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News and Press

News Archive 2015

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Our most popular reads of 2015 and a prediction for 2016

The biggest issue for 2016...is the same as it was for 2015: the possibility of Brexit
Section by John Van Reenen
Being part of the world's largest economic trading block benefits the UK through more trade and foreign investment (and yes, by attracting talented people too). All serious analysis shows that the average Britain can expect cuts in real incomes after Brexit. To get the same level of access to the Single market we would, like Norway, have to continue paying a large ''entry fee'', adopt the same regulations and cease to have a say in Europe's development. So unless we wake up soon, Britain will slope towards exit.

And here are our most popular articles in 2015:

Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia
Voting for Jeremy Corbyn as leader is a gut reaction to Labour's electoral defeat. Corbyn does point to some real economic problems facing Britain but his policies are based largely on the kind of wishful thinking that is endemic in UK politics and both blights Labour's past. His popularity lies in Labour's failure to defend its own record in government. The party needs to learn from its successes as well as its evident recent failures if it wants to re-build, writes John Van Reenen.

This article was posted online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on December 31, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 31/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health Affairs Blog

Making sense of price and quantity variations in U.S. health care

A recent study by Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor, and John Van Reenen has documented the remarkable variations across regions and age groups, and within regions, in U.S. health care spending. Previously, the Dartmouth Atlas project studied variations using Medicare data on people over 65, and the 2013 Institute of Medicine study showed no association between spending and quality in both over-65 Medicare and under-65 private insurance markets.

This article was published online by the Health Affairs Blog on December 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 30/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

USNews Health

Hospital prices vary widely across the United States

The cost of medical care varies widely across the United States, a new study reports. Hospitals negotiate the cost of medical services with insurance companies. And, the new report found that prices at hospitals in monopoly markets are 15 percent higher than those at hospitals in areas with at least four providers.

This article was published online by USNews Health on December 26, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 26/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Western Mail (Cardiff)

These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

News

Dr Joan Costa Font commenting on the Catalan elections.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on December 21, 2015
Link to programme here
Also broadcast on 6 other BBC outlets

See also
NPR/National Public Radio
Link
Also broadcast on 9 other stations

Related links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health Management.org

Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Saga Magazine

Ten good reasons to go for a winter walk

2. It's better for you than the gym
Well, that's the conclusion of researchers from the London School of Economics, who claim regular brisk walking is the best exercise for maintaining a healthy weight. Having analysed data from the annual Health Survey for England, researchers found that adults who regularly walk briskly for more than 30 minutes tend to have a lower body mass index and smaller waist than those who take part in sports or exercise at the gym. The results were particularly pronounced in the over-50s.

This article appeared in Saga Magazine on 21 December 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Private Sector Development (World bank blog)

What's next fo the competitive cities initiative: ‘To travel far, let's travel together'

The World Bank Group launched the Competitive Cities report [1] on December 10 - ''Competitive Cities for Jobs and Growth: What, Who and How,'' which represents almost two years of research and analysis to put together a reliable, comprehensive and unified body of work. It is aimed primarily to help cities formulate and implement economic development strategies, and it is intended to be used by city leaders themselves. ... ''This [report] seems like a natural outflow from the World Development Report 2009 [7] ... [That report in] 2009 was a huge step [8] in getting us towards thinking more about cities [9]. What is really nice about this report is that it is the next step on this journey [of trying to understand] how we should be structuring decision-making to try to drive forward this [economic development of cities] agenda.'' - Professor Henry Overman, London School of Economics; Director, What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth.

This article was published online by Private Sector Development (World bank blog) on December 18, 2015
Link to the blog article here

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage



News Posted: 18/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Becker's Hospital Review

Week in review: 10 biggest healthcare stories this week

3. New data shows experts were wrong about where healthcare costs less
Researchers analyzed the real prices hospitals negotiate with private insurers and found places that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The new ''Big Data'' project from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics shows that the prices hospitals negotiate with private health insurers vary significantly within and across geographic regions in the U.S.

This article was published online by the Becker's Hospital Review on December 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 18/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

China Daily

Experts split on Brexit impact on Chinese links

Dennis Novy believes Chinese investors would no longer take the UK seriously if the country left the EU. ''It would be one-sided deterioration'', argues the associate professor of economics at the University of Warwick, who has written numerous articles on the subject. ''Britain would be in a much worse position and would not matter much to China, since Britain is a relatively small player on the global stage. ''The EU works because it leverages size. There are a lot of small countries in Europe that individually are not terribly powerful, but together they can increase their economic and political power. Of course, this is also true for the UK.'' He believes the main reason China is talking to the UK now is due to direct influence Beijing believes the UK has in Brussels. ''What would Britain look like if it left the EU? This is the big question, and I think this is the weak point of the Brexit campaign because we have a relatively good understanding what the future would look like if Britain remains in the EU, but if it left it would be much harder to think about'', Novy says.

This article was published online by the China Daily (Europe) on December 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 18/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Center for American Progress

Helping firms by helping employees? Work-life balance in America

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, Daniela Scur and John Van Reenen
There is a long history of debate within business, policy, and economic literature regarding whether firms can improve their performance by treating their employees well. One view is that policies to improve employees' work-life balance - such as working from home, part-time working, child care support, and generous maternity leave - are both expensive and often counterproductive for firms. For example, the U.S. internet firm Yahoo famously banned working from home in February 2013, stating in its leaked e-mail that ''Speed and quality are often sacrificed when working at home.'' In this view, improved employee work-life balance will come at the expense of substantially lower profits for most firms. An alternative view is that improving employees' work-life balance may simultaneously raise firms' profits. For example, the U.S. airline JetBlue allows its call-center employees to work flexible hours from home in order to attract highly skilled employees, such as college educated women with young children, so that JetBlue can offer superior customer service.

This article was published by the Center for American Progress on December 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Helping firms by helping employees? Work-life balance in America, Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, Daniela Scur and John Van Reenen, Center for American Progress, December 2015

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Daniela Scur webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage



News Posted: 18/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph

Five simple habits that will make you feel happier

Happiness expert Prof Paul Dolan, a professor at the London School of Economics, recently outlined five tips for feeling more content.

This article was published online by the Telegraph on December 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 17/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Europe's fate rests in the hands of Spanish voters this weekend

There is much in the Ciudadanos programme, drawn up by Luis Garicano, a London School of Economics professor, to appeal to investors.

This article was published in The Times on December 17, 2015
Link to article http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/business/columnists/simonnixon/article4642974.ece">here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 17/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV News at 10

A British Exit from the EU? There's still no plan for that

John Van Reenen interviewed by ITN
A group of economists from the LSE have tried to model the effect Brexit would have on trade. Interestingly, they concluded that even in the best-case scenario Britain would face substantial costs.

The ITV interview and article were published online on December 17, 2015
Link to article and embedded interview here
[Prof Van Reenen speaks around 1.42 mins in]

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 17/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

DonnaD

Cellulare a scuola, sì o no? I consigli per usarlo nel modo giusto

A survey conducted by two researchers from the London School of Economics on a hundred high schools revealed that in schools where it is permissible for mobile students lose the equivalent of a week of school because of the constant distractions.

This article was published by DonnaD (Italy) on December 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Nursing Times

Is there a national shortage of nurses? Which specialties are mainly affected?

Article by David Metcalf
Would it be sensible to fill vacancies by attracting extra nurses from outside of the EU? These are the main questions the home secretary asked the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to examine earlier this year. The MAC will report in February 2016. The background to this commission is as follows. The MAC analysed NHS nurse numbers in late 2014, reported to the government at the end of January 2015 and published its report in February. The Centre for Workforce Intelligence (CfWI), which distils NHS evidence on behalf of the Department of Health, did not recommend placing adult nurses on the Shortage Occupation List (SOL). Occupations on the SOL get priority for skilled non-EU immigration.

This article was published in Nursing Times on December 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 16/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Medical Xpress

Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for the privately insured

A new ''Big Data'' project from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics demonstrates that the prices hospitals negotiate with private health insurance companies vary considerably within and across geographic regions in the United States. The study, released today, provides the most comprehensive and detailed analysis of private health care spending in the U.S. to date and examines the real prices hospitals negotiate with private insurers for medical services. The researchers analyzed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people covered by three of the nation's largest insurance companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealth. The data, provided by the Health Care Cost Institute, represents spending and utilization for nearly 30 percent of all individuals in the U.S. with employer-sponsored coverage.

This article was published online by Medical Xpress on December 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 16/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Time

Costs of hospital operations can vary wildly by location

The cost insurance companies pay for a medical operation in a hospital varies dramatically from city to city within the U.S. and can even vary by a factor of nine within an individual city, according to new research. The study from researchers at Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania and other schools relies on data from private insurers to provide a lens into health care costs. Researchers found that the cost of hospital visits is the primary driver of differences in health care cost between regions. ''These price differences between hospitals can be thousands of dollars,'' said study author Martin Gaynor, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University.

This article was published online by Time on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

infoPLC.net (Spain)

Nos quitara el empleo un robot?

Robots at work is a study by Georg Graetz of the University of Uppsala in Sweden and Guy Michaels at the London School of Economics that analyzes statistics from 1993 until 2007 of 14 industries in 17 developed countries. According to the study, industrial robots have had a ''substantial'' contribution to productivity and growth. The research also finds that fears that robots are destroying jobs on a large scale are unfounded, although there is evidence that they can lead to a reduction of hours of work for low specialization workers.

This article was published online by infoPLC.net (Spain) on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

HealthNewsDigest.com

Hospital prices show ‘mind-boggling' variation

Health care is among the largest sectors of the U.S. economy and accounted for more than 17 percent of gross domestic product (GDP) in 2014. About 60 percent of the U.S. population has private health insurance, which pays for over a third of health care spending annually. ''The fact that prices are so high and can vary so much for hospital treatments of the same costs and quality is simply mind-boggling to foreign observers of the U.S. health care system,'' says John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, one of the study's authors. ''This is surely one of the reasons why U.S. health care absorbs a bigger share of GDP than in every other large advanced country.''

This article was published online by HealthNewsDigest.com on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Modern Healthcare

Data suggest hospital consolidation drives higher prices for privately insured

Commercial health plans that cover workplace benefits for millions of Americans pay higher prices to hospitals that have little or no competition, according to a new study that raises questions about how to slow U.S. health spending amid a wave of consolidation. In a study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, researchers analyzed health spending across multiple U.S. markets and compared the numbers for Medicare with claims data for 88 million patients with employer-sponsored health insurance.

This article was published online by Modern Healthcare on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Albany Times Union blog

Study: Hospital costs vary widely nationwide, Capital Region in the middle

Economists at Yale, Carnegie Mellon, the University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics have released a paper that shows vast differences in charges for hospital procedures across the country. Unlike some previous studies, the research by Martin Gaynor of Carnegie Mellon and Zack Cooper of Yale is based on the actual amount that insurers negotiated for various procedures. Other analyses have been based on such information as what hospital the hospitals charge - which is not the fees that insurance companies actually negotiate and pay.

This article was published online by the Albany Times Union blog on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

AEIdeas

New study casts doubt on Obamacare's wisdom of encouraging hospital mergers

Three of the nation's largest insurance companies - Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealth - have let researchers have a look at the negotiated prices they pay for services and procedures like C-sections, MRIs and hospital stays. ... [Zack] Cooper said the team, including John Van Reenen from the London School of Economics and the University of Pennsylvania's Stuart Craig, controlled for all those factors. And Cooper said market power matters more than the rest. The report found after decades of mergers, nearly a third of U.S. markets have monopolies, or are close to having monopolies.

This article was published online by AEIdeas on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yale News

Hospital prices show ‘mind-boggling' variation across U.S. driving up health care costs

The prices hospitals negotiate with health insurance companies vary enormously within and across geographic regions in the United States, according to a new study coauthored by a Yale economist. ... ''Virtually everything we know about health spending and most of the basis for federal health policy comes from the analysis of Medicare data,'' says Zack Cooper, assistant professor of health policy and economics at Yale University, one of the study's authors. ''The rub is that Medicare only covers 16 percent of the population. The majority of individuals - 60 percent of the U.S. population - receive health care coverage from private insurers. This new dataset really allows us to understand what influences health spending for the majority of Americans. This information is critical to creating better public policy.''

This article was published online by Yale News on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Caller

Study: Less money spent on Medicare doesn't mean cheaper health care

According to the report, titled ''The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured,'' information collected on Medicare has largely impacted the country's health-care policy as data on private plans was not widely available. Using data collected by the Health Care Pricing Project on the private health sector's spending, the authors of the study - Zack Cooper of Yale University, Stuart Craig of University of Pennsylvania, Martin Gaynor of Carnegie Mellon University and John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance - found variations in Medicare spending were highly contingent on the quality of care whereas price variation between the United State's 306 Hospital Referral Regions was the key component in spending discrepancies for those with private insurance plans.

