regardless of whether the Brexit deal is “hard” or “soft”, because of the predicted rise in the costs of trade.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
i paper - New study finds towns in South hit worst after Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times (Scotland)

Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

Aberdeen and Edinburgh are the cities set to take the biggest financial hit when the UK leaves the European Union, according to a think tank that predicts a downturn in trade even if ministers strike a “soft Brexit” deal.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
The Times (Scotland) - Aberdeen and Edinburgh ‘to be hit hardest by Brexit'

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

SERC blog

The local economic impacts of Brexit

Article by Henry Overman

I've been working with colleagues at the Centre for Economic Performance (Swati Dhingra and Steve Machin) and the Centre for Cities (Naomi Clayton) to take a first look at the local economic impacts of Brexit. You can read the more technical CEP piece here and the less technical CfC piece here. The research looks at the difference in predicted effects across all Local Authority Areas and across Primary Urban Areas under a 'soft' and a 'hard' Brexit scenario (the former involves zero tariffs, but increased non-tariff barriers with the EU, the latter involves non-zero tariffs and even higher non-tariff barriers). It also provides some initial analysis on whether these predicted impacts are likely to exacerbate or alleviate existing disparities and looks at how the predicted economic impacts of Brexit correlate with voting patterns from the referendum.

Related publications

‘The Local Economic Effects of Brexit’, Swati Dhingra, Stephen Machin and Henry Overman, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.10, July 2017.

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf

‘Brexit, Trade and the Economic Impacts on UK Cities’, Naomi Clayton and Henry Overman, Centre for Cities briefing, July 2017.

http://www.centreforcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/17-07-26-Brexit-trade-and-the-economic-impacts-on-UK-cities.pdf


Related Links:
SERC blog - The local economic impacts of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Aberdeen ‘worst hit' by hard Brexit, experts predict

Aberdeen could be the city worst hit by falling economic output due to a "hard" Brexit, experts have predicted.

A new report from the Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said all cities would see a fall in output due to increasing trade costs. Aberdeen and Edinburgh were both ranked among the ten most affected cities. However the study said both cities are also among the best-placed to respond to any predicted economic turbulence.


Related Links:
BBC News - Aberdeen ‘worst hit' by hard Brexit, experts predict

The Local Economic Effects of Brexit

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sky news

Businesses clamour for clarity from 'long overdue' migration study

Consider the timescale: the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) is made up of one chairman (Professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics) and three independent economists who now have to commission data and solicit responses from industry and Government.

Related publications

1st Report - Brexit and the Labour Market


Related Links:
Sky news - Businesses clamour for clarity from 'long overdue' migration study

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Those Brexit scare stories debunked – House prices could crash

Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the LSE, says house prices could crash by 40 percent. His colleague Christian Hilber explains: ‘If Brexit leads to a recession and/or sluggish growth for extended periods, then an extended and severe downturn is more likely than a short-lived and mild one.’


Related Links:
Daily Mail - Those Brexit scare stories debunked – House prices could crash

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 26/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Finance

The three things businesses need to survive Brexit

While the Prime Minister seems to understand that trade with the European Union is sizeable, she also seems to be under the illusion that Britain can pick and choose during the Brexit negotiations. Let’s keep trade but stop immigration, payments to Brussels, and oversight from the European Court of Justice. This option won’t be available. The reality is that Britain faces a trade-off. More distance from the EU means bigger income loss. The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics estimates that a hard Brexit, i.e. falling back on World Trade Organization terms, will cut trade by 40% over 10 years. For the average household earning around £23,000, this translates into £600 less per year. The softest version of Brexit, i.e. the Norwegian model, still reduces trade by 20-25%, and household income by £300.

Related publications

‘The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.02, March 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 

 


Related Links:
Yahoo! Finance - The three things businesses need to survive Brexit

CEP Trade CEP Growth

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

Making sense of our very competitive super monopolistic economy

These two narratives needn’t be completely at odds. As I concluded in a piece last year on the debate over too much versus too little competition:

There’s a pessimistic synthesis between the competition and concentration stories. Perhaps the gap between firms starts out as the inevitable result of competition. Firms concentrate on what they’re good at, adopt new technology, and deliver products and services more efficiently. Having reached those heights, they then cement their status through lobbying or M&A. “Once those firms get there, it may be that they can actually draw up the drawbridge,” said [John] Van Reenen [of MIT]. Maybe competition creates corporate inequality. But maybe it’s lack of competition that preserves it.


Related Links:
Harvard Business Review - Making sense of our very competitive super monopolistic economy

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 25/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The State of Working Britain blog

Is there a public sector pay premium?

Article by Jonathan Wadsworth

The issue of public sector pay went centre-stage recently in the debate over whether to lift the public sector pay cap. Presumably one of the key factors, alongside where the revenue to pay for any uplift would come from, would be whether public sector salaries had fallen behind those in the private sector which could make it harder to recruit, retain and motivate staff. The problem is how to measure any public sector pay gap. Because public sector jobs often have different characteristics from those in the private sector (there are relatively more graduate jobs in the public sector for example) a simple comparison of average pay between the public and private sector can be misleading.

Related links

The State of Working Britain blog webpage:  http://stateofworkingbritain.blogspot.co.uk/


Related Links:
The State of Working Britain blog - Is there a public sector pay premium?

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 25/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal

Board Is Cited In Bank's Collapse

Snippet: “In Europe, you have 28 different banking systems, which were created nationally under different mandates,” said Tom Kirchmaier, deputy director of corporate governance at the

London School of Economics.

[No link available]


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage



News Posted: 25/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Companies risk fines for labour abuses lower on supply chain

Big retailers and construction companies may be fined for labour abuses committed by smaller firms further down the supply chain, the government’s first labour enforcement tsar has suggested. Unveiling his new strategy, David Metcalf — appointed in January to lead a campaign against abuses in the labour market — suggested it was time for companies to take more responsibility for illegal practices among their contractors, such as minimum wage violations.


Related Links:
Financial Times - Companies risk fines for labour abuses lower on supply chain

CEP Labour Markets

David Metcalf webpage



News Posted: 25/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

JamesACox blog

Productivity and robots

In a new study from London’s Center for Economic Research [sic], the analysis offered by George Graetz and Guy Michaels of Uppsala University and the London School of Economics, respectively, offers some of the first rigorous macroeconomic research and finds that industrial robots have been a substantial driver of labor productivity and economic growth.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015

 


Related Links:
JamesACox blog - Productivity and robots

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 24/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Analysis - The Minimum Wage: too much of a good thing?

Professor Stephen Machin took part in this programme about the minimum wage.

Has the initial success of the minimum wage meant politicians have extended the policy to damaging levels? All the major political parties agree: the measure has been a success, and in the 2017 election all promised substantial rises in the rate by 2020. The Conservatives are aiming for a £9 national living wage by the end of the decade, and not to be outdone, Labour promised £10 for all but the under-18s. Paul Johnson, director of the Institute of Fiscal Studies, asks why left and right have both adopted this once controversial policy. And could the current bidding war of big increases undermine the positive effects it has had over its eighteen-year history?


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Analysis - The Minimum Wage: too much of a good thing?

CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 24/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and the economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.

“We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,” Dr. Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
New York Times - England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 24/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

atd – Association for Talent Development

Is working from home better than working in the office?

Although workforces are becoming more spread out and technologies such as videoconferencing are making workplaces more fluid, employees who work exclusively from home are still getting a bad rap. Their jobs aren’t viewed as legitimate, and they aren’t as valued as their more traditional counterparts. However, this notion isn’t necessarily based in reality. According to Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Nicholas Bloom, requiring employees to be in the office is an outdated work tradition. Such inflexibility ignores employee desires needlessly and actually hurts employers and their workers. “Working from home is a future-looking technology,” Bloom said during TEDxStanford, which took place in April. “I think it has enormous potential.”

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Working or shirking? Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 3, Winter 2012

 


Related Links:
atd – Association for Talent Development - Is working from home better than working in the office?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 24/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Research on the wage and employment impact of refugees shows modest or no harmful effects on native workers

Sudden inflows of refugees have been shown to have little or no impact on native wages, but recent research has challenged this consensus, using instrumental variables to show uniformly large detrimental effects. This column argues that these new results were due to problems with the strategy used and, in the case of the Mariel boatlift, the composition of the sample. Correcting for these flaws, the impact of immigration on average native-born workers remains small and inconsistent, with no evidence to show a large detrimental impact on less-educated workers.

Related links

Jennifer Hunt, Rutgers and Visiting Academic to CEP:  http://economics.rutgers.edu/people/296-hunt-jennifer

 


Related Links:
Vox - Research on the wage and employment impact of refugees shows modest or no harmful effects on native workers

The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling Conflicting Results

CEP Labour Markets



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC2 TV

Victoria Derbyshire Show [around 10:30am]

Dennis Novy was live on the show.  The topic was the ongoing Brexit negotiations between the UK and the EU in Brussels, and in particular what the potential outcome might be for Britain’s economy and international trade. The fellow panelists were Nigel Evans MP and James McGrory, Executive Director of Open Britain.


Related Links:
BBC2 TV - Victoria Derbyshire Show [around 10:30am]

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Source – poverty + inequality

The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling conflicting results – Centre for Economic Performance (LSE)

An influential strand of research has tested for the effects of immigration on natives’ wages and employment using exogenous refugee supply shocks as natural experiments. Several studies have reached conflicting conclusions about the effects of noted refugee waves such as the Mariel Boatlift in Miami and post-Soviet refugees to Israel. We show that conflicting findings on the effects of the Mariel Boatlift can be explained by a large difference in the pre- and post-Boatlift racial composition in subsamples of the Current Population Survey extracts. This compositional change is specific to Miami, unrelated to the Boatlift, and arises from selecting small subsamples of workers. We also show that conflicting findings on the labor market effects of other important refugee waves are caused by spurious correlation between the instrument and the endogenous variable introduced by applying a common divisor to both. As a whole, the evidence from refugee waves reinforces the existing consensus that the impact of immigration on average native-born workers is small, and fails to substantiate claims of large detrimental impacts on workers with less than high school.

Source:  Clemens, Michael A. and Hunt, Jennifer. “The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling conflicting results.” Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. CEPDP1491. July 2017.

Related publications

The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling Conflicting Results Michael A. Clemens and Jennifer Hunt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper NO.1491, July 2017

 

Related links

Jennifer Hunt, Rutgers and Visiting Academic to CEP:  http://economics.rutgers.edu/people/296-hunt-jennifer

 


Related Links:
Source – poverty + inequality - The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling conflicting results – Centre for Economic Performance (LSE)

The Labor Market Effects of Refugee Waves: Reconciling Conflicting Results

CEP Labour Markets



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The UK in a Changing Europe (Kings College London)

Brexit and the skills challenge

Article by Sandra McNally

The UK’s productivity suffered a shock in 2008 from which it has not recovered, and the ‘skills problem’ needs to be addressed. Within the context of a broader industrial strategy, improving skills is part of the solution – but Brexit may well harm these efforts if the feared negative economic effects put additional pressure on public finances. Likewise, Brexit will not help if prolonged uncertainty discourages employer investment in skills; nor if employers substitute capital for labour as a response to migration barriers. However, Brexit does do is bring the skills problem into sharper focus.


Related Links:
The UK in a Changing Europe (Kings College London) - Brexit and the skills challenge

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Financial

Report outlines costs of no Brexit deal

The consequences of the UK failing to reach a deal with the EU will be “widespread, damaging and pervasive”, according to a new report featuring LSE experts.

Related publications

‘The Cost of No Deal’  The UK in a Changing Europe http://ukandeu.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Cost-of-No-Deal-The-UK-in-a-Changing-Europe.pdf

CEP Election Analysis: Brexit and the UK Economy, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson . May 2017 .Paper No' CEPEA040 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf


Related Links:
The Financial - Report outlines costs of no Brexit deal

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE News

‘People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research'

Dr Ted Pinchbeck, a Fellow in Real Estate Economics and Finance at LSE and one of the authors of the research, said: “Prices of leaseholds of different lengths provide direct new evidence on how people discount the very far future. Our results support the use of a time-declining discount rate, which is used for policy evaluation here in the UK, but not everywhere in the world. This kind of discount rate implies that people are actually willing to pay more or take action now to improve things in the distant future.

Related publications

‘The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence on Discount Rates,’ Economic Journal     Philippe Bracke, Edward W. Pinchbeck, James Wyatt. A copy of this paper is available from the LSE press office.


Related Links:
LSE News - ‘People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research'

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme CEP Trade

Edward Pinchbeck webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Watan ( Algeria)

Il ne faut pas rester au niveau sécuritaire pour trouver des solutions / We must not stay at the security level to find solutions

The topics covered this year are varied: "The social foundations of world happiness"; "Growth and happiness in China"; "Waiting for happiness in Africa"; "The key determinants of happiness and misery"; "Happiness at work"; "Restoring American happiness". The report is written by the authors Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, John F. Helliwell, Haifang Huang, Richard Layard, Jeffrey Sachs and Shun Wang. The China team is led by Richard A.Easterlin and the African team consists of Valerie Møller, Habib Tiliouine and two other members.

 

Related publications

World Happiness Report Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.


Related Links:
El Watan ( Algeria) - Il ne faut pas rester au niveau sécuritaire pour trouver des solutions / We must not stay at the security level to find solutions

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Leasehold homeowners are ‘overpaying to extend' leases

Homeowners living in leasehold properties are being asked to pay extortionate prices to extend the leases on their homes. That’s the conclusion of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), which has analysed data from 8,000 sales of leasehold properties showing how the sale price varied depending on how much time was left on the lease.

Related publications

‘The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence on Discount Rates,’ Economic Journal. Philippe Bracke, Edward W. Pinchbeck, James Wyatt. A copy of this paper is available from the LSE press office.


Related Links:
Independent - Leasehold homeowners are ‘overpaying to extend' leases

CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Edward Pinchbeck webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk

Economic Affairs Committee publishes its report on Brexit and the Labour Market

Professor Alan Manning, Chair of the Migration Advisory Committee and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics and Lord Layard member of the Economic Affairs Committee…

Related publications

1st Report - Brexit and the Labour Market


Related Links:
Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk - Economic Affairs Committee publishes its report on Brexit and the Labour Market

CEP Community CEP Wellbeing

Alan Manning webpage

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Europeanceo

We need to tear down the silos and rebuild the digital economy

The digital economy is exacerbating the capital-labour disparity in global markets. A new competition authority with global remit is needed to reset the balance

And, as the economists David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence Katz, Christina Patterson, and John Van Reenen show, the US industries with the fastest-growing market concentration have also seen the largest drop in labour’s share of income.


Related Links:
Europeanceo - We need to tear down the silos and rebuild the digital economy

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 20/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE News

Report outlines costs of no Brexit deal

The consequences of the UK failing to reach a deal with the EU will be “widespread, damaging and pervasive”, according to a new report featuring LSE experts.

                   Related publications

‘The Cost of No Deal’  The UK in a Changing Europe http://ukandeu.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Cost-of-No-Deal-The-UK-in-a-Changing-Europe.pdf


Related Links:
LSE News - Report outlines costs of no Brexit deal

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 20/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

The six flavours of Brexit

Brexiteers rejected the Treasury’s projections for the cost of Brexit last year as “project fear”. But the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has remodelled the trade consequences…..

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: Brexit and the UK Economy, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson . May 2017 .Paper No' CEPEA040 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf


Related Links:
The Economist - The six flavours of Brexit

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 20/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Hatcher+ blog

How medieval accountants and AI created the jobless future

Graph credit: Graetz and Michaels, “Robots at Work" - taken from the Brookings Institute article located here- which manages to interpret data from the Graetz and Michaels study rather too positively, I think.


Related Links:
Hatcher+ blog - How medieval accountants and AI created the jobless future

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 19/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio

[19:05:04]

Reference to Paul Cheshire on possible house price collapse.

Click to open


Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 19/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Live (South Africa)

Is London's housing bull run coming to an end?

Bloomberg News asked seven market commentators to predict what they expected next in London’s £1.6-trillion housing market.

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics and Political Science: "The turning point is just being reached. Housing prices have continued to rise relative to incomes and the affordability ratio is now at an all-time low. Real incomes are falling as the weakness in the pound feeds through to higher inflation.

Also in:

The Edge Markets

London’s home price growth has flatlined. What happens next?

http://www.theedgemarkets.com/article/londons-home-price-growth-has-flatlined-what-happens-next


Related Links:
Business Live (South Africa) - Is London's housing bull run coming to an end?

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 19/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Education Policy Institute

The impact of academies on educational outcomes

The Education Policy Institute (EPI) has published a new paper examining the impact of academies on educational outcomes. The comprehensive report brings together EPI’s own analysis, along with research undertaken by the London School of Economics.

Our principal finding through this extensive study is that academies do not provide an automatic solution to school improvement. As we demonstrate throughout this report, there is significant variation in performance at both different types of academies and Multi-Academy Trusts.

Related publications

The Impact of Academies on Educational Outcomes, Jon Andrews and Natalie Perera with Andrew Eyles, Gabriel Heller Sahlgren, Stephen Machin, Matteo Sandi and Olmo Silva, Education Policy Institute and London School of Economics and Political Science Report, July 2017

https://epi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/EPI_-Impact_of_Academies_Consolidated_Report.pdf

Primary Academies in England’, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 3, Winter 2016

Academy Schools and Pupil Outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015

 


Related Links:
Education Policy Institute - The impact of academies on educational outcomes

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

Academies 2: The New Batch

The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Gabriel Heller-sahlgren webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Olmo Silva webpage



News Posted: 19/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Suratkabar.id

Ternyata Bekerja Dari Rumah Membuat Anda Lebih Bahagia dan Luar Biasa Produktif, Riset Ini Mengungkapkannya/ Apparently Working From Home Makes You Happier and Extraordinarily Productive, This Research Revealed

But it seems that the assumption is just a false assumption-if it can not be wrong. In fact, reported Inc.com report on Tuesday (07/17/2017), Professor Nicholas Bloom as an economist from Stanford recently explained the opposite in the talk show Talk TED. Unexpectedly, the professor explains how working from home is as potentially as powerful and innovative as a "car without a driver". And this is serious.

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Working or shirking? Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
Suratkabar.id - Ternyata Bekerja Dari Rumah Membuat Anda Lebih Bahagia dan Luar Biasa Produktif, Riset Ini Mengungkapkannya/ Apparently Working From Home Makes You Happier and Extraordinarily Productive, This Research Revealed

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 18/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mundiario

La productividad laboral mejora cuando se trabaja desde casa

But what many ignore or is difficult to accept, is that when working from home, productivity increases. The latest statement is reflected in a study by Nicholas Bloom, a researcher at Stanford University, who was charged with studying a Chinese company and the productivity of employees who worked from home. Bloom's final conclusions show that home-based workers were happier, increasing their productivity, generating more dividends for the company, and earning better wages.

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Working or shirking? Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
Mundiario - La productividad laboral mejora cuando se trabaja desde casa

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 18/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Neue Rheinische Zeitung

Dauer-Strohfeuer

Trump and Brexit are rapidly becoming the main threat to the upturn. Once the downturn begins, all fingers will point to them. But the real causes lie somewhere else: Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom points to a fatal development in the SPIEGEL interview (4/2017): For decades the inequality in the population would grow in the USA and to a certain extent also in countries of Europe. A small group possesses the majority of the wealth. This was a source of uncertainty and would be exploited by populists.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016


Related Links:
Neue Rheinische Zeitung - Dauer-Strohfeuer

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 18/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio

[19:05]

Discussion on possible housing crash – mention of Paul Cheshire.

Click to open


Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 18/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Brexit blog

Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals are likely to favour graduates

Businesses that rely on low-skilled EU labour may face hiring difficulties, writes Jonathan Wadsworth. He argues that post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will probably favour graduates.

Related links

Jonathan Wadsworth CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=wadsworth


Related Links:
LSE Brexit blog - Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals are likely to favour graduates

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 18/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

ItalyEurope24

A new course for economic liberalism

A recent study by Erling Bath, Alex Bryson, James Davis, and Richard Freeman showed that the diffusion of individual pay since the 1970s is associated with pay differences between, not within, companies. The Stanford economists Nicholas Bloom and David Price confirmed this finding, and argue that virtually the entire increase in income inequality in the US is rooted in the growing gap in average wages paid by firms.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016

Fluctuations in Uncertainty, Nicholas Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.38, December 2013

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty Scott R. Baker, Nick Bloom, Steven J. Davis and John Van Reenen, CEP US Election Analysis Paper No.2, October 2012

Policy Uncertainty: A New Indicator, Scott. R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven J. Davis.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
ItalyEurope24 - A new course for economic liberalism

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

Does Uncertainty Reduce Growth? Using Disasters as Natural Experiments

Really Uncertain Business Cycles

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 17/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

What next for US-Europe trade policy?

Article by Nikhil Datta and Swati Dhingra

The economies of Europe and the United States are inextricably linked and in an ideal world, a number of factors motivate a trade deal such as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. This column, taken from a recent VoxEU eBook, argues, however, that given the Brexit referendum in the UK and the election of Donald Trump as US president, as well as a number of other pre-existing complications, achieving such agreements will be highly contentious.

Related publications

What next for US-Europe trade policy?’, Nikhil Datta and Swati Dhingra. A chapter in the Vox eBook, Economics and policy in the Age of Trump, available to download here: http://voxeu.org/content/economics-and-policy-age-trump


Related Links:
Vox - What next for US-Europe trade policy?

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Nikhil Datta webpage



News Posted: 16/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Developpez.com (France)

Employees working from home would be happier and more efficient than those on the premises of the company. What about France?

Nicholas Bloom, a professor at Stanford University, was interested in the phenomenon of working from home, a particular mode of work that allows employees of a company to stay at home rather than going into space Of the employer's usual work. For Professor Nicholas Bloom, the fact that an employer obliges employees to come and work every day is an obsolete process. He believes that this behavior of the company belongs to the traditions set up during the Industrial Revolution and should no longer be topical. Such inflexibility, disregarding the current sophisticated means of communication and the difficulties associated with transport and the distances to be traveled, is harmful both for employees and for businesses.

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Working or shirking? Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 3, Winter 2012

 


Related Links:
Developpez.com (France) - Employees working from home would be happier and more efficient than those on the premises of the company. What about France?

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 16/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Schools Week

Education has ‘done nothing' to improve social mobility

Education has “not done anything” to improve social mobility and has made inequality worse, according to the education economist Stephen Machin. Speaking at a debate held by the Sutton Trust on Wednesday in central London, Machin said education had been a “dequaliser” because it benefited rich pupils more. “Education has not been the great leveller. It’s either done nothing for social mobility, or it has reinforced existing inequalities.” Time at school strengthened the link between pupils and their family backgrounds, said Machin, a professor at the London School of Economics, meaning more rich pupils ended up in higher education. He also cited the OECD’s finding in 2012 that in 20 developed countries, only young people in the UK and US had as poor literacy and numeracy skills as their parents’ generation.

Related links

Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=machin

 


Related Links:
Schools Week - Education has ‘done nothing' to improve social mobility

CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 16/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

oikonomia.gr (Greece)

A new road to economic liberalism

A similar trend can be observed at the organizational level. A recent study by Erling Bath, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman has shown that the spread of individual wages since the 1970s is linked to differences in pay between businesses and not within them. Stanford economists Nicholas Bloom and David Price have confirmed this conclusion and argue that virtually the whole increase in income inequality in the US is due to the growing gap in average wages paid by businesses.

Related links

Alex Bryson CEP Alumni webpage:  https://www.niesr.ac.uk/users/bryson


Related Links:
oikonomia.gr (Greece) - A new road to economic liberalism

Firming Up Inequality

It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 14/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Estate Agent Today

London's prime housing market is no longer roaring

Brexit and higher tax has had a particularly negative impact on the market in well-heeled inner London areas, some of which have seen prices fall sharply over the past 18 months or so, as they absorb the stamp duty increases, and could yet drop further, with Professor Christian Hilber from the London School of Economics warning earlier this month that a recession induced by Brexit could lead to a severe downturn in house prices. Hilber’s view is shared by Professor Paul Cheshire, who has advised the government on housing policy, and predicts that “we are due a significant correction in house prices”.


Related Links:
Estate Agent Today - London's prime housing market is no longer roaring

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 14/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Why the housing market is on a go-slow What about the forecast of a 40 per cent decline in prices?

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, says that a house price correction, or significant fall in prices, is likely within the next two or three years. This is partly because house prices have risen so far beyond average incomes, while “real” incomes, which take inflation into account, have begun to stagnate. He says: “With Brexit, where you have foreign exchange risk as well as an asset price risk, if house prices start to fall, London real estate may be seen as a less attractive place to park money.” Although Cheshire was reported as predicting a 40 per cent fall, he says this is unlikely and expects positive house price growth over the next 15 years.

 


Related Links:
The Times - Why the housing market is on a go-slow What about the forecast of a 40 per cent decline in prices?

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 14/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

VoxDev – Video

The backlash against globalisation


Related Links:
VoxDev – Video - The backlash against globalisation

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 13/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Roboteer-tokyo.com (Japan)

'Employment and wages increase rather than introducing robots' ... International Robot Federation Reports

IFR quoted OECD's research results. Companies that introduced innovative technology said they are more productive than 2-10 times more than companies that do not. Also cited a study by Graetz and Michaels published in 2015. Explaining that industrial robots contributed about 10% to GDP growth in 17 European countries between 1993 and 2007.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015


Related Links:
Roboteer-tokyo.com (Japan) - 'Employment and wages increase rather than introducing robots' ... International Robot Federation Reports

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 13/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

A study of 16 countries shows that the most productive firms (and their employees) are pulling away from everyone else

Article by Giuseppe Berlingieri, Patrick Blanchenay and Chiara Criscuolo

The corporate landscape has become increasingly unequal, with the most productive firms thriving and the least productive ones failing to keep up. This matters not just for economic growth but also for inequality: Our research shows that as they grow apart in productivity, firms are also becoming more unequal in how much they pay workers.

Related publications

The great divergence(s) Giuseppe Berlingieri, Patrick Blanchenay, Chiara Criscuolo.

12 May 2017. http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/science-and-technology/the-great-divergence-s_953f3853-en


Related Links:
Harvard Business Review - A study of 16 countries shows that the most productive firms (and their employees) are pulling away from everyone else

CEP Trade

Giuseppe Berlingieri webpage



News Posted: 13/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP on Twitter

Shadow Secretary of State for Education Angela Rayner MP @AngelaRayner retweeted LSE: 'Education has not been the great leveller – it has actually reinforced existent inequalities,' says Prof Stephen Machin @s_machin_ of LSE'

Related article

Sunday 16 July

Schools Week

Education has ‘done nothing’ to improve social mobility

http://schoolsweek.co.uk/education-has-done-nothing-to-improve-social-mobility/

Related links

Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=machin


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bezprawnik.PL (Poland)

Working from home earns more, less often, and are happier than those working in offices

Nicholas Bloom, a professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, conducted a study on a large, multi-thousand research group: employees of a Chinese travel company Ctrip. Have not you heard of her? Not surprisingly, neither is it, but it turns out to be a $ 20 billion capitol (2 times as much as our domestic, poisonous Plock Orlen). Employees in the helpline who were randomly assigned to work remotely and in offices were subjected to the study.