This article was published online by The Daily Caller (Washington, DC) on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Minnesota Star Tribune

Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds

While many studies have shown that Medicare gets a good deal in Rochester, Duluth and Minneapolis, new work from four economists suggests that private insurers in those cities pay noticeably more for care.

This article was published online by the Minnesota Star Tribune on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

See also
Thursday 16 December
Duluth News Tribune
Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds
Bloomberg Business
Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds
Scitechdaily
Hospital price study reveals 'mind-boggling' variation across USA
Pharmacy Choice
Hospital price study reveals 'mind-boggling' variation across USA
HealthCanal
Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for privately insured
Carnegie Mellon University
Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for privately insured

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Marketplace.org

An unprecedented look at medical costs nationwide

Researchers have compiled data on $682 billion worth of claims to look at the truth behind medical costs.

This article was published online by Marketplace.org on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Becker's Hospital CFO

Researchers use hospital prices to show need to 'combat market power'

Hospitals that face fewer competitors have considerably higher prices, according to a new study from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics. ... The study shows that hospitals with fewer competitors have substantially higher prices, beyond those that would be driven by quality or cost differences. According to the study, hospitals in monopoly markets have prices that are more than 15 percent higher than those in areas with four or more competitors.

This article was published online by Becker's Hospital CFO on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

The Experts Were Wrong About the Best Places for Better and Cheaper Health Care

... But a new study casts doubt on that simple message. The research looked not only at Medicare but also at a huge, new database drawn from private-insurance plans - the sorts used by most Americans for health care. And it shows that places that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on health care over all. Grand Junction, as it happens, is one of the most expensive health care markets in the country for the privately insured - despite its unusually low spending on Medicare.

This article was published by the New York Times on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais (Spain)

La digitalización y la robotización no aparecen en el PIB

Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (2014) teachers at the University of Uppsala (Sweden) and the LSE, have written a study called 'Robots at Work' that has examined the effects of the use of robots in 14 manufacturing sectors, services and even agriculture and concludes that robots increase the productivity of labour without effecting so much wages.

This article was published online by El Pais (Spain) on December 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 14/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Policy Network

Mind the gap: capital and labour in the digital economy

A recent study by Guy Michaels and Georg Graetz shows that robots might not drive people out of work. Instead they raise productivity which reduces the prices of goods and services. Lower prices increase demand to which firms react by hiring new workers. Although robots might not destroy jobs overall, there are strong indications that technology profoundly changes the structure of labour markets.

This article was published online by Policy Network on December 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 14/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

KABC-AM

News

...phones see clear improvement in test scores according to a study by the London School of Economics quote we found the impact of banning...

This news item was broadcast by KABC-AM on December 13, 2015
Link to programme here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist - Free exchange

Europe's carbon-trading system is better than thought, and could be better still

In December talks in Paris involving more than 200 countries may result in a new agreement aimed at reducing carbon emissions. In the months leading up to the conference, The Economist will be publishing guest columns by experts on the economic issues involved. Here, Arthur van Benthem, of the University of Pennsylvania, and Ralf Martin, of Imperial College London argue that adoption of a price floor and the end of free permit allocations would strengthen the world's biggest carbon pricing system.

This article was published by The Economist - Free exchange blog on December 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Ralf Martin CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 11/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

A notch looser

The new proposals would probably affect just a few hundred hectares, says Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics—“a spit in the ocean”. But it is nonetheless significant that the government is sanctioning any kind of review of the green-belt policy, he says.

This article appeared in the Economist on 11 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! France

Minceur : la marche vigoureuse meilleure que le sport

L'etude est parue dans la revue Risk Analysis a l'initiative de deux specialistes de l'economie de sante, le Dr Grace Lordan (London School of Economics and Political Science, UK) et le Dr Debayan Pakrashi (School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia).

This article was published online by Yahoo! France on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Lincolnshire Echo

Every brisk step counts towards improving your health - so get walking

... your gym membership for some good walking shoes. Research from the London School of Economics and Political Science ...

This article was published by the Lincolnshire Echo on December 10, 2015

Also in
Newcastle Journal

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Corrections and Clarifications: December 10, 2015

We said in reporting official Labour Market Statistics that ''Three in four new jobs go to migrants from EU countries'' (News, Nov 12). This was wrong. The Office for National Statistics has stated that its estimates of employment by nationality and country of birth relate to the number of people in employment rather than the number of jobs. Changes therefore show net changes in the number of people employed, not the proportion of new jobs that have been filled by UK and non-UK workers. Analysis of statistics by the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance has consistently found that immigrants do not account for a majority of new jobs, and that the immigrant share in new jobs is broadly the same as the share of immigrants in the working age population. We are happy to make this clear.

This article was published in The Times on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2015 Election Analyses No. 19, February 2015

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Aftenposten

Bergensere selger kaker som bistand til britisk ungdom

The opportunities for social mobility, that higher education and income than the parents, is less in the United Kingdom than in Norway. Professor Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance in the United Kingdom in 2005 published a sensational report on this subject, and says that today are few signs of progress. On the contrary, the issue is getting bigger on the single field.

This article was published online by Aftenposten.no (Norway) on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement

Social mobility prospects remain bleak, academic warns

The prospects for improving social mobility for future generations remain bleak, an author of a key social study released a decade ago will warn. Stephen Machin, professor of economics and research director at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), will say today that an ''ever-escalating educational arms race'' has meant the middle classes have continued to find new ways to retain the upper-hand. Prof Machin was one of the authors of a seminal study in 2005, which concluded that social mobility in Britain, alongside the United States, was lower than any other developed country. The study, supported by the social mobility charity the Sutton Trust, warned that many young people would remain stuck where their parents were if improvements were not made.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News online - Education and Family

Norwegian school funds UK youth charity

'Bleak' prospects
A seminar on social mobility in the UK, to be held at the London School of Economics on Thursday, will hear that too little progress is being made.
It will be addressed by Prof Stephen Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance and author of a landmark report in 2005 highlighting the lack of social mobility.

This article was published online by BBC News on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

China's growth: a brief history

Article by Linda Yueh
My own research with John Van Reenen has shown that GDP growth would be lower by between 0.43 to 1% per year if not for joint ventures that allowed for transfers of knowledge and technology, as opposed to domestic innovation.

This article was published online by the Harvard Business Review on December 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Why Has China Grown So Fast? The Role of International Technology Transfer', John Van Reenen, Linda Yueh, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1121, February 2012

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 09/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Connected World

Automated Distribution Center: A Vision of the Robotic Future

Earlier this year in a blog entitled ''Robots are infiltrating the growth statistics,'' the Brookings Institution commented on jointly conducted new research from Uppsala University and the London School of Economics, which indicated that robots were having a significant impact on the growth of productivity.

This article was published online by Connected World on December 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 09/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

'Middle classes have found new ways to retain their upper hand in the educational arms race'

Article by Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin
Private tutoring is booming and elite universities remain preserve of middle classes; something must change, say Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin
Social mobility is too low in Britain. Too many people are stuck from one generation to the next in the same income bracket or social class group. Too much talent goes unfulfilled at great social and economic cost to the nation. We know this from a seminal study published by the Sutton Trust and produced by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics 10 years ago.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on December 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 09/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio

Are we headed for a manufacturing slowdown? With John Van Reenen of LSE

John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, discusses today's UK manufacturing.

This interview was broadcast by Share Radio on December 8, 2015
Link to interview here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 08/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Irish News

You really can walk your way to better health

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) found that people aged over 50, and women of all ages, who regularly walked briskly for more than 30 minutes at a time, had a lower body mass index (BMI) and smaller waists than those who say they favour other forms of exercise, including gym workouts, cycling and swimming.

This article was published by The Irish News on December 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 08/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Centrist reformers poised to land late blow in Spanish elections

Analysts already point to Ciudadanos as the likely kingmaker after the December 20 election. The party is expected to command a parliamentary group so large that it would be impossible for others to rule without it. Ciudadanos leaders, however, are more ambitious still. ''We are in this to win'', says Luis Garicano, a professor at the London School of Economics who is in charge of the party's economic programme. ''We are very close to overtaking the Socialists, or have already overtaken them, and are in striking distance of the [ruling] Popular party.''

This article was published by The Financial Times on December 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 08/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Independent

Ditch the gym: Why walking the weight off is the way to go this Christmas

Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective — in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases — than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes. “People are also more likely to get walking ‘right’, as compared to gym exercises — it’s easier to know if you’re working to a moderate level with walking than with other exercises,” Dr Lordan adds.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent on 7 December 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 07/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

How can the UK improve its lagging productivity — and still build the workforce

On video: Vince Cable, Diane Coyle, Bronwyn Curtis and Anna Leach, with John Van Reenen and Robin Mansell
LSE Business Review's official launch event took place on 2 December. A panel of top UK economists discussed How can the UK improve its lagging productivity - and still build the workforce? Former Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills Vince Cable was the keynote speaker and touched on many insights from his book After the Storm: The World Economy and Britain's Economic Future.

This post was published by the LSE Business Review blog on December 7, 2015
Watch the video here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 07/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Open Democracy

The Eurozone crisis and the future of Europe, as viewed from Greece

Structural reforms that were wrongly timed, or outright wrong, feature large in a discussion paper[9] published last week by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE. The paper’s authors, Tito Boeri and Juan Francisco Jimeno, long-standing advocates of policies to tackle labour market segmentation in Italy and Spain, are highly critical of the reforms actually imposed on peripheral countries by European institutions (including the ECB)

This article appeared in Open Democracy on 6 December 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
The Unbearable Divergence of Unemployment in Europe Tito Boeri, Juan Francisco Jimeno, November 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1384

Related Links
Tito Boeri webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 06/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The i

Winter walks to warm the soul

... published last month, walking is better for you than hitting the gym. The London School of Economics found people who...

This article was published online by The i on December 5, 2015
(no link available)

Also in:
The Northern Echo (Darlington)
The Independent

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

7 days

Taking the simple steps to a healthier habit

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) states that people over 50, and women of all ages, who regularly walked briskly for more than 30 minutes at a time, had a lower body mass index (BMI) and smaller waistlines than those who say they favour other exercises like gym workouts, cycling and swimming.

This article appeared in 7 days on 5 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Examiner

Skip the gym and start walking to boost your health

Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective – in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases – than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes. “People are also more likely to get walking ’right’, as compared to gym exercises – it’s easier to know if you’re working to a moderate level with walking than with other exercises,” Dr Lordan adds.

This article appeared in the Irish Examiner on 5 December 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

European Politics and Policy Blog

Debunking the myths about British science after an EU exit

“Our current assessment is that leaving the EU would be likely to impose substantial costs on the UK economy and would be a very risky gamble.” Analysis by economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)

This article appeared in the European Politics and Policy Blog on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News online

Finding new ways of going Forth

These economists, in an article published by the Centre for Economic Performance, concluded it could also have a lot to do with the 'search costs'. That is, the hassle of finding out other means of getting to work was more costly than the advantages perceived as likely to come from doing so.

This article appeared on BBC News Online on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
The upside of London Tube strikes Shaun Larcom, Ferdinand Rauch and Tim Willems November 2015 Paper No' CEPCP455

Related Links
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Trade webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

CMI - Chartered Management Institute

The Economist agrees: the accidental manager's time is up

The Economist quoted a study by John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, which conducted 14,000 interviews and discovered that UK employees score their bosses less favourably than equivalent workers in the US, Germany and Japan.

This article was published online by CMI on December 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage



News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Edinburgh Evening News

Keeping fit is a walk in the park

Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective – in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases – than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes. “People are also more likely to get walking ‘right’, as compared to gym exercises – it’s easier to know if you’re working to a moderate level with walking than with other exercises,” Dr Lordan adds.

This article appeared in the Edinburgh Evening News on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Finance (France)

Dans l'industrie, les patrons français moins bons que les patrons allemands

Chaque année, John van Reenen, directeur du Centre for Economic Performance à la London School of Economics, et son équipe demandent à 14.000 salariés de noter de 1 à 5 leur patron. Résultat : la Grande-Bretagne se retrouve distancée par les bons élèves.

This article appeared in Yahoo! Finance (France) on 3 December 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mature Times

Tackling the challenges of dementia

Professor Martin Knapp at the London School of Economics and Political Science will lead another study, which will develop a publicly available tool to help meet the future needs of dementia patients and their carers. A model will be developed from this which will enable us to better predict the future costs of dementia.