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Working or shirking? Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
Bezprawnik.PL (Poland) - Working from home earns more, less often, and are happier than those working in offices

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Project Syndicate

A new course for economic liberalism

Research by Cesar Hidalgo and his colleagues at MIT reveals that, in countries where sectoral concentration has declined in recent decades, such as South Korea, income inequality has fallen. In those where sectoral concentration has intensified, such as Norway, inequality has risen. A similar trend can be seen at the organizational level. A recent study by Erling Bath, Alex Bryson, James Davis, and Richard Freeman showed that the diffusion of individual pay since the 1970s is associated with pay differences between, not within, companies. The Stanford economists Nicholas Bloom and David Price confirmed this finding, and argue that virtually the entire increase in income inequality in the US is rooted in the growing gap in average wages paid by firms.


Related Links:
Project Syndicate - A new course for economic liberalism

Firming Up Inequality

It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

MarketPlace

Now we can measure economic policy uncertainty

In the world of business and economics, there’s a bit of a fixation on uncertainty. To start, there's the VIX, a measure of investor fear, that tracks expected volatility in the markets. But there’s another index out there, one that might be less familiar. It's called the Economic Policy Uncertainty Index, and it provides clues about how politics might be shaping the economy. Scott Baker from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University developed the index along with Nicholas Bloom at Stanford University and Steven Davis at the University of Chicago. At the time they began working on it, in the years after the Great Recession, "there wasn't something that highlighted the role the government played in generating or driving uncertainty," Baker said.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016

Fluctuations in Uncertainty, Nicholas Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.38, December 2013

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty Scott R. Baker, Nick Bloom, Steven J. Davis and John Van Reenen, CEP US Election Analysis Paper No.2, October 2012

Policy Uncertainty: A New Indicator, Scott. R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven J. Davis.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
MarketPlace - Now we can measure economic policy uncertainty

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

Does Uncertainty Reduce Growth? Using Disasters as Natural Experiments

Really Uncertain Business Cycles

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Quartz

Work from home people earn more, quit less, and are happier than their office-bound counterparts

Working from home gets a bad rap. Google the phrase and examine the results—you’ll see scams or low-level jobs, followed by links calling out “legitimate” virtual jobs. But Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Nicholas Bloom says requiring employees to be in the office is an outdated work tradition, set up during the Industrial Revolution. Such inflexibility ignores today’s sophisticated communications methods and long commutes, and actually hurts firms and employees. “Working from home is a future-looking technology,” Bloom told an audience during TEDxStanford, which took place in April. “I think it has enormous potential.”

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Working or shirking? Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
Quartz - Work from home people earn more, quit less, and are happier than their office-bound counterparts

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Contrepoints

Les pays où il fail bon vivre sont

The same report by academics (John F. Helliwell, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and Vancouver School of Economics Richard Layard, Director, London School of Economics, Jeffrey D. Sachs, Columbia University) offers also a ranking of countries in terms of the happiness at work.

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
Contrepoints - Les pays où il fail bon vivre sont

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Hellenic News

Business casts doubt on UK-US post-Brexit trade deal

“There are bigger potential gains from doing a deal with Europe than with the U.K. on its own, just because Europe is a bigger market,” said Thomas Sampson, an economist at the Centre for Economic Performance. “The flip side of that would be that because the U.K. is just one country rather than a block of 27 countries it should have more flexibility.”


Related Links:
Hellenic News - Business casts doubt on UK-US post-Brexit trade deal

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

The secret of Singapore's development master plan

Letter from Edwin Loo, Singapore

Singapore is one of only a few jurisdictions in the world to have successfully implemented a comprehensive system of land value capture through betterment taxes and revenues from the sale of government-owned land. The revenues from this system have worked to create a virtuous cycle where development helps to pay for itself by unlocking the funds necessary to bring forward the infrastructure needed to support further development.  Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics has rightly observed in his response to the recent Housing White Paper, the UK desperately needs a rules-based system similar to Singapore’s Master Plan that provides clarity and certainty.


Related Links:
Financial Times - The secret of Singapore's development master plan

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Emirates-Business.ae

Businesses cast doubt on UK-US post-Brexit trade deal

“There are bigger potential gains from doing a deal with Europe than with the UK on its own, just because Europe is a bigger market,” said Thomas Sampson, an economist at the Centre for Economic Performance. “The flip side of that would be that because the UK is just one country rather than a block of 27 countries it should have more flexibility.”


Related Links:
Emirates-Business.ae - Businesses cast doubt on UK-US post-Brexit trade deal

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg (USA)

Post-Brexit UK trade deal with Trump in easier said than done

“There are bigger potential gains from doing a deal with Europe than with the U.K. on its own, just because Europe is a bigger market,” said Thomas Sampson, an economist at the Centre for Economic Performance. “The flip side of that would be that because the U.K. is just one country rather than a block of 27 countries it should have more flexibility.”

Also in: Las Cruces Sun-News (New Mexico) Post-Brexit UK trade deal with Trump in easier said than done


Related Links:
Bloomberg (USA) - Post-Brexit UK trade deal with Trump in easier said than done

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The core of the REVOLUTION (Korea)

‘Robots introduced', contributing to competitiveness and job creation

According to the report of "The Impact of Robots on Productivity, Employment and Jobs" published by the International Robot Federation (IFR) recently issued by the Korea Robot Industry Promotion Agency (President Park Ki-Han) Productivity, and job creation.

IFR cited the results of the OECD and found that companies that introduced innovative technologies were 2 to 10 times more productive than those who did not, and cited the study by Graetz and Michaels, published in 2015, In fact, robots have contributed 10% to GDP growth in 17 countries in Europe from 1993 to 2007.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015


Related Links:
The core of the REVOLUTION (Korea) - ‘Robots introduced', contributing to competitiveness and job creation

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 11/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE News

People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research

People may be paying too high a price to extend the leases on their homes according to new research from the LSE. The research, forthcoming in The Economic Journal(1), suggests that current leasehold extension practices underestimate the value of many leasehold properties.  Dr Ted Pinchbeck, a Fellow in Real Estate Economics and Finance at LSE and one of the authors of the research, said: “Prices of leaseholds of different lengths provide direct new evidence on how people discount the very far future. Our results support the use of a time-declining discount rate, which is used for policy evaluation here in the UK, but not everywhere in the world. This kind of discount rate implies that people are actually willing to pay more or take action now to improve things in the distant future.

 

Related publications

‘The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence from London Residential Leases’, Philippe Bracke, Ted Pinchbeck and James Wyatt, SERC Discussion Paper No.168, December 2014

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/serc/publications/download/sercdp0168.pdf

'The Time Value of Housing: Historical Evidence on Discount Rates', Philippe Bracke, Ted Pinchbeck and James Wyatt, The Economic Journal, 21 March 2017

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecoj.12501/epdf


Related Links:
LSE News - People may be overpaying for lease extensions says LSE research

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Philippe Bracke webpage

Edward Pinchbeck webpage



News Posted: 11/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo!Finance

Post-Brexit U.K. trade deal with Trump is easier said than done

“There are bigger potential gains from doing a deal with Europe than with the U.K. on its own, just because Europe is a bigger market,” said Thomas Sampson, an economist at the Centre for Economic Performance. “The flip side of that would be that because the U.K. is just one country rather than a block of 27 countries it should have more flexibility.”


Related Links:
Yahoo!Finance - Post-Brexit U.K. trade deal with Trump is easier said than done

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Vanguaria

En salario que necesita unbarcelonés para vivir dignamente/The salary that a person living in Barcelona needs to be able to live in dignity


Related Links:
La Vanguaria - En salario que necesita unbarcelonés para vivir dignamente/The salary that a person living in Barcelona needs to be able to live in dignity

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Maria Sánchez-vidal webpage



News Posted: 10/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

el Vocero (Puerto Rico)

¿Riqueza o bienestar?/Wealth or wellbeing?

According to Richard Layard, one of the study's leaders, "evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness and misery are social relationships and mental and physical health." In his view, this calls for a new role for the state, but not in the sense of "wealth creation," but in the "creation of welfare."

 

Associated article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
el Vocero (Puerto Rico) - ¿Riqueza o bienestar?/Wealth or wellbeing?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

David Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 10/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

dS De Standaard (The Netherlands)

Zwitserland is hset beste land ter wereld

In particular, Switzerland takes the first place on the list that the World Economic Forum (a Swiss setting) on the global competitiveness, and also on the list of most innovative countries by the French business school Insead. On another ranking of competitiveness, that of the also Swiss business school IMD, the Alpine country second. The list of human development of the UN is good for a third place, and on the list of most fortunate countries of the professors Jeffrey Sachs and Richard Layard pick up the Swiss a fourth place.

 

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
dS De Standaard (The Netherlands) - Zwitserland is hset beste land ter wereld

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 10/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP mentions on Twitter

Mike Gapes MP (Labour) retweeted LSE CEP

'Since 1993, rate of home ownership among Brits aged 20-29 has declined from 50% to only 20%, @CEP_LSE research… https://t.co/UiapxN8Rkf'.

 

  1. Mike Gapes Retweeted

Romesh Vaitilingam‏ @econromesh Jul 8

Since 1993, rate of home ownership among Brits aged 20-29 has declined from 50% to only 20%, @CEP_LSE research http://cep.lse.ac.uk/centrepiece/abstract.asp?index=5496 …pic.twitter.com/V6WO7SmVDw

18 replies 250 retweets 164 likes

Reply

18

Retweet

250

Retweeted

250

Like

164

Liked

164

 

Related publications

Home ownership and social mobility Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Summer 2017

 


Related Links:
CEP mentions on Twitter - Mike Gapes MP (Labour) retweeted LSE CEP

CEP Labour Markets

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

(21:17:57)

Snippet: ... signs of faltering market with a slight drop in house prices month on month quarter-on-quarter but they're still up on a year ago a man quoted in many areas house prices crash stories was Professor Paul Cheshire of the LSE he wasn't too pleased how his words had been used...

Click to open


Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

This is Money.co.uk

Homes on the brink: In the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

Professor Paul Cheshire, who has advised the Government on housing policy, said: 'We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.


Related Links:
This is Money.co.uk - Homes on the brink: In the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Metro

House prices slipping in wake of warning about market on verge of collapse

Speaking last week, Paul Cheshire, a former government housing adviser, also warned that the property market could tumble. ‘We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting,’ he said. ‘Historically, trends seem always to start in London and then move out across the rest of the country. In the capital, you are already seeing house prices rising less rapidly than in other parts of Britain.’


Related Links:
The Metro - House prices slipping in wake of warning about market on verge of collapse

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Fresh fears of housing market collapse as new data suggests property prices are falling

Paul Cheshire, professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics, said: “We are due a significant correction in house prices.

“I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.”


Related Links:
The Sun - Fresh fears of housing market collapse as new data suggests property prices are falling

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

For interest rates the only way is up. Act now to put your house in order

Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, made headlines last weekend by warning that house prices could be heading for “a significant correction” — of perhaps as much as 40%. Other commentators dismissed his claim as sensationalist, however.


Related Links:
The Sunday Times - For interest rates the only way is up. Act now to put your house in order

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

Homes on the brink: in the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

House price data has so far suggested a softening in the market rather than a crash. However, The Mail on Sunday last weekend reported that Britain could be on the brink of a major 1990s-style house price collapse, according to an academic at the London School of Economics. Professor Paul Cheshire, who has advised the Government on housing policy, said: 'We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.


Related Links:
Mail online - Homes on the brink: in the wake of dire warning on house market, fresh data shows prices slipping

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 09/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Romper

How to talk to someone about going to therapy and getting them the help they need

Mental health issues are often stigmatized, or even considered "made up illnesses." But according to a report by The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group at The London School of Economics and Political Science, mental illness is typically more debilitating than most chronic physical conditions. The report indicated that, on average, a person with depression is at least 50 percent more disabled than someone with angina, arthritis, asthma or diabetes.

Related publications

‘How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS’. A report by The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/special/cepsp26.pdf

In brief: Mental illness and the NHS by Richard Layard. Article in CentrePiece 17 (2) Autumn 2012


Related Links:
Romper - How to talk to someone about going to therapy and getting them the help they need

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 08/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Money Box Programme

Newspaper headlines this week have been shouting about a crash in the housing market. Massive collapse! Property prices could plunge! We hear from the man quoted in many of those stories, Professor Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, (who is not too pleased with how his thoughts have been represented) about what he thinks does lie ahead for house prices. And from property market analyst Kate Faulkner on the picture across the UK, and the housing bubble you may have missed.


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Money Box Programme

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 08/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Building.co.uk

House prices rise 2.6% in past 12 months

Paul Cheshire, emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, told Building: “There’s likely to be a downward correction of house prices, primarily because of decline in real incomes and the fact that the planning world and indeed the building world tend to act as if what determined demand for housing was household numbers and population.

“But that has quite amazingly little to do with demand, which is mainly determined in the long term by incomes,” he added.


Related Links:
Building.co.uk - House prices rise 2.6% in past 12 months

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 07/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

FD.nl (The Netherlands)

Ranglijsten: Nederland handhaaft zich als een na beste land ter wereld (en loopt in op Zwitserland)/ Leaderboards: Netherlands maintains itself as a second-best country in the world (and walks in on Switzerland)

On the fifth list that I use for the rankings of the Netherlands increased rankings again though. Dutch were something happier and are now a position higher, at place 6 of the Happiness index of economists Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs. Only in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Finland are the people still happier.

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
FD.nl (The Netherlands) - Ranglijsten: Nederland handhaaft zich als een na beste land ter wereld (en loopt in op Zwitserland)/ Leaderboards: Netherlands maintains itself as a second-best country in the world (and walks in on Switzerland)

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 07/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Jobs up, unemployment rate up, here's why US economy has more room to grow

At which point a little thumbnail sketch of what we're worried about in the US labour market. Traditionally the US has had very little long term unemployment. Sure, the general rate rose in recessions, fell in the booms, but there has always been a difference with the European labour markets as my old professor, Richard Layard, points out: The evidence for the first proposition is everywhere around us. For example, Europe has a notorious unemployment problem. But if you break down unemployment into short term (under a year) and long-term, you find that short-term unemployment is almost the same in Europe as in the U.S. – around 4% of the workforce. But in Europe there are another 4% who have been out of work for over a year, compared with almost none in the United States. The most obvious explanation for this is that in the U.S. unemployment benefits run out after 6 months, while in most of Europe they continue for many years or indefinitely.

Related publications

‘Welfare-to-work and the New Deal’, Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/occasional/OP015.pdf


Related Links:
Forbes - Jobs up, unemployment rate up, here's why US economy has more room to grow

CEP Labour Markets

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 07/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Blog-illusio.com

Comment la transmission de la politique monétaire américaine a changé au cours du temps/How the transmission of U.S. monetary policy has changed over time

Several empirical studies have sought to determine whether recent technological advances have reduced the aggregate demand for work or hindered wage growth. For example, Terry Gregory, Anna Salomons and Ulrich Zierahn (2016) felt that the negative effects of automating routine tasks on the medium-skilled jobs in Europe were offset by job creation through increased demand. By observing 17 European countries, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (2015) believe that the diffusion of industrial robots has stimulated labour productivity, added value, wages and overall factor productivity; It did not significantly affect the duration of the work, except perhaps for low-or medium-skilled workers. More pessimistic, Daron Acemoglu and Pascual Restrepo (2017) conclude on their side that robots can reduce employment and wages: in the United States, the addition of an industrial robot for a thousand workers reduced the employment-to-population ratio from 0.18 to 0.34 percentage points and salaries from 0.25 to 0.5%. Consider that the findings to which these studies are successful are, however, very difficult to generalise. Indeed, robots operate only in a limited set of industrial applications, mainly in heavy industry, or as the use of robots extends outside the industry, the impact that automation has on employment will be likely to change.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in


Related Links:
Blog-illusio.com - Comment la transmission de la politique monétaire américaine a changé au cours du temps/How the transmission of U.S. monetary policy has changed over time

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 07/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC - capital

The many upsides of a happy workforce

There are many benefits to putting happiness at the centre of business and policy decisions, says economist Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, a professor at the University of Oxford’s Said Business School. He points to a 2014 study, which suggests that raising people’s happiness makes them more productive by between 7% and 12%.

Related publications: Does work make you happy?  Evidence from the World Happiness Report’, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and George Ward, Harvard Business Review, March 20, 2017

 

 


Related Links:
BBC - capital - The many upsides of a happy workforce

CEP Wellbeing

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

The ‘haves and have-mores' in digital America

Research from the Bonn-based Institute of Labor Economics shows that the differences in individual workers’ pay since the 1970s is associated with pay differences between — not within — companies. Another piece of research, from the Centre for Economic Performance, shows that this pay differential between top-tier companies and everyone else is responsible for the vast majority of inequality in the US.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016

Fluctuations in Uncertainty, Nicholas Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.38, December 2013

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty Scott R. Baker, Nick Bloom, Steven J. Davis and John Van Reenen, CEP US Election Analysis Paper No.2, October 2012

Policy Uncertainty: A New Indicator, Scott. R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven J. Davis.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012


Related Links:
Financial Times - The ‘haves and have-mores' in digital America

Fluctuations in Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Lasiritide.it

Rettrice Unibas, 'L'Università è un ‘bene comune' della Basilicata'/ President Unibas, 'The university is a ' common good ' of Basilicata'

At the G7delle University, which took place recently in Udine, "I talked about the role of universities – concluded sun-in the development of the economic revival of the internal areas, as demonstrated by a recent study, published in November 2016, by Anna Valero of the London School of Economics, and John Van Reenen of the MIT Economics in Boston, entitled ' How the Universities stimulate economic growth ' : The authors show that the birth of a university is essential for the economic and social progress of a territory, resulting in an increase on the estimated income averaged in 0.4% ".

Related articles

Growth multiplier: how university expansion increases national income, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, March 24, 2016


Related Links:
Lasiritide.it - Rettrice Unibas, 'L'Università è un ‘bene comune' della Basilicata'/ President Unibas, 'The university is a ' common good ' of Basilicata'

How universities boost economic growth

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Property Investor Today

London house prices are ‘vulnerable to an exceptionally painful correction'

Simon French of Panmure Gordon told the newspaper: “These prices are only sustainable in a world of permanently low interest rates and low unemployment. Any sharp correction in either the credit or the labour market has the capital’s housing market vulnerable to an exceptionally painful correction.” Gordon’s views are shared by various economists, including Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who earlier this week warned that home prices in London “are due a significant correction”.


Related Links:
Property Investor Today - London house prices are ‘vulnerable to an exceptionally painful correction'

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Nacion

¿Riqueza o bienestar?/ Wealth or well-being?

According to a study by the London School of Economics (LSE), with the participation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, most human misery is not due to economic factors, but to failed relationships and physical and mental illness ..

According to Richard Layard, one of those responsible for the study, "the evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness and misery are social relationships and mental and physical health." In his view, this demands a new role for the state, but not in the sense of "wealth creation", but in the sense of "welfare creation".                      

Related publications

World Happiness report Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017).

2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

http://worldhappiness.report/

 


Related Links:
La Nacion - ¿Riqueza o bienestar?/ Wealth or well-being?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Evening Standard

London house prices rise so fast they outstrip wages

Earlier this week Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, gave a starker warning.  He said: “We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting.”


Related Links:
Evening Standard - London house prices rise so fast they outstrip wages

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 05/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE News

What can Brexit tell us about the white working class?

In the July episode of the #LSEIQ podcast we ask, ‘What can Brexit tell us about the white working class?’ One year on from the European Referendum, this demographic has been scrutinised for their role in the Leave vote. But were they really responsible for the 51.9 per cent vote to ‘Brexit’? If so, why did they vote that way? Helping to tackle the question are Dr Justin Gest co director of LSE’s Migration Studies Unit and Assistant Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University; Dr Lisa McKenzie, Fellow in LSE’s Department of Sociology, and; Dr Dennis Novy, an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Warwick and an Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE.

Related podcast

LSE IQ Episode 4: What can Brexit tell us about the white working class?

Contributors: Justin Gest, Lisa McKenzie and Dennis Novy

http://www.lse.ac.uk/website-archive/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/LSEIQ/player.aspx?id=3849


Related Links:
LSE News - What can Brexit tell us about the white working class?

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 05/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek (Online)

Big houses in the U.S. are back (and there's a growing housing bubble)

Construction of McMansions has also increased but people who have smaller homes near where McMansions are built are much, much unhappier with their homes, according to a paper published in the spring by researcher Clement Bellet at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance. As more McMansions are built, their presence pushes other Americans to build bigger and go further into debt.

Related publications

Superstar houses and the American mortgage frenzy, Clement Bellet. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017


Related Links:
Newsweek (Online) - Big houses in the U.S. are back (and there's a growing housing bubble)

The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage



News Posted: 05/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Express

Britain on brink of WORST house price collapse since the 1990s, expert warns

HOUSE prices in Britain are close to a crash that could be as bad as the bust of the early 1990s, according to warnings from a leading economics expert

Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics claims the warning signs are clear, suggesting a plunge of at least 40 per cent. The warnings have led to an increased fear of the return of “negative equity”, in which the value of a property falls so far, it becomes less than the cost of the mortgage.


Related Links:
The Express - Britain on brink of WORST house price collapse since the 1990s, expert warns

The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 05/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

The growing inequality between firms

Globalisation, technological progress and a range of policies and institutions are driving ‘Great Divergences’ in wages and productivity, write Giuseppe Berlingieri, Patrick Blanchenay and Chiara Criscuolo...

Related publications

The great divergence(s) Giuseppe Berlingieri, Patrick Blanchenay, Chiara Criscuolo.

12 May 2017. http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/science-and-technology/the-great-divergence-s_953f3853-en


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - The growing inequality between firms

CEP Trade

Giuseppe Berlingieri webpage



News Posted: 05/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LBC

[20:50:16]

9 o'clock if you have a health read then you can call us now and takes more calls as well on this issue of people fleeing the NHS but before that Sir rumours are continuing to circulate of the crash in house prices so let's talk to one expert who thinks this time it might actually happen It's Professor Paul Cheshire who's Professor of economic geography at the LSE former government housing adviser as well Professor Cheshire good evening Thank you very much for joining us so room lots of rumours in the last few days about a potential housing crash what's your opinion where I think it's this conditions probably ask for what I call a correction or down turning house prices in London and across England and lonely because of falling real incomes and when you look at what determines the demand for housing...


Related Links:
LBC - [20:50:16]

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 04/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Market Oracle

UK House Prices ‘On Brink' Of Massive 40% Collapse

Two leading economics professors have warned that the UK housing market is on the brink of a 40% collapse, echoing the early 1990s property crisis. “We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting” Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics told the Mail on Sunday. The sharp correction or crash may come about due to two primary factors – Brexit and a fall in real wages as they fail to keep pace with rising inflation.

Professor Christian Hilber and former Government housing adviser, and Professor Paul Cheshire warned that Brexit could be a catalyst for the correction which will see thousands of homeowners plunged into negative equity. Hilber warned that the crash will not be short and sharp: “If Brexit leads to a recession and/or sluggish growth for extended periods, then an extended and severe downturn is more likely than a short-lived and mild one.”


Related Links:
Market Oracle - UK House Prices ‘On Brink' Of Massive 40% Collapse

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 04/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Ham and High

Comment: Could London property be about to blow?

Professor Paul Cheshire predicts London property is long overdue a price correction. But could values really fall 40 per cent and bring about the return of 1990s scale negative equity?


Related Links:
Ham and High - Comment: Could London property be about to blow?

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 04/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bullfax.com

UK house prices ‘on brink' of massive 40% collapse

Two leading economics professors have warned that the UK housing market is on the brink of a 40% collapse, echoing the early 1990s property crisis. "We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting” Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics told the Mail on Sunday. The sharp correction or crash may come about due to two primary factors - Brexit and a fall in real wages as they fail to keep pace with rising inflation. Despite these warnings following swiftly on the tail of recent poor housing market data, homeowners seem unfazed by what the future might hold, disregarding the parallels that are being drawn between today and the run up to the 1990s property crash. Brexit deals another blow Professor Christian Hilber and former Government housing adviser, and Professor Paul Cheshire warned that Brexit could be a catalyst for the correction which will see thousands of homeowners plunged into negative equity.


Related Links:
Bullfax.com - UK house prices ‘on brink' of massive 40% collapse

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 04/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! News

Big Houses in the U.S. Are Back (And There's a Growing Housing Bubble)

Construction of McMansions has also increased but people who have smaller homes near where McMansions are built are much, much unhappier with their homes, according to a paper published in the spring by researcher Clement Bellet at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance.

 

 

Related publications

Centrepiece magazine ”Home ownership and social mobility” Volume 22, issue 2, Summer 2017. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/CentrePiece_22_2.pdf

 

“Superstar houses and the American mortgage frenzy” Clement Bellet , Centre Piece Summer 2017. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp498.pdf


Related Links:
Yahoo! News - Big Houses in the U.S. Are Back (And There's a Growing Housing Bubble)

The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage



News Posted: 04/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Cambridge News

Brexit: Lower wages could cause drastic drop in house prices, experts say

Homeowners could see a sharp drop in the value of their houses because of Brexit paired with the wage drop, a London School of Economics professor predicts. Prices could fall almost 40 per cent and even put homeowners at risk of negative equity, meaning their home could be worth less than their mortgage, The Mirror reported. Professor Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at LSE, said the property market could take a sharp downturn similar to the crash in the 1990s. He said house price can be affected when earnings drag behind inflation. Last month, inflation hit 2.9 per cent, while incomes grew by 2.1 per cent.


Related Links:
Cambridge News - Brexit: Lower wages could cause drastic drop in house prices, experts say

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 03/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Warning of severe house price crash

House prices may be on the brink of a severe crash, according to a former government housing adviser. Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, told The Mail on Sunday that the downturn could be severe enough to leave many homeowners in negative equity, with their houses valued at less than the mortgages they had taken out to pay for them.


Related Links:
The Times - Warning of severe house price crash

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 03/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

The Observer view on a crisis in mental health

The human condition today is ever more complex in an era of the internet, social media and the focus on status, appearance and material success. However, more is required as an antidote than early intervention, self-help and medication alone. As Richard Layard rightly argues in Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, a boost to serotonin and dopamine, both associated with mental wellbeing, is also provided by public policy that is judged on how it increases human happiness and reduces misery.

Related publications

Happiness Lessons from a New Science (Second Edition) Richard Layard, Penguin, 2011.


Related Links:
The Observer - The Observer view on a crisis in mental health

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 84, Issue 3, July 2017

'High' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

Olivier Marie and Ulf Zölitz


Related Links:
The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 84, Issue 3, July 2017 - 'High' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

'High' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Olivier Marie webpage



News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

LBC

News (16:05:01)

Snippet: there are already warning signs that prices are heading toward a near 40% plunge Paul Cheshire Professor of economic geography at the London school of economics while here to debunk...
Click to open


Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

City A.M.

UK house prices: Is a crash coming? These economists thinks so, raising spectre of negative equity

Leading economists have warned that the UK is heading for a collapse in house prices not seen since the early 90s which risks plunging homeowners into negative equity. "We are due a significant correction in house prices. I think we are beginning to see signs that correction may be starting," said Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, speaking to the Mail on Sunday and warning that they could fall as much as 40 per cent.