This article was published by Mature Times on December 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 03/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Belfast Telegraph

Want to slim down and feel much healthier? Then try going for a stroll

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) found that people over 50, and women of all ages, who regularly walked briskly for more than 30 minutes at a time, had a lower body mass index (BMI) and smaller waists than those who say they favour other forms of exercise, including gym workouts, cycling and swimming. (Men aged under 50 had similar waist sizes whether they walked or went to the gym.)

This article was published by the Belfast Telegraph on December 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 03/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Could brisk walks be more effective than running for slimming down?

WANT to slim down and get healthier in the New Year? Forget trendy workouts and pricey gym memberships - according to research, you're better off going for a walk.
So what is it about walking that's so effective? A very big factor is that people who like to walk tend to do it very regularly, so they are more active overall - compared with non-walkers who, while they may say they do other forms of exercise, are possibly doing them far less frequently. Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective - in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases - than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes.

This article was published by The Scotsman on December 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 02/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

La Comunidad Valenciana ante el dilemma de la reindustrializacion

Faced with the dilemma of re-industrialization Valencia
Andres Rodriguez-Pose, Professor at the London School of Economics, said for his part, that the Valencian economy is currently ''very weak''. And has highlighted the paradox that, despite being a territory historically exporter, the internationalization of enterprises is lower than the Spanish average. And that, despite being a community with entrepreneurial tradition, the level of training of entrepreneurs is also below the average.

This article was published by El Pais on December 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage



News Posted: 02/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Crosswater Job Guide (Germany)

Die jobs der zukunft? Hauptsache digital

Now, robots in the past have never been job-killers. First investigations of scientists Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels on the effects of robots show an increase in labour productivity, added value and wages, but also a replacement of low-skilled workers. However, the researchers could not find a significant impact on employment. This also applies to Germany. The robot will bring productivity gains between 10 and 30 percent, the consulting firm Boston Consulting Group (BCG) estimates.

This article was published online by Crosswater Job Guide (Germany) on December 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 01/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Georgia News Day

How many calories can YOU burn walking between New York's subway stations? New map reveals exactly how much energy you can work off on your daily commute

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by Georgia News Day on December 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 01/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg View

Watch Out China: A Reserve Currency Brings Boom and Busts

Even the private sector, though, could be harmed by capital inflows. As economists Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse, and Luca Fornaro have found, large influxes of foreign money can lead to booms and busts. They can also cause a country to shift resources out of manufacturing, where productivity growth is often high, into service-oriented industries where productivity is relatively stagnant

This article appeared in Bloomberg View on 1 December 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Large Capital Inflows, Sectoral Allocation and Economic Performance Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse, Luca Fornaro, May 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1348

Related Links
Gianluca Benigno webpage
Trade webpage

News Posted: 01/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How many calories can YOU burn by walking between subway stations?

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by the MailOnline on November 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

COP21: Gates fund to back development of liquid hydrocarbons

The move was welcomed by a group of British scientists, academics and officials who have been pushing a “global Apollo programme” to boost energy innovation. But they cautioned that to be truly effective, governments had to include two elements in their plan. First, a clear target had to be set to reduce the cost of clean electricity below that of coal, preferably by 2025, and second, it was important to establish a committee that would properly co-ordinate the global research effort and identify successful opportunities.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 30 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Success of living wage gamble will depend on employers' response

John Van Reenen, economics professor at LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, thinks Mr Osborne has been lulled into a false sense of security by the labour market’s rapid recovery over the past five years. “It comes down to a sense of complacency that because we have done OK on the jobs market side, going forward we will be able to regulate and mandate these big increases in wages, which I think is likely to affect small employers, places which are not far off the minimum wage at the moment,” he said. “My gut sense is that it is actually going to cause quite significant falls in employment.”

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 30 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mirror.co.uk

Will George Osborne's steamy shower scene make him King of Tory Jungle?

Chancellor George Osborne survived the Bush Tucker trial that was Wednesday's spending review. ... Professor John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance, said: ''The sexy centrefold was a naked reversal of his attempt to cut in-work tax credits.''

This article was published online by the Mirror.co.uk on November 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 28/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

End of the accidental boss

THE low productivity of British workers has several possible culprits. Inefficient family-run companies are sometimes blamed, as are poor workforce skills. But whereas these problems are well documented, another factor is glossed over: the mediocre performance of British bosses. John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, argues that the standard of British management is ''significantly below'' that in leading countries. His team carried out 14,000 interviews with employees around the world and found that British workers rated their supervisors lower than those in countries such as America, Germany and Japan (see chart). ''We are not in the premier league,'' he says.

This article was published by The Economist on November 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 28/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

FEWEEK.CO.UK

Good news in Budget - but what does it mean for learners?

Sandra McNally, Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research, considers the possible impact of Chancellor George Osborne's November 25 Budget.

This article was published in FEWeek.co.uk on November 27, 2015
Link to article here. See p.14.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 27/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Stampa Societa

La crisi di mezza età? Esiste, ma dopo si torna a sorridere

Happiness in life can be traced in the shape of a 'U'. We start with the enthusiasm of 20 years, then you hit the lowest point between 45 and 55, but from sixty things start to look up again. ... The latest confirmation comes from the study of three researchers Nattavudh Powdthavee, Terence Cheng and Andrew Oswald of the Universities of Melbourne and Warwick and the London School of Economics who have collected tens of thousands of questionnaires on the welfare of people between 20 and 70 years in the United Kingdom, Australia and Germany.

This article was published by La Stampa Societa on November 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Well-being: Results from Four Data Sets, Terence C. Cheng, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew J. Oswald, The Economic Journal, October 2015
DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12256

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 27/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Childless adults are generally just as happy as parents

And just to be clear, having a kid isn't worse for you than unemployment or losing a spouse, even though that's what the new study found. Nick Powdthavee, a happiness researcher at the London School of Economics and the University of Melbourne, notes that the average change in well-being reported in the paper ''was derived from a raw data that 70 percent of people reported a drop in life satisfaction following having a child''.

This article was published online by Vox on November 26, 2015
Lik to article here

Also in
MSN PH
Childless adults are generally just as happy as parents

Related publications
Think having children will make you happy?, Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Psychologist, Volume 22, April 2009

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 26/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Autumn Statement 2015: U-turn on tax credits saves the short term argument, but serious long term questions remain

Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, John Van Reenen, gives his reaction to the Autumn Statement. Whilst the U-turn on tax credits might appear to be the big story in the short term, the longer term plans continue to represent a shrinking of the state on a spectacular scale.

This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on November 26, 2015
Link to response here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 26/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Spending review brings good news for science

Sustained public investment in research can boost business, writes Romesh Vaitilingam
In the government's recent Spending Review, Chancellor George Osborne had surprisingly good news for UK researchers and UK businesses. 'In the modern world, one of the best ways you can back business is by backing science', he said. 'That's why, in the last Parliament, I protected the resource budget for science in cash terms. In this Parliament, I'm protecting it in real terms.' His recognition of the importance of public spending on research echoes the conclusions of a report published just ahead of the 2010 Spending Review by Research Councils UK (RCUK), the strategic partnership of the UK's seven Research Councils.

This article was published by the LSE Business Review blog on November 26, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Romesh Vaitilingam webpage
Romesh is on Twitter, @econromesh



News Posted: 26/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Healthcare competition can improve management quality and save lives

Money should follow patients and they need information and choice, write Nicholas Bloom and John Van Reenen
In work with Carol Propper and Stephan Seiler, we evaluate whether competition improves hospital quality, in particular by stimulating greater managerial effort. We do this in the context of the acute care hospitals in the NHS.

This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on November 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Healthcare: How competition can improve management quality and save lives, Nicholas Bloom and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
The Impact of Competition on Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals, Nicholas Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen, Review of Economic Studies 82: 457-89

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 25/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Food World News

Depression during midlife crisis: how to find relief when the happiness pattern takes a dip to depression

A study on happiness by researchers Dr Terence Cheng (University of Adelaide), Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee (Centre for Economic Performance, LSE) and Professor Andrew Oswald (Warwick University), verified a U-shaped happiness pattern among its 50,000 men and women subjects from Britain, Germany and Australia. The findings were based on assessments of the participants throughout their lives. This is the first study to monitor the same set of participants for a full cycle assessment, yet it is not the first study to determine the U-shape happiness pattern among individuals from other countries and from different times.

This article was published online by Food World News on November 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Well-being: Results from Four Data Sets, Terence C. Cheng, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew J. Oswald, The Economic Journal, October 2015
DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12256

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 25/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Finance and Development magazine

People in Economics: A generous-hearted life

Richard Layard profiled: ''Richard Layard, who believes the basic purpose of economics is the maximization of happiness and well-being''
A day after sharing a stage with the Dalai Lama, London School of Economics (LSE) professor Richard Layard is still buzzing. As director of the Wellbeing Programme at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, Layard focuses on the study of happiness.

This article was published by Finance and Development magazine on November 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 25/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Trade Only Today

Passion, energy and the other traits needed for entrepreneurial success

It turns out that whether in another hemisphere or right in our own backyard, entrepreneurial traits are strikingly similar ... being smart is only a start. Researchers at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business and the London School of Economics found that flourishing industrialists often got into trouble as teenagers - breaking the rules, taking things by force and challenging the status quo, as opposed to accepting what they were told (according to Ross Levine, who co-authored the study).

This article was published online by Trade Only Today on November 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief ... 'smart and illicit': the making of a successful entrepreneur, Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein, CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
Smart and illicit: Who becomes an entrepreneur and does it pay?, Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1237, August 2013

Related links
Yona Rubinstein webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 23/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

The UK needs a clear growth strategy to avoid short-term solutions to the productivity puzzle

Anna Valero suggests ways to deal with deficits in skills, infrastructure and innovation.

This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on 23 November, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Written evidence from Anna Valero, Centre for Economic Performance (LSE), to BIS Select Committee inquiry on the Government's productivity plan:
Link here
Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analalyses Series, March 2015

Related podcast/video
'Productivity and Business'. Interview with Anna Valero, March 2015.
Low productivity is probably the greatest challenge facing the UK economy, according to 'Productivity and Business' by Anna Valero, part of the CEP Election Economics series.
Link to video here

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 23/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

whoar.co.nz

Bernie Sanders is right: the top 0.1 percent have as much as the bottom 90 percent

In his speech Sanders also cited a remarkable statistic: 0.1 percent of American families enjoy almost as much as wealth 90 percent of the rest of the country put together. In 2014 just 160,000 families - each with a net worth in excess of $20.6 million - counted themselves among the wealthiest 0.1 percent of households. Together they owned nearly as much as everyone from the very poor to the upper middle class combined - 90 percent of the country - some 145 million families in total. Those statistics are from a recent paper by Emmanuel Saez of the University of California, Berkeley and Gabriel Zucman of the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by whoar.co.nz (New Zealand) on November 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Gabriel Zucman CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 21/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE EUROPP blog

We have been overlooking the relationship between immigration and international trade in services

The volume of international trade in services has grown rapidly over recent decades and, in fact, has outpaced growth in goods trade. Over the same period many developed countries experienced rapid growth in immigration. Gianmarco Ottaviano, Giovanni Peri and Greg Wright argue that while many studies have analysed the link between immigrants and trade in goods, the link between immigrants and trade in services is almost unexplored. Due to the customer-specific information required for the provision of services, this link may be particularly important.

This article was published on the LSE EUROPP blog on November 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Immigration: the link to international trade in services, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Giovanni Peri and Greg Wright. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
'Immigration, Trade and Productivity in Services: Evidence from UK Firms', Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, Giovanni Peri and Greg Wright, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1353, May 2015

Related links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Trade Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

CVER News

CVER gives evidence to the Select Committee on Social Mobility

On 18 November, representatives from the Centre for Vocational Education Research gave evidence to the House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility, as part of its inquiry into the transition from school to work for 14-24 year olds, with a focus on those young people who fall between the route of A-Levels and Higher Education and those classified as ‘not in education, employment or training’ (NEET).

CVER Director, Professor Sandra McNally, and Dr Stefan Speckesser, Chief Economist from the Institute for Employment Studies and member of the CVER consortium, took part in an evidence session on the use of data, its strengths and limitations, as well as the accessibility of relevant data. The complexities of vocational education data were described, and the need for merged data to gain better understanding of people’s participation in education and the labour market. The importance of generating administrative linked data as efficiently as possible across government departments was emphasised, as this would allow greater analysis of the education pathways and subsequent trajectories of young people in a far more contemporary setting. A transcript of the session is available online.

The Committee aims to report to the House of Lords with recommendations in late March 2016 - http://www.parliament.uk/social-mobility-committee.  