Related Links:
City A.M. - UK house prices: Is a crash coming? These economists thinks so, raising spectre of negative equity

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Mirror

Experts predict house prices could plummet by up to 40 PER CENT due to Brexit and wage drop

House prices could plummet by almost 40 per cent as Britain faces a crash similar to that in the 1990s, a leading professor at the London School of Economics has warned. A possible Brexit -sparked recession coupled with a fall in real earnings, could cause a double blow to homeowners and put them at risk of 'negative equity' - meaning that the value of their home is less than the cost of their mortgage. Professor Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at LSE, warned the property market could collapse as prices reflect the decline in earnings.


Related Links:
The Mirror - Experts predict house prices could plummet by up to 40 PER CENT due to Brexit and wage drop

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Lancaster online

Republicans are missing an opportunity on health care

A study by Zack Cooper, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen — economists at Yale, Carnegie Mellon University, and the London School of Economics, respectively — concludes that lack of competition and poor transparency in hospital costs are driving up U.S. health care prices.

 


Related Links:
Lancaster online - Republicans are missing an opportunity on health care

The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured

CEP Growth

Zack Cooper webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

Britain on the brink of the worst house price collapse since 1990s': experts predict property costs could plunge by forty per cent

House prices are teetering on the brink of a crash that could be as bad as the bust of the early 1990s, a leading expert has warned. There are already warning signs that prices are heading towards a near 40 per cent plunge, warns Paul Cheshire, Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics. It raises the alarming spectre of the return of ‘negative equity’ – when a house falls so far in value it is worth less than the mortgage – which hit one million people at the worst point in the 1990s. Prof Christian Hilber of the LSE also warned: ‘If Brexit leads to a recession and/or sluggish growth for extended periods, then an extended and severe downturn is more likely than a short-lived and mild one.’


Related Links:
Mail online - Britain on the brink of the worst house price collapse since 1990s': experts predict property costs could plunge by forty per cent

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 01/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

IBS intelligence

Technology downtime is a major problem for the UK's banking sector

The average employee in the finance industry loses more than 20 minutes per day of productive time to faulty IT. This is ironic in a sector which has always been proud of its trail-blazing attitude to be an early-adopter to keep its competitive advantage. However, a critical new report released by Managed 24/7 says the impact of poor IT to the UK’s workforce productivity is considerable. UK economists have long been of the opinion that the country’s workforce is unproductive but few can agree on why.


Related Links:
IBS intelligence - Technology downtime is a major problem for the UK's banking sector

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 30/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Parliament

Live House of Commons

…but analyses, London School of Economics, growth commission report pointed out the lack of a comprehensive and coherent, long-term industrial strategy from the UK Government had actually contributed to what they quoted as poor productivity performance, harming the nations of the UK. Isn't it time the UK Government and this Chancellor got to work in actually doing something to correct the problems they have caused for the economies of the nations of the UK? I agree with my colleague that it is too little, too late. In the time a British worker makes #1, the German worker makes #1 35 and not enough is being done. I understand the strategy is being consulted on. It has not received that favourable responses compared to previous things that have been done in relation to industrial strategy. I hope to see major changes as it goes forward in order that it is more fit for purpose. The Conservatives in this election failed to bolster their majority and they have had to…

Click to open

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.

 

Related links

LSE Growth Commission webpage:  http://www.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/units/growthCommission/home.aspx


Related Links:
BBC Parliament - Live House of Commons

CEP Growth



News Posted: 29/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Reader's Digest

You'll be happiest during these two years of your life, according to science

According to new research, we’re happiest at two points in our lives—not just one. Researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science asked 23,000 German volunteers aged 17 to 85 to rate their life satisfaction. Participants predicted how happy they would feel in five years, and then, after five years’ time, reported back on how they actually felt.


Related Links:
Reader's Digest - You'll be happiest during these two years of your life, according to science

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage



News Posted: 29/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The UK in a changing Europe (Kings College London)

EU referendum: one year on - trade and the single market

Article by Thomas Sampson

One year ago, the UK voted to leave the EU. However, voters did not choose what would come after Brexit.

Options for “life after Brexit”:  One option is to remain in the Single Market and preserve the free movement of goods, services, capital and labour with the EU. Another is to negotiate a bespoke trade agreement with the EU that keeps trade barriers as low as possible while ending labour mobility and giving the UK greater control over economic regulation. Finally, if no deal is reached, the UK and EU would trade under World Trade Organization (WTO) terms. This means the UK would have much the same economic relations with the EU as with non-EU countries such as the US or Japan. It would lead to tariffs on goods trade and reduced market access for service exporters. Each of these alternatives was endorsed by different factions of the Leave campaign prior to the referendum. Asking voters what they prefer does not resolve the conundrum: opinion polls show support for maintaining the benefits of Single Market membership. Yet polls also find support for taking back control by restricting immigration and removing the UK from the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) (though see the section on public opinion).


Related Links:
The UK in a changing Europe (Kings College London) - EU referendum: one year on - trade and the single market

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 28/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Glamour (Spain)

La ciencia revela las 2 edades a las que somos más felices/Science reveals the two ages when we are happiest

There are many theories about the ages and the optimization of one or several vital aspects: there is an age for the body, another for the mind and, according to a new study, there is not one, but two ages for happiness: And it is the 23 and the 69.  According to a study conducted by the London School of Economics and Social science to more than 23,000 participants between 17 and 85 years were asked how happy they expected to be after 5 years and, after 5 years, were asked for their current degree of happiness.


Related Links:
Glamour (Spain) - La ciencia revela las 2 edades a las que somos más felices/Science reveals the two ages when we are happiest

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage



News Posted: 27/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider UK

The Bank of England is preparing for the absolute worst case Brexit scenario

Under May's argument, Britain would drop out of the EU, immediately reverting to unfavourable WTO trade terms, if the country's negotiators failed to get an agreement seen as having favourable terms for the UK. May has widely been criticised for this approach, with a report from the London School of Economics earlier in June saying that failure to strike a deal with the European Union on trade during Brexit talks will lower income per household by at least £1,890 a year.

Related publications

‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No.40, 

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf


Related Links:
Business Insider UK - The Bank of England is preparing for the absolute worst case Brexit scenario

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 27/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will likely favour graduates

Businesses that rely on low-skilled EU labour may face hiring difficulties, writes Jonathan Wadsworth

Had things gone as most commentators expected, the UK would now be entering hard Brexit talks with the near certainty of leaving the single market and/or customs union and the consequent ending of free movement of people from the European Union. Two weeks later and that near certainty no longer seems as certain, with murmurings of a softer Brexit and the implication that allowing freer movement of labour from the EU may now be up for discussion.

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Post-Brexit work visa quotas on EU nationals will likely favour graduates

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 27/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

ESRC Press

Winner of the 25th Kenneth J. Arrow award

The 25th Arrow Award for the best paper in health economics is awarded to Martin Gaynor, Carol Propper, and [CEP Alumni]  Stephan Seiler for their paper “Free to choose? Reform, choice and consideration sets in the English National Health Service” American Economic Review 106(11): 3521-3557, 2016The Arrow Award Committee is proud to acknowledge the authors of this innovative and policy-relevant paper which uses a reform in the English National Health Service (NHS) to assess how removing constraints on patient choice affects the quality of health care received, as well as patient welfare. HEA’s Kenneth J. Arrow Award was created to recognize excellence in the field of health economics with the Award presented to the author(s) of the paper judged to be the best paper published in health economics in English in the award year.


Related Links:
ESRC Press - Winner of the 25th Kenneth J. Arrow award

Free to choose? The impact of healthcare reform

Free to Choose? Reform and Demand Response in the English National Health Service

CEP Growth



News Posted: 27/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE The education blog

Judith Shapiro and Steve Pischke on recommended summer reads

As has become the tradition for our last post of the academic year, we’re featuring summer reading recommendations from special people at LSE. This year, two winners of the LSESU Teaching Excellence Awards shared their picks with us.

Steve Pischke, Professor of Economics and Research Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, Winner of LSESU Teaching Excellence Award for Research Guidance and Support

I am not sure my recent reading is all that good fare for the summer; in fact, it seems more appropriate for London’s November days. The last book I read was Walter Scheidel’s The Great Leveller, a history of inequality from the beginning of humanity to the present day. The author argues that inequality has always been increasing with the exception of periods of extreme violence: mass mobilisation warfare, bloody revolutions (the French one was too tame!), state collapse, and pandemics like the Black Death in the Middle Ages. For me this is the most provocative—and depressing—piece on inequality I have seen in a very long time, and this is a literature I follow as part of my day job. The descriptive account of what happened is most intriguing. Scheidel is weaker when he wants to be analytical and his writing does not rival the best.


Related Links:
LSE The education blog - Judith Shapiro and Steve Pischke on recommended summer reads

CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage



News Posted: 26/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LaPrensa – Economia

El crecimiento de las empresas superestrellas/the rise of superstar companies In most countries, workers' participation in national income has fallen for about three decades. Why?

Article by John Van Reenen with Christina Patterson

Perhaps the cause is the "robbery-Apocalypse Now," that companies are replacing expensive people with cheaper machines.  We suggest another factor: the rise of superstar companies. Over the last 40 years, more industries have become the "winner takes almost Everything" type. Companies with advantage in costs or quality have always enjoyed higher market shares. But the new giants of our era are left with a much larger fraction of their markets (if not with everything). Think of Amazon.com, Apple and Google, or at Goldman Sachs and Wal-Mart.


Related Links:
LaPrensa – Economia - El crecimiento de las empresas superestrellas/the rise of superstar companies In most countries, workers' participation in national income has fallen for about three decades. Why?

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Regio7

La polititzaci, una tesi incompleta i parcial per explicar la crisi dels bancs/ The politicization, an incomplete and partial thesis to explain the crisis of the banks

A study of professors Luis Garicano and Vicente Cuñat, of the London School of Economics, established in 2009, a relationship between a higher degree of politicization, less experience and a lower academic level of the directors of financial institutions with a higher propensity to incur management errors.


Related Links:
Regio7 - La polititzaci, una tesi incompleta i parcial per explicar la crisi dels bancs/ The politicization, an incomplete and partial thesis to explain the crisis of the banks

CEP Growth

Luis Garicano webpage



News Posted: 26/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Overworked staff still love their bosses

Encouraging better work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, academics at London School of Economics found. Neither does forcing workers into miserable servitude.

Related publications

‘Work Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity’, Nicholas Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen, Report from the Anglo-German Foundation, ESRC, Advanced Institute of Management Research and CEP, January 2006

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/management/worklifebalance_research.pdf


Related Links:
Financial Times - Overworked staff still love their bosses

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Kashmir Observer

How Mobile Phones (Mis)Use Is Affecting Our Health and Social Fabric

There are other consequences of using mobile phones as well. A research published by London School of Economics argues that banning pupils from carrying mobile phones in schools showed a sustained improvement in exam results, with the biggest advances coming from struggling students.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015


Related Links:
Kashmir Observer - How Mobile Phones (Mis)Use Is Affecting Our Health and Social Fabric

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 25/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

4-traders

MORGAN STANLEY : Britain's financial power already on the wane

Among the matters at stake in those talks, which began in Brussels last Monday, is whether London can maintain its status as a global hub for finance after Brexit or be forced to watch as business flows to the continent or New York. Such an exodus would jeopardise an industry responsible for nearly a 10th of the economy and some 1.1 million jobs. “There will be a lot of political pressure to get as much of the finance industry moved to the EU as possible,” said Tom Kirchmaier, a fellow in the financial-markets group at the London School of Economics. “The big question will be what the final role of the City will be in Europe.”


Related Links:
4-traders - MORGAN STANLEY : Britain's financial power already on the wane

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage



News Posted: 25/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Voce

Quando la mobilità del lavoro fa la differenza/When labour mobility makes the difference

What explains this persistence? The results of our recent work suggest some considerations.

The evolution of economic activity throughout the country has systematically favoured at the expense of other areas. For territories that have experienced positive changes in the demand for local work was higher the chance to learn about other positive changes in later times. And vice versa. The phenomenon is not a distinctive feature of our country. On the contrary, it seems stronger in other countries (such as the United States, see a recent work of Michel Amior and Alan Manning).


Related Links:
La Voce - Quando la mobilità del lavoro fa la differenza/When labour mobility makes the difference

The Persistence of Local Joblessness

CEP Community

Michael Amior webpage

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Forbes (Mexico)

La derrota de los pequeños/The defeat of the little ones

In a recent working paper presented by MIT, John Van Reenen and his co-authors document a clear global trend towards the fall in the share of income from Labour in total income.


Related Links:
Forbes (Mexico) - La derrota de los pequeños/The defeat of the little ones

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Time

The continuing urgency of the Grenfell Tower inferno

In the days since the fire, Grenfell Tower has been held up as a tragic symbol of the social ills facing Britain: a detached political class; nearly seven years of a government-led austerity program that has sliced through the country’s welfare state; rising socioeconomic disparities; and a hastening decline in living standards. The U.K. has seen the biggest drop in average real wages in OECD countries except for Greece, according to an analysis by the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance.

Related publications

‘Real wages and living standards in the UK’. Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 036, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf


Related Links:
Time - The continuing urgency of the Grenfell Tower inferno

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Stanford Business Insights

Why working from home is a 'future-looking technology'

Nick Bloom – a Stanford GSB expert shows how companies and employees benefit from workplace flexibility.

Related publications

Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

http://bit.ly/2tCwyah


Related Links:
Stanford Business Insights - Why working from home is a 'future-looking technology'

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 22/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Stanford Business Insights

Why working from home is a 'future-looking technology'

Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Nicholas Bloom says requiring employees to be in the office is an outdated work tradition, set up during the Industrial Revolution. Such inflexibility ignores today’s sophisticated communications methods and long commutes, and actually hurts firms and employees. “Working from home is a future-looking technology,” Bloom told an audience during TEDxStanford, which took place in April. “I think it has enormous potential.” To test his claim, Bloom studied China’s largest travel agency, Ctrip. Headquartered in Shanghai, the company has 20,000 employees and a market capitalization of about $20 billion.


Related Links:
Stanford Business Insights - Why working from home is a 'future-looking technology'

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 22/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

UOL Economia

Empresas enfrentam Brexit com ‘espirito de buldogue'/Companies face Brexit with ‘bulldog spirit'

"It's not a catastrophic madness, but the pound fell, investments decreased and inflation reached the highest rate in four years," said Swati Dhingra, economist at the Center for Economic Performance in London. "But I totally disagree with the idea that we err - the overwhelming consensus is that Brexit will be nesting in the long term."


Related Links:
UOL Economia - Empresas enfrentam Brexit com ‘espirito de buldogue'/Companies face Brexit with ‘bulldog spirit'

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 22/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg news

Brexit one year on: keep calm and hedge the pound

‘It’s not crazy catastrophic stuff, but the pound has fallen, investment is down, and inflation is up to a four-year high,” said Swati Dhingra, an economist at the Center for Economic Performance in London.  “But I totally disagree with the idea that we got it wrong – the overwhelming consensus is that Brexit will be damaging over the long term.”


Related Links:
Bloomberg news - Brexit one year on: keep calm and hedge the pound

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 22/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Herald

Choppy year could be calm before Brexit storm

Swati Dhingra, of the LSE, said: “There is near consensus among economists that the hard – or chaotic – form of Brexit…would hurt the UK economy. Although there was little immediate economic fallout from the Brexit vote, in the first quarter of this year UK economic growth was the slowest of any EU economy. … Mrs May insists “no deal is better than a bad deal” — but no deal could spell “chaos”, economists said. Thomas Sampson, of the London School of Economics (LSE), said: “Progress will require the UK to make concessions. Possible concessions include making payments to the EU budget, agreeing EU regulations will continue to apply in some industries, and guaranteeing immigration rights for EU citizens offered a job in the UK. “The UK has a weaker negotiating position than the EU, so even with these concessions it is unlikely to achieve all its objectives. “But refusing to compromise will guarantee failure. “Research estimates that leaving the EU without a deal could reduce UK income per capita by up to 10 per cent in the worst-case scenario.”

Related publications

Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.1, February 2016

Four principles for the UK's Brexit trade negotiations Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.9, October 2016


Related Links:
The Herald - Choppy year could be calm before Brexit storm

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 22/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

South China Morning Post

On track: remote monitoring and artificial intelligence ensure more efficient railway systems along belt and road routes

High-speed rail has triggered a wave of innovation , according to a London School of Economics and Political Science discussion paper by Lin Yatang, Qin Yu and Xie Zhuan, which describes a 20 per cent increase in patent applications after 2004, when high-speed technology from Europe began.

 

Related publications

'High-speed rail in China', Lin Yatang, Qin Yu and Xie Zhuan. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 2, Autumn 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp484.pdf


Related Links:
South China Morning Post - On track: remote monitoring and artificial intelligence ensure more efficient railway systems along belt and road routes

CEP Trade



News Posted: 21/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Herald

Herald View: Holyrood's role means hard Brexit is dead and buried

But the greatest potential trouble is on Brexit, with the constitutional uncertainty growing and economists laying out this week just what a hard or chaotic Brexit could mean for the economy: the pound dropping even further, falling wages and more businesses leaving the UK. And yet the Government still appears to believe that no deal is an option even though the London School of Economics suggests that leaving the EU without one could reduce UK income per capita by up to 10 per cent.

Related publications

‘BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance’, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Brexit Analysis Paper No.8, June 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit08_book.pdf


Related Links:
The Herald - Herald View: Holyrood's role means hard Brexit is dead and buried

CEP Trade CEP Growth

Holger Breinlich webpage

John Van reenen webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage



News Posted: 21/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

South China Morning Post

On track: remote monitoring and artificial intelligence ensure more efficient railway systems along belt and road routes

High-speed rail has triggered a wave of innovation , according to a London School of Economics and Political Science discussion paper by Lin Yatang, Qin Yu and Xie Zhuan, which describes a 20 per cent increase in patent applications after 2004, when high-speed technology from Europe began.

Related publications

'High-speed rail in China', Lin Yatang, Qin Yu and Xie Zhuan. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 2, Autumn 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp484.pdf


Related Links:
South China Morning Post - On track: remote monitoring and artificial intelligence ensure more efficient railway systems along belt and road routes

CEP Trade



News Posted: 21/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Eurasia Review

Will Brexit lead to financial big bang for EU-27? - Analysis

Many commentators are throwing out numbers about the negative impact of Brexit on GDP growth and income across Europe. The Center for Economic Performance has concluded that every EU member will lose income after Brexit, but that the loss for the UK will be about twice the loss for the remaining 27 members combined.

Related publications

‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.2, March 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf


Related Links:
Eurasia Review - Will Brexit lead to financial big bang for EU-27? - Analysis

CEP Trade CEP Growth

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 20/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

24 heures

La question des Européens au Royaume-Uni/ The question of Europeans in the United Kingdom

BrexitAlors que les négociations sur le Brexit s'ouvrent lundi, quel sort attend les plus de 3,6 millions d'Européens au Royaume-Uni?/ BrexitAlors that the negotiations on the Brexit open Monday, what fate awaits the more than 3.6 million Europeans in the UK?

Some also accuse European immigrants of having contributed to lowering wages. But according to Jonathan Wadsworth, author of a report on the subject for the London School of Economics, "All studies show that immigration has no impact on the level of wages or in a very marginal way".

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf


Related Links:
24 heures - La question des Européens au Royaume-Uni/ The question of Europeans in the United Kingdom

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 19/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Foreign Policy Research Institute

Will Brexit Lead to a Financial Big Bang for the EU-27?

Many commentators are throwing out numbers about the negative impact of Brexit on GDP growth and income across Europe. The Center for Economic Performance has concluded that every EU member will lose income after Brexit, but that the loss for the UK will be about twice the loss for the remaining 27 members combined. However, a lot depends (as ever when economics is involved) on what data you look at, as well as on what deals and Euro-fudge the politicians come up with in the coming months.

Also in

Eurasiareview.com http://www.eurasiareview.com/20062017-will-brexit-lead-to-financial-big-bang-for-eu-27-analysis/

Related publications
'The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards',
Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2. March 2016.
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 


Related Links:
Foreign Policy Research Institute - Will Brexit Lead to a Financial Big Bang for the EU-27?

CEP Trade CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

John Van reenen webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 19/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Communist Party of Vietnam Online Newspaper

European citizens living in the UK: a priority, many worry

Some also accuse European immigrants of having contributed to lowering wages. But according to Jonathan Wadsworth, author of a report on the subject for the London School of Economics, "All studies show that immigration has no impact on the level of wages or in a very marginal way".

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf


Related Links:
Communist Party of Vietnam Online Newspaper - European citizens living in the UK: a priority, many worry

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 18/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Diario Gestión (Spain)

Los Europeos en el Reino Unido: una prioridad, muchas inquietudes/Europeans in the UK: a priority, many concerns

Another recurring argument is that immigrants lower wages, a thesis that resists analyses. "All studies show that immigration has no impact on the wage level, or has it in a very marginal way," insisted Jonathan Wadsworth, author of a study on this topic for the London School of Economics (LSE).

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf


Related Links:
Diario Gestión (Spain) - Los Europeos en el Reino Unido: una prioridad, muchas inquietudes/Europeans in the UK: a priority, many concerns

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 17/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Quotidien (Luxembourg)

Brexit : quel avenir pour les expatriés européens au Royaume-Uni?/What future for the European expatriates in the United Kingdom?

Some also accuse the European immigrants have contributed to depress wages. But according to Jonathan Wadsworth, author of a report on the subject for the London School of Economics, "all the studies show that immigration has no impact on the level of wages or so very marginally."

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf


Related Links:
Le Quotidien (Luxembourg) - Brexit : quel avenir pour les expatriés européens au Royaume-Uni?/What future for the European expatriates in the United Kingdom?

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 17/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Journal Dunet (France)

Les Européens au Royaume-Uni: une priorité, beaucoup d'inquiétudes/Europeans in the United Kingdom: a priority, a lot of concern

Some also accuse European immigrants of having contributed to lowering wages. But according to Jonathan Wadsworth, author of a report on the subject for the London School of Economics, "All studies show that immigration has no impact on the level of wages or in a very marginal way".

See Also:

Lemainelibre.fr (France)

Les Européens au Royaume-Uni: une priorité, beaucoup d'inquiétudes/Europeans in the United Kingdom: a priority, a lot of concern

 

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf


Related Links:
Journal Dunet (France) - Les Européens au Royaume-Uni: une priorité, beaucoup d'inquiétudes/Europeans in the United Kingdom: a priority, a lot of concern

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 17/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mdz

¡Que vienen los robots!/The robots are coming!

Of made, in one of the pioneers on the subject drawn up by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels in 2015 and in which analyzed data from 17 countries advanced from 1993 to 2007, found that, as seen in the following image, there were more increased the "density of Robotics" (i.e., the number of robots per million hours worked) increased to a greater extent both the labor productivity and value added per worker. Also the total productivity factor (TFP), as well as media workers wages did.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015


Related Links:
Mdz - ¡Que vienen los robots!/The robots are coming!

Flooded Cities

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 16/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

QJE Highly Cited Articles

The Quarterly Journal of Economics received an Impact Factor of 6.662 and a 5-year Impact Factor of 9.681, according to the most recent Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

The Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past two years have been cited in the JCR year. The Impact Factor is calculated by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the two previous years. The five-year Impact Factor is calculated in the same way as the standard Impact Factor, except the standard two-year window for inclusion of articles is extended to five years.

OUP has granted free access to five highly cited articles from The Quarterly Journal of Economics for a limited time. These articles are just a sample of the impressive body of research from The Quarterly Journal of Economics that contributes to the Impact Factor.

Highly Cited Articles published in 2016

‘Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty’, Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, and Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics 131 (4): 1593-1636

https://academic.oup.com/qje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/qje/qjw024

doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/qje/qjw024


Related Links:
QJE Highly Cited Articles - The Quarterly Journal of Economics received an Impact Factor of 6.662 and a 5-year Impact Factor of 9.681, according to the most recent Journal Citation Reports® (Thomson Reuters).

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 16/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP and latest Impact Factors

Economics Impact Factors

The latest Impact Factors have now been released and it has been a great year for Oxford University Press’s economics journals. To celebrate this success we have collated a collection of highly cited articles from a selection of our journals. This collection is freely available to be read online until the 31st December 2017.

The Quarterly Journal of Economics – 6.662

See:

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts, Zhichun Jenny Ying

 

Related publications

‘Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment’, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1194.pdf

 

The Review of Economic Studies – 4.030

See:

The Impact of Competition on Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals  Nicholas Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler, John Van Reenen

 

Related publications

‘The Impact of Competition on Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals’, Nicholas Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.983, November 2014

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp0983.pdf

 

Journal of the European Economic Association – 2.758

See:

Unemployed but Optimistic: Optimal Insurance Design with Biased Beliefs Johannes Spinnewijn

 


Related Links:
CEP and latest Impact Factors - Economics Impact Factors

Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage

Johannes Spinnewijn webpage



News Posted: 16/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP reports

‘EU referendum: One year on'. Report from The UK in a Changing Europe and the Political Studies Association, June 2017

‘EU referendum: One year on’. Report from The UK in a Changing Europe and the Political Studies Association, June 2017

Articles within the report:

‘Trade and the Single Market’, Thomas Sampson, EU referendum: One year on, pp.32-33

‘UK economic policy’, Swati Dhingra, EU referendum: One year on, pp.36-37


Related Links:
CEP reports - ‘EU referendum: One year on'. Report from The UK in a Changing Europe and the Political Studies Association, June 2017

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 16/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Politikon (Spain)

¡Que vienen los robots!/The robots are coming!

In fact, in one of the pioneering works on the topic developed by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels in 2015 and analyzing data from 17 advanced countries from 1993 to 2007, find that, as seen in the following image, where more increased "robotic density" (ie, the number of robots per million hours worked) Increased both labour productivity and added value per worker. So did the total productivity of the factors (TFP), as well as the average salaries of the workers. This increasingly accused use of robots leads them to estimate that the robotization has contributed more than one tenth to the added growth during those 15 years, a negligible figure.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015


Related Links:
Politikon (Spain) - ¡Que vienen los robots!/The robots are coming!

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 16/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Politikon (Spain)

¡Que vienen los robots!/The robots are coming!

In fact, in one of the pioneering works on the topic developed by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels in 2015 and analyzing data from 17 advanced countries from 1993 to 2007, find that, as seen in the following image, where more increased "robotic density" (ie, the number of robots per million hours worked) Increased both labour productivity and added value per worker

 

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015

/


Related Links:
Politikon (Spain) - ¡Que vienen los robots!/The robots are coming!

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 16/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Korea Herald

How Macron keeps winning

By Philippe Aghion and Benedicte Berner 

Emmanuel Macron’s one-man revolution in French and European politics continued this weekend, as he will soon be able to add a huge parliamentary majority to his cause, if the results from the first round of the French parliamentary election hold. Such an outcome appears to be very likely...


Related Links:
Korea Herald - How Macron keeps winning

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 15/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Brexit exacts a heavy toll on UK business schools

France and Spain sense an opportunity as top professors seek employment outside Britain

Luis Garicano arrived in the UK a decade ago to take up the role of professor of economics and strategy in the department for management at the London School of Economics. Today, he is preparing to return home to Spain, where he will join Madrid’s IE Business School as a member of faculty and to lead its newly created centre for the digital economy. “Spain is open to business and open to foreigners in a way the UK no longer is,” he says. “There is no anti-immigrant party in Spain.” One year after UK voters decided by referendum to leave the EU, business schools find their academics are quitting to work in other European countries.