News Posted: 18/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Gavin Kelly blog

The debate on social mobility is stuck: time for a city perspective

Social mobility plays a curious and sometimes tortuous role in our national political psyche. We love talking about it even if we can't, or won't, do much about it. Greater mobility is a goal lionised by all politicians - along with the NHS it's perhaps the closest thing to a secular faith that you will find at Westminster. Our media lap up story after story on it. And research on the issue has undergone a mini-boom in our top universities, dominating the work of some of our finest scholars over the last decade or so.

This article was posted online on the Gavin Kelly blog on November 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America: A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009
Abstract | Full Paper
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Abstract | Full Paper

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 18/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Boras Tidning - Online

Maskinerna tar – och ger jobb

Tillsammans med kollegan Guy Michaels vid London School of Economics har de undersökt effekterna av den ökade robotiseringen mellan 1993 och 2007

This article apperaed on Bora Tidning Online on 17 November 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

IDG.se

Nej, än har robotarna inte knuffat ut mänsklig arbetskraft

Mellan 1993 och 2007 halverades priset på robotar och användningen av dem i industrin ökade med 150 procent. Det visar en studie av de två nationalekonomerna Georg Graetz vid Uppsala universitet och Guy Michaels vid London School of Economics.

This article appeared in IDG.se on 17 November 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

To find the energy to save the earth, shoot for the moon, article by Richard Layard

The world spends $100bn subsidising the private production of renewables using the inadequate technologies that are now available. We can surely spend $15bn on transformational research and development — to be followed, of course, by private sector efforts to apply the results. This should be high on the agenda for the climate change meeting in Paris beginning on November 30.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 17 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Hallands Nyheter

Robotar både tar och ger jobb - Affärsvärlden

In order of importance, it can be compared with the steam machine's breakthrough in the beginnings of industrialisation, according to Department of Economics Researcher George Graetz at Uppsala University.

This article was published by Hallands Nyheter (Sweden) on November 16, 2015
Link to article here

Also in
Affarsvarlden - online
Robotar bade tar och ger jobb - Affarsvarlden

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 16/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

WGCL-TV Online

Study: Daily Walks Beat Gym Workouts For Weight Control

London School of Economics researchers collected data from 1999 to 2012 to evaluate the link between various kinds of physical activity and weight, as reported by CBS News. The study analyzed how often people took 30-minute walks at a fast pace and how often people played sports or worked out at the gym. Researchers also considered heavy housework and manual labor in their analysis.

This article appeared on WGCL-TV Online on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

City Metric

Can better housing policy improve physical health and mental wellbeing too?

To that end, LSE’s Paul Dolan agrees that building on the green belt, to increase housing supply and cut commuting times, is “part of the solution”. His colleague Lord Richard Layard, the director of the wellbeing programme at the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, agrees: “If we allowed building on 10% of the green belt, we could largely solve the housing shortage.”

This article apperaed in City Metric on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Sharper elbows

Poor students have been protected by a generous maintenance grant and relaxed terms for the repayment of loans. Their participation rate has grown at a faster rate than that of their richer peers since the reform, finds Gill Wyness of the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Higher Education Gill Wyness, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA026

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Canberra Times

Is this the optimal exercise for staying slim?

Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at how regularly Britons engaged in 30 minutes or more of walking, moderate intensity exercise such as going to the gym, swimming, dancing, running and tennis, as well as heavy housework or heavy outdoor labour like chopping wood. They then compared the waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) data of the people and found that those who regularly walked were leaner.

This article was published by the Canberra Times (Australia) on November 12, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Fortune Online

Meet Spain's Kingmaker

In late 2013, Rivera’s party announced that it would expand across Spain. It was around this time that Rivera joined up with Luis Garicano, a Spanish economics professor at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Fortune Online on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Topnews

Brisk walk helps shed and maintain weight

Researchers from the London School of Economics carried out the study on over 50,000 patients between 1999 and 2012. In the study, the researchers have assessed the activity levels and exercises carried out by the participants.

This article appeared in Topnews on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Adjacent Government

Raising academic standards in UK schools

In May, the London School of Economics (LSE) found that banning mobile phones from classrooms, could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in Adjacent Government on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Evening Standard

Let's build on green belt to ease squeeze on commuters

Real house prices — but not real incomes — have grown faster in the UK over the last 40 years than in any other developed country, according to the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

FT.com

Beware the Ozymandias syndrome

John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has studied some of the less high-profile strategies employed by companies that are successful over the long term.

This article was published by FT.com on November 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
'The New Empirical Economics of Management', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, Daniela Scur and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.41, April 2014

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Paul Dolan interview BBC radio

Paul Dolan discusses happiness and use of social media.

This article appeared on BBC Radio 5 Live on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vozpópuli

El presidente de Ciudadanos, lanzado: dice que tiene ya ministros para un Gobierno de centro

No obstante, al lado de Rivera viene trabajando un grupo de expertos, a modo de gobierno en la sombra, con integrantes conocidos como el responsable de Economía, Luis Garicano, profesor en la London School of Economics, el expresidente de la CNMV Manuel Conthe, el exsecretario de la organización de Inspectores de Hacienda Francisco de la Torre o la abogada y referente del partido en la Comunidad Valenciana, Carolina Punset.

This article appeared in Vozpópuli on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Stock Journal

Is this the optimal exercise for staying slim?

Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at how regularly Britons engaged in 30 minutes or more of walking, moderate intensity exercise such as going to the gym, swimming, dancing, running and tennis, as well as heavy housework or heavy outdoor labour like chopping wood.

This article appeared in Stock Journal on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Canada

Brisk walking: is it better than vigorous exercise for losing weight?

A new study by the London School of Economics found that people are "more likely to have a lower weight if they regularly engage in high impact walking compared to doing another vigorous activity like going to the gym."

This article appeared in Yahoo Canada on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

msn

Study Finds That Regular Brisk Walking Is More Effective Than Going to the Gym

Researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science have found that walkers tend to be in better shape than their gym-going counterparts. In the study of 50,000 people over the age of 13, people who walked briskly for at least 30 minutes a day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than those who engaged in moderate-intensity activities at the gym. The results were particularly pronounced in women and people over 50.

This article appeared on msn on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

MoneyTalksNews

Best exercise for weight control may be cheap and easy

The research was led by assistant professor Grace Lordan, who specializes in health economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, a school of the University of London. She analyzed data on physical activity levels from annual national English surveys from 1999 to 2012, focusing on activities that increase heart rate and cause perspiration, and analyzed data on BMI scores and waist circumference.

This article was published online by MoneyTalksNews on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage



News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Economonitor

Nicaragua: a success story in the making

All said, are Nicaraguans happier? According to the World Happiness Report 2015, edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, Nicaraguans are indeed happier now than they were in 2007. Nicaragua ranks first as the country in the world that increased its happiness levels the most from 2007 to 2014.

This article was published online by EconoMonitor on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2015, John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Politics and Policy blog

Because GDP is not enough: five headline indicators for better policymaking

Prioritising wellbeing as a key measure of whether policy is improving human lives would lead to more interventions like the provision of psychological therapy for people with mental health problems, which increased access to at least minimal levels of talking therapies, rather than just medication, for those suffering depression and anxiety disorders. This policy was implemented as a result of efforts by wellbeing expert, Professor Richard Layard, and his engagement with wellbeing evidence.

This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sound

EF2: The economic importance of good management

John Van Reenen, Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, joins us to discuss the economics of management, productivity, and information technology. Listen to this episode if you want to learn about how economists think about measuring management quality. We discuss the latest evidence the causal effects of ''modern'' management on productivity and worker satisfaction. We then move onto to the big picture questions regarding whether management explains cross-country differences in outcomes. Furthermore, we talk about interesting differences between how American and European firms have adopted to information technology and why this matters. We also touch upon how economics research has changed over time and whether the increasing access of managers to information will make the world a better place.

This video was posted on Soundcloud.com on November 9, 2015
Link to film here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Coventry and Warwickshire

Drive

Dennis Novy interviewed about the upcoming negotiations of Prime Minister David Cameron over Britain's EU membership and in particular their implications for international trade.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio Coventry & Warwickshire on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Economic Frontiers

The economic importance of management

John Van Reenen interviewed about the economics of management, productivity, and information technology.

This interview was broadcast by Economic Frontiers on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
The New Empirical Economics of Management, Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, Daniela Scur and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.41, April 2014

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Nottingham

thing researchers at the London school of economics reckon

... maybe a brisk walk this is the thing researchers at the London School of Economics reckon going freight 30 minute brisk ...

This piece was broadcast by BBC Radio Nottingham on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times LIVE

Walking the best way to stay trim

Walking officially beats them all, hands (or rather feet) down. Regular walking is the best thing you can do to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, according to a study from the London School of Economics. It concluded that the brisk constitutional is a better deterrent against obesity than any other form of exercise.

This article was published online by Times LIVE on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

CBS News Online

Does brisk walking beat the gym for weight control?

Good old-fashioned brisk walking on a regular basis may trump gym workouts and other types of exercise when it comes to managing weight. London School of Economics researchers wanted to look at associations between various types of physical activity and weight, so they analyzed data collected from 1999 to 2012 from the country's annual Health Survey of England.

This article was published online by CBS News Online on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

MSN MY

Study finds that walking could be better than the gym

Could it be time to quit the gym altogether? Not exactly, but researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science did find that walkers tend to be thinner than gym-goers. In an analysis of 50,000 people over the age of 13, those who did at least 30 minutes of brisk walking per day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than people who did high intensity workouts.

This article was published online by MSN MY on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Coventry and Warwickshire

Drive Programme

Dennis Novy gave a radio interview for the Drive programme with Lorna Bailey. The topic was the upcoming negotiations of Prime Minister David Cameron over Britain's EU membership and in particular their implications for international trade.

The interview was broadcast on BBC Coventry & Warwickshire's Drive programme on November 9, 2015
[No link available]

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

Is walking really the best way to lose weight fast?

This week scientists at the London School of Economics revealed the results of a study of more than fifty thousand patients in England between 1999 and 2012. The study found that those who took brisk walks as their main form of exercise had lower BMIs than those who did high-intensity workouts. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the study, said: “We think it is because walking is more convenient than the gym, and is easier for people to maintain. This is particularly true for older people because they do not have to be at peak physical fitness to walk.”

This article appeared on BT.com on 9 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Albawaba Business

World Innovation Summit for Health partner up with World Innovation Summit for Education

WISH has also established the Mental Health and Well-being in Children Forum, chaired by Professor the Lord Richard Layard, Wellbeing Program Director at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE). The Forum explored the role of education in well-being as part of its remit to produce evidence-based reports and provide recommendations for policymakers at the second WISH Summit that took place in February 2015 in Qatar.

This article was published online by Albawaba.com on November 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

WUSA-TV

Sunday Morning

Mention of LSE report which outlined the benefits of regular brisk walking.

Report mentioned on WUSA-TV on November 8, 2015
[No link available]

Also on:
KBMT-TV, 08.11.2015 (18 hours, 45 minutes ago)
This Week With George Stephanopoulos

KTRH-AM, 07.11.2015 (1 day, 19 hours ago)
as safe at the London School of Economics says

New York News 1 - NY1, 08.11.2015 (18 hours, 44 minutes ago)
New York News 1

BBC Radio Devon (Plymouth), 07.11.2015 (1 day, 21 hours ago)
absolutely well and the London school of economics came

CBS News, 08.11.2015 (11:40am)
Milepost: Walking vs. running

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage



News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Foyle

News

Passing mention of LSE work on infrastructure.

Broadcast by BBC Radio Foyle on November 8, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Also on:
BBC Radio Ulster
Link to broadcast here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission webpage



News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Nation (Pakistan)

30-minute walk more effective to lose weight

A study by scientists at the London School of Economics, this week, claimed a brisk 30-minute walk each day is a more effective way to lose weight than running or going to the gym. But, how much exercise do personal trainers, whose jobs depend on their getting results, say we need to do to shed pounds? Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics led the research at LSE. Her team compared the measurements of people who performed half-an-hour of fast-paced walking compared to those who did the same amount of heavy housework, manual labour and sports, including rugby.

This article appeared in the Nation (Pakistan) on 8 November 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Woman's Day online

Study finds that regular brisk walking is more effective than going to the gym

Researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science have found that walkers tend to be in better shape than their gym-going counterparts. In the study of 50,000 people over the age of 13, people who walked briskly for at least 30 minutes a day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than those who engaged in moderate-intensity activities at the gym. The results were particularly pronounced in women and people over 50.

This article appeared on Woman's Day Online on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Khooa Hoc Phattrien (Vietnam)

Robot làm tang dang ke nang suat loa dong

A recent study by scientists Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (UK) shows that the robot has contributed to the increase in labour productivity.