Related Links:
Financial Times - Brexit exacts a heavy toll on UK business schools

CEP Growth

Luis Garicano webpage



News Posted: 15/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

UniteWorks – Unite the Union

Unite warns of deepening Tory ‘wage pain' as average wages continue to fall

Theresa May and the Tories’ ‘wage pain’ is leaving millions of people struggling to make ends meet warned Britain’s largest union, Unite as official figures out today (Wednesday 14 June) showed a deepening wage squeeze. Official labour market figures out today showed that average earnings, excluding bonuses, fell in real terms by 0.6 per cent compared to a year earlier. The figures follow an analysis by the London School of Economics of OECD data showing the UK had suffered the biggest drop in average wages between 2007 and 2015 of any developed country except austerity-ravaged Greece.

Related publications

‘Real wages and living standards in the UK’. Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 036, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf


Related Links:
UniteWorks – Unite the Union - Unite warns of deepening Tory ‘wage pain' as average wages continue to fall

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 14/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business 2 Community

Why Are Monopolies Bad? An Analysis of 6 Rise-and-Fall Companies

According to Professor Jeremiah Dittmar of the London School of Economics, writing in 2011, European cities which adopted the printing press experienced 60% higher economic growth than those which didn’t buy into the technology from 1450 to 1600. Ironically, in the context of this article, the printing press itself was monopolistic as the knowledge of materials was quasi-proprietary:

Related publications

‘Information Technology and Economic Change: The Impact of The Printing Press’, Jeremiah Dittmar, The Quarterly Journal of Economics (2011) 126 (3): 1133-1172

http://bit.ly/2rv5Ks0

 

Related article

‘Information technology and economic change: the impact of the printing press’, Jeremiah Dittmar, Vox article, 11 February 2011

http://voxeu.org/article/information-technology-and-economic-change-impact-printing-press


Related Links:
Business 2 Community - Why Are Monopolies Bad? An Analysis of 6 Rise-and-Fall Companies

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Jeremiah Dittmar webpage



News Posted: 14/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The i Paper

How many young people actually turned out to vote?

Snippet: ... Analysis from the London School of Economics shows that constituents with more young voters experienced marked increases in turnout compared to the 2015 election. Similar analysis has shown that the change in turnout this election is related to  areas with high numbers of graduates.

Related article

‘Who swung GE2017: young voters turning out, or older voters not?’, Thiemo Fetzer, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, June 11, 2017

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/who-swung-ge2017/?utm_content=buffer65f4e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer


Related Links:
The i Paper - How many young people actually turned out to vote?

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Thiemo Fetzer webpage



News Posted: 14/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Project Syndicate

How Macron keeps winning

Article by Philippe Aghion and Benedicte Berner

Emmanuel Macron’s one-man revolution in French and European politics continued this weekend, as he will soon be able to add a huge parliamentary majority to his cause, if the results from the first round of the French parliamentary election hold. Such an outcome appears to be very likely. Eliminating the old “right-left” divide in French politics by uniting “reformists” of the left, the right, and the center, was the challenge that Macron set for himself when he created his En Marche! movement in April 2016 as part of his bid for the French presidency. The result of the first round of elections to the National Assembly is the clearest indication yet of how successful Macron has been in recasting French politics.


Related Links:
Project Syndicate - How Macron keeps winning

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 13/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Express (India)

UK election result 2017: With Theresa May dependent on DUP, Brexit negotiations become more difficult

But this election turned out to be much more than Brexit. “Economics is as much about humanity as policy”. Professor Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, in her article Salvaging Brexit, had written about the “long years of economic neglect”, leading to the disaffection and disillusion of large swathes of the UK population. Successful Brexit negotiations or not, by the time of the vote, the sustained cuts in healthcare, education and other social sectors – in real terms – had assumed larger dimensions.

Related article

‘Salvaging Brexit: The right way to leave the EU’. Article by Swati Dhingra, Foreign Affairs, November/December 2016 issue

https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-kingdom/salvaging-brexit


Related Links:
Financial Express (India) - UK election result 2017: With Theresa May dependent on DUP, Brexit negotiations become more difficult

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 13/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Voz de Cádiz – Economia

El Banco Popular tuvo que pedir el rescate bancario en el año 2012

Interview with Luis Garicano, head of citizen economy

The same day he participates in a conference on the impact of Brexit at the Rafael del Pino Foundation, Luis Garicano (Valladolid, 1967) announces his personal Brexit: The professor at the London School of Economics will change from London to Madrid and join the IE Business School next year. "No one has left the United Kingdom because of Brexit, but it does contribute to this: the environment is less enjoyable for a foreigner," he describes.


Related Links:
La Voz de Cádiz – Economia - El Banco Popular tuvo que pedir el rescate bancario en el año 2012

CEP Growth

Luis Garicano webpage



News Posted: 11/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Who swung GE2017: young voters turning out, or older voters not?

Article by Thiemo Fetzer

That the Labour party got 40% of the vote – against all odds – is being attributed to a higher turnout among young voters. Thiemo Fetzer‘s analysis finds that older voters did not turn up to vote, relative to younger voters. He also finds that in many places, the older vote was split between the two main parties, possibly due to the controversial social care provisions in the Conservative manifesto.


Related Links:
LSE British Politics and Policy blog - Who swung GE2017: young voters turning out, or older voters not?

CEP Growth

Thiemo Fetzer webpage



News Posted: 11/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Universal (Spain)

Europeos en Reino Unido tienen una prioridad y muchas inquietudes

Brexit supporters replicate that immigrants ' additional pressure on housing, schools and hospitals is not considered. Another recurring argument is that immigrants lower wages, a thesis that resists analyses. "All studies show that immigration has no impact on the salary level, or has it in a very marginal way," insisted Jonathan Wadsworth, author of a study on this topic for the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
El Universal (Spain) - Europeos en Reino Unido tienen una prioridad y muchas inquietudes

Immigration and the UK Economy

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 11/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

dziennik.pl (Poland)

Bukowski I Novokmet: Bogaci stali sie jeszcze bogatsi. Udato nam sie dogonic Niemcy. Niestety


Related Links:
dziennik.pl (Poland) - Bukowski I Novokmet: Bogaci stali sie jeszcze bogatsi. Udato nam sie dogonic Niemcy. Niestety

CEP Labour Markets

Pawel Bukowski webpage



News Posted: 10/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Geschichte der Gegenwart (Germany)

May will Regierung bilden – Brexit-Verhandlungen ab 19. Juni

In total, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain part of the EU’s common market.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
Geschichte der Gegenwart (Germany) - May will Regierung bilden – Brexit-Verhandlungen ab 19. Juni

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Gill Wyness webpage

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 10/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

It's not that London is too big, but that other large UK cities are too small

Article by Henry Overman

The elections are barely behind us now, and we should keep asking the question, ‘What are the economic forces polarising the UK?’ A big part of the story concerns the geographical concentration of economic activity in London (and the South East). Is this concentration good for those who live or work in London but bad for those who don’t? Is the attraction of London creating an economy that is distinct from the rest of the UK? And what are the implications?

Related publications

The UK’s Regional Divide: Can Policy Make a Difference?’, Henry Overman, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA042, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea042.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - It's not that London is too big, but that other large UK cities are too small

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 09/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Finance

What does a hung parliament mean for Brexit and the economy?

Snippet: ...ana. “Without a strong mandate, Europe can ignore the UK’s demands. Even the UK’s threat to pull out of negotiations will now appear hollow and lacking the support of the British public.” But Dr Thomas Sampson, from the London School of Economics and an expert on Brexit…


Related Links:
Yahoo! Finance - What does a hung parliament mean for Brexit and the economy?

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 09/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Express (online)

‘We need your tourists!' Spanish fear bad Brexit deal for UK will damage THEIR future

Luis Garicano, a professor of Economics and Strategy in London, said he feared a lack of British tourists would hugely impact Spain's economy. Speaking at a Brexit conference in Spain, the professor said there was no going back on the UK’s decision to leave the EU and a ‘hard’ Brexit was likely. He added middle classes in Britain had felt “threatened” by globalisation and technology and Brexiteer politicians had taken advantage of their mood.


Related Links:
Express (online) - ‘We need your tourists!' Spanish fear bad Brexit deal for UK will damage THEIR future

CEP Growth

Luis Garicano webpage



News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Frankfurter Rundschau (Germany)

Die schlechteste Variante

A year ago, in June 2016, the British voted on their country's EU membership. Economists and financial markets were in bright turmoil and warned of the consequences of a Brexit. Today, twelve months later, the markets are no longer afraid of the Brexit. They fear for him. Only two years are left to the EU and the United Kingdom to agree on the conditions of the withdrawal. And with each passing day there is a growing likelihood that the horror scenario will occur: there is no agreement, no deal--"for the British economy, this would be the worst of all results," warns the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

                                         


Related Links:
Frankfurter Rundschau (Germany) - Die schlechteste Variante

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Trade

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage



News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Berliner Zeitung (Germany)

Horrorszenario „No Deal': Keine Brexit-Einigung wäre für die britische Wirtschaft fatal/Horror scenario „No Deal' no Brexit agreement would be fatal for the British economy

erall, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain in spite of Brexit part of the EU's common market. This, too, would incur costs, but in the case of a no-deal scenario, these costs would double. The British trade with the EU would break by 40 percent over the next ten years. The overall effect amounted to just under three percent of British per capita income. Every household on the island would cost about 1 900 pounds.

Also in:

Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger

Furcht vor dem Desaster; BREXIT Großbritannien droht eine schwere Rezession, wenn es keine Einigung mit der EU gibt

In total, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain in spite of Brexit part of the EU's common market. This, too, would incur costs, but in the case of a no-deal scenario, these costs would double. The British trade with the EU would break by 40 percent over the next ten years. The overall effect amounted to just under three percent of British per capita income. Every household on the island would cost about 1900 pounds.

http://www.ksta.de/wirtschaft/brexit-furcht-vor-dem-desaster-27764024

 

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

                                         

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp


Related Links:
Berliner Zeitung (Germany) - Horrorszenario „No Deal': Keine Brexit-Einigung wäre für die britische Wirtschaft fatal/Horror scenario „No Deal' no Brexit agreement would be fatal for the British economy

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Gill Wyness webpage

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Professional Adviser

The evidence for Brexit and other key election issues - LSE

The London School of Economics (LSE) has published a report assessing all of the party manifestos and how respective policies will affect key voter issues.

Intended to be "objective, brief and non-technical", the report by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance looks at the evidence on the most-talked-about policies, including education, health, immigration, industrial strategy, living standards, regional policy and Brexit.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

 Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

                                        


Related Links:
Professional Adviser - The evidence for Brexit and other key election issues - LSE

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Gill Wyness webpage

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Booth Review

Why top-down companies can underperform their peers

“Just as the US military has become more decentralized, letting soldiers on the ground in Afghanistan and Iraq make more decisions than they would have in Korea or in Vietnam, so are the best firms decentralizing in times of economic conflict,” says Stanford’s Nicholas Bloom, who conducted the research with College of France’s Philippe Aghion, Stanford PhD candidate Brian Lucking, Harvard’s Raffaella Sadun, and MIT’s John Van Reenen.


Related Links:
Chicago Booth Review - Why top-down companies can underperform their peers

Turbulence, Firm Decentralization and Growth in Bad Times

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage

Raffaella Sadun webpage

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 07/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The National (Scotland)

Letters: BBC debates reveal how little they've progressed

SOME time ago Paxman's questions to Mrs May exposed effectively how ineffective she had been at the Home Office in dealing with immigration. She could not explain how Conservative policy has completely failed in this area (even to reduce non-European immigrants). So I will explore the possible causes. As we have near full employment one must agree with Jonathan Wadsworth at London School of Economics that there is no statistical impact of immigrants on wages of UK workers. Scottish farmers have claimed that they can't get local workers for seasonal work, so need immigrants, and in Scotland EU nationals make up 3.4 per cent of the population but 4.5 per cent of the workforce. So they are vital and skilled workers. Now if industry (having benefited from five years of corporation tax concessions) is simply not training local workers then it's necessary for the Government to tax industry and spend major sums of money on training. And if years of austerity have not created a mood of business confidence in the UK (but instead has reduced consumer purchasing power) then perhaps the economy needs government stimulus to take us through the uncertainty which our changing trade relationship with Europe and other countries will create. Unless government spends a lot of money on skills training and infrastructure it is most unlikely that we will not see significant falls in immigration. So in five years time Mrs May will be facing the same questions from Paxman with the same lack of answers. Andrew Vass, Edinburgh

Related publications

‘Immigration and the UK Economy’, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 039, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf

‘Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.5, May 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit05.pdf

 


Related Links:
The National (Scotland) - Letters: BBC debates reveal how little they've progressed

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 07/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Economic Journal, Volume 127, Issue 602, June 2017

‘Adjusting Your Dreams? High School Plans and Dropout Behaviour'

Dominique Goux, Marc Gurgand and Eric Maurin

 

Related publications

‘in brief… What can be done to help low-Achieving teenagers?’ Dominique Goux, Marc Gurgand and Eric Maurin.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp499.pdf


Related Links:
Economic Journal, Volume 127, Issue 602, June 2017 - ‘Adjusting Your Dreams? High School Plans and Dropout Behaviour'

CEP Education and Skills

Eric Maurin webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Reason.com – July 2017 issue

Are robots going to steal our jobs?

In 2015, economists Georg Graetz of Uppsala University and Guy Michaels of the London School of Economics analyzed the effects of industrial robots on employment in 17 different countries between 1993 and 2007. In contrast to the Acemoglu and Restrepo study, "We find a negative effect of robots on low-skilled workers' employment," says Michaels in an interview, "but no significant effect on overall employment." Their study also found that the increases in the number of robots boosted annual economic growth by 0.37 percent.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs’, Georg Graetz, Guy Michaels, Article in CentrePiece  Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015


Related Links:
Reason.com – July 2017 issue - Are robots going to steal our jobs?

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Guy Michaels webpage

Georg Graetz webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

CityWire

Crazy in ETF love? New study imagines bottling star quality

A new paper – by David Dorn of the University of Zurich, Lawrence Katz of Harvard University, and David Autor, Christina Patterson, and John Van Reenen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – offers an alternative way to define what they term ‘superstar’ companies. Their research is primarily concerned with labour’s falling share of GDP, which they argue can in part be attributed to these businesses.


Related Links:
CityWire - Crazy in ETF love? New study imagines bottling star quality

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Manifesto economics

For the first time in years, UK voters have a real choice between economic models

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has published a series of election analyses, looking at wages and living standards, health and social care, education and skills, and inequality between UK regions.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

 

Related links

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

 


Related Links:
Financial Times - Manifesto economics

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The UK in a changing Europe

The manifestos uncovered: trade

Article by Swati Dhingra

Unlike some other countries – the US and France spring to mind – trade has not been a major issue in recent UK elections. This reflected both EU membership and a broad political consensus that, within the EU, the UK should argue for a relatively liberal approach. Brexit, however, will mean the most fundamental reorientation of UK trade policy in forty years, so it not surprising that it is much more prominent in manifestos for this election. The Liberal Democrats would stay in the single market and the customs union. Free movement of goods, services, capital and people would continue, and trade policy would still be set at the EU level. The loss of market access that would follow from leaving the EU would be minimized. Labour are less specific, to the point of inconsistency – they retain the option of being in the single market and the customs union, but also say that Brexit will mean an end to free movement, which is inconsistent with single market membership. The Conservatives’ plans are rather more detailed. Immigration controls are central to their Brexit plan, which means that we will leave the single market, while the aspiration to do new trade deals with countries outside the EU means leaving the customs union. Together, this means a “hard Brexit”. If there is no new deal with the EU after the two-year period – the hardest possible Brexit – the UK would revert to World Trade Organization rules.

Related publications

‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra, Thomas Sampson,  CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No.40, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

‘The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards’,  CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco  Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards’,  Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and  John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016


Related Links:
The UK in a changing Europe - The manifestos uncovered: trade

The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU: Trade Effects

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Socialist Worker

Migrant works say – ‘Don't blame us for low pay'

The London School of Economics’ (LSE) Centre for Economic Performance last year found that “the areas of the UK with large increases in EU immigration did not suffer greater falls in the jobs and pay of UK-born workers.”

Related publications

‘Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.5, May 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit05.pdf


Related Links:
Socialist Worker - Migrant works say – ‘Don't blame us for low pay'

CEP Labour Markets CEP Growth CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

John Van reenen webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Advertiser (Adelaide, Australia)

John Newton: Labour set to remain tarnished an divided while newly enthroned May will be mistress of all she surveys

Mrs May still seems to suggest that immigration should be kept under 100,000 a year while being just about the only person in the country who thinks that number should include students. Damage to university numbers is inevitable. Student admission rates are already lower this year. Her incapacity to deliver on such a KPI when Home Secretary adds the accusation of incompetence to that of pigheadedness. And is this a wise policy anyway? Recent research suggests that hitting a target of 100,000 will mean a fiscal deficit 30 per cent higher by 2066. Immigrants are regularly proven to add value and are not the burden on the state that many believe them to be. A recent report from the Centre for Economic Performance correlates the drop in immigrant numbers to falls, not rises, in living standards.

 

Related publications

‘Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.5, May 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit05.pdf


Related Links:
The Advertiser (Adelaide, Australia) - John Newton: Labour set to remain tarnished an divided while newly enthroned May will be mistress of all she surveys

CEP Labour Markets CEP Growth CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

John Van reenen webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Economic Policy Digest – June 2017

Education and deprivation explain the Brexit vote better than immigration

Demography and education are a much better explanation of the ‘Leave’ vote in the June 2016 Brexit referendum than the decline in public services or recent immigration. These are the conclusions of Sascha O. Becker, Thiemo Fetzer and Dennis Novy in their paper Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis. … It might be assumed that the 48% of people who voted to remain in the EU last June, and many of the 52% who voted to Leave, would prefer a ‘soft Brexit’ instead.  In this case the UK would follow the example of a country like Norway, which is outside the EU but inside the Single Market. If they got their wish, this would halve the fall in income to about 1.3%. But whether Brexit is hard or soft, Britain will be worse off. The authors of the paper – Swati Dhingra, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, João Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen – from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and MIT, found that for both extreme versions of Brexit, as well as many in between cases that they costed, reductions in budget payment to Brussels will be easily outweighed by the costs of reduced trade with the EU, which accounts for about half of all British trade.


Related Links:
Economic Policy Digest – June 2017 - Education and deprivation explain the Brexit vote better than immigration

Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis

The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU: Trade Effects

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

John Van reenen webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Thiemo Fetzer webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Woman's Hour: Emily Thornberry ‘Finds brief in handbag' after last-minute appearance in place of ‘unwell' Diane Abbot

Woman’s Hour: Emily Thornberry ‘Finds brief in handbag’ after last-minute appearance in place of ‘unwell’ Diane Abbot

Rudd also claimed that cutting numbers of police officers since 2010 has led to a reduction in crime. The Centre for Economic Performance has suggested a reduction in crime may be due to both improved productivity within the police and fewer people turning to crime in the first place


Related Links:
Huffington Post - Woman's Hour: Emily Thornberry ‘Finds brief in handbag' after last-minute appearance in place of ‘unwell' Diane Abbot

Fighting Crime: Can the Police do more with less?

CEP Labour Markets

Brian Bell webpage



News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Economics and policy in the age of Trump

This collection of 18 essays by leading economists highlights many of the most pressing domestic and international economic policy issues on the Trump docket.  Many chapters are sharply critical of the Trump administration’s new approach.

Part III: International Policy Reform: Trade policy and trade agreements

18 What next for US-Europe trade policy?

Nikhil Datta and Swati Dhingra

 

Related publications : ‘What next for US-Europe trade policy?’, Nikhil Datta and Swati Dhingra, Economics and Policy in the Age of Trump, Chad Brown (Editor), e-book by VoxEU, June 2017


Related Links:
Vox - Economics and policy in the age of Trump

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Nikhil Datta webpage



News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review (Brazil)

As corporações na era da desigualdade

Article by Nicholas Bloom

Translating the economic principles into common language is the passion of Nicholas Bloom, who describes his work as "bar economics" or "concepts that I can explain to my friends drinking beer in London". Here he resumes the common mistaken interpretations on inequality of income and proposes a new way to think the problem. Quoting the Brexit in the United Kingdom, the United States presidential election, the five-Star Movement in Italy and the revival of Marine Le Pen in France, bloom opines on income inequality: "It's not just a huge social issue, but she's now running global politics." After completing his Ph.D. at University College London — his thesis was on the economic impact of political uncertainty —, Bloom accepted a job at Stanford and began translating his interests into management in an academic research agenda. Working with colleagues from Harvard Business School and the London School of Economics, he collected data on the management and financial performance practices of 100000 organizations from 35 countries. In the article "The management really works?", with Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, he showed empirical evidence that good management has a great impact on the economy.


Related Links:
Harvard Business Review (Brazil) - As corporações na era da desigualdade





News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

RT (Russia)

British wages in free fall, only crisis-hit Greece is worse in OECD

According to a London School of Economics (LSE) paper, Brits were the worst off when it came to their real wages, with pay falling by more than five percent between 2007 and 2015.

Researchers for the prestigious British university also found that all types of British earners, with the exception of pensioners and minimum wage workers, were no better off today than they were in 2008.


Related Links:
RT (Russia) - British wages in free fall, only crisis-hit Greece is worse in OECD

Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider UK

Sovereign wealth funds are shunning British investments after Brexit

The LSE's Centre for Economic Performance said that returning to World Trade Organization rules would reduce the UK's trade with the EU by 40% over 10 years.

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf


Related Links:
Business Insider UK - Sovereign wealth funds are shunning British investments after Brexit

Brexit and the UK Economy

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Parents reduced to crowdfunding for whiteboards due to education cuts

Following years of government budget cuts, parents are now turning to crowdfunding websites in order to provide basic school supplies. Appeals have been launched on websites including Justgiving.com for online donations towards items such as whiteboards and computers, as well as to pay for crossing attendents. … Prime Minister has echoed this claim several times, stating in an interview with Andrew Marr: “The level of funding going into schools is at record level.”  However, Professor Sandra McNally from the School of Economics, University of Surrey, published an article​ fact-checking this “highest level on record” claim.  She explains that only the “per pupil expenditure” (the amount spent on each pupil) is relevant, rather than the total amount of money available. According to Professor McNally, current spending per pupil was “largely frozen in real terms” between 2010 and 2016.  And as onward spending is frozen in cash terms, this will likely lead to a “real terms reduction of around 6.5 per cent by 2019-2020”.

Related links

Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=mcnally


Related Links:
Independent - Parents reduced to crowdfunding for whiteboards due to education cuts

CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Cinquantamila.it

Londra vota Brexit. Morbida o estrema saremo comunque più poveri

Brexit In fact is a trauma that breaks the vertical chain of production of the value that ties the United Kingdom to the EU, with consequences not apparent immediately. Quantifying these costs is therefore a difficult exercise, but we have tried S. Dhingra, H. Huang, G. Ottaviano, J.P. Pessoa, T. Sampson and J. Van Reenen in the article "the costs and benefits of leaving the EU: trade Effects", forthcoming in the magazine. … The British voters who chose leave, contrary to appearances, seem to know that their problem is not immigration. The analysis of the vote at the last June referendum by S. Becker, T. Fetzer and D. Novy in the article "who voted for Brexit: a comprehensive district-level analysis" (also being published in the economic policy), confirms this conclusion.


Related Links:
Cinquantamila.it - Londra vota Brexit. Morbida o estrema saremo comunque più poveri

Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis

The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU: Trade Effects

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thiemo Fetzer webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

The chart that shows UK workers have had the worst wage performance in the OECD except Greece

The UK has suffered the biggest drop in average real wages of any OECD country except depression-wracked Greece, according to a pre-general election analysis published by the London School of Economics.

The LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) uses OECD data to show that average wages for British workers, when adjusted for inflation, fell by more than 5 per cent between 2007 and 2015..

Related publications

'Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK', Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, CEP Election Analysis Paper No' CEPEA036: , May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf

'The Return of Falling Real Wages' David Blanchflower, Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, CEP report, May 2017 

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/rwu006.pdf

 


Related Links:
Independent - The chart that shows UK workers have had the worst wage performance in the OECD except Greece

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Herald (Scotland)

Anton Muscatelli: Immigrationisn't making us poorer – but scaremongering about it might

Firstly, there is simply no evidence that EU immigration has impacted negatively on the living standards of UK workers. A new study by the London School of Economics (LSE) has shown that there is no apparent link between changes in the real wages of UK nationals and changes in immigration – wages of UK-born workers changed at much the same rate in areas with high immigration as in areas with a low change in immigration.


Related Links:
Sunday Herald (Scotland) - Anton Muscatelli: Immigrationisn't making us poorer – but scaremongering about it might

Immigration and the UK Economy

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 04/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Election uncertainties to be followed by many more

The election uncertainty will give way to new uncertainties. Two new reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics highlight some of the dangers. On immigration, the CEP concludes that cutting it significantly will result in a lowering of living standards for the UK-born population, with the extent of the fall depending on the extent of the drop in net migration. The May target of “tens of thousands” will leave us all poorer. The report, on the CEP website, is a good mythbuster. Areas of high EU immigration have not seen UK-born workers displaced or suffered from weaker wage growth. The route to reduced living standards is partly via the fact that migrant workers pay more in taxes than they take out in welfare and use of public services. The CEP’s other report looks at something that really worries businesses — the prime minister’s “no deal is better than a bad deal” rhetoric. CEP economists Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, using what they describe as a state-of-the-art trade model based on comprehensive data, say that leaving the EU without a deal would result in a 40% drop in exports to the EU over 10 years and a 3% fall in GDP per capita. Add in dynamic effects and the medium-term economic effects could be double those arising from the model, the authors say.


Related Links:
The Times - Election uncertainties to be followed by many more

Brexit and the UK Economy

Immigration and the UK Economy

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 04/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Evening Chronicle

The North should become a ‘free trade zone' to create jobs and bring in cash, think tank says

The need to give the North a boost was highlighted by a new study by the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the London School of Economics, which said the Government’s Northern Powerhouse project had produced uneven results, with Manchester benefitting more than other parts of the North. Professor Henry Overman, co-author of the report, said: “The manifestos of the main parties the 2017 election campaign reflect the continuing urge that politicians feel to try to do something about the UK’s regional divide without any real understanding of what drives the differences in performance or what policies might be effective.”


Related Links:
Evening Chronicle - The North should become a ‘free trade zone' to create jobs and bring in cash, think tank says

The UK's Regional Divide: Can Policy Make a Difference

CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 03/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Britain's election offers little respite for its woes

Most independent experts predict long-term harm as well. According to the most recent estimates from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, a hard Brexit would reduce GDP per head by 2.6% over ten years, while a softer Swiss- or Norwegian-style Brexit would cut it by 1.3%...

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

CEP BREXIT Analysis: ‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. March 2016. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/


Related Links:
The Economist - Britain's election offers little respite for its woes

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 03/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Economic Voice

Green Party: We will stand up for free movement

A recent study by the London School of Economics has blown apart a number of key myths around migration, saying: “Immigrants pay more in taxes than they take out in welfare and use of public services. UK-born individuals, on average, take out more in welfare and benefits than they pay in taxes. So immigrants help to reduce the budget deficit. There is little evidence that immigrants have negative effects on crime, education, health or social housing.”