This article appeared in Khooa Hoc Phattrien (Vietnam) on 8 November 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

CBC News (British Columbia)

Brisk walking: is it better than vigorous exercise for losing weight?

Study from the London School of Economics measured the body mass index and waists of participants
A new study by the London School of Economics found that people are "more likely to have a lower weight if they regularly engage in high impact walking compared to doing another vigorous activity like going to the gym."

This article appeared on CBC News (British Columbia) on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times of India

Brisk walking better way to lose weight than gymming

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in regular, brisk walking for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby. The results were particularly true for women, people over 50 and those on low incomes. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the study said, "The results thus provide an argument for a campaign to promote walking."

This article appeared in the Times of India on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Ekonomi (Sweden)

Jobben som försvann bäddade för nya jobb

Several recently published studies suggests that the fear of the future robotiseringen is unfounded. Scientists Georg Graetz and Guy Michael from Uppsala University and the London School of Economics shows in a recently published and internationally acclaimed report, "Robots at Work", that robotiseringen brings higher wages and economic growth which in turn generate as many jobs as before. Graetz, Michael believes rather that robotiseringen is similar to that of the railway and highway construction would have on the economy.

This article appeared in Ekonomi (Sweden) on 8 November 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent (Ireland)

Greece votes for austerity while Yanis is in Kilkenny

Polls also show Ciudadanos set to become kingmaker in Spain's parliament as the quickest-growing party after a long economic crisis. [Luis] Garicano, an economics professor at the London School of Economics and one of the most vocal critics of corruption in the ruling party, said Ciudadanos would overhaul Spain's public sector and take the politics out of the justice system.

This article appeared in the Independent (Ireland) on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

How walking to work changed my life

There are times when you deserve to feel pleased with yourself and last week was one of them. Science, you see, confirmed something that I had worked out a decade and a half ago, namely: regular walking is the best thing you can do to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. According to the study from the London School of Economics, brisk walking is a better deterrent against obesity than any other form of exercise. Forget the gym or five-aside, stuff running, spinning, zumba and squash… Walking officially beats them all, hands ( or trainer’d feet) down.

This article appeared in the Sunday Telegraph on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Artificial intelligence: ‘Homo sapiens will be split into a handful of gods and the rest of us'

Recent research led by Guy Michaels at the London School of Economics looked at detailed data across 14 industries and 17 countries over more than a decade, and found that the adoption of robots boosted productivity and wages without significantly undermining jobs.

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Nation online

Brisk walk is a great workout

NEW RESEARCH SAYS that regular brisk walking is the best exercise for keeping weight down, according to the UK’s London School of Economics. In the study, Do All Activities “Weigh” Equally? How Different Physical Activities Differ as Predictors of Weight, lead author Dr Grace Lordan of the LSE examined reported physical activity levels from the annual Health Survey for England from 1999 to 2012.

This article appeared in the Daily Nation Online on 7 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 07/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Eurasia Review

Offshoring and the geography of British jobs – analysis

Offshoring has risen in all advanced economies in recent years. This column analyses the impact of offshoring trends in the UK, where offshoring in services has followed the abundant offshoring in manufacturing, by uncovering their spatial implications. The impact of offshoring in places more exposed to such trends has been significantly negative on routine occupations. On the other hand, when investment abroad targeted developing economies, the effect on job creation in non-routine occupations was positive.

This article appeared in the Eurasia Review on 7 November 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Offshoring and the Geography of Jobs in Great Britain Luisa Gagliardi, Simona Iammarino and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, SERC Discussion Paper No.185, October 2015

Related Links
Luisa Gagliardi webpage
Simona Iammarino webpage
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

WISH partners with WISE on education and wellbeing

The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) held a special debate on education and well-being with the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE). The event marked the second collaboration between the two global initiatives of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF). Held at the Qatar National Convention Centre in Doha last week, the session was aimed at ensuring influential outcomes are reached in healthcare and education innovation in Qatar, the region and across the globe. … WISH has also established the Mental Health and Wellbeing in Children Forum, chaired by professor the Lord Richard Layard, director, Wellbeing Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE). The forum explored the role of education in well-being as part of its remit to produce evidence-based reports and provide recommendations for policymakers at the second WISH Summit that took place in February 2015 in Qatar.

This article appeared in Gulf Times on 7 November 2015 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Whoar.co.nz

Walking might beat the gym for weight loss

A study conducted by the Dr Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics found that women of all ages and men over 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes weighed less than those who took part in more vigorous exercise.

This article appeared on Whoar.co.nz on 6 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 06/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Study finds that walking could be better than the gym

Could it be time to quit the gym altogether? Not exactly, but researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science did find that walkers tend to be thinner than gym-goers. In an analysis of 50,000 people over the age of 13, those who did at least 30 minutes of brisk walking per day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than people who did high intensity workouts.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 6 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 06/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

How George Osborne could easily soften his tax credit cuts, in one chart

Despite insisting as soon as he got into the Treasury that he had no "plan B", Mr Osborne has shown himself to be remarkably willing to adapt his deficit reduction strategy as needed. In last year's Autumn Statement, the Chancellor boasted of his plans to deliver a budget surplus of £23 billion by the end of the decade, declaring: "Out of the red and into the black for the first time in a generation". As the election drew near, Mr Osborne reined in his austerity drive, revealing that his intended budget surplus target - as indicated by the Office for Budget Responsibility - had more than halved to £7 billion. The difference, Professor John Van Reenen noted, was "mainly due to less spending cuts". "We took difficult decisions in the teeth of opposition and it worked," Mr Osborne was still able to brag.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 6 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Business

What will the UK do in 2016?

Prime Minister David Cameron has promised a vote by the end of 2017, though it may occur as early as summer 2016. He wants to stay in the EU but hopes to renegotiate the terms of membership. Regardless of the outcome, the runup to the vote will affect the economy, with HSBC analysts arguing in a recent report that it should be held sooner rather than later to limit the “potentially damaging uncertainty” surrounding it. “I would expect a negative impact,” says Thomas Sampson, a specialist in trade at the London School of Economics. “It’s fairly well established that where there’s more uncertainty, businesses tend to delay investment.”

This article appeared in Bloomberg Business on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

El País

Garicano: ''En España, la defensa de la competencia es sumisa al Ibex 35''

The Coordinator of the economic program of citizens ensures that he calls for a real consumer protection. "We will spend zero grant on entrepreneurs."

This article appeared in El Pais on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! News

Spain could clean up its act quickly, says rising party Ciudadanos

Polls show Ciudadanos (Citizens) is set to become kingmaker in Spain's fragmented parliament. It is the quickest-growing party after a long economic crisis has left Spaniards with a distrust of politicians. It says a political and economic "big bang" is possible by focusing on three key elements: erradication of corruption and cronyism from institutions, new labor market regulation to boost job creation and reduce job insecurity, and an overhaul of the education system. "There are things that require (new) laws, and that should be discussed and agreed, but there are plenty of things that are just a question of political will, and can be changed at no cost at the start of the legislature," Luis Garicano, head of Ciudadanos' economic program, told Reuters.

This article appeared on Yahoo! News on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Also on:
Reuters
The West Australian

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How much exercise do you REALLY need to do to lose weight? Here, five personal trainers give their expert verdict

A study by scientists at the London School of Economics, this week, claimed a brisk 30-minute walk each day is a more effective way to lose weight than running or going to the gym. But, how much exercise do personal trainers, whose jobs depend on their getting results, say we need to do to shed pounds? Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics led the research at LSE.

This article appeared in the Mail Online on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Israel Herald

Brisk walking a better method for losing weight than going to the gym, study claims

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in "regular, brisk walking" for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Glow Australia

The best exercise strategy for weight loss isn't hitting the gym

Yet new research from the London School of Economics and Political Science suggests there’s an even more efficient option. The study claims that people who walk briskly for longer than 30 minutes every day have lower Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) and smaller waists than those who work out at the gym, run, or go swimming.

This article appeared in The Glow Australia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Voz de Galicia

Lo que Albert Rivera esconde, clave del éxito de Ciudadanos en las generales

Conscientes de qué es lo que realmente preocupa a los españoles, los de Rivera han desplegado todo su encanto en un puñado de medidas orquestadas por el célebre economista Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in La Voz de Galicia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Belfast News Letter

Brisk walk 'better than gym' for weight

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym.

This article appeared in Belfast News Letter on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Record

Brisk and reward

Research from the London School of Economics has revealed you’re more likely to lose weight from a brisk 30-minute daily walk than going to the gym.

This article appeared in the Daily Record on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily News Online

Walking better than gym membership for fitness over 50

''Walking is a lasting habit,'' said the study's author, Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics. '''Going to the gym takes much more time than walking out the door and turning left''.

This article was published by Daily News Online on November 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

NYSE Post

Walking 'more beneficial' to keeping weight down than visiting the gym

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym.

This article apperaed in NYSE Post on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
Dallas Sun
Hometown News Group
Beat 102-103
Counsel and Heal
WKBW-TV - Online
Classic 105

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Unlimited Online

Walking beats gym for weight loss

A study conducted by the Dr Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics found that women of all ages and men over 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes weighed less than those who took part in more vigorous exercise.

This article appeared on Unlimited Online on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
WFTS-TV Online
Sunrise Radio Online
Mummypages
Telepolis.pl
KIT-FM - Online
Eat This, Not That! Online

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

AOL.com

Study says walking could be better than visiting the gym

Researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science analyzed data of 50,000 people who were at least 13 years old and found those who walked briskly 30 minutes a day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower body mass indexes than those who did higher-intensity workouts.

This article apperaed on AOL.com on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health, Medical, and Science Updates

Brisk walks better at keeping weight off than going to the gym: new UK study

Research by the London School of Economics discovered people who walked a lot had lower BMIs and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport. Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics who led the research, compared the measurements of people who took part in activities which increased heart rate and caused perspiring.

This article appeared in Health, Medical, and Science Updates on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brisk walking better for losing weight than going to the gym, study claims

A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in “regular, brisk walking” for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby.

This article appeared in the Independent on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

News

Grace Lordan's research on walking being better for weight loss than the gym mentioned.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio 5 Live on 4 November 2015.
Broadcast link here

Also on
News4 today; Kiro 7; BBC Radio Nottingham; BBC Wales(Bangor); BBC Nottingham; BBC Essex; KXNT-AM; FM News 101 KXL; WGMD-FM BBC Radio Scotland (Glasgow); WGMD-F; LBC Radio

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Gloucestershire

News

Grace Lordan's research on walking being better for weight loss than the gym mentioned.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Gloucestshire on 4 November 2015. Link

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sun

WALKS BEATS A GYM

Speedy strollers are about 4½lb lighter and women are almost a dress size smaller than gym-goers, said experts at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Sun on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Metro

Losing weight can be just a walk in the park

Researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science analysed data about how much people exercise from the annual Health Survey for England between 1999 and 2012.

This article appeared in the Metro on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Brisk walk better than gym for weight control

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym. The effects were particularly strong for women, and both men and women over the age of 50.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror

Forget the gym.. a half-hour walk is better for you

Dr Lordan, of the London School of Economics and Political Science, studied exercise data from the annual Health Survey for England over 13 years.

This article apperaed in the Daily Mirror on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Express

Just 30 minutes of walking a day will keep you slim

Research from the London School of Economics said that people who regularly stride out are more likely to have slimmer waistlines and a lower body mass index than people who do high-intensity workouts.

This article appeared in The Express on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Forget the gym, take a brisk walk to lose weight

A study from the London School of Economics found that people may benefit more from “high-impact” walking than other exercise.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 November 2015. (No link available)

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Half an hour of walking better than gym for losing weight

The benefits of high-impact walking outweigh those from keep fit activities including running, swimming and working out at the gym, according to researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article appeared in The Times on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Onda Cero

Luis Garicano: ''Antonio Baños quiere crear un país nuevo y ni siquiera sabe contar''

El coordinador del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, asegura en Más de uno que no va a ir en las listas del partido pero que esta "totalmente involucrado" en el proyecto.

This article apperaed in Onda Cero on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

This is Local London

Brisk walk 'better than gym' for weight control

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym. The effects were particularly strong for women, and both men and women over the age of 50. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the research, examined data on how much people exercise from the annual Health Survey for England (HSE) from 1999 to 2012.

This article appeared in This is Local London on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
Hastings Observer and News Series
Redditch Advertiser Online
Andover Advertiser
Wiltshire Business - Online
Hillingdon Times - Online

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror (Eire)

Want to lose weight but hate the gym? You'll like these scientists' findings

Study leader Dr Grace Lordan compared exercises that raise the heart rate and causes sweating – such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling, gym workouts, dancing, running, jogging, football, rugby and squash.

This article appeared in the Daily Mirror (Eire) on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

StyleCaster

Skip the Spin Class: Research Shows 'Brisk Walks' Could be the Secret to Weight Loss

Bad news for anyone who spends a significant chunk of cash every month paying off a gym membership or signing up for luxury spin classes: Research by the London School of Economics has discovered that brisk walking is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. We like the sound of this.

This article appeared in Style Caster on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mirror Online

Want to lose weight but hate the gym? We have some VERY good news

Study leader Dr Grace Lordan compared exercises that raise the heart rate and causes sweating – such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling, gym workouts, dancing, running, jogging, football, rugby and squash. And the study found those taking a half hour stroll had lowest body mass index and smaller waists.

This article apperaed in Mirror Online on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Chartered Management Institute

The Pro50: Our pick of the UK's most productive companies

Professor John Van Reenen is the director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science; his research confirms a strong correlation between management and productivity.

This article appeared in Chartered Management Institute on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Libre Mercado

Francisco de la Torre: ''El programa fiscal del PSOE me deja helado, no saben de esto''

Hace unos días, el autor de ¿Hacienda somos todos?, el libro con el que se dio a conocer entre el gran público, concedía una entrevista a Libre Mercado. Su cometido está en el equipo económico, que lidera junto a Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in Libre Mercado on 2 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times of India

Experiencing an early mid-life job crisis?

According to professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, Paul Dolan, a mix of purpose and pleasure makes one feel truly happy. People can be too goal-focused. They have ticked off making money and career goals, and wonder what next?

This article appeared in Times of India on 2 November 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Evening Standard

Rohan Silva: As arts' old guard departs, young turks are great hope for London

According to London School of Economics professor John Van Reenen, Britain has a bit of a problem when it comes to the quality of our managers. His research suggests that poor management is holding our country back — and there’s a big skills gap between managers here and the US.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 2 November 2015 Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider (Scotland)

Report: Immigration

''Immediately after the General Election in May this year, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) was commissioned by the Conservative government to examine Tier 2 of the Points-Based System,'' ... The MAC indicated in August that there appeared to be a ''good case'' for increasing it, because eit was calculated in 2009 when lower-skilled jobs were eligible for sponsorship. However, chair of the MAC Professor David Metcalf has said salary levels should not be considered in isolation.

This article was published in the Business Insider (Scotland) magazine in November 2015
Link to magazine here (pp53-54)

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 01/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

wyborcza.biz

Szczescie w fawelach, depresja w Glasgow

Wcale nie jest tak, ze im jestesmy bogatsi, tym sie stajemy szczliwsi. Do szczcia rednio wystarcza nam okoto 20 tys. dolarów rocznie. Z lordem Richardem Layardem rozmawia Aleksandra Kaniewska
It is not true that the richer we are, the happier we become. Happiness on average, about 20 thousand. dollars a year is enough. Lord Richard Layard talks to Alexander Kaniewska.

This article appeared in wyborcza.biz on 31 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Faro de Vigo Online

Convidados de novembro no Club FARO

A conferencia de Luís Garicano, catedrático de Economía e Estratexia da London School of Economics, versará sobre "Recuperar o futuro. Doce propostas que cambiarán España". Medidas para reconducir a España á senda do crecemento económico, a igualdade de oportunidades, a cultura do esforzo e a honestidade.

This article appeared in Faro de Vigo Online on 31 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vozpópuli

Rivera, lanzado: dice tener ya ministros para un Gobierno de centro

No obstante, al lado de Rivera viene trabajando un grupo de expertos, a modo de gobierno en la sombra, con integrantes conocidos como el responsable de Economía, Luis Garicano, profesor en la London School of Economics, el expresidente de la CNMV Manuel Conthe, el exsecretario de la organización de Inspectores de Hacienda Francisco de la Torre o la abogada y referente del partido en la Comunidad Valenciana, Carolina Punset.

This article appeared in Vozpopuli on 30 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Robot revolution: Will machines replace humans and take our jobs one day?

A 2015 study by the London School of Economics dispels myths around job losses, providing new empirical evidence that indicates countries which invested significantly in automation between 1993 and 2007, such as Germany and Sweden, experienced fewer job losses compared to countries that made lesser investments.

This article appeared in City AM on 30 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

RTM - Rail Technology Magazine

Awards, contracts and appointments: £100bn Adonis commission to help shape Crossrail 2 and HS3

Other members will include ... a former member of the LSE's Growth Commission and a former chief adviser to the Great London Authority.

This article was published online by RTM - Rail Technology Magazine on October 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
LSE Growth Commission webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 30/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio

The topsy-turvy world of negative interest

Dennis Novy gave a radio interview to Share Radio about negative interest rates and what they mean for the UK economy. ''Is the US headed for negative interest rates? As the Fed announced a mostly positive rate outlook this Wednesday, some are still worried that we could see a negative interest on the horizon. Matt Cox investigates...''

The interview was broadcast by Share Radio on October 29, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage



News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Wiley - Press Release

Winners of the Wiley Prizes in Economics and Psychology 2015 announced

Hoboken, NJ - John Wiley and Sons, Inc., and the British Academy are pleased to announce the winners of the 2015 Wiley Prize in Economics and the Wiley Prize in Psychology
The annual Wiley Prize in Economics, made in partnership with the British Academy, rewards achievement in research for an outstanding early career economist with a prize of £5,000. The 2015 winner is Dr Johannes Spinnewijn (London School of Economics and Political Science) for academic excellence in the field of economics, in particular his research in current and topical public policy. ''I was very pleased to hear the news,'' said Dr Johannes Spinnewijn. ''I am very honoured to be the young person in such a distinguished group.''

This press release from Wiley was published on October 29, 2015
Link to the release here

Related links
Johannes Spinnewijn webpage
Johannes Spinnewijn CEP publications webpage
Labour Market Programme webpage



News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Dot

Spring Valley proves there's one device that should never be banned from schools

The primary focus of this incident is on police brutality and the disproportionate levels of school discipline that put young Black girls across America at risk every day. But those who explain the incident away, such as The View co-host Raven-Symone, say that the incident wouldn't have happened if the student didn't bring her phone to school and hadn't used it in class. Earlier this year, report after report praised the idea of banning cell phones in schools, citing a study that a strict cell phone policy improves students' test scores. According to research published by the London School of Economics, which looked at how cell phone policy changes since 2001 have affected more than 130,000 pupils in schools across England, learning environments without cell phones were tied to a 6.4 percent increase in national exam scores - on average. For so-called ''underachieving'' students, specifically, scores rose by 14 percent.

This article was published online by The Daily Dot on October 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Austerity cuts are causing mental distress and are linked to rise in suicides, health professionals warn

According to the Centre for Economic Performance, mental health services receive just 13 per cent of the total NHS budget, while mental illness is responsible for 23 per cent of the loss of years of healthy life caused by all illness nationwide.

This article appeared in the Independent on 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
How mental health loses out in the NHS The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

CIPD

We can make you work for less: the psychology of pay

Professor Nick Powdthavee, principal research fellow in the wellbeing research programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, suggests it is no accident that increasing pay around the world is accompanied by rising stress and mental ill-health. “We underestimate the negative things that go hand in hand with high pay, and, while surveys find people saying they would swap money for happiness or ‘good living’, behaviour doesn’t bear that out,” he says.

This article appeared in CIPD in 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Variation in value of student bursaries ‘exacerbates inequality'

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that students from relatively wealthy backgrounds can receive more aid than those from poor families simply because of the university they attend. In a paper presented at the institute last week, she analyses the financial support available at 22 universities over a five-year period and finds that bursaries awarded by Russell Group institutions were twice as generous as those provided by others.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education in 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist (online)

How academies are changing British education

This meant that schools in poorer areas were likely to become one: according to research by Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, under Labour a ten percentage point increase in the number of pupils eligible for free school meals (a measure of poverty) resulted in a 75% increase in the probability of a school becoming an academy

This article appeared in The Economist Online on 28 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage

News Posted: 28/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Can You Imagine a Mindful Parliament in Britain?

Among them is Lord Richard Layard, Programme Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 28 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Could ‘mindfulness' make Britain happier?

It marks the first time mindfulness has been seriously considered in the context of national public policy - and the firsts don’t stop there: for instance, today, I discover that, to date, almost 200 MPs, Peers and their staff have undergone mindfulness training since January 2013 (after Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster), and listen to Tracey Crouch, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Sport, Tourism and Heritage, tell the room about how mindfulness has helped her cope with her own anxiety and depression

This article appeared in the Scotsman on 28 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
A new priority for mental health, Richard Layard, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, May 2015

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education (Online)

NSS results have little impact on university applications, study finds

An institution moving from the bottom of the scale (around a 65 per cent NSS satisfaction score) to the top of the scale (around 95 per cent satisfaction) results in a degree course gaining only about seven more applicants for every 100 it already receives, according to Stephen Gibbons, professor of economic geography and environment at the London School of Economics (LSE) and co-author of the report.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education (Online) on 27 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

MSN Canada

Sair ou ficar na UE, eis a grande questão

Apesar de ninguém saber ao certo o que aconteceria se o Reino Unido saísse da UE, um artigo de maio do 'The Guardian' cita alguns estudos que deixam pistas. Um do Centre for Economic Performance, da London School of Economics, refere que no pior cenário o PIB britânico cairia entre 6,3% e 9,5% e no melhor 2,2%.

This article appeared in MSN on 27 Ocotber 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Humberside

Morning Show

Olmo Silva discusses Academies.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Humberside on 27 October 2015. Link

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage

News Posted: 27/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Avoiding the Financial Resource Curse

Interestingly, though, a team of economists may have just found that third factor. Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse, and Luca Fornaro have a new paper in which they propose something called the “financial resource curse.” This theory says that the real culprit behind slow growth might not be finance itself, but rather large influxes of financial investment from foreign countries.

This article appeared in Bloomberg on 26 October 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Large Capital Inflows, Sectoral Allocation and Economic Performance Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse, Luca Fornaro, May 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1348

Related Links
Gianluca Beningo webpage
Trade webpage

News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

IQ

Notre cerveau nous trompe lorsque nous parlons à des robots

Pour le découvrir, des scientifiques de la London School of Economics ont conduit une expérience durant laquelle une personne normale devait dire des choses suggérées par un ordinateur

This article appeared in IQ on 26 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Jern og Maskinindustrien - Online

Flere robotter marcherer ind i industrien

Det viste en rapport i marts fra London School of Economics. I "Robots at Work", som rapporten hedder, anslår forskerne bag, at den stigende brug af robotter øgede vækstraterne med 0,37 procentpoint.

This article appeared in Jern og Maskinindustrien - Online on 26 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Onda Cero

Garicano: 'Nuestra propuesta es que Sanidad y Educación se financien vía impuestos'

Luis Garicano, coordinador del programa económico de Ciudadanos, considera que "el Gobierno ha hecho una gestión de la crisis muy de apagar fuegos" en la que "ha hecho recortes en todo lo que la economía española necesita para poder crecer".

This article appeared in Onda Cero on 26 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Antena 3 Noticias

La entrevista a Luis Garicano en Espejo Público, en siete puntos

Luis Garicano, coordinador del programa económico de Ciudadanos, considera que "el Gobierno ha hecho una gestión de la crisis muy de apagar fuegos" en la que "ha hecho recortes en todo lo que la economía española necesita para poder crecer".

This article appeared on Antena 3 Noticias on 26 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Ok Diario

Garicano llama ''tacaño'' a Amancio Ortega tras donar 17 millones a la sanidad gallega

Luis Garicano cree Amancio Ortega es un "tacaño" por su donación de 17 millones de euros para la lucha contra el cáncer. El economista de Ciudadanos cree que el por unas horas hombre más rico del mundo debería tomar ejemplo de Bill Gates.

This article appeared in Ok Diario on 25 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El País Online

La educación: la gran asignatura pendiente, article by Luis Garicano

En los últimos treinta años de historia, España ha conseguido mucho. Los logros económicos, la integración en Europa, el desarrollo de una democracia plena son indudables. En algunas áreas importantes, como en sanidad, se ha logrado una verdadera excelencia mundial, a pesar de la falta en muchos casos de recursos.

This article appeared in El Pais Online on 25 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Diario de Navarra Online

Sair ou ficar na UE, eis a grande questão,

Um do Centre for Economic Performance, da London School of Economics, refere que no pior cenário o PIB britânico cairia entre 6,3% e 9,5% e no melhor 2,2%.
The Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, says that in the worst scenario the British GDP would fall between 6.3% and 9.5% and 2.2% at best.