Related Links:
The Economic Voice - Green Party: We will stand up for free movement

Immigration and the UK Economy

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 02/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Economist – free exchange blog

Europe inches closer to a plan for fixing its financial flaws

Article by Luis Garicano

DONALD TRUMP and Theresa May may have done more to push Europeans together, and open up an opportunity for reform of its institutions, than any pro-European American president or British prime minister could ever have dreamt. The Commission’s “Reflection paper on the deepening of the Economic and Monetary Union”, issued on May 31st, points the way towards a package deal that could be acceptable to Northern and Southern euro area countries. But some key elements are still missing. Encouragingly, the Commission sets out a tight calendar for completing the banking union, with the creation of a common deposit insurance scheme and a common backstop for the European Resolution fund intended to be in place by 2019.


Related Links:
The Economist – free exchange blog - Europe inches closer to a plan for fixing its financial flaws

CEP Growth

Luis Garicano webpage



News Posted: 02/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Brexit blog

Brexit has already started to make UK citizens poorer

Leaving the European Union with no deal in place for future trading arrangements would be the worst-case Brexit scenario for the UK economy. What’s more, just because GDP growth has not declined since last year’s referendum, it would be wrong to think that Brexit is yet to have any economic effects: it has already lowered UK living standards by causing the value of the pound to decline, which has led to higher inflation and lower real wage growth. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) authored by Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson.


Related Links:
LSE Brexit blog - Brexit has already started to make UK citizens poorer

Brexit and the UK Economy

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 02/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

ITV News

Theresa May reveals risky migration target timescale

So the prime minister may have to choose between risking the economy (immigrants keep living standards up and the deficit down according to the London School of Economics) or missing her target.


Related Links:
ITV News - Theresa May reveals risky migration target timescale

Brexit and the UK Economy

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

True Viral News

Brexit makes people poorer with more pain on the way, warns study

BREXIT has already started to make UK citizens poorer and more pain is likely in the months and years to come, a new study has warned. Although last year’s vote to quit the European Union has had “no obvious effect” on GDP growth, the collapse in the value of the pound – down 13 per cent against the US dollar and nine per cent against the euro by the end of April – has fuelled a surge in inflation from 0.5 per cent to 2.7 per cent and a fall in real wage growth from 1.3 per cent to minus 0.5 per cent, the report from the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance found.


Related Links:
True Viral News - Brexit makes people poorer with more pain on the way, warns study

Brexit and the UK Economy

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Herald Scotland

Brexit makes people poorer with more pain on the way, warns study

Although last year’s vote to quit the European Union has had “no obvious effect” on GDP growth, the collapse in the value of the pound – down 13 per cent against the US dollar and nine per cent against the euro by the end of April – has fuelled a surge in inflation from 0.5 per cent to 2.7 per cent and a fall in real wage growth from 1.3 per cent to minus 0.5 per cent, the report from the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance found….

Co-author Thomas Sampson said Labour and the Conservatives plans to “take back control” rather than making Brexit work for the UK economy would “inevitably” be bad for living standards…

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

CEP BREXIT Analysis: ‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. March 2016. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp


Related Links:
Herald Scotland - Brexit makes people poorer with more pain on the way, warns study

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider UK

LSE: Failure to get a Brexit trade deal will cost every household at least £1,890 a year

A report by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance said that returning to World Trade Organization rules would reduce the UK's trade with the EU by 40% over 10 years…Report authors Swati Dinghra and Thomas Sampson write: "While it is a tautology that a sufficiently bad deal must be worse than no-deal, in practice the no-deal outcome, where the UK and EU trade under WTO terms, is the worst-case scenario for the UK economy. The economic costs of Brexit would be twice as large in the no-deal case than if the UK remains in the Single Market."

 


Related Links:
Business Insider UK - LSE: Failure to get a Brexit trade deal will cost every household at least £1,890 a year

Brexit and the UK Economy

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

AOL.UK

UK citizens already poorer as a result of Brexit, study finds

Although last year's vote to quit the EU has had "no obvious effect" on GDP growth, the collapse in the value of the pound - down 13% against the US dollar and 9% against the euro by the end of last month - has fuelled a surge in inflation from 0.5% to 2.7% and a fall in real wage growth from 1.3% to minus-0.5%, the report from the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance found.


Related Links:
AOL.UK - UK citizens already poorer as a result of Brexit, study finds

Brexit and the UK Economy

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

Theresa May's 'no deal' Brexit would cost each family £1,890, experts warn

Although last year's vote to quit the EU has had "no obvious effect" on GDP growth, the collapse in the value of the pound - down 13% against the US dollar and 9% against the euro by the end of last month - has fuelled a surge in inflation from 0.5% to 2.7% and a fall in real wage growth from 1.3% to minus-0.5%, the report from the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance found.

Co-author Thomas Sampson said: "Prime Minister May's decision to leave the single market was not an inevitable consequence of the referendum and will increase the economic costs of Brexit.

Related publications

'Brexit and the UK Economy', Swati Dhingra, Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analysis Paper No. 40. May 2017.

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

 

 

 


Related Links:
Mirror - Theresa May's 'no deal' Brexit would cost each family £1,890, experts warn

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

National Affairs - Findings

Getting the job done

Includes in the roundup: ‘Is Modern Technology Responsible for Jobless Recoveries?’, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, American Economic Review, May 2017

Abstract:  Since the early 1990s, recoveries from recessions in the US have been plagued by weak employment growth. We investigate whether a similar problem afflicts other developed economies, and whether technology is a culprit. We study recoveries from 71 recessions in 28 industries and 17 countries from 1970-2011. We find that though GDP recovered more slowly after recent recessions, employment did not. Industries that used more routine tasks, and those more exposed to robotization, did not recently experience slower employment recoveries. Finally, middle-skill employment did not recover more slowly after recent recessions, and this pattern was no different in routine-intensive industries.

Related publications

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries? Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece 22 (1) Spring 2017


Related Links:
National Affairs - Findings - Getting the job done

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries?

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Germany's declining respect for the UK

Further reading

Brexit and the UK Economy There are many ways to leave and the referendum did not allow voters to choose between them — Brexit does not simply mean Brexit. (LSE Centre for Economic Performance)

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

CEP BREXIT Analysis: ‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. March 2016. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp


Related Links:
Financial Times - Germany's declining respect for the UK

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News online

Brexit Bulletin: The Ghost at the Debate

May’s insistence that “no deal is better than a bad deal” is wrong, according to a report by the Centre for Economic Performance….

“In practice the no-deal outcome, where the U.K. and EU trade under WTO terms, is the worst-case scenario for the U.K. economy,” CEP economists Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson said in the report.

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

CEP BREXIT Analysis: ‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. March 2016. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp


Related Links:
Bloomberg News online - Brexit Bulletin: The Ghost at the Debate

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News

No Brexit Deal ‘Worst-Case Scenario' for U.K. Economy, CEP Says

According to the Centre for Economic Performance, leaving the European Union with no pact in place would have twice the negative economic impact as remaining in the single market. That’s at odds with Prime Minister Theresa May’s repeated assertion that “no deal is better than a bad deal.”

“While it is a tautology that a sufficiently bad deal must be worse than no deal, in practice the no-deal outcome, where the U.K. and EU trade under WTO terms, is the worst-case scenario for the U.K. economy,” CEP economists Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson said in a report published Wednesday.

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

CEP BREXIT Analysis: ‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. March 2016. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

Related links

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp


Related Links:
Bloomberg News - No Brexit Deal ‘Worst-Case Scenario' for U.K. Economy, CEP Says

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Evening Express

UK citizens already poorer as a result of Brexit, study finds

Although last year’s vote to quit the EU has had “no obvious effect” on GDP growth, the collapse in the value of the pound – down 13% against the US dollar and 9% against the euro by the end of last month – has fuelled a surge in inflation from 0.5% to 2.7% and a fall in real wage growth from 1.3% to minus-0.5%, the report from the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance found…..

Co-author Thomas Sampson said:  ”Prime Minister May’s decision to leave the single market was not an inevitable consequence of the referendum and will increase the economic costs of Brexit.

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: ‘Brexit and the UK Economy’, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. May 2017 Paper No' CEPEA040: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea040.pdf

CEP BREXIT Analysis: ‘The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards’, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. March 2016. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit02.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp


Related Links:
Evening Express - UK citizens already poorer as a result of Brexit, study finds

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 31/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

ccrmagazine.com

Centre for Economic Performance report on the UK's new industrial strategy

All of the UK’s main political parties now highlight the importance of an ‘industrial strategy’ with the aim of improving economic growth and achieving more balance in how its gains are distributed. In addition, and in contrast to the 2015 election, all parties have made a manifesto commitment to raising the intensity of UK research and development. Both the Conservatives and Labour share a desire for more market intervention in some areas: promising energy price caps of some form, tightening up rules on takeovers, and – along with the Liberal Democrats – pushing company boards to consider the interests of workers. But major differences have emerged with respect to business taxes, and the extent of public investment and intervention. The most dramatic differences are that Labour would renationalise large parts of the privatised utilities, and would raise corporate (and other) taxes to fund higher public spending in a number of areas. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the third in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election. ... Anna Valero, author of the report, comments: ‘All parties aspire to raise UK R&D intensity, with the Conservatives’ commitment to increase R&D further as a share of GDP to 2.4% within 10 years and a longer-term aim of 3%; a Labour target of reaching 3% by 2030, and the Liberal Democrats’ long-term aim to double R&D spending. This is a welcome contrast to the 2015 election, when no parties committed to more than a nominal ring-fence of the science budget.’


Related Links:
ccrmagazine.com - Centre for Economic Performance report on the UK's new industrial strategy

The UK's New Industrial Strategy

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 30/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Market News

UK reality check: BOE wage growth forecasts implausible: CEP

Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee claims that nominal wage growth will return close to 4% by 2019 are "rather implausible and over-optimistic", according to two respected academics at the Centre for Economic Performance. Interviewed for the latest MNI Reality Check, Professor Stephen Machin, Director of the CEP, along with Rui Costa, a fellow researcher at the body, said that existing pressures would not alleviate enough over the near-term horizon to justify the MPC's prediction laid out in the Bank's latest Inflation Report, published earlier this month.


Related Links:
Market News - UK reality check: BOE wage growth forecasts implausible: CEP

Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 30/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

iNews

Political pledges to cut immigration ‘will mean a drop in living standards'

The LSE study also states that immigration is not to blame for lower pay and prospects of low skilled workers. Academics behind the research said lower pay and prospects for UK workers was the result of the 2008 economic crash rather than immigration. Professor Jonathan Wadsworth, author of the report, said: “It is very difficult to find much evidence that immigration has had a negative effects on many sectors of the economy.

“Any adverse experiences of UK-born workers with regard to jobs and wages are much more closely associated with the biggest economic crash for more than 80 years.”

Related publications

Election Analyses series; ‘Immigration and the UK Economy’ Jonathan Wadsworth. May 2017. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea039.pdf

Related links

CEP Election Analyses series http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp


Related Links:
iNews - Political pledges to cut immigration ‘will mean a drop in living standards'

Immigration and the Access to Social Housing in the UK

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 30/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Jornal de Negócios

A solução escandinava de Macron para a França / Macron's Scandinavian solution for France

Article by Philippe Aghion

What Macron likes about the Scandinavian model is that it combines a high degree of flexibility in the labor market with the encouragement of innovation and with high levels of social protection....


Related Links:
Jornal de Negócios - A solução escandinava de Macron para a França / Macron's Scandinavian solution for France

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 28/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Il Sole 24 Ore

Le bugie di Donald Trump sul commercio / Donald Trump's lies on business

Article by Gianmarco Ottaviano

…at the G7 in Taormina, an extraordinary thesis was presented to the international community. According to the new US presidency, from the liberalization of international trade, the US would not have obtained what they would have to pay.


Related Links:
Il Sole 24 Ore - Le bugie di Donald Trump sul commercio / Donald Trump's lies on business

CEP Trade

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage



News Posted: 28/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Brighton and Hove News

Hundreds turn out for Save Our Schools rally

According to Sandra McNally, professor of economics at Surrey University, the Conservatives’ figures are misleading. This is because the “per pupil figure” was frozen from 2010 to 2011 and again from 2015 to 2016.

She argues that an increase in the core funding for schools is not the same as an increase in the amount per pupil. A freeze in cash terms is likely to result in a reduction in real terms of 6.5 per cent between 2010 and 2020. This reduction has not happened yet and school funding has doubled in the last 20 years

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: Education and Skills: The UK Policy Agenda, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness,June 2017 Paper No' CEPEA041. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea041.pdf

Related links

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
Brighton and Hove News - Hundreds turn out for Save Our Schools rally

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Gill Wyness webpage



News Posted: 27/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation UK

Cut immigration and the UK's economic prospects will just get worse – here's why

Jonathan Wadsworth and colleagues at the London School of Economics showed convincingly that across UK local authorities from 2008-15, EU immigrants had no statistically significant impact on the real wages of UK-born workers. Neither did it affect the job prospects of low-skilled UK-born workers.

Related publications

CEP BREXIT ANALYSIS NO. 5 ‘Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK’ Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen. May 2016.

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit05.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Brexit 2016 webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/brexit/


Related Links:
The Conversation UK - Cut immigration and the UK's economic prospects will just get worse – here's why

CEP Trade CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 132, Issue 2, May 2017

‘Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Do They Earn More?'

Article by Ross Levine; Yona Rubinstein

ISSN 0033-5533, EISSN 1531-4650.

 

Related publications

‘In brief...'Smart and illicit': the making of a successful entrepreneur’
Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013


Related Links:
Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 132, Issue 2, May 2017 - ‘Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Do They Earn More?'

In brief...'Smart and illicit': the making of a successful entrepreneur

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Yona Rubinstein webpage



News Posted: 25/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance

NHS and social care staffing crisis ‘not addressed in general election manifestos'

The parties all recognised funding shortfalls, rising costs, demographic pressures, increased expectations, and changes in health technology and medical practice, the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance found.

The report noted 70% of NHS expenditure goes on staffing, stating “it is no surprise that as expenditure tightens, staffing issues are a growing problem”.

Professor Alistair McGuire, author of the report, said: “The growing crisis in staffing in the NHS, which accounts for 70% of total NHS expenditure, is recognised by all parties but remains to be fully addressed.”

Related publications

CEP Election Analyses Series ‘The NHS and Social Care: Prospects for Funding, Staffing and Performance into the 2020s’ Alistair McGuire. May 2017 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea037.pdf

 

Related links

CEP Election 2017   http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/abstract.asp?index=5431

Alistair McGuire webpage: http://www.lse.ac.uk/LSEHealthAndSocialCare/whosWho/LSEHealth/profiles/ajm cguire@lseacuk.aspx

LSE Health and Social Care Programme webpage:   http://www.lse.ac.uk/LSEHealthAndSocialCare/home.aspx


Related Links:
Public Finance - NHS and social care staffing crisis ‘not addressed in general election manifestos'





News Posted: 25/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News Analysis

Superstar multinationals need to be put on a tight leash

As the economists David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence F. Katz, Christina Patterson, and John Van Reenen show, the US industries with the fastest-growing market concentration have also seen the largest drop in labour’s share of income. This increased market concentration is widening the gap between the firms that own the robots (capital) and the workers whom the robots are replacing (labour).


Related Links:
Gulf News Analysis - Superstar multinationals need to be put on a tight leash

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 24/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

ccrmagazine.com

Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards

Higher price inflation as a result of sterling’s depreciation following the vote to leave the EU, coupled with nominal wage growth stuck at a norm of 2% a year, means that once again the UK faces falling real wages, threatening family living standards.  A new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the first in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election – outlines what’s been happening to real wages and living standards, and considers relevant policies in the parties’ election manifestos.


Related Links:
ccrmagazine.com - Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards

Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Rui Costa webpage



News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Investopedia

Trump economic uncertainty worse than 2008 crisis

Increases in policy uncertainty "foreshadow declines in investment, output and employment in the United States," according to the developers of the Economic Policy Uncertainty Index, professors Scott R. Baker of Northwestern University, Nicholas Bloom of Stanford University and Steven J. Davis of the University of Chicago, CNBC reports. As measured by the EPU index, the election of Donald Trump as president so far is the third most uncertainty-inducing event for the U.S. since the beginning of 1985, CNBC reports, sending it to an average value of 254 in November.

Related publications

‘Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty’, Scott R. Baker, Nick Bloom, Steven J. Davis and John Van Reenen, CEP US Election Analysis No.2, October 2012

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cepusa002.pdf


Related Links:
Investopedia - Trump economic uncertainty worse than 2008 crisis

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Jordan Times

Restoring digital economy competition

Today’s superstar companies owe their privileged position to digital technology’s network effects, whereby a product becomes even more desirable as more people use it.

And although software platforms and online services can be costly to launch, expanding them is relatively inexpensive.

Consequently, firms that are already established can keep growing with far fewer workers than they would have needed in the past.

These factors help to explain why the digital economy has given rise to large firms that have a reduced need for labour. And, once these firms are established and dominate their chosen market, the new economy allows them to pursue anti-competitive measures that prevent actual and potential rivals from challenging their position. And, as the economists David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence F. Katz, Christina Patterson and John Van Reenen show, the US industries with the fastest-growing market concentration have also seen the largest drop in labour’s share of income.

Also in:

Monday 22 May

MENAFN

Jordan – restoring digital economy competition

http://menafn.com/1095505479/Jordan--Restoring-digital-economy-competition


Related Links:
Jordan Times - Restoring digital economy competition

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harpers

LWF Day One: The big Brexit debate

Breaking down the cloud of uncertainty brought about by Brexit into manageable bite-sized pieces was the objective of panelists at this afternoon’s London Wine Fair industry briefing. A panel of industry experts from political, economic, legal and business backgrounds framed the general “Brexit debate” hanging over the industry by looking at what can and can’t be predicted, and also by prioritising some of the concerns. One of the issues widely predicted to cause mass headaches following the referendum has been the effect of trade tariffs on producers exporting to the UK. But from an economics point of view, Dr Swati Dhingra from the London School of Economics argued that non-tariff barriers such as foreign investment will have the far bigger impact on GDP. “If we leave the single market and the EU, the impact on tariffs would be between 1% and 3% - probably around 1.5%. But non-tariff barriers, such as a lack of foreign investment, have the much bigger potential to contribute to a reduction of GDP.

Related links

Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=dhingra


Related Links:
Harpers - LWF Day One: The big Brexit debate

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Hindu Online

Walk with purpose

Snippet: ... you lose those extra kilos or keep you at your optimum weight. Avoid turning it into a social exercise though, rather than one that is concentrated on the cardiovascular activity you set out for it to be! A study by the London School of Economics reported that people...


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage



News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

What research tells us about the avocado toast controversy


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - What research tells us about the avocado toast controversy

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage



News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Mirror

The rise of superstar firms

Article by John Van Reenen and Christina Patterson

In most countries, labor’s share of the national income has declined for about three decades. Why? Maybe the cause is “Robocalypse Now”—firms replacing expensive people with cheaper machines. Or maybe Chinese imports have caused employers to outsource employment. However, China itself is experiencing a labor share decline. We suggest another factor: the rise of superstar firms. Over the last 40 years, more industries have become “winner take most”. Firms with a cost or quality advantage have always enjoyed higher market shares. But the new behemoths of our age capture a much larger fraction—if not all—of their markets. Think Amazon.com, Apple and Google, or Goldman Sachs and Wal-Mart. These superstar firms make lots of profit per employee, so as they become a bigger part of the economy, labor’s share of gross domestic product declines.


Related Links:
Business Mirror - The rise of superstar firms

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 21/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Lkm – The Education and Youth ‘think and action-tank' – The LKMco Podcast

#002 – Research Round Up: Social segregation and white Working Class boys

In episode #002  Dr Sam Baars talks to George Duoblys. They ask do faith schools perpetuate social social segregation? Is focusing on white working class boys helpful? Do Ofsted’s gradings for nurseries really measure the right things?  Centre for Economic Performance research by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Sandra McNally mentioned in the video.

Related publications

‘Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement’, Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1468, February 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1468.pdf


Related Links:
Lkm – The Education and Youth ‘think and action-tank' – The LKMco Podcast - #002 – Research Round Up: Social segregation and white Working Class boys

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 19/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC

Radio 5 Live (09:25:01)

Snippet: ... artifice follows on life it is my 2nd point the question that the media should be asking the Tories there are countless countless reports the OBR the report I FF John comport system works and Worldcom this London school of economics they all say that for basically the same thing immigrants pay more into the Exchequer then they take care now and that includes public services as well so if you want to reduce immigration the question should be asked of the Tories won the launch launching their manifesto should be asked again and again and again is that this could create a black hole so the question simply is what taxes are you going to raise or what public services so you don't go because she just said how airline on people coming over here…Click to open

Related publications

‘Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK’, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit05.pdf

 


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

CNBC online

Trump economic ‘uncertainty' worse than '08 financial crisis levels, index shows

Increases "in policy uncertainty foreshadow declines in investment, output, and employment in the United States," the three professors who created the index wrote in a 2016 paper. The index was created in 2011 by Scott R. Baker of Northwestern University, Nicholas Bloom from Stanford University and Steven J. Davis, of the University of Chicago.

 

Related publications

‘Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty’, Scott R. Baker, Nick Bloom, Steven J. Davis and John Van Reenen, CEP US Election Analysis No.2, October 2012

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cepusa002.pdf


Related Links:
CNBC online - Trump economic ‘uncertainty' worse than '08 financial crisis levels, index shows

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Time

The jobs that weren't saved

Nevertheless, manufacturers see cause for optimism. The U.S. economy has added some 41,000 manufacturing jobs since February, and large firms such as GM and Hyundai have announced new investments in U.S. factories--often with the White House's encouragement. Thanks in part to regulatory changes and proposed tax cuts, the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) says 93% of member companies it surveyed have a positive outlook on the economy--a 20-year high. "What manufacturers see is an agenda from the federal level that is focused on growth," says Jay Timmons, NAM's president and CEO. Many economists are far more skeptical. They say the nature of manufacturing work has fundamentally changed and they don't believe tax cuts and protectionism can deliver a Rust Belt revival. "Those are not the policy solutions of the future," says John Van Reenen, a professor of applied economics at MIT. Pointing to the U.S. trade wars of the 1930s that worsened the Great Depression, he says, "Those are the policy failures of the past."


Related Links:
Time - The jobs that weren't saved

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Impact of lower-rated journals on economists' judgements of publication lists

Article by Nattavudh Powdthavee, Yohanes E. Riyanto and Jack L. Knetsch

Economists are judged on both the number of times they publish and where they publish. Yet very little is known about the impact on reputation of including lower-rated journals in an author’s list of publications. This column presents evidence that including these publications has a negative impact on judgements of the author’s contribution by other economists. To the extent that such judgements may influence research and publication strategies, the findings imply negative implications for social welfare.


Related Links:
Vox - Impact of lower-rated journals on economists' judgements of publication lists

CEP Wellbeing

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage



News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Arab News

Restoring competition in the digital economy

As the economists David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence F. Katz, Christina Patterson and John Van Reenen show, the US industries with the fastest-growing market concentration have also seen the largest drop in labor’s share of income.


Related Links:
Arab News - Restoring competition in the digital economy

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Faro de Vigo (Spain)

A degradation gives quality to the public health system Galego

Luis Garicano, professor of the London School of Economics and responsible for economy, industry and knowledge of citizens, Expoñía ("exceptional doctors who say goodbye soon and badly", the Spaniard, 16/4/17) to Súa surprise polo Tratamento vexatorio ao final da sua race of dous Médicos Excepcionais:…


Related Links:
Faro de Vigo (Spain) - A degradation gives quality to the public health system Galego

CEP Growth

Luis Garicano webpage



News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Cloudland Collective

‘Robots are coming for your job!' – Liz Ross

In the period 1993-2007, Graetz and Michaels found that in 14 industries in 17 developed countries including Australia, industrial robots increase labour productivity, total factor productivity and wages. They had no significant effect on total hours worked but did impact the number of jobs. So in essence, robots did not reduce toil (hours of work) for those who had work, on the contrary. But they did lead to a loss of jobs for the unskilled and even those with some skills.  So more toil, not less hours; and more unemployment.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs’, Georg Graetz, Guy Michaels, Article in CentrePiece  Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015


Related Links:
The Cloudland Collective - ‘Robots are coming for your job!' – Liz Ross

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

LA Times

Strong economic outlook may help cushion Trump through Washington turmoil

Strong economic outlook may help cushion Trump through Washington turmoil

Economists such as Nicholas Bloom, a Stanford University Professor who’s been tracking the rising degree of uncertainty in recent weeks, were puzzled that the markets were shrugging off the succession of troubling news coming out of Washington.

Related publications

‘Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty’, Scott R. Baker, Nick Bloom, Steven J. Davis and John Van Reenen, CEP US Election Analysis No.2, October 2012

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cepusa002.pdf


Related Links:
LA Times - Strong economic outlook may help cushion Trump through Washington turmoil

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Svenska Dagbladet Online (Sweden)

'Sanandaji vilseleder läsarna i sin bok om invandring'/'Snandaji mislead the readers of his book on immigration'

There is an extensive economic research literature on immigration and crime. Two of the international Authorities are Brian Bell (Oxford University) and Stephen Machin (LSE).   Sanandaji also refers to these two researchers with a quotation to give support to what he calls the first-order factor. But citing the text says that the social and economic cost of crime (in general) are usually estimated as high, and that each link between immigration and crime must be taken very seriously. But what Sanandaji carefully avoids mentioning is that Bell and Machin’s research indicates that the migration effect on crime is not very large (source 3).


Related Links:
Svenska Dagbladet Online (Sweden) - 'Sanandaji vilseleder läsarna i sin bok om invandring'/'Snandaji mislead the readers of his book on immigration'

Immigrant Enclaves and Crime

Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves

CEP Labour Markets

Brian Bell webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Adding a piece to the productivity puzzle: Management practices

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Erik Brynfolfsson, Lucia Foster, Ron Jarmin, Megha Patnaik, Itay Saporta Eksten and John Van Reenen

Disentangling the relationship between management practices and productivity has been hampered by the absence of large sample data across plants and firms. This column exploits a new survey covering US manufacturing to show that management practices vary both among and within companies. Furthermore, management practices are just as important for productivity as a number of other factors associated with successful businesses, such as technology adoption.

Related publications

What Drives Differences in Management? Nicholas Bloom, Erik Brynjolfsson, Lucia Foster, Ron Jarmin, Megha Patnaik, Itay Saporta-Eksten and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1470, March 2017


Related Links:
Vox - Adding a piece to the productivity puzzle: Management practices

What Drives Differences in Management?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

NIESR Blog

Britain's skills problem

Article by Sandra McNally

It is well known and acknowledged in the government’s Industrial Strategy that Britain has a skills problem: ‘We have a shortage of technical-level skills and rank 16th out of 20 countries for the proportion of people with technical qualifications’. As the Green Paper also says, ‘a bewildering complex array of qualifications, some of which are poor quality, makes the system hard to use for students and employers’. This shortage of ‘technical level skills’ is important because it impacts on economic growth, inequality and social mobility. It also affects a lot of people. Well over half of young people do not do A-levels each year. Furthermore, only about 35-40% of a typical cohort finishing their GCSEs can expect to go to university. The shortage of ‘technical skills’ mainly needs to be supplied by those who choose non-academic pathways. This is a major educational issue and all parties should be addressing it in their manifestos.