This article appeared on Diario de Navarra Online on 25 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

More.com

The Counterintuitive Guide to a Balanced Life

The London School of Economics recently did a CEO time-use survey, studying CEOs working in more than 1,000 manufacturing companies across different countries. The average CEO worked 52 hours a week. That still leaves room for other things.

This article appeared in More.com on 24 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
What Do CEOs Do? Oriana Bandiera, Luigi Guiso, Andrea Prat, Raffaella Sadun, May 2012 Paper No' CEPDP1145

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 24/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Britain needs Europe a lot more than Europe needs Britain

With the Leave.eu campaign pledging to win back the UK, and with The Britain Stronger in Europe campaign pledging to explain the ''true reality of life'' outside the EU, arguments for and against UK's membership give and take daily. Here, Dennis Novy explains why a divorce from the EU would risk putting the UK in a weaker economic position.

This blog article was published by LSE British Politics and Policy on October 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 23/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

TV5Monde

Le chomage en Espagne poursuit son repli a deux mois des législatives

Liberal Ciudadanos defends the idea of a single contract to end a two-tier labour market, with ''a core of the temporary workers, much less protected and highly protected workers even as the United States'', said economist Luis Garicano, inspiring his economic program, in an interview with AFP.

This broadcast was aired by TV5Monde on October 22, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

elplural.com

Gobierno se felicita por la EPA y los sindicatos denuncian empleo precario y estacional

El responsable del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, decía esta mañana, en los Los Desayunos de TVE que pese a la reducción del paro en el tercer trimestre “existe una tasa muy alta de pobres” que están empleados. “El PP no es capaz de dar una vida digna y acabar con la precariedad” ha señalado

This article appeared in El Plural.com on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Universal

El desempleo español sigue cayendo a dos meses de las legislativas

Ciudadanos, de centro-derecha, defiende la idea de un contrato único para poner fin a un mercado laboral de dos velocidades, con "un núcleo duro de trabajadores muy protegidos y trabajadores temporales mucho menos protegidos que en Estados Unidos", explicó el economista Luis Garicano, artífice de su programa económico, en una entrevista.

This article appeared on El Universal on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

Recetas contra la desigualdad: renta básica y subir el salario mínimo

Ciudadanos cree que el problema es "un sistema de contratación perverso y un modelo económico que no funciona", ha defendido Luis Garicano, responsable del programa económico del partido de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in El Pais on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Lainformacion.com

Garicano: PP y PSOE tienen que reconocer que todas sus reformas educativas han fracasado

El coordinador del programa económico y social de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, ha afirmado que las reformas educativas que han hecho PP y PSOE en estos años de democracia han sido "un fracaso" y cree que hay "posibilidades" de que en esta legislatura se pueda llegar a un pacto nacional de educación

This article appeared on Lainformacion.com on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial Digital

Albert Rivera encarga a Garicano que rete a Álvaro Nadal y Jordi Sevilla a un debate económico

En el partido han realizado un amplio análisis interno sobre las causas del éxito de Albert Rivera en su enfrentamiento con Pablo Iglesias y parte de responsabilidad la achacan al proyecto económico de Luis Garicano, que ha pasado con creces la prueba. Es percibido como “sólido y solvente”.

This article appeared in El Confidencial Digital on 22 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Rioja

Ciudadanos deja el copago en manos de las autonomías

El encargado de aclarar la propuesta fue Luis Garicano, responsable económico de la formación y mano derecha de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in La Rioja on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

InfoLibre

C's desmiente los copagos y traslada a las comunidades el coste de prestar nuevos servicios

Así lo explicaron el economista de cabecera de la formación, Luis Garicano, y el responsable del programa fiscal, Francisco de la Torre, en una rueda de prensa en la que intentaron salir al paso del revuelo formado después de que el diario El País publicara este miércoles que el partido defiende la implantación de copagos en sanidad y educación.

This article appeared in Info Libre on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Diaro.es

Ciudadanos acusa a PP y Podemos de copiarle algunas de sus propuestas después de haberlas criticado

"Iglesias adoptó parte del programa de C's, hoy Moncloa adopta la parte de Infraestructuras. ¿Adoptarán todo antes del 20D?", ha dicho en Twitter el responsable del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano.

This article appeared on El Diaro.es on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Marea

Luis Garicano y su defensa encendida del copago sanitario

El revuelo provocado por las declaraciones de Francisco de la Torre, número 2 de Ciudadanos en Madrid, que defiende dicha medida en las páginas del diario de Prisa ha obligado a Luis Garicano, responsable del programa económico, a salir al paso negando que el partido de Albert Rivera estudie la instauración de copagos, subrayando que el partido “apuesta por la gratuidad y universalidad de la Sanidad y la Educación en todo el territorio nacional”. Pero es cierto que Garicano ha sido en el pasado un defensor entusiasta de esta medida.
The commotion caused by the statements of Francisco de la Torre, No. 2 Citizens in Madrid, defending the action on the pages of Prisa has forced Luis Garicano, head of the economic program, refusing to step out of the party Albert Rivera study the introduction of co-payments, stressing that the party "is committed to free and universal health and education throughout the national territory." But it is true that Garicano in the past has been an enthusiastic advocate of this measure.

This article appeared in La Marea on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El País Online

Las repetidas ocasiones en que Ciudadanos ha defendido el copago

Luis Garicano, profesor de la London School of economics, responsable del programa económico de Ciudadanos y miembro de su Ejecutiva, ha asegurado esta mañana que el partido “apuesta por la gratuidad y universalidad de la Sanidad y la Educación en todo el territorio nacional”.
Luis Garicano, professor at the London School of Economics, head of the economic program of Citizens and member of its Executive, has said this morning that the party "is committed to free and universal health and education throughout the national territory."

This article appeared on El Pais Online on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

EL BOLETIN.com

Cuando Luis Garicano defendía el copago y lo veía 'necesario'

Tanto es así, que su máximo responsable económico, Luis Garicano, ha comparecido en una rueda de prensa convocada de urgencia acompañado del número dos al Congreso de los Diputados por Madrid, el inspector de Hacienda del Estado, Francisco de la Torre. Precisamente, el autor de las declaraciones que habían sido utilizadas por el diario de Prisa para apoyar la tesis de su noticia.
So much so, that their full economic responsibility, Luis Garicano, appeared at a press conference accompanied emergency number two the Congress of Deputies in Madrid, the State Tax Inspector, Francisco de la Torre. Indeed, the author of the statements that had been used by the Journal of Prisa to support the thesis of his article

This article appeared in El Boletin.com on 21 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial

Golpe en la mesa de Garicano: desautoriza a De la Torre y afirma que no habrá copago

El coordinador del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, ha respondido al número dos de Albert Rivera en la lista al Congreso por Madrid y encargado de elaborar las propuestas fiscales de la formación, Francisco De la Torre, asegurando que la financiación de las CCAA "debe garantizar la igualdad básica de todos y especialmente cuando se trata del disfrute de servicios básicos como la sanidad y la educación".
The coordinator of the economic program Citizens Luis Garicano, replied to Albert Rivera's number two on the list to Congress by Madrid with instructions to establish the tax proposals of training, Francisco de la Torre, ensuring that the financing of the CCAA "must guarantee the basic equality of all and especially when it comes to the enjoyment of basic services such as health and education

This article appeared on El Confidencial on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Cuatro

Ciudadanos niega que pretenda introducir ''copagos'' sino que las CCAA decidan

El responsable del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, ha aclarado que su partido no propone que las comunidades autónomas "introduzcan copagos" ni que suban los impuestos, sino que ejerzan su autonomía y cada una decida cómo financia los servicios adicionales que desee ofrecer a los ciudadanos.
The head of the economic program Citizens Luis Garicano, clarified that his party does not propose that the autonomous communities "introduced co-payments" or to raise taxes, but to exercise their autonomy and each decide how to finance the additional services they want to offer the citizens.

This article appeared in Cuatro on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

195 MPs, peers and staff attend mindfulness classes

To date, 115 parliamentarians and 80 of their staff have undergone mindfulness training since January 2013, after former Labour MP Chris Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster.

This article appeared on BT.com on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph.co.uk

Dangerous prisoners taught mindfulness and meditation

Almost 200 MPs, peers and their staff have also attended mindfulness classes after Labour MP Chris Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster in January 2013.

This article appeared on Telegraph.co.uk on 21 October 2015. Link to article Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vozpópuli

Podemos ficha a un asesor de Varoufakis y recupera a Vicenç Navarro para su programa económico

Así lo ha anunciado este martes la dirección de Podemos después de dos días de silencio tras el debate de La Sexta, donde Albert Rivera, asesorado por Luis Garicano, profesor de la London School of Economics, y su equipo, se impuso al eurodiputado, según la mayoría de los analistas y la propia encuesta habilitada por la formación liderada por Iglesias.
This was announced on Tuesday the address we after two days of silence after the debate of the Sixth, where Albert Rivera, assisted by Luis Garicano, professor at the London School of Economics, and his team won the MEP, as most analysts and the survey itself enabled by the group led by Iglesias.

This article appeared in Vozpópuli on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times of Malta Online

Migration myths we love

Surveys in Spain show that immigrants are net contributors for health. Research in 2009 from University College London found that immigrants who arrived after EU enlargement in 2004 “are far less likely to live in social housing” than the rest of the UK population. The same result was found in a 2015 study by the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Times of Malta Online. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Euro Scientist

From Mindful Nation to Mindful Europe

Inspired by these words, Lord Richard Layard, director of the well-being programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, UK, and myself proactively focused on bringing mindfulness forward as a catalyst for change. Three years ago, we invited Mark Williams and Chris Cullen, from the Oxford University Mindfulness Centre, UK, to help us establish mindfulness practice in the British Parliament.

This article appeared in Euro Scientist on 20 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Libre Mercado

Las tres promesas del programa económico de Ciudadanos que PP y PSOE no querrán pactar

En el terreno puramente económico, el encargado de desarrollar ese plan ha sido Luis Garicano. El catedrático de la London School of Economics ha repetido en numerosas ocasiones que ha bajado a la arena política para hacer cosas, que si no consigue cambiar la situación sentirá que ha fracasado y volverá a sus clases y sus papers.
In purely economic terms, responsible for developing the plan was Luis Garicano. The professor at the London School of Economics has repeated on numerous occasions that came down to the political arena to do things, that if you cannot change the situation feel you've failed and will return to their classes and their papers

This article appeared in Libre Mercado on 18 October 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 18/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Local.es

'Deeper reforms needed in Spain to seal long-term economic recovery'

With the economy growing again after a double recession, Spain's government is claiming victory over the crisis. But Luis Garicano, a professor at the London School of Economics, told AFP in an interview on Thursday that deeper reforms are needed.

This article appeared on The Local.es on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

iMagazine

Lord Richard Layard, article by Richard Layard

There is a shocking fact. Despite our huge increase in affluence, opinion research data for most developed countries show that people in the West have grown no happier In the last 50 years. This should make us rethink everything, including our work-life balance and our attitudes to tax.

This article appeared in iMagazine on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

West Sussex Gazette - Online

School says there's 'no cause for alarm' over mobile phones in classrooms

The success flew in the face of research by the London School of Economics, published earlier this year, which found schools which restricted the use of mobile phones experienced an improvement in test scores.

This article appeared in the West Sussex Gazette on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Free Lunch: Be very afraid

Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse, and Luca Fornaro argue that an inflow of capital can have the same effect, causing a temporary boom that boosts growth but directs activity away from manufacturing into low-productivity or unsustainable sectors.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Large Capital Inflows, Sectoral Allocation and Economic Performance Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse, Luca Fornaro, May 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1348

Related Links
Gianluca Beningo webpage
Trade webpage

News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News 24

Hour News

Sandra McNally interviewed on the topic of grammar schools following reports that the Kent ‘satellite’ school has been approved.

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 on 15 October (no link available)

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

La economía española necesita reformas estructurales

Yahoo! Espana

España reanudó el crecimiento económico pero necesita reformas estructurales para solucionar el desempleo masivo, la corrupción y la rigidez de su sistema educativo, consideró este jueves el economista Luis Garicano, artífice del programa económico del partido liberal emergente Ciudadanos.
Spain resumed economic growth but needs structural reforms to solve mass unemployment, corruption and the rigidity of its educational system, considered on Thursday the economist Luis Garicano, architect of the economic program of the Liberal Party emerging Citizens.