Related publications

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002795011724000113

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


Related Links:
NIESR Blog - Britain's skills problem

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

A squeeze on wages will set the tone for whoever wins on June 8

There are three reasons to be sceptical about the Bank’s forecasts for the growth in earnings in future years, and hence the recovery in real wages. One is that unemployment may not stay as low as 4.5 per cent. Most forecasters, including the EY Item Club, which reported earlier this week, think that slower growth will mean a rise in unemployment, which could press down on the growth in wages. Second, as David Blanchflower, a former member of the Bank’s monetary policy committee (MPC), Rui Costa and Stephen Machin of the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) point out in a paper, The Return of Falling Real Wages, the Bank has form on overpredicting the growth in wages. Two years ago the Bank was predicting 4 per cent earnings growth for 2017. Now it expects half that rate, a 2 per cent increase in earnings which the CEP paper says is the new norm.


Related Links:
The Times - A squeeze on wages will set the tone for whoever wins on June 8

The Return of Falling Real Wages

CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Unemployment is at its lowest since 1975, so why do people feel worse off?

One reason for the weakness of earnings growth is the ferocious squeeze on public sector pay, which – stripped of bonus payments – is rising at just 1.3% a year. A second factor is that employers are able to buy in cheap labour from overseas. Migration from other EU countries has not fallen off a cliff despite the result of last summer’s referendum: according to the Office for National Statistics, the number of non-UK nationals from the EU working in the UK rose by 171,000 to 2.32 million between the first quarter of 2016 and the first quarter of 2017. This continues a trend, which has seen the number of workers from the other 27 EU countries double since the recession of 2008-09. Finally, the nature of work seems to have changed. Work by David Blanchflower, Rui Costa and Stephen Machin has shown that earnings growth for the self-employed – who account for 15% of the workforce – has been particularly weak in recent years. People are working flat out in the gig economy but still struggling to make ends meet. The labour market has, for want of a better word, been Uberised.


Related Links:
Guardian - Unemployment is at its lowest since 1975, so why do people feel worse off?

The Return of Falling Real Wages

CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

TES (online)

The UK's first university centre for improving mental health in schools

Earlier this month, Lord Layard, director of the wellbeing programme at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance, called for all schools to employ a senior teacher in charge of mental health.


Related Links:
TES (online) - The UK's first university centre for improving mental health in schools

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 16/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Debrief

New report suggests there's bad news on the horizon for the UK job market

David Blanchflower, a former Bank of England policymaker and a London School of Economics professor, is saying that wages are likely to remain low for several years. He’s particularly critical of how the Bank of England is handling the situation, as their forecasting for wage growth consistently expects it to revert to around 4% within 18 months which, at least for the last 10 forecasts, just hasn’t happened.

 

Related publications

‘The Return of Falling Real Wages’, David Blanchflower, Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, Real Wages Update blog No.6, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/rwu006.pdf


Related Links:
The Debrief - New report suggests there's bad news on the horizon for the UK job market

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 15/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

VOX

Great Divergences: The growing dispersion of wages and productivity in OECD countries

Article by Giuseppe Berlingieri, Patrick Blanchenay and Chiara Criscuolo

Some firms pay well while others don’t; and some are highly productive while many aren’t. This column presents new firm-level data on the increasing dispersion of wages and productivity in both the manufacturing and services sectors in 16 OECD countries. Wage inequalities are growing between firms, even those operating in the same sector – and they are linked to growing differences between high and low productivity firms. Both globalisation and technological progress (notably information and communications technologies) influence these outcomes – as do policies and institutions such as minimum wages, employment protection legislation, unions, and processes of wage-setting.

Related links

Giuseppe Berlingieri CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=berlingieri


Related Links:
VOX - Great Divergences: The growing dispersion of wages and productivity in OECD countries

CEP Trade



News Posted: 15/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Fiscal Studies

‘Academies 2: The New Batch - The Changing Nature of Academy Schools in England'

Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva

Accepted manuscript online: 27 May 2017

DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5890.2017.12146


Related Links:
Fiscal Studies - ‘Academies 2: The New Batch - The Changing Nature of Academy Schools in England'

Academy schools and pupil outcomes

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Olmo Silva webpage



News Posted: 14/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP citations

‘New Automation Technologies and Job Creation and Destruction Dynamics', Employment Policy Brief, International Labour Office p.3.

 ‘The first of these studies uses an industry-level robotics dataset to estimate the impact of the implementation of industrial robots on wages, productivity nd working hours from the 1990s to 2007 in an econometric analysis of 17 developed countries.’

Cites: Graetz, Georg; Michaels, Guy. 2015. “Robots at Work”, IZA Discussion Paper No. 8928. Bonn, Institute of Labor Economics.

 

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs’, Georg Graetz, Guy Michaels, Article in CentrePiece  Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015


Related Links:
CEP citations - ‘New Automation Technologies and Job Creation and Destruction Dynamics', Employment Policy Brief, International Labour Office p.3.

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 14/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Veren of Lood (Holland)

Econmoische aanraders/Economic recommendations

Recommends:

Jobless recoveries: Exploring technology’s role – Georg Graetz, Guy Michaels - 13 mei

Recoveries from recessions in the US used to involve rapid job generation, but job growth has failed to match GDP recovery after recent US recessions. This column examines the role of technology in this and asks whether jobless recoveries are a wider problem outside of the US. In the US, industries that are more prone to technological change experienced slower job growth during recent recoveries, but it appears unlikely that modern technologies are causing jobless recoveries outside of the US. This poses a puzzle as to the nature of recent jobless US recoveries.

Related article

‘Jobless recoveries: Exploring technology’s role’, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Vox blog, 13 May

Recoveries from recessions in the US used to involve rapid job generation, but job growth has failed to match GDP recovery after recent US recessions. This column examines the role of technology in this and asks whether jobless recoveries are a wider problem outside of the US. In the US, industries that are more prone to technological change experienced slower job growth during recent recoveries, but it appears unlikely that modern technologies are causing jobless recoveries outside of the US. This poses a puzzle as to the nature of recent jobless US recoveries. 

http://voxeu.org/article/jobless-recoveries-exploring-technologys-role

 

Related publications

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries? Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece 22 (1) Spring 2017


Related Links:
Veren of Lood (Holland) - Econmoische aanraders/Economic recommendations

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries?

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 14/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Naked Capitalism

Jobless recoveries: exploring technology's role

Article by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article originally published at VoxEU, Saturday 13 May

Recoveries from recessions in the US used to involve rapid job generation. During the 1970s and 1980s, the first two years of recoveries saw an average increase in employment of over 5%. But since the 1990s, the job recovery engine has slowed down, and the first two years of recoveries have generated, on average, less than a 1% increase in employment (Gali et al. 2012). This recent joblessness of recoveries exceeds what we would expect based only on the recovery of GDP, and has caused concern among policymakers. In our latest research, we investigate whether the jobless recovery is a wider problem that plagues developed countries outside the US, and whether modern technologies may be an underlying cause (Graetz and Michaels 2017).

Related publications

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries? Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017
Is Modern Technology Responsible for Jobless Recoveries? Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1461, January 2017


Related Links:
Naked Capitalism - Jobless recoveries: exploring technology's role

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries?

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 14/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'

Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

Related publications

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


Related Links:
National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017 - ‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Claudia Hupkau webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Jenifer Ruiz-valenzuela webpage

Guglielmo Ventura webpage



News Posted: 12/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

American Economic Review,107(5): 168-73.

‘Is Modern Technology Responsible for Jobless Recoveries?'

Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels,

DOI: 10.1257/aer.p20171100

Related publications

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries? Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017


Related Links:
American Economic Review,107(5): 168-73. - ‘Is Modern Technology Responsible for Jobless Recoveries?'

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries?

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 12/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Institute of Employment Rights

Is a robot after your job?

In 2015 by Georg Michaels[SIC] and Guy Graetz [SIC] published evidence from a dataset of companies in 17 countries gathered between 1993 and Subject articles 30 CLR News 1/2017 2007. They suggest that, while productivity increases with robotic innovation and some semi-skilled and lower skilled jobs are abandoned: “there is some evidence of diminishing marginal returns to robot use – ‘congestion effects’ – so they are not a panacea for growth. … this makes robots’ contribution to the aggregate economy roughly on a par with previous important technologies, such as the railroads in the nineteenth century and the US highways in the twentieth century.” Neither do robots do away with the contradictions within capitalist accumulation. This is because, as capital-bias and labour shedding takes place proportionately less, new value is created (as labour is the only source of new value) relative to the cost of invested capital. Added to this, as the economist Michael Roberts reminds us, worker resistance to the dystopia of permanent joblessness would surely ensure that the road to ‘full automation’, if ever constructed, would be a very rocky one.

Related publications

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015


Related Links:
The Institute of Employment Rights - Is a robot after your job?

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 12/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy

The labor impact of superstar firms

New research shows that the rise of ever-larger firms means that workers are getting a shrinking slice of a slower-growing economic pie.

Increasingly, labor accounts for less and less of GDP in most countries. Not only does this trend undermine decades of traditional economic thinking about the stability of the labor share, it heightens concerns about employment and wages. Where are jobs going and who will be most impacted? Theories abound about the extent of the decline and the causes. Some believe that increased use of IT is a key contributor, while others point to increased trade exposure, especially, from China. John Van Reenen, Professor in the MIT Department of Economics and Sloan School of Management (pictured, below), acknowledges these factors, but doesn’t think they are the primary drivers of the labor gap. He and his co-authors offer another explanation in a new working paper,


Related Links:
MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy - The labor impact of superstar firms

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 11/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

Research: The rise of superstar firms has been better for investors than for employees

Article by John Van Reenen and Christina Patterson

In America, labor’s share has been on the decline for about three decades, and it has accelerated since the turn of the century. The fall has also occurred in most other countries. In the U.S. the share of income that workers take home each year now hovers around 60%. … In a recent paper, we put forward a different story based on the rise of superstar firms. More and more industries have become “winner take most” over the last 40 years. Firms with a cost or quality advantage have always enjoyed higher market shares. In the “good old days,” more-productive companies would take a bigger slice of the market, but there would be plenty left over for their rivals. By contrast, the new behemoths of our age capture a much larger fraction — if not all — of their market. Think of Google, Apple, and Amazon in the digital sphere, or Walmart and Goldman Sachs in the offline world.


Related Links:
Harvard Business Review - Research: The rise of superstar firms has been better for investors than for employees

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 11/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

TES

Every school should have a therapist, says happiness expert

Lord Layard also wants government to assess how much value schools add to pupils’ happiness

Every school should have an on-site therapist, according to one of the country’s leading economists and wellbeing experts. Lord Layard, director of the wellbeing programme at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance, has also called for all schools to employ a senior teacher in charge of mental health. He wants child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs) to provide therapeutic services in schools. “Extra money for child mental health should be devoted to building a school-based wing of Camhs,” he said.


Related Links:
TES - Every school should have a therapist, says happiness expert

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 11/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

MIT Sloan Management Review

The importance of structured management practices

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Erik Brynjolfsson, Megha Patnaik, Itay Saporta-Eksten and John Van Reenen

Our analysis of the Census data, conducted with Lucia Foster and Ron Jarmin of the U.S. Census Bureau and published recently, has led us to conclude that a particular set of practices that we call “structured management” is tightly linked to performance and success.


Related Links:
MIT Sloan Management Review - The importance of structured management practices

What Drives Differences in Management?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 18/04/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP research citations

Bell B and Machin S (2016) Brexit and Wage Inequality, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, July 2016.

Cited in ‘Research for REGI Committee – Building Blocks for a Future Cohesion Policy – First Reflections: Study’, Directorate-General for Internal Policies, Policy Department B – Structural and Cohesion Policies’ European Parliament, April 2017

ISBN 978-92-846-0904-8

Doi: 10.2861/337566

http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/STUD/2017/601974/IPOL_STU(2017)601974_EN.pdf

 

Related publications

Brexit and Wage Inequality, Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, July 2016. (http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/_NEW2014/BREXIT/Bell_Machin_BrexitWages.pdf)


Related Links:
CEP research citations - Bell B and Machin S (2016) Brexit and Wage Inequality, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, July 2016.

CEP Labour Markets

Brian Bell webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 09/04/2017      [Back to the Top]

YouTube

Game of Mates – Interview with Paul Frijters

Game of Mates: How favours bleed the nation, is a new book by Dr Cameron K. Murray and Professor Paul Frijters that exposes the inner workings of Australia's economic elite.
In this video, Paul Frijters is interviewed about exactly how this great Game is hidden behind the 'economic scenes' in Australian life.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gSMYQkVfHw&feature=youtu.be

 

Related publications

Game Of Mates: How favours bleed the nation by Cameron Murray (Author), Paul Frijters (Author), Publicious Pty Limited, April 5, 2017

ISBN:  0648061108; 9780648061106

 


Related Links:
YouTube - Game of Mates – Interview with Paul Frijters

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage



News Posted: 09/04/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Sleep deprivation, even when moderate, hurts employment

Article by Joan Costa-i-font and Sara Flèche

Sleep is often overlooked in economic models despite its obvious restorative effects on human health alongside its influence on brain plasticity and feelings of well-being. Sleep exerts an influence on emotional well-being and restful perceptions, and sleep deprivation more generally, even when moderate, is found to be detrimental to employment behaviours. The number of hours the average person sleeps has declined over the past century, and we still ignore its effects on economic activity and economic performance.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Sleep deprivation, even when moderate, hurts employment

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage



News Posted: 06/04/2017      [Back to the Top]

Elite Daily (USA) Online

Experts Revealed The One Thing You Need To Truly Be Happy

Related publications

http://worldhappiness.report/

Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network. ISBN 978-0-9968513-5-0

 

Related links

Richard Layard webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=970

Wellbeing Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/wellbeing/default.asp


Related Links:
Elite Daily (USA) Online - Experts Revealed The One Thing You Need To Truly Be Happy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Left Foot Forward (Online)

People are happier in more equal societies. Here's the evidence

On World Happiness Day we should be talking about inequality

Richard Layard among others has noted how happiness has stalled in many developed countries, despite considerable improvements in living standards over the last fifty years to so.

Related publications

http://worldhappiness.report/

Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network. ISBN 978-0-9968513-5-0

 

 


Related Links:
Left Foot Forward (Online) - People are happier in more equal societies. Here's the evidence

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Financial (Georgia) online

Norway takes top spot in 2017 World Happiness Report

The report also highlights the personal factors affecting happiness. As Professor Layard points out, “in rich countries the biggest single cause of misery is mental illness”…

Related publications

http://worldhappiness.report/

Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network. ISBN 978-0-9968513-5-0


Related Links:
The Financial (Georgia) online - Norway takes top spot in 2017 World Happiness Report

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Allmediascotland.com

Media Release: SCDI Forum – Exporting key to resilient growth during Brexit and second independence referendum

The SCDI Forum – ‘Brave New Worlds? Economic Growth & Wealth Creation’ – will today (Thursday 16 March) consider the challenges and changes facing our economy, with presentations and discussions on the new industrial strategy and inclusive growth, as well as the particularly pressing topic of how we raise our sights to grow the value of our exports.

The agenda for day two of the SCDI Forum 2017 on Friday 17 March includes: …

  • Richard Davies - Chief of staff at the LSE Growth Commission; and former chair of the Council of Economic Advisers at HM Treasury and economics dditor at The Economist will discuss the Commission’s major new report, ‘UK Growth, A New Chapter’, on a post-Brexit strategy for modern labour markets, industrial strategy, ‘openness’ to trade and talent, and business finance and growth.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
Allmediascotland.com - Media Release: SCDI Forum – Exporting key to resilient growth during Brexit and second independence referendum

CEP Growth

Richard Davies webpage



News Posted: 17/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Italia

Perché serve una nuova economia/Why we need a new economics

Labor economists of the United Kingdom, as well as co-author of both Richard Layard that Steven Nickell, we need the introduction of the NAIRU in 1986.

Related publications

Combatting Unemployment IZA Prize in Labor Economics, Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell; Edited by Werner Eichhorst and Klaus F. Zimmermann, OUP, 2011, ISBN 978-0-19-960978-9

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/combatting-unemployment-9780199609789?q=978-0-19-960978-9&lang=en&cc=gb

‘Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market’, Richard Jackman, Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell, OUP, 2005, ISBN: 9780199279173

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/unemployment-9780199279166?cc=gb&lang=en&


Related Links:
Wall Street Italia - Perché serve una nuova economia/Why we need a new economics

CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 16/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

W Radio (Spain) online

Vicente Fox cree que 'la gente está perdiendo la confianza en la democracia/ Vicente Fox believes that 'people are losing confidence in democracy'

At the table today the economist Richard Layard, director of the office of the Bhutan gross national happiness, Saamdu Chetri and the spiritual leader also included Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, among others. EFE


Related Links:
W Radio (Spain) online - Vicente Fox cree que 'la gente está perdiendo la confianza en la democracia/ Vicente Fox believes that 'people are losing confidence in democracy'

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 16/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Noroeste.com

Special Newsweek: the causes of unhappiness

Youth and young adults are especially vulnerable to mental illness

"We found, persistently and in all countries, that mental health problems are the leading causes of suffering", says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, who, together with his colleague Sarah Flèche, analyzed happiness and satisfaction surveys carried out around the world.

See also

Saturday 11 March

Newsweek en Español

Las causas de la infelicidad

http://nwnoticias.com/#!/noticias/las-causas-de-la-infelicidad

 

Related publications

‘Do more of those in misery suffer from poverty, unemployment or mental illness?’, Sarah Fléche and Richard Layard, KYKLOS International Review for Social Sciences Volume 70, Issue 1, February 2017

DOI: 10.1111/kykl.12129

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/kykl.12129/abstract


Related Links:
Noroeste.com - Special Newsweek: the causes of unhappiness

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 15/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Thanhnien.vn (Vietnam)

British students taught happiness

Professor Richard Layard, the British Government's Adviser in the test program conducted in 26 schools.


Related Links:
Thanhnien.vn (Vietnam) - British students taught happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 14/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Canary

The government has a new way to tackle the childhood mental health crisis

Schools across the country are going to trial lessons on happiness and dealing with mental health issues. Professor Richard Layard, who is a government adviser for a four-year trial of weekly mindfulness classes, says schools shouldn’t obsess about academic achievement. The well-being of pupils also matters.


Related Links:
The Canary - The government has a new way to tackle the childhood mental health crisis

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 13/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

US News

Brexit withdrawal pains loom over UK

Europe, not Britain, is seen as having the most leverage going into the talks. "The party with the most to lose has the weakest position," says Dennis Novy, a University of Warwick economist, "and that's the U.K." The EU is Britain's closest and largest trading partner. Forty-four percent of U.K. exports go to the EU, while only 8 to 17 percent of EU exports go to Britain. Novy says failing to reach a trade deal wouldn't completely quash U.K. markets for European goods and services anyway, just shrink them as rising prices dilute demand.


Related Links:
US News - Brexit withdrawal pains loom over UK

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 13/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider (Italy)

Brexit, l'appello della London School of Economics: 'Immigrati fondamentali per l'economia'/Brexit, the appeal of the London School of Economics: 'Immigrants are fundamental to the economy'

Brexit constringerà the United Kingdom to rethink all its economic policies: from the labour market to industrial policy, from immigration to foreign trade. A commitment is certainly not trivial for the Government by Theresa May that still waits for the green light from Parliament to invoke article 50 of the European treaties setting in motion the process that will lead Britain out of the borders of the European Union within the next two years. "For Britain, it is the hardest undertaking by the defeat of Nazism in World War II" admits election campaign manager Dominic Cummings, in support of Brexit. Of course, the outcome of the referendum has undermined even analysts and researchers engaged in studies in support of government policies. As in the case of the London School of economics that in 2013 has created the first "growth commission" a kind of white paper of the economy: "Brexit", so nobody imagined the result pushed the London School has rilancare a second Board for growth, "says Novella Bottini, a consultant for the London Institute.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
Business Insider (Italy) - Brexit, l'appello della London School of Economics: 'Immigrati fondamentali per l'economia'/Brexit, the appeal of the London School of Economics: 'Immigrants are fundamental to the economy'

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 12/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Schools to trial happiness lessons for eight-year-olds

Lord Layard, who is a government adviser for a current four-year trial of weekly mindfulness classes in 26 schools, said there was an obsession with measuring only academic achievement.

“The development of the character of children is an incredibly important issue,” said Layard, who is also a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). “If you really want schools to take the wellbeing of their pupils as an important goal, there has to be a way of measuring that.”

Related publications

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
The Guardian - Schools to trial happiness lessons for eight-year-olds

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 12/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Die Bundesregierung

Discussion with Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Third International German Forum

Chancellor Angela Merkel and international experts have discussed ways of improving global health. This is a matter of major importance, she said, and thus one of the priorities of Germany’s G20 Presidency.  Richard Layard speaking at 56:05 minutes.


Related Links:
Die Bundesregierung - Discussion with Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Third International German Forum

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 10/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

St Louis Post-Dispatch (USA)

Stacy Washington: Minimum wage hike will hurt city of St. Louis

Researchers Maarten Goos and Alan Manning posit in “Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Great Britain” that there is a general “hollowing out of middle income routine jobs” while “high income cognitive jobs and low income manual jobs” continue to produce increasing job opportunities. While I disagree that entry-level food service and retail work is middle income, their point is well-made. Any human function that can be sequenced and programmed, such as taking orders, flipping burgers or operating fry baskets, can and will be automated to save money.

Related publications

‘Lovely and lousy jobs’, Alan Manning.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013 (http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/CentrePiece_18_2.pdf)

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp398.pdf


Related Links:
St Louis Post-Dispatch (USA) - Stacy Washington: Minimum wage hike will hurt city of St. Louis

Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Britain

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 10/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Journal of Economic Geography

CEP Journal Articles

‘Agglomeration externalities and urban growth controls’, Wouter Vermeulen, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2n719tK

Related publications

Agglomeration Externalities and Urban Growth Controls Wouter Vermeulen, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No.093, October 2011

Related links

Wouter Vermeulen webpage:  https://www.cpb.nl/medewerkers/wouter-vermeulen

‘Urban renewal after the Berlin Wall: a place-based policy evaluation’, Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt, Wolfgang Maennig and Felix J. Richter, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2n7160U

Related links

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=10268

‘Innovation, SMEs and the liability of distance: the demand and supply of bank funding in UK peripheral regions’, Neil Lee and Ross Brown, Journal of Economic Geography Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2017

http://bit.ly/2mqOC0P

Related links

Neil Lee webpage:  http://www.lse.ac.uk/geographyAndEnvironment/whosWho/staff%20profiles/NLee.aspx

 


Related Links:
Journal of Economic Geography - CEP Journal Articles

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP on TV/Radio

BBC York

17:20:17

Professor Martin Knapp comments on money for social care in the budget

Also on:

BBC Wiltshire


Related Links:
CEP on TV/Radio - BBC York

CEP Wellbeing

Martin Knapp webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Technology may not be responsible for jobless recoveries

Since the early 1990s, the US has been plagued by weak employment growth when emerging from recessions – so called ‘jobless recoveries’. Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels look at multiple recoveries elsewhere in the world over a 40-year period to see if the same applies – and whether modern technology is responsible.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Technology may not be responsible for jobless recoveries

In brief... Is technology to blame for jobless recoveries?

Is Modern Technology Responsible for Jobless Recoveries?

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Horticulture Week

Dutch TV news Javado and Alton Garden Centre Brexit report airs

Following Brexit, Dutch TV news has followed a consignment of orchids from Holland to Alton Garden Centre and visited last month's Garden Retail Summit.

Dutch TV channel NPO1 (equivalent to BBC1) followed the plant exports to the UK for themselves last week and visited the London School of Economics to get an insight into the impact of Brexit through Dutch/UK trade.  Nikhil Datta, a researcher at the London School of Economics, said the LSE has estimated that Brexit will have a negative effect of 0.75% on the Dutch economy.


Related Links:
Horticulture Week - Dutch TV news Javado and Alton Garden Centre Brexit report airs

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Nikhil Datta webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

A Tribuna (Brazil)

Pesquisas comprovam: dinheiro não compra felicidade/Polls show: money can't buy happiness

Having good mental health and being in a good relationship makes people happier than doubling income points says study.  The London School of Economics, in the United Kingdom, interviewed 200,000 people in Australia, United Kingdom, Germany and United States on the factors that most influence your sense of well-being. And having a partner positively led this list. "The evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness are our relationships and our physical and mental health," says the study's co-author Richard Layard, an economist who initiated a few years ago a movement to create a happier and compassionate society, called action for Happiness.

 

Related publications

Associated article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
A Tribuna (Brazil) - Pesquisas comprovam: dinheiro não compra felicidade/Polls show: money can't buy happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

‘Superstar firms' may have shrunk workers' share of income

From manufacturing to retailing, giant companies have managed to gobble up a larger and larger share of the market. While such concentration has resulted in enormous profits for investors and owners of behemoths like Facebook, Google and Amazon, this type of “winner take most” competition may not be so good for workers as a whole. Over the last 30 years, their share of the total income kitty has been eroding. And the industries where concentration is the greatest is where labor’s share has dropped the most, according to research that analyzed confidential financial data from hundreds of companies. Think about the retail sector, where mom-and-pop stores once crowded the landscape. Now it is dominated by a handful of giants like Walmart, Target and Costco. “They’re very sophisticated and efficient and they don’t use as much labor,” said Mr. Autor, who worked on the research with a team of economists that included David Dorn, Lawrence F. Katz, Christina Patterson and John Van Reenen.

See also

Pagina (Italy)

Chi più innova meno paga/Who pays most

http://www.pagina99.it/2017/03/07/innovazione-stipendi-profitti-imprese-mit-u-s-economic-census/


Related Links:
The New York Times - ‘Superstar firms' may have shrunk workers' share of income

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC London 94.9 (Radio)

CEP on TV/Radio

19:00:01

Snippet: ...Martin Knapp discusses the Chancellor’s plans to put an extra £2 billion towards England’s social care systems.

Click to open

Also on BBC Radio 4, BBC Foyle, BBC Radio Ulster, BBC Radio Nottingham, BBC Lancashire


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Martin Knapp webpage



News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Daily Republic Online

Specter of no Brexit deal haunts Britain's automakers

Swati Dhingra, an economics lecturer at the London School of Economics, estimated in a study prior to last year’s referendum that Brexit could reduce total U.K. car production by as much as 12 percent.

 

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here


Related Links:
Daily Republic Online - Specter of no Brexit deal haunts Britain's automakers

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Jakarta Globe

Britain Seeks to Plug Skills Shortages Sapping Productivity

While skills shortages are a crucial element, they are not the only factor behind Britain's weak productivity, said London School of Economics researcher Anna Valero. Low business investment, a lack of focus on exports, limited public spending on infrastructure, and greater difficulty commercializing scientific research than in the United States, have all played a part, she added. Another difference is that Britain's easy-hire, easy-fire jobs market and low labor costs for many roles have made it viable to rely on low-skilled workers – boosting employment levels compared with other countries but discouraging investment in less labor-intensive working methods. This may be starting to change, with Britain's minimum wage now rising more steeply, in addition to new pension charges and the incoming apprenticeship levy for many employers.

 

Related publications

‘UK Growth: A New Chapter’, LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017

http://www.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/units/growthCommission/documents/pdf/2017LSEGCReport.pdf


Related Links:
Jakarta Globe - Britain Seeks to Plug Skills Shortages Sapping Productivity

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

U.S. News and World Report

Dennis Novy gave an interview to the American news magazine U.S. News and World Report on 07 March 2017

The interview was about the negotiations on international trade between the UK and the EU that will follow once Article 50 has been triggered. In particular, the interview covered the strengths and weaknesses of the UK negotiating position on trade after Brexit, and how European partners might react to British demands.

https://www.usnews.com/ 


Related Links:
U.S. News and World Report - Dennis Novy gave an interview to the American news magazine U.S. News and World Report on 07 March 2017

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 07/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

RPT-Britain seeks to plug skills shortages sapping productivity

While skills shortages are a crucial element, they are not the only factor behind Britain's weak productivity, said London School of Economics researcher Anna Valero. Low business investment, a lack of focus on exports, limited public spending on infrastructure, and greater difficulty commercialising scientific research than in the United States, have all played a part, she added.

 

Related publications

‘UK Growth: A New Chapter’, LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017

http://www.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/units/growthCommission/documents/pdf/2017LSEGCReport.pdf

 


Related Links:
Reuters - RPT-Britain seeks to plug skills shortages sapping productivity

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 07/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Call for statistics to measure quality of economic growth

National figures on economic growth fail to take into account of regional variations and ignore quality of life, such as the gap in life expectancy between Surrey and the north east of England, the Inclusive Growth Commission warned.

Local productivity, local incomes, the distribution of earnings, pay changes for the lowest paid and levels of regional economic inactivity could all form part of this new inclusive growth metric, said the ICG which is chaired by Stephanie Flanders, JP Morgan’s chief market strategist. The Commission also includes former Rolls-Royce chief executive Sir John Rose and London School of Economics professor Henry Overman.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Call for statistics to measure quality of economic growth

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme CEP Trade

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 07/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

CVER Press Release

Transforming Technical Education in England: Analysis of promised budget proposals

Trails for the Chancellor’s budget speech on Wednesday promise big new plans for technical education in England. Professor Sandra McNally of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics, who is available for comment on the proposals, summarises the evidence and her view of what reforms are needed.

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/_new2014/news/releases/2017_03_06.pdf


Related Links:
CVER Press Release - Transforming Technical Education in England: Analysis of promised budget proposals

CEP CVER



News Posted: 06/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

The roles of nature and history in world development

A study on how the relative importance of a place’s suitability for agriculture and trade has changed over time, by Vernon Henderson, Tim Squires, Adam Storeygard and David Weil

Related publications

This article summarises ‘The Global Spatial Distribution of Economic Activity: Nature, History and the Role of Trade’ by Vernon Henderson, Tim Squires, Adam Storeygard and David Weil, SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper No. 198, May 2016

http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0198.pdf

 


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - The roles of nature and history in world development

The roles of nature and history in world development

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

J. Vernon Henderson webpage



News Posted: 06/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

SurreyBaby

‘Outstanding' nurseries may not be the best, says new research

Attending a nursery with an outstanding Ofsted rating has ‘limited benefits’ for children’s education, says new research from the University of Surrey. The report, published last month, showed that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if they had been taught by a qualified teacher or attended an outstanding nursery. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), looked at the information of 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.


Related Links:
SurreyBaby - ‘Outstanding' nurseries may not be the best, says new research

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 06/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! News

Phonics were being taught 350 years ago, one of world's oldest children's book reveals

Research has shown that phonics can boost children’s reading age by an average of 28 months by the time they turn seven. Boys benefit the most from the back-to-basics system and actually overtake girls after just two years of school, according to a study by Dr Marlynne Grant, an educational psychologist, who analysed the performance of pupils taught to read using synthetic phonics from the reception year upwards. The school had high levels of special educational needs. However, a study by London School of Economics last year found that while phonics help children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as their first language, it has had "no measurable effect on pupils’ reading scores at age 11".

 

Related links

Martina Viarengo webpage:  http://personal.lse.ac.uk/viarengo/


Related Links:
Yahoo! News - Phonics were being taught 350 years ago, one of world's oldest children's book reveals

in brief... Children's reading: evaluating a new teaching method

in brief... Children's reading: evaluating a new teaching method

"Teaching to Teach" Literacy

CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 06/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

Three ways to value gold. Three conclusions

Then three economics and finance professors—Scott Baker of Northwestern University, Nick Bloom of Stanford University and Steven Davis of the University of Chicago—created a series of Economic Policy Uncertainty, or EPU, indexes. And sure enough, according to Prof. Harvey, gold shows a modest historical correlation with the global version of the EPU.

 Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016

http://bit.ly/2n6M3oa


Related Links:
The Wall Street Journal - Three ways to value gold. Three conclusions

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 05/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

How a rise in Britons being their own boss risks a borrowing crisis

Getting the balance right

A recent report by the LSE Growth Commission also warned that a world where everyone is their own boss could lead to less training, with consequences for UK living standards. 

"In the longer term, the gig economy may erode employers' incentives to invest in their workers' skills," it said.

"It is unlikely that short-term workers will receive extensive on-the-job training, and thus in the long run this may have an impact on the make-up of the skill set of the UK workforce."

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
The Telegraph - How a rise in Britons being their own boss risks a borrowing crisis

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 05/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Mirror

Health is our wealth

If I asked what makes you happy what would you say? I think many of us would answer money. But according to a study by researchers at the London School of Economics, much of the world’s unhappiness stems from failed relationships.

[No link available.]

Related articles

Vox – 12 December 2016

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 05/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Jornada Aguascalientes (Spain)

El reto de la desigualdad / Opciones y decisiones/ The challenge of inequality / choices and decisions

The UN in this regard, ruled: "the year 2015 is a milestone for mankind by the adoption, in September, of sustainable development goals (SDGS), to help guide the world community towards a more inclusive and sustainable global development. It is very likely that the concepts of happiness and well-being will help to guide progress towards sustainable development"(John Helliwell, Richard Layard, and Jeffrey Sachs. Happiness 2015 World report. Overview).

Related publications

The ‘World Happiness Report 2015’, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs (Eds.), April 2015

http://worldhappiness.report/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/04/WHR15_Sep15.pdf


Related Links:
La Jornada Aguascalientes (Spain) - El reto de la desigualdad / Opciones y decisiones/ The challenge of inequality / choices and decisions

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 04/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP Engagement/In politics

CEP and its research had a broad reach in Parliament during the month of February.

During the passage of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill in the Lords, research on the benefits from immigration at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) was mentioned.

Also, LSE research was picked up during debates on building more homes (Professor Cheshire)

pre-school education: teachers (Dr Jo Blanden, Professor Sandra McNally).

LSE has been particularly involved in the debate on Brexit through its submissions of written evidence in Parliament and academics appearing before select committees. LSE has responded to the Impact of Brexit on Higher Education and the Immigration inquiries.

Swati Dhingra and Professor Niamh Moloney gave their insights on UK Trade Options Beyond 2019

Professor Alan Manning and Philippe Legrain informed the Lords on Brexit and the Labour Market.

Related links

Community Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/Community/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme CEP Education and Skills CEP Trade

Paul Cheshire webpage

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 04/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Buitenland.eenvandaag.nl (Dutch TV)

Wat betekent de Brexit voor de handel met Engeland?/ What does Brexit mean to trade with England?

England, one of our main trading partners is to get out of the EU. The British Prime Minister Theresa May this month officially advised the European Union of the British departure. Dutch entrepreneurs who do a lot of trade with England wait with bated breath the negotiations that will follow. And the question is whether, in particular, the EU wants to be the best deal out there.

What the consequences will be of Brexit for the Dutch and the English economy depends on the deal concluded between the European Union and the United Kingdom says Nikhil Datta, researcher at the London School of Economics. According to him, the damage can be limited if there actually is as little change as possible.


Related Links:
CEP Trade

Nikhil Datta webpage



News Posted: 04/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yibada (English Chinese News, USA)

China's high-speed rail technology game: the significant role of transfer deals

Yatang Lin, a researcher from the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, enthused that "there were ambitions to get everything done pretty quickly. Of course, there were political motives there. Therefore, the fastest and safest way was to use foreign technology."


Related Links:
Yibada (English Chinese News, USA) - China's high-speed rail technology game: the significant role of transfer deals

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China

High-speed rail in China

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme



News Posted: 04/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

Government silent on adult skills behavioural research centre funding

The government is refusing to say whether more funding will be given to two “pioneering” FE research centres after their start-up grants end shortly.

Meanwhile, the Centre for Vocational Education Research is beginning to publish its own projects after being given a £3 million government grant in May 2015. Dr Sandra McNally leads the centre, and said that in the two years it has been running, her team has focused on “huge administrative data”, such as individual learner records, the national pupil database and longitudinal education outcomes data, in an attempt to process, code and apply it to their research.


Related Links:
FE Week - Government silent on adult skills behavioural research centre funding

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Entorno inteligente

MÉXICO: ?El dinero no da felicidad, sobre todo si es poco??/ Mexico:? The money does not give happiness, especially if it's bit?

Almost eight out of 10 people think that the money spoiled people. This is supported by one of the gurus of happiness research, Richard Layard. In his book Happiness.

Related publications

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science 2nd Edition, Richard Layard, Penguin, 7 April 2011

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/54928/happiness/


Related Links:
Entorno inteligente - MÉXICO: ?El dinero no da felicidad, sobre todo si es poco??/ Mexico:? The money does not give happiness, especially if it's bit?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Europe 1

Should we ban cell phones in school?

A brake to the concentration. Still, according to a study of 2015 to the United Kingdom by the London School of Economics, the use of the current mobile phone impair concentration. The study, which looked at the school results of 130,000 students 91 institutions of the country, shows that students enrolled in schools that have banned mobile phone have better results than those enrolled in institutions where the smartphone is not banned. And the students the less comfortable at the school who in would suffer the most, explain the researchers.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Related Links:
Europe 1 - Should we ban cell phones in school?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Repubblica.it

Irrinunciabile smartphone. 'Ma i divieti non servono'/Essential smartphone. 'But the bans are not needed'

Research by the London School of Economics in 2015 calculated that at maturity, in schools where the mobile phone is banned, the boys get ratings of 6.4% higher.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Related Links:
Repubblica.it - Irrinunciabile smartphone. 'Ma i divieti non servono'/Essential smartphone. 'But the bans are not needed'

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Charleston Gazette-Mail (USA)

Steve White: Pipeline projects will create plenty of good jobs

The recent U.S. energy revolution, courtesy of high-tech advancements in hydraulic fracturing, has made U.S. manufacturing more competitive globally, lowering costs for energy-intensive industries while increasing output, employment and exports.Those aren’t my conclusions. They come from the London School of Economics and Political Science. “For every two jobs created in direct relation to fracking, this indirect effect adds more than one additional job elsewhere in the economy,” the report says. In fact, manufacturing exports have increased about 10 percent, on average, since the energy boom began


Related Links:
Charleston Gazette-Mail (USA) - Steve White: Pipeline projects will create plenty of good jobs

Fracking: the boost to US manufacturing

Fracking: the boost to US manufacturing

CEP Trade

Frank Pisch webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

i Newspaper

Why does nobody want to host the Olympics anymore?

The Olympics shouldn’t be sold as bringing any wider benefits at all – but, instead as a very expensive party. Hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 cost about £150 per UK tax payer – but it did make Londoners happier. Londoners were happier during the summer of 2012 than those of 2011 and 2013, a study by the Centre for Economic Performance found. But in times of austerity, the happiness argument is a hard sell. That is especially true when the benefits are concentrated in the glitziest city – normally the capital. In the 2012 Olympics, citizens in poorer parts of the country effectively subsidised the happiness of Londoners.


Related Links:
i Newspaper - Why does nobody want to host the Olympics anymore?

The Host with the Most? The Effects of the Olympic Games on Happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

LSE Growth Commission: invest more in people, not only buildings and machines

The LSE Growth Commission sets out a new blueprint for inclusive and sustainable growth that deals with the challenges facing the UK, old and new. Based on the latest research, analysis and evidence from leading practitioners and scholars, the Commission – drawn from leading business, policy-making and academic figures – outlines the top priorities in four key areas: jobs and skills; industrial strategy; openness and finance and growth.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - LSE Growth Commission: invest more in people, not only buildings and machines

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg View

Specter of No Brexit Deal Haunts U.K. Automakers

Swati Dhingra, an economics lecturer at the London School of Economics, estimated in a study prior to last year's referendum that Brexit could reduce total U.K. car production by as much as 12 percent.

Related article

8 June 2016

The UK in a Changing Europe – King’s College London

Brexit and foreign investment: cars and cash

Article by Swati Dhingra

One of the key issues in the referendum campaign has been the extent to which a Brexit would affect the UK’s economy. While much of this discussion has focused on trade, the role of investments in the UK from other EU countries is also important. The UK is a major recipient of investment, with only the United States and China receiving more foreign direct investment (FDI) than the UK. And of this investment in the UK (which has an estimated stock value of over £1 trillion) about half has come from other EU countries.

http://ukandeu.ac.uk/brexit-and-foreign-investment-cars-and-cash/


Related Links:
Bloomberg View - Specter of No Brexit Deal Haunts U.K. Automakers

Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards

The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Carrier Management

Are fears of a Brexit exodus overblown

“Each business lobby is motivated — the worse you can make it sound at this point, the more likely your sector will get special treatment,” said Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. “I don’t know how analytically rigorous a lot of the numbers are. You want to take a lot of these numbers with a grain of salt.”

Related links

Thomas Sampson CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=sampson


Related Links:
Carrier Management - Are fears of a Brexit exodus overblown

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 02/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Hard Brexit will ‘open Pandora's box' for UK businesses says CBI president

Economists from the London School of Economics have estimated that the WTO route would cause an almost 10 per cent hit to UK GDP by 2030.

Also in:

The i Paper

Failure to secure trade deal 'would open Pandora's Box'

(no link available)


Related Links:
Independent - Hard Brexit will ‘open Pandora's box' for UK businesses says CBI president

The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards

CEP Trade CEP Growth

Swati Dhingra webpage

Hanwei Huang webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 02/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Huffington Post (France)

Macron veut durcir la loi qui encadre l'usage du portable à l'école, mais qu'en est-il aujourd'hui?/ Macron wants to tighten the law that oversees the use of the laptop to school, but what about today?

According to a study published in the journal of the London School of Economics in may 2015, the ban on mobiles in schools would be beneficial for the academic performance of students. Researchers have shown that in schools that forbid it, results improved by 6.4 percent compared to other schools. In the United Kingdom, more and more schools ban their speakers mobile: they were 50% in 2012 and 98% in 2012 to prohibit them or collect them earlier today, according to the Guardian.

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015.


Related Links:
Le Huffington Post (France) - Macron veut durcir la loi qui encadre l'usage du portable à l'école, mais qu'en est-il aujourd'hui?/ Macron wants to tighten the law that oversees the use of the laptop to school, but what about today?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 02/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Staff News

New report from LSE Growth Commission

Last Friday, the LSE Growth Commission released a new report setting out a blueprint for inclusive and sustainable growth in the UK, which deals with both old and new challenges.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
LSE Staff News - New report from LSE Growth Commission

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 02/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News online

The Brexit Bank Exodus Could Be More Like a Trickle

“Each business lobby is motivated -- the worse you can make it sound at this point, the more likely your sector will get special treatment,” said Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. “I don’t know how analytically rigorous a lot of the numbers are. You want to take a lot of these numbers with a grain of salt.”


Related Links:
Bloomberg News online - The Brexit Bank Exodus Could Be More Like a Trickle

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Railway Technology

The importance of China's high-speed tech transfer policy

China is the world leader in the deployment of high-speed rail infrastructure but how much of this is because of the extensive technology transfer deals that were struck with foreign companies during the early days?

“There were ambitions to get everything done pretty quickly,” says Yatang Lin, a researcher from the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance. “Of course, there were political motives there. Therefore, the fastest and safest way was to use foreign technology.”


Related Links:
Railway Technology - The importance of China's high-speed tech transfer policy

High-speed rail in China

International Technology Transfer and Domestic Innovation: Evidence from the High-Speed Rail Sector in China

CEP Trade



News Posted: 01/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Britain is damning itself to a low wage, low productivity economy

As the London School of Economics’ “Growth Commission” noted in a recent update on the UK economy, growing self-employment is eroding the incentives for companies to invest in training and skills. I don’t want to demonise the so-called “gig economy”, which for many of those who work in it is a positive and liberating choice. It has also greatly contributed to Britain’s superior employment performance

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Britain is damning itself to a low wage, low productivity economy

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 01/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE academic mentioned in Parliament

Building more homes

During the debate on 'Building more homes' in the Economic Affairs Committee, Lord Layard mentioned LSE:

"Professor Cheshire at the London School of Economics has suggested a levy on the final value of a completed development, combining that with the change in presumption that I referred to earlier. There are many areas in which these ideas can be explored. The committee took no view on these issues but it made a clear recommendation that the Government should examine these proposals."

 

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire

Richard Layard webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=970

 


Related Links:
LSE academic mentioned in Parliament - Building more homes

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme CEP Wellbeing

Paul Cheshire webpage

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Paisley Daily Express

Banking on a good day


Related Links:
Paisley Daily Express - Banking on a good day





News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek online

Study: Mental Illness Causes More Misery Than Anything Else

“We keep on finding in every country that the mental health problems are the biggest causes of misery,” says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, who along with colleague Sarah Flèche analyzed happiness and satisfaction surveys from around the world. In a paper published in January in the journal Kyklos, Flèche and Layard found that the correlation between mental illness and misery was strong even when poverty and unemployment were controlled for.

Related publications

‘Do more of those in misery suffer from poverty, unemployment or mental illness?’, Sarah Fléche and Richard Layard, Kyklos (International Review for Social Sciences), 70(1), February 2017

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/kykl.12129/epdf


Related Links:
Newsweek online - Study: Mental Illness Causes More Misery Than Anything Else

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

O2 (Poland)

So many minutes of sleep loses his mother when she wakes up her baby

The study is based on data about the life of 14 thousand. the British families. Was collected from the birth of a child in the family up to the 25 years of his life. Applications have developed Joan Costa-and-Font and Sarah Flèche from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.


Related Links:
O2 (Poland) - So many minutes of sleep loses his mother when she wakes up her baby

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage



News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Indiana University Bloomington

IU College of Arts and Sciences announces 2017 alumni and faculty honorees

The recipient of this year’s Outstanding Young Alumni Award is Rebecca Homkes (B.A./B.S. ’05) of London. Homkes is a teaching fellow/adjunct professor in the London Business School, the director of the London-based Ashridge Strategic Management Centre, co-founder of Next Wave Innovation, and the founder and director of 21st Century Strategy, a boutique consultancy firm.

Rebecca Homkes is the director of 21st Century Strategy, a boutique consultancy firm, where she works with CEOs and executive teams of top global companies and fast-growing enterprises on developing and executing strategies for growth, especially when facing extreme uncertainty. Homkes is also a teaching fellow at the London Business School’s Department of Strategy and Entrepreneurship.

A fellow at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance and a director at the Ashridge Strategic Management Centre, Homkes is also a co-founder of corporate innovation consultancy Next Wave Innovation and a board member and mentor at GrowthX and the Silicon Valley Growth Syndicate. A 2005 graduate of IU, Homkes earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and her Bachelor of Science degree in business administration with majors in finance, accounting and international studies. A Marshall Scholar, Homkes earned her Ph.D. and M.Sc. in international economy from the London School of Economics and was an Indiana University Herman B Wells Scholar in 2005.

Related links

CEP Alumni - Rebecca Homkes : http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/alumni.asp

Rebecca Homkes CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=homkes


Related Links:
Indiana University Bloomington - IU College of Arts and Sciences announces 2017 alumni and faculty honorees

CEP Growth



News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Post

Is the WTO one of Trump's ‘big quagmire deals'? here's what's at stake

Recent research by Paola Conconi, Maurizio Zanardi and their co-authors finds U.S. presidential elections tend to influence the timing of WTO dispute filings, especially those with economic interests in key electoral (“swing”) states. But if domestic politics drove the filing of those cases and winning them would mainly help a political opponent, incoming presidents may choose to drop them entirely and focus on their own priorities.

Related article

‘Suspiciously timed trade disputes: How politics influencese WTO enforcement’, Paola Conconi, David DeRemer, Georg Kirchsteiger, Lorenzo Trimarchi and Maurizio Zanardi, Vox Article, 16 June 2015

http://voxeu.org/article/politics-influences-wto-enforcement


Related Links:
The Washington Post - Is the WTO one of Trump's ‘big quagmire deals'? here's what's at stake

CEP Trade

Paola Conconi webpage



News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC 2

Newsnight [23:39]

Snippet: ...Although maybe they won't thank me for saying that. Tracey Brown is the Director of Sense and Science - Because Evidence Matters, Nassim Nicholas Taleb is the author of Black Swan and Swati Dhingra is an Economist at LSE. Nice to have all of... (from 28m10s).


Related Links:
BBC 2 - Newsnight [23:39]

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 27/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Times

Theresa May's Nasty Party dons UKIP's Brexit clothes at a heavy price

Immigration has now been extensively studied: there is lots of excellent data that reveals robust conclusions over many different pieces of research. According to, for example, the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, EU immigrants are more likely to be in work and less likely to claim benefits than their UK-born counterparts.


Related Links:
The Irish Times - Theresa May's Nasty Party dons UKIP's Brexit clothes at a heavy price

Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK

CEP Trade CEP Labour Markets CEP Growth

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 27/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Our nation of shoppers needs a new growth model

…"more coherent and comprehensive than anything the government has yet come up with" Article on the LSE Growth Commission Report.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
The Sunday Times - Our nation of shoppers needs a new growth model

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 26/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Health: Child-induced fatigue costs economy dear, says study

In the first study of its kind, Joan Costa-i-Font and Sarah Flèche, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science, have found that baby-induced fatigue is significantly undermining economic performance. Their work is to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s annual conference in April.


Related Links:
The Observer - Health: Child-induced fatigue costs economy dear, says study

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage



News Posted: 25/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Snippet: ... Martin Knapp

Martin Knapp is director of health and social care at the London school of economics and an economist specialising in health and social care.


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Snippet: ... Martin Knapp

CEP Wellbeing

Martin Knapp webpage



News Posted: 24/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC III – video

What would the UK look like without immigrants?

On #OneDayWithoutUs people are encouraged to show how much immigrants contribute to the country.

So how much of a difference do immigrants make to the UK economy?

At1:12 mins CEP (LSE) research flashes up.

Related links

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=787

Swati Dhingra webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=7558

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=7598

John Van Reenen webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=1358

CEP Growth Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/growth/default.asp

CEP Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp


Related Links:
BBC III – video - What would the UK look like without immigrants?

Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK

CEP Labour Markets CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 24/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Brexit Bulletin: Team May hits back

Brexit is expected to spell the end of passporting, where firms seamlessly service the rest of the single market from their London hubs. That could herald a loss of more than 25 percent of the U.K.’s total financial services trade, a London School of Economics study said on Thursday. 

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
Bloomberg - Brexit Bulletin: Team May hits back

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Stephen Machin webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage



News Posted: 24/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Britain ‘needs more skilled migrants' to help drive growth

Britain needs to attract more skilled migrants than ever, improve skills and education, strike trade deals with the European Union and America and secure a new EU passport for financial services.

ESRC's insight:

The ESRC-funded study by the London School of Economics Growth Commission set out a range of options to improve the UK’s productivity record and boost prosperity. Also recommended in the 92-page report was enhancing the government’s fledgling industrial strategy and increasing competition in finance.


Related Links:
The Times - Britain ‘needs more skilled migrants' to help drive growth





News Posted: 24/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News

UK banks' loss of EU passport a ‘major threat', LSE study says

The U.K. government must ensure British financial-services companies don’t lose their ease of access to the European Union after Brexit as a “matter of urgency,” according to a report backed by high-profile British economists including former Bank of England Deputy Governor Charlie Bean. The study, compiled by the London School of Economics with input from business leaders, ex-policy makers and academics, says the U.K. needs to retain near-equivalent European Union passporting rights and warned that alternatives are “costly and time-consuming.”  It sets out a list of recommendations for Prime Minister Theresa May’s administration to bolster growth, including prioritizing free-trade deals with the U.S. and EU. It also encourages the government to boost skills, develop an industrial strategy, and increase competition in finance.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-02-23/u-k-banks-loss-of-eu-passport-a-major-threat-lse-study-says

 

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
Bloomberg News - UK banks' loss of EU passport a ‘major threat', LSE study says

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 23/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4

FactCheckQandA: Why isn't immigration falling more quickly?

Why has net migration continued to rise and successive government’s failed to hit their targets?

According to the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), the majority of those who come from the EU, do so for work related reasons, whilst the majority of those who come from non-EU countries do so for study-related reasons. Both positively contribute to the UK economy with the CEP suggesting both groups have had no negative effect on jobs or wages. This is one of the main reasons the government has found it difficult to reduce immigration.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.

Related Links:

 

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=787

Swati Dhingra webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=7558

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=7598

John Van Reenen webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=1358

 

 


Related Links:
Channel 4 - FactCheckQandA: Why isn't immigration falling more quickly?

Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Labour Markets

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 23/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance

LSE growth commission sets out economic reform proposals

Britain’s tax laws are biased in favour of the self-employed and should be reformed to enable greater investment in people instead of buildings and machines, the LSE Growth Commission has said. This was one of the findings of a report released by the commission today on how the UK can achieve inclusive and sustainable growth after Brexit. In the study, authors identify four key priority areas: jobs and skills, industrial strategy, economic openness, and finance and growth. The commission consists of senior figures from business, politics and academia and was formed in 2013 to provide authoritative and evidence-based policy recommendations. UK Growth: A New Chapter was based on the input of senior policymakers, business people and academics, including two former chancellors, George Osborne and Alastair Darling.

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.


Related Links:
Public Finance - LSE growth commission sets out economic reform proposals

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 23/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News online

Brexit Bulletin: What Can By-Elections Tell Us About Brexit?

Snippet: ... Due today: latest migration figures from the ONS, and a report on the economy from the LSE Growth Commission.


Related Links:
Bloomberg News online - Brexit Bulletin: What Can By-Elections Tell Us About Brexit?

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Anna Valero webpage

Richard Davies webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage



News Posted: 23/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP Journal Articles

Gender Inequality and Economic Development: Fertility, Education and Norms'

Henrik Kleven and Camille Landais, Economica, 14 March 2017

DOI:  10.1111/ecca.12230


Related Links:
CEP Journal Articles - Gender Inequality and Economic Development: Fertility, Education and Norms'

CEP Labour Markets



News Posted: 22/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk

LSE research mentioned in Parliamentary Question on graduate nursery teachers

The question was tabled on 22 February by Lord Blencathra (Con):

"What is their response to the conclusions of a recent report by LSE and Surrey University that graduate nursery teachers for three- to five-year-olds make a small impact on children's attainment compared to non=graduates; and whether they have any plans to review their policy regarding requirements for nursery staff to be graduates."


Related Links:
Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 22/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Australian Economic Review

Observations on Uncertainty (pages 79–84)

© The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Volume 50, Issue 1 Pages 1 - 132, March 2017

Observations on Uncertainty (pages 79–84)

Nicholas Bloom

Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/1467-8462.12203

Related links

Nick Bloom CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=bloom


Related Links:
Australian Economic Review - Observations on Uncertainty (pages 79–84)

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

House of Lords Hansard – www.parliament.uk

LSE research mentioned in Lords debate on the Article 50 Bill

During Lords debate on the Article 50 Bill, Lord McKenzie of Luton (Lab) mentioned LSE/CEP research:

 

"One of the most profound choices that the Government are seeking to make is to eschew membership of the single market and the customs union. They are prepared to sacrifice these at the altar of reducing immigration, notwithstanding research, most recently from the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, again showing the benefits to national income, taxes and the budget ​deficit from immigration, and notwithstanding a report from the think tank Global Future that suggests that the Government’s approach could mean a fall in current net levels of immigration of no more than 15%, and that might be reduced further by the terms of new free trade agreements, which typically come with a demand for liberalisation on free movement."

 

Related publications

'UK Growth: A New Chapter', LSE Growth Commission Report, February 2017.

Related links

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=787

Swati Dhingra webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=7558

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=7598

John Van Reenen webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=1358


Related Links:
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Labour Markets

Philippe Aghion webpage

Tim Besley webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Isabelle Roland webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Financiero

El Dinero no da felicidan, sobre todo si es poco

Almost eight out of 10 people think that money spoils people. This is supported by one of the gurus of the research of happiness, Richard Layard.

Related publications

Happiness:  Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005.  2nd edition: 2011; ISBN 0713997699

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/54928/happiness/9780241952795/


Related Links:
El Financiero - El Dinero no da felicidan, sobre todo si es poco

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Dien dan (Vietnam)

The index of real economic policy of China in record level 672.82 points

Index of uncertainty in the economic policy of China and Hong Kong (China-Hong Kong Economic Policy Uncertainty Index-CHEPUI) are at record levels 672.82 points after soaring up fivefold higher than the average rate in 22 years.  This index tracks the frequency of mention of economic uncertainties related to the policy of South China Morning Post (SCMP), the most prestigious English newspaper of Hong Kong. It is part of the tracking system developed by Scott Baker in Northwestern University, Nick Bloom of Stanford University and Steven Davis from the University of Chicago.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016

http://bit.ly/2m481r4

 


Related Links:
Dien dan (Vietnam) - The index of real economic policy of China in record level 672.82 points

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 20/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

China economic policy has never been more uncertain. Sort of.

Economic policy is always challenging to decipher in China, where Communist Party leaders steer one of the world's most opaque central banks. Indeed, one measure of uncertainty has never been higher amid complications from Hong Kong's politics to Donald Trump's protectionism. The China-Hong Kong Economic Policy Uncertainty Index stands at a record 672.82 after soaring to more than five times its average in data stretching back 22 years. The gauge tracks mentions of policy-related economic uncertainty in Hong Kong's main English-language newspaper, the South China Morning Post. It's part of a suite of trackers developed by Northwestern University’s Scott Baker, Stanford University’s Nick Bloom and Steven Davis from the University of Chicago.

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016 http://bit.ly/2m481r4


Related Links:
Bloomberg - China economic policy has never been more uncertain. Sort of.

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 20/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

6 in 10 say ban children from social networks

A majority six of ten Gulf News poll respondents think children should be banned from using social media sites altogether. Their opinion is in line with the findings of a study by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, in the UK. Researchers found that banning mobile phones from school premises caused test scores of students to improve by 6.4 per cent — the equivalent of adding five days to the school year.


Related Links:
Gulf News - 6 in 10 say ban children from social networks

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 20/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Get Surrey

Attending ‘outstanding' nursery has limited benefit for children, university research reveals

University of Surrey's economics senior lecturer, Dr Jo Blanden, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief these are important for children's learning. "Our research finding that having a graduate working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us. "It is possible it is driven by the types of qualifications held by those working in private nurseries, they are not generally equivalent to the qualifications of teachers in nursery classes in schools."  The study was conducted by researchers at the Centre of Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London.

 


Related Links:
Get Surrey - Attending ‘outstanding' nursery has limited benefit for children, university research reveals

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 19/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Turkish World Television

TRT [around minute 9:30]

The show was on www.trtworld.com/live at these times on Friday 17 February  (GMT): 1630/ 2030/ 0130/ 0730/ 1230

Insight: Seasonal affective disorder and the business of happiness – Part I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSoOvT_zdxk

Insight: Seasonal affective disorder and the business of happiness – Part II

Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, affects people around the world. So-called SAD lights have been developed to help combat the condition. And how effective are books that train you to be happy? The World Wellbeing Panel got mentioned in both and advertised in the second of these interview clips.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZWERkTvilc


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP and the media

Looking to raise your profile?

The BBC is looking for female experts in a whole range of areas who would like to appear on air as presenters or contributors. This is a wonderful opportunity for early career or established female academics who are interested in raising their profile and gaining some experience in the broadcast media.

Click here for more details.


Related Links:
CEP and the media - Looking to raise your profile?





News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP Impact

CEP article on Top Downloaded of the Economic Journal

Congratulations to Richard Layard, Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, who authored What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-course Model of Well-being. The article, which features in volume 124 of the Economic Journal (EJ), has recently been listed on the Top Downloaded page of the EJ website. Since its publication in 2014, the article has received 11,796 downloads, and in 2016 it was the most downloaded article in the journal for that year.

Related publications

‘What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-course Model of Well-being’, Richard Layard, Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, The Economic Journal, Vol 124, Feature Issue, November 2014

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecoj.12170/epdf


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Shropshire

Research from LSE says graduate nursery staff have little effect on children's attainment.

…and there's a good piece on the BBC news website if you have a look at it so the couple of days so it is very current and it says gradual nursery staff have little effect on children OK having a graduate teacher industry only has a limited impact on children's attainment this is new research from the Centre of Economic Performance at the London school of economics.


Related Links:
BBC Radio Shropshire - Research from LSE says graduate nursery staff have little effect on children's attainment.

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Quartz

Economists quantified what sleep deprivation does to mothers' pay and productivity

When Joan Costa-Font became a father, the health economist noticed a dramatic drop in his productivity. “And I am the man,” he said, acknowledging that the effect was clearly worse on his wife.

He and Sarah Flèche, a labor economist, decided to quantify the productivity drop. The novel way they chose to do it was to look at how children disrupt mothers’ sleep, and how that disruption in turn affects mothers’ labor force productivity, including hours worked and income earned.


Related Links:
Quartz - Economists quantified what sleep deprivation does to mothers' pay and productivity

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Day Nurseries

Charity disputes research which claims qualified nursery teachers have ‘tiny effect' on children's learning

Save the Children has disputed research which found nurseries with a qualified nursery teacher have only a “tiny effect” on children’s attainment.

Earlier this week, researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, found that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate had an Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP) score that was only around a third of a point higher than those whose nurseries did not employ a graduate. The total number of points available is 117. Lead author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at Surrey University, said: “Our research finding that having a member of staff qualified to graduate level working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us, given existing research that finds well-qualified staff have higher quality interactions with children.” However, Save the Children has claimed that children without an early years teacher are almost 10 per cent less likely to meet the expected levels of development when they start school compared to children who do have a teacher. This comes from its ‘Untapped Potential’ report last November.


Related Links:
Day Nurseries - Charity disputes research which claims qualified nursery teachers have ‘tiny effect' on children's learning

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sun FM

Worrying start in a life of education for Wearside children

"… there are many early years providers that do not employ graduate staff but nevertheless offer high-quality care and education." "As research published by the London School of Economics this week found, quality in the early years is about more than staff academics, and so it's important that we don't apply overly-simplistic solutions to complex problems."


Related Links:
Sun FM - Worrying start in a life of education for Wearside children





News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde.fr

Affaire, famille et politique: les liaisons dangereuses

The issue of jobs of members of the family of the elect is more complex. How do I know if a person got a job, or a higher wage, because of his family ties with an elected official? This is the problem that have tried to solve Stefano Gagliarducci and Marco Manacorda ("Politics in the family: anti-nepotism and the hiring decisions of Italian firms", no. 9841, January 2017, link to PDF IZA working paper). They combined an extensive database covering 500,000 men and women politicians on nearly thirty years, and a random sample of one million employees in the private sector.


Related Links:
Le Monde.fr - Affaire, famille et politique: les liaisons dangereuses

Politics in the Family: Nepotism and the Hiring Decisions of Italian Firms

CEP Labour Markets

Marco Manacorda webpage



News Posted: 16/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Miami Herald online

World leaders, researchers, economists slated to speak at World Happiness Summit

Miami will be the site of the first global gathering of governmental leaders, economists, academics and researchers for the World Happiness Summit next month, the summit announced.

The H20 is one of four tracks being organized by the inaugural World Happiness Summit. Confirmed participants for the governmental track include former President of Mexico, Vicente Fox; spiritual leader and peace negotiator Sri Sri Ravi Shankar; World Happiness Report co-author Sir Richard Layard, founder of the Wellbeing Center at the London School of Economics; Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness Center Director Dr. Saamdu Chetri; Harvard happiness researcher and author Tal Ben-Shahar; Smart Dubai’s Director General Dr. Aisha Bin Bishr; and dignitaries from more than 40 countries.


Related Links:
Miami Herald online - World leaders, researchers, economists slated to speak at World Happiness Summit

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 16/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Monopolies are worse than we thought

A recent paper by David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence Katz, Christina Patterson and John Van Reenen speculates that tech might have enabled the rise of a few “superstar” companies in each industry. The fact that leaders in more concentrated industries also tend to have higher productivity supports this hypothesis. Technology might have simply changed the nature of markets so that the winners take most of the profits.

 


Related Links:
Bloomberg - Monopolies are worse than we thought

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 15/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Manchester Evening News

What do Ofsted know about three-year-olds? Parents at this ‘inadequate' nursery say it's nonsense

A university study says that inspectors are failing to spot the best and worst nursery schools by using 'traditional methods'

Parents have defended a pre-school rated ‘inadequate’ by Ofsted as a report shows the watchdog’s inspections don’t always reveal the best nurseries. The report published this week shows that sending children to an ‘outstanding’ nursery makes barely any difference to how well they develop in their early years. Researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Sussex and University College London, discovered that traditional measures used to evaluate nursery schools by inspectors failed to spot the best or worst schools.


Related Links:
Manchester Evening News - What do Ofsted know about three-year-olds? Parents at this ‘inadequate' nursery say it's nonsense

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 15/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

NaturalNews.com

Dutch families are raising the world's happiest kids, according to new study

Childhood has a tremendous influence on a person’s entire life. A study from the London School of Economics exploring what makes people happy found that a person’s emotional health as a child was the strongest determinant of their mental well-being as they got older, which is why parents need to take a proactive role in their children’s life and ensure their physical and emotional needs are being met.

Related articles

Vox – 12 December 2016

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
NaturalNews.com - Dutch families are raising the world's happiest kids, according to new study

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 15/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post Deutschland

US-Top-and#336;konom erwartet unter Trump 'wirtschaftliche Blüte ungekannten Ausmaßes'/US top economist expected to trump 'economic boom of unprecedented proportions

Von anderen Star-Ökonomen waren eher pessimistische Stimmen zur Wirtschaftsentwicklung unter Trump zu hören. So sagt Stanford-Ökonom Nicholas Bloom, ...

Related publications

'Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty', Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom, Steven J. Davis, The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol 131, Issue 4, November 2016

http://bit.ly/2m481r4


Related Links:
Huffington Post Deutschland - US-Top-and#336;konom erwartet unter Trump 'wirtschaftliche Blüte ungekannten Ausmaßes'/US top economist expected to trump 'economic boom of unprecedented proportions

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Day Nurseries

'Outstanding' nurseries have 'tiny effect' on children's attainment

The report titled 'Nursery Quality: New evidence of the impact on children’s outcomes', found that staff qualifications and Ofsted ratings cannot predict the quality of early years education, arguing that conventional methods of testing quality do not have a significant influence on educational outcomes. Co-author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at the University of Surrey, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief that these are important for children’s learning.


Related Links:
Day Nurseries - 'Outstanding' nurseries have 'tiny effect' on children's attainment

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera TV

CEP on TV/Radio

Dennis Novy gave a live TV interview to Al Jazeera. The topic was the confirmation of Steven Mnuchin as the new U.S. Treasury Secretary. The interview covered the proposed U.S. tax reforms and how changes to financial regulation might affect the U.S. dollar and international trade. 


Related Links:
Al Jazeera TV - CEP on TV/Radio

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

IZA Newsroom

Does modern technology slow down employment growth after recessions?

This phenomenon of labor market polarization (or “hollowing out” of middle-skilled jobs) has attracted widespread attention and contributed to the ongoing debate on the impact of technological change on labor markets. While much of the focus has been on the United States, Georg Graetz (Uppsala University and IZA) and Guy Michaels (London School of Economics and IZA) investigate in their recent IZA Discussion Paper whether labor markets in other countries have also been slow to pick up after recessions, and if modern technology could be to blame.


Related Links:
IZA Newsroom - Does modern technology slow down employment growth after recessions?

Is Modern Technology Responsible for Jobless Recoveries?

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Phys.Org

New evidence of the impact of quality nurseries on children's outcomes

A report published today reveals that a child's educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or early years professional. Attending a nursery rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted, the regulator of educational quality in England, also has limited benefits. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, matches data on children's outcomes at the end of reception with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.

 


Related Links:
Phys.Org - New evidence of the impact of quality nurseries on children's outcomes

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Education

Graduate nursery staff have 'little effect' on children

Having a graduate teacher in a nursery has only a limited impact on children's attainment, new research suggests.

In England the government wants more graduate staff in nurseries in a bid to boost children's literacy and numeracy. But a study published by the London School of Economics (LSE) claims highly qualified staff had only a "tiny" effect on attainment. One early years group said the the report challenged "many of the assumptions" around current policy. The researchers, from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, Surrey University and University College London, looked at figures, drawn from the National Pupil Database, on about 1.8 million five-year-olds who started school in England between 2008 and 2011.


Related Links:
BBC News - Education - Graduate nursery staff have 'little effect' on children

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph (Print edition)

Pulling rank Top nurseries fail to raise prospects

Sending children to a nursery school rated “outstanding” by Ofsted makes barely any difference to how well they develop, researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London discovered.

[Link unavailable.]


Related Links:
Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

Nursery staff qualifications have little effect on pupils' achievement – study

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, Surrey University and University College London, compared data on children's results with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million youngsters born in England between September 2003 and August 2006. The findings showed that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate have a teacher assessment score around a third of a point higher, where the total number of points available was 117.


Related Links:
BT.com - Nursery staff qualifications have little effect on pupils' achievement – study

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 13/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Nursery World

Graduate settings have little impact on children's outcomes

New research finds that attending an outstanding nursery, or one with graduate staff, has a limited benefit to children's educational attainment.

The study of 1.8 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006, reveals that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only ‘slightly’ higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or Early Years Professional (EYP).

It also found that attending a nursery rated outstanding by Ofsted had limited benefits.


Related Links:
Nursery World - Graduate settings have little impact on children's outcomes

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 13/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

TES

Qualified nursery teachers make little difference to attainment, study finds

Children with graduate nursery teachers achieve only slightly more by the end of Reception than children with unqualified teachers

Children who have access to a qualified teacher at nursery school do only slightly better at age 5 than those who do not, research suggests.

A new study concludes that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their Reception year is only very slightly higher if they have been taught in a nursery with a teacher trained to graduate level.

There was also little difference between those attending a nursery rated "outstanding" by Ofsted and others.

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, compared data on children's results with information about the nurseries they attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million people born in England between September 2003 and August 2006.


Related Links:
TES - Qualified nursery teachers make little difference to attainment, study finds

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage



News Posted: 13/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Blasting News

Brexit could swiftly become a steep exit

The economic cost of Britain's exit from Europe could be quadruple original estimates according to MIT Economist, Professor John Van Reenen.

Given all of the political flailing of arms and rhetorical sniping that has been going on, this has prevented many from seeing the bigger economic picture in terms of Brexit. The anticipated costs of Brexit seem to be increasing as more is known about Britain's plans and intentions on that score - four times the original estimate.

#professor john van Reenen made these assertions from research he had been taking out over the last few years in a separate report.


Related Links:
Blasting News - Brexit could swiftly become a steep exit

BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 10/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Brexit four times worse for UK economy than previously believed, say MIT economists

New research claims leaving the EU will have bigger impact on UK productivity than had been thought

Britain’s departure from the European Union could cause output losses of as much as 9.5 per cent, according to new research. Calculations using models that incorporate productivity measures show a negative impact on gross domestic product per capita of almost four times that of previous estimates, according to John Van Reenen, a professor of applied economics at the MIT Sloan School of Management who supported the campaign for the UK to remain in the EU.


Related Links:
Independent - Brexit four times worse for UK economy than previously believed, say MIT economists

Brexit: the final assessment

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 09/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Rochdale Observer

Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

A dedicated tax is the only way that we can be sure the government is reflecting public wishes, argues Richard Layard, emeritus professor at the London School of Economics. He points out that Britain currently spends less on health as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) than other countries at the same income level - and that nearly half of Britons say they are willing to pay for a better service and almost none want it cut. “If, as in Germany, there were a dedicated source of funding for the healthcare sector, it would be much easier for public demand to be translated into action,” he writes.


Related Links:
Rochdale Observer - Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 09/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Taxing Times: Brits should pay a dedicated NHS tax to fund the ailing health service, expert says

Britain currently spends less on health as a share of national income than other equivalent countries, according to economist Professor Richard Layard

BRITS should pay a dedicated tax to fund the ailing NHS, a leading expert says.  Professor Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, claims it is the only way to ensure the government reflects public wishes.


Related Links:
The Sun - Taxing Times: Brits should pay a dedicated NHS tax to fund the ailing health service, expert says

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 09/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Brexit will leave Britons more than $4,000 poorer, says MIT professor

Britons' incomes could be slashed by as much as 9.5 percent once the U.K. formally leaves the European Union, a new study released today by MIT economics professor John Van Reenen has claimed.

The report points to a 6.3 to 9.5 percent reduction in GDP per capita with the U.K. outside of the EU's single market on the basis that a one percent decline in trade reduces income per capita by between 0.5 and 0.75 percent.


Related Links:
CNBC - Brexit will leave Britons more than $4,000 poorer, says MIT professor

BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 08/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Finansgundem.com (Turkey)

Brexit, national income per capita in the UK to drop

Brexit, national income per capita in the UK to drop

On June 23, a referendum MIT faculty member, Professor John Van Reenen advocated keeping Britain in the EU.


Related Links:
Finansgundem.com (Turkey) - Brexit, national income per capita in the UK to drop

BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 08/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Work improves general happiness, but are you happy while you work?

By checking on people at random times of the day via an app, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron uncover the misery of work.

Related links

Alex Bryson, CEP Alumni, Labour Markets Programme.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Work improves general happiness, but are you happy while you work?

Are you happy while you work?

Are You Happy While You Work?

CEP Labour Markets



News Posted: 08/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

theBMJ

Head to Head: Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

A dedicated tax is the only way that we can be sure the government is reflecting public wishes, says Richard Layard, but John Appleby argues it would not protect funding from economic uncertainty

Yes—Richard Layard

Taxpayers finance the National Health Service. But how much are they willing to pay for it? No one has any idea. The service is financed from general taxation and there is thus no real way in which the public can express its wish for a better (or worse) funded service. If instead there were a specific funding stream dedicated to health, there could be a real public debate about how much people were willing to pay. And this debate would be particularly intense at the time of general elections, ensuring that our healthcare system in some way reflected the wishes of the population.


Related Links:
theBMJ - Head to Head: Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 08/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newsin English.no (Norway)

Immigration tests the welfare state

Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, told newspaper Aftenposten in January that the Migration Advisory Committee he ...

Related Links:
Newsin English.no (Norway) - Immigration tests the welfare state

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 02/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Trump's trade war may have already begun

"The idea of trade wars these days, what politicians have in mind is really a 19th-century or early 20th-century conception of trade," said Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, a trade economist at the London School of Economics. "You don't even know who you're going to hurt with these kind of things. You're probably going to destroy American jobs in the end."


Related Links:
CNBC - Trump's trade war may have already begun

CEP Trade

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

On the spatial distribution of development: the roles of nature and history

Economists point to three factors to explain how population is distributed: geographical characteristics, agglomeration, and history. This column, taken from a new Vox eBook, examines how economic and technological development have changed the ways in which two first-nature characteristics – suitability for growing food and suitability for engaging in trade – impact population distribution. 

This column first appeared as a chapter in the Vox eBook, The Long Economic and Political Shadow of History, Volume 1, available to download here.


Related Links:
Vox - On the spatial distribution of development: the roles of nature and history

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

J. Vernon Henderson webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Dr Hilary Steedman discusses IFS report criticising huge investment into apprenticeships.

0725
Is the way in which the Government will fund new apprenticeships a monumental waste of money? Dr Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow at LSE specialising in apprenticeships.

 


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - The Today Programme

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Hilary Steedman webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

Trump's trade war may have already begun

“The idea of trade wars these days, what politicians have in mind is really a 19th-century or early 20th-century conception of trade,” said Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, a trade economist at the London School of Economics. “You don’t even know who you’re going to hurt with these kind of things. You’re probably going to destroy American jobs in the end.”


Related Links:
The New York Times - Trump's trade war may have already begun

CEP Trade

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Star Tribune Online

World awaits next move amid threat of trade war

Most experts have assumed the responsibilities of governance would temper Trump's trade posture. Given that nearly one-third of all U.S. trade is conducted with China and Mexico, a rupture risks severe economic damage. "The idea of trade wars these days, what politicians have in mind is really a 19th-century or early 20th-century conception of trade," said Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, a trade economist at the London School of Economics. "You don't even know who you're going to hurt with these kind of things. You're probably going to destroy American jobs in the end."


Related Links:
Star Tribune Online - World awaits next move amid threat of trade war

CEP Trade

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Apprenticeship levy and targets risk being poor value for money

Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at The London School of Economics, speaking on the BBC’s Today programme, said: “I think the IFS has really overstated their case here. We have a really serious skills problem in this country and we need to raise skills through apprenticeships in order to promote economic growth and improve our productivity levels, which are dire compared to Europe.”


Related Links:
Personnel Today - Apprenticeship levy and targets risk being poor value for money

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Hilary Steedman webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Delo (Slovenia)

Trump(izem) - return to the future

Nicholas Bloom (Stanford University) explores the political uncertainty in the world, and from 1900 on, he found out that after his election Trump increased uncertainty by at least twice and is comparable to that during the great economic crisis, the end of the twenties of the last century.


Related Links:
Delo (Slovenia) - Trump(izem) - return to the future

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty

The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Cash (Germany)

Verunsicherte medien, zuversichtliche unternehmen – wer behalt recht?

A study of three researchers Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven j. Davis has revealed that the current economic uncertainty is still higher than during times of 9 / 11 or the Lehman collapse. The experts at Swiss life asset managers analyze the situation.

Have, the Brexit and the US insecure you elections? Then, you're not alone. Researchers Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven j. Davis attempting to measure the economic insecurity and to depict in an index. It is collected for 12 countries, captured how often words with reference to uncertainty and instability in the media. Currently, index is higher than to times of crisis like 9/11, the Lehman collapse, or Europe's debt crisis the "economic policy uncertainty".


Related Links:
Cash (Germany) - Verunsicherte medien, zuversichtliche unternehmen – wer behalt recht?

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty

The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Workers are happier with less hierarchy

The World Wellbeing Panel agrees that every effort should be made to reduce middle management, write Nick Powdthavee and Paul Frijters.

Workers’ satisfaction with their job is, on average, higher in a flatter organisation than in a hierarchical organisation. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world on the impact of different organisational structures on workers’ wellbeing.

The World Wellbeing Panel on wellbeing and organisational structures is available here. The experts, their affiliations and their responses to the survey are here.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Workers are happier with less hierarchy

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage



News Posted: 30/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

NZZ.at (Germany)

Ignorant and irresponsible

Not surprisingly, when an index for global political uncertainty, compiled records so unsafe level, inter alia by the Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom, on a high, (Stanford). And Austria's foreign trade must prepare for uncertain times (the press).


Related Links:
NZZ.at (Germany) - Ignorant and irresponsible

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 27/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Quint

Blame monopolies for short-changing U.S. workers

There are several worrying trends in the global economy, such as rising inequality within countries and slowing productivity growth. But perhaps the most troubling of them is the fall in labor’s share of national income. … Two new papers suggest that the rise might be due to an increase in market concentration. If industries are slowly inching toward monopoly, a few superstar companies in each sector could be squeezing profits out of the rest of the economy. The first of these new papers is by a large, star-studded team from the U.S. and Europe -- David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence Katz, Christina Patterson and John Van Reenen. Titled “Concentrating on the Fall of the Labor Share,” it is short, clear and relies on relatively simple theories and general observations.

 

Related publications

Autor D, Dorn D, Katz LF, Patterson C, Reenen JV. Concentrating on the Fall of the Labor Share. American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings. Forthcoming;107 (5).

 


Related Links:
Bloomberg Quint - Blame monopolies for short-changing U.S. workers

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 27/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Does a firm hiring an experienced manager improve its performance?

Exporters to Angola that hired managers with specific types of experience were more likely to succeed, write Giordano Mion, Luca David Opromolla and Alessandro Sforza.

The enormous variation in firm performance has become a focus of empirical and theoretical interest throughout the social sciences, including economics. ... We believe the next question to be addressed in this literature is what happens when managers move from one firm to another. Does a firm hiring a good manager improve its performance? How much? If yes, is it due to the manager intrinsic capabilities or is it due to the knowledge and abilities the manager has learned in previous firms? What happens to the firm when the “good” manager leaves?


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Does a firm hiring an experienced manager improve its performance?

The Diffusion of Knowledge via Managers' Mobility

CEP Trade

Giordano Mion webpage

Alessandro Sforza webpage



News Posted: 26/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

YLE (Finland)

Taloudellinen epävarmuus kalvaa brexit-Britanniaa

Britain's economy made a decision after the brexit-lock braking. One-third of the companies that froze investment plans as a result of a decision. The collapse of the value of the pound sterling told the concern in the market. Light in the darkness is brought to the car manufacturer Nissan's fall made an extensive investment decision. The British Government has committed itself to the EU get rid of presented 7 000 jobs in the creative vitality after spending as evidence of Brexit in. However, the decision by the secretive Government boosted Nissanille. Researcher Swati Dhingra to keep secret the agreement concern.


Related Links:
YLE (Finland) - Taloudellinen epävarmuus kalvaa brexit-Britanniaa

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 26/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Businessweek

Trump's uncertainty principle

The cloud of uncertainty Trump has kicked up may be a big deal for the economy, or not. … For one thing, uncertainty isn’t necessarily bad. It simply means the distribution of possible outcomes—both upward and downward—has widened. Investors in the stock market seem to be betting on the upside of the distribution, judging from the 6.5 percent rise in the S&P 500 since the election. It’s also possible that what looks like economic uncertainty is really just scary reports in the news media. Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom, an originator of the Economic Policy Uncertainty Index, joked (I think) in an e-mail, “It may simply be the news has no connection to reality—as you know from Trump, you guys are the biggest liars.”


Related Links:
Bloomberg Businessweek - Trump's uncertainty principle

Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty

Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 26/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Challenges.fr (France)

2016: 'in success formidable pour l'industrie automobile britannique'

Thomas Sampson, Professor at the London