This article appeared on Yahoo! Espana on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Also on:
La Información República Dominicana
The West Australian
Portal Terra

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Luis Garicano CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

UOL - Universo Online

Economia espanhola precisa de reformas estruturais, avalia economista - Notícia

Espanha retomou o crescimento econômico, mas precisa de reformas estruturais para solucionar o alto desemprego, a corrupção e a rigidez de seu sistema educacional, afirmou nesta quinta-feira o economista Luis Garicano, artífice do programa econômico do partido liberal emergente Cidadãos
Spain resumed economic growth, but needs structural reforms to address high unemployment, corruption and the rigidity of its education system, said on Thursday the economist Luis Garicano, architect of the economic program of the emerging Liberal Party Citizens

This article appeared in Universo Online on 15 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Luis Garicano CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Spain star economist urges reforms to lock in recovery

Yahoo News

With the economy growing again after a double recession, Spain's government is claiming victory over the crisis. But Luis Garicano, a professor at the London School of Economics, told AFP in an interview that deeper reforms are needed.

This article appeared on Yahoo News on 15 October 2015. Link to article

See also
Expatica Spain
Spain star economist urges reforms to lock in recovery

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Luis Garicano CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Housebuilding in Britain: How to build more?

The Economist (Online)

Council tax is set at the local level. This should give councils a reason to build more houses: more houses, more tax revenue. But it does not, as Christian Hilber of the London School of Economics explains. For one, council taxes bear little relation to underlying property values (they are based on prices prevailing in the early 1990s).

This article appeared in the Economist Online on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Christian Hilber CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Why Tech Execs Don't Rush to Get Their Children Smartphones

The Huffington Post

Considering that teens use their phones almost solely for entertainment, it's not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that a ban on smartphones at school considerably improved kids' test scores. The formula is simple: Putting phones away makes for better schools.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Not all academies are the same – don't assume they will all boost results, article by Stephen Machin, Andrew Eyles and Olmo Silva

Our new research shows that many of the schools that have become academies since the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government came to power are fundamentally different in nature from those that became academies under Labour. Because of this, their conversion is unlikely to generate the same positive results in raising students' attainment.

This article appeared in the Conversation on 14 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage

News Posted: 14/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vozpopuli - Online

La reforma constitucional de Ciudadanos pone fin al 'café para todos' autonómico

Al tanto de los trabajos también ha estado el gurú de las finanzas con que cuenta el partido y miembro de la Ejecutiva nacional, el profesor de la London School of Economics Luis Garicano.
Aware of the work has also been the guru of finance available to the party and member of the National Executive, Professor at the London School of Economics Luis Garicano.

This article appeared on Vozpopuli Online on 13 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 13/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

L'obs Online

Angus Deaton, prix Nobel d'économie: 5000 ?, le salaire du bonheur ? Une théorie à nuancer

Ce que montre un autre spécialiste de l’économie du bonheur, Sir Richard Layard, professeur à la London School of Economics, c'est que ce qui compte surtout c’est de "gagner plus que son voisin". That shows another expert in the economics of happiness, Sir Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, is that what counts above all is to "earn more than his neighbor."

This article appeared on L'obs Online on 13 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Il Sole 24 Ore Online

Gli scossoni economici di Brexit

Pochi hanno prodotto numeri seri sul costo della non Europa per la Gran Bretagna perché si tratta di un esercizio complesso e vago. Ci limitiamo a citare la ricerca di Open Europe, il think tank eurospettoso fondato da Mats Persson oggi consigliere di David Cameron, che nello scenario più estremo immagina una caduta del Pil del 2,2% e la ricerca del Centre for economic performance della London school of economics che in uno studio firmato anche da Gianmarco Ottaviano immagina una perdita del pil del 3,1%.
Few have produced serious numbers on the cost of non-Europe for Britain because it is a complex exercise and vague. We just mention the search of Open Europe, the think tank founded by Mats Persson eurospettoso today adviser to David Cameron, that the more extreme scenario envisions a fall in GDP of 2.2% and the research of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of economics that in a study also signed by Gianmarco Ottaviano imagines a loss of GDP of 3.1%.

This article appeared in Il Sole 24 Ore Online on 13 October 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA022

Related Links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Trade webpage

News Posted: 13/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Finfacts

One-handed economists, Nobels and economics as a science

The reputation of mainstream economists was damaged by the financial crisis and Queen Elizabeth in Nov 2008 at the London School of Economics (LSE) where she cut the tape on the new academic building, famously asked: "Why did nobody notice it?" Prof Luis Garicano explained to journalists: "She was asking me if these things were so large how come everyone missed it." He told the Queen: "At every stage, someone was relying on somebody else and everyone thought they were doing the right thing."

This article appeared on FinFacts on 12 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 12/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Dagens Nyheter - Online

Jan Eklund: Stenhård liten bok avslöjar de rikas skattefusk

Det senaste tillskottet på svenska är en stenhård liten bok av den unge ekonomen Gabriel Zucman vid London School of Economics: ”Gömda rikedomar” (övers. Håkan Edgren, Daidalos). Zucman har undersökt hur mycket pengar som göms undan i skatteparadis som Schweiz och Luxemburg, alltså hur stora rikedomar som den europeiska överklasssen smugglar ut för att slippa lagenlig beskattning
The recent addition in Swedish is a tough little book by the young economist Gabriel Zucman at the London School of Economics: "Hidden Riches" (trans. Hakan Edgren, Daedalus). Zucman has investigated how much money is hidden away in tax havens like Switzerland and Luxembourg, ie how much wealth as the European överklasssen smuggled out to avoid legality of taxation

This article appeared in Dagens Nyheter Online on 12 October 2015. Link to article Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations, Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business.com

3 Common Business Meeting Problems and the Apps That Solve Them

That said, business meetings are a tremendous waste of time and money. The London School of Economics and Harvard Business School reports that executives spend 18 hours a week on meetings according to Forbes.

This article appeared in Business.com on 12 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
What Do CEOs Do? Oriana Bandiera, Luigi Guiso, Andrea Prat, Raffaella Sadun, May 2012 Paper No' CEPDP1145

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Growth webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Amazon's Jeff Bezos plummets down corporate leader rankings

John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics, said he was doubtful about how much of any company’s performance could be attributed to the influence of a single chief executive. As for HBR’s attempt to assess the impact of environmental, social and governance policies, Prof Van Reenen said it made sense to look beyond financial performance for a guide to a company’s future prosperity and survival prospects. But he added that “it is not very clear to me that they are particularly powerful measures of long-run success, over and above what we aim for with more conventional things”.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 12 October 2015 Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Market News International - The Main Wire

BREXIT: MNI experts poll puts one-in-three chance on leaving

Some experts suggest it is more likely than not the UK will vote to leave. LSE Professor John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance, put the chance of an ''Out'' vote at 54%, with very wide uncertainty around that figure. ''I think the Scottish referendum is a salutary reminder of how populist sentiment can be very strong. And unlike that vote there is no chance of a last minute set of concessions,'' he said.

This article was published online by Market News International - The Main Wire - on October 12, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 12/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio - Morning-Money

How are robots impacting on the economy?

Robots are gradually becoming a part of everyday life, and as a result are impacting on the economy. To look at the influence robots are having, Joe Aldridge speaks with Guy Michaels, Associate Professor at the London School of Economics and co-author of a report on robots at work, and Stian Westlake, Executive Director of Policy and Research at innovation charity Nesta.

The interview was broadcast on Share Radio's Morning Money programme on October 12, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 12/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vox

International capital flows, sectoral resource allocation, and the financial resource curse

Article by Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse and Luca Fornaro
In the aftermath of the Global Crisis, policymakers have adopted policies to limit, or at least manage, capital inflows. This column explores episodes of capital inflows coupled with weak productivity growth, in other words, the financial resource curse. The findings show that once access to foreign capital subsides, the initial boom gives way to a recession. Both investment and employment in the manufacturing sector drop, and the larger the decrease of labour in manufacturing, the sharper the following contraction.

This article was published online by Vox on October 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Large Capital Inflows, Sectoral Allocation and Economic Performance', Gianluca Benigno, Nathan Converse and Luca Fornaro, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1348, May 2015

Related Links
Gianluca Beningo webpage
Trade Programme webpage



News Posted: 11/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Inequality is the great concern of our age. So why do we tolerate rapacious, unjust tax havens? Article by Gabriel Zucman

Examine democratic and budgetary crises across the world and you’ll find a running theme – tax havens. Let’s take a look: in the last three years alone, in France the budget minister has had to resign because he had cheated on his taxes for 20 years through unreported offshore accounts. In Spain, the former treasurer of the party in power has gone to jail after having revealed a hidden system of financing through Swiss banks. In the United States, Congress has revealed that Apple avoided tens of billions in taxes by manipulating the location of its profits, at a time when US infrastructure is crumbling.

This article appeared in the Observer on 11 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

George the Builder CAN HE FIX IT?

Will the attempt by the chancellor to take politics out of our new infrastructure projects succeed, asks Kathryn Cooper
''Britain is a big, diverse country with very active press and democratic process, which can hold up infrastructure projects,'' said John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance, who co-chairs the London School of Economics Growth Commission.

This article was published in The Sunday Times on October 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 11/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Oil booms attract mostly men, but women flock to newly created service jobs

The gender pay gap widens substantially in oil-rich counties, find Stephan Maurer and Andrei Potlogea

This article appeared in the LSE Review on 10 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Fueling the Gender Gap? Oil and Women's Labor and Marriage Market Outcomes Stephan E. Maurer, Andrei V. Potlogea, June 2014 Paper No' CEPDP1280

Related Links
Stephan Maurer webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Quin

Robots in the News

They cite the analysis offered by George Graetz and Guy Michaels of Uppsala University and the London School of Economics which finds that industrial robots have contributed to 10% of total GDP growth in the countries studied and 16% of labour productivity growth over that time period.

This article appeared in Quin.co.uk on 9 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015 Related links

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

This Is As Good As It Gets Folks: The US Is About At Full Employment

However, there’s also the point that Richard Layard and other European labour economists have been making for a long time now. Long periods of unemployment mean that people become detached from the labour force in a rather more involuntary manner. Skills decay, of course, but employers are also extremely hesitant to employ someone who has been unemployed a long time. Unemployment of more than a year or two can mean complete divorce from the workforce: possibly simply on the grounds that no one will even grant an interview to someone in that position.

This article appeared on Forbes on 9 October 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio

Investment Perspectives

Anna Valero interviewed re LSE report on the need for long term planning on infrastructure in the UK and encouraging investors.

This programme was broadcast on Share Radio on 9 October 2015. Link

Related Publications
Productivity and Business Policies Isabelle Roland, Anna Valero, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA021

Related Links
Anna Valero webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Australia Plus

'Happiness thinker' Professor Paul Dolan on pleasure, purpose and everyday happiness

He is a professor at London School of Economics, and one of the world's leading thinkers on happiness, or what policy-makers call "subjective wellbeing". Happiness, as defined by Professor Dolan, is "experiences of pleasure and purpose over time".

This article appeared on Australia Plus on 9 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph Online

Can a course teach you to be happy in 8 weeks?

Richard Layard is an economist, an expert on mental health and the author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, which argues that we should make happiness, not growth, the object of our economic policies

This article appeared on the Telegraph Online on 9 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

High immigration to an area actually reduces NHS waiting times there, research finds

The new study follows research from the London School of Economics published earlier this year that found that migration to an area had no overall negative effect on its rates of wages or unemployment.

This article appeared in the Independent on 8 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Mindfulness an essential ‘parachute' for politicians – former British MP

He introduced the valued form of meditation to fellow Commons politicians, working with Labour peer and economist Prof Richard Layard, who has spoken about its merits at Davos, and with Oxford University’s Prof Mark Williams and Chris Cullen.

This article appeared in the Irish Times on 8 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Fixing a hole

Four ideas to improve Britain's bad record on big building projects
UK government's plans for increased infrastructure spending and Centre for Economic Performance's recommendations.

The article was published online by the Economist on October 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation. Report of the LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute of Government and Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. January 2013.
The LSE Growth Commissioners are: Philippe Aghion, Tim Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen.

Related links
Philippe Aghion webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission webpage



News Posted: 08/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

ETNO - European Telecommunications Network Operators' Association

ETNO ThinkDigital Blog Post: New CERRE study: concentration in the mobile communications industry generates a true economic trade-off

A new CERRE report highlights the relationship between prices, investments, and market structure. It is co-authored by Tommaso Valletti, a Joint Academic Director of CERRE and Professor of Economics at Imperial College London and at the University of Rome as well as a member of the Economic Advisory Group on Competition Policy (EAGCP) at the European Commission, Frank Verboven, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Economics at the University of Leuven, and also a member of the EAGCP, and Christos Genakos, Assistant Professor at the Athens University of Economics and Business, and Research Economist at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance

This article was published online by ETNO (European Telecommunications Network Operator's Association) on October 7, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Loss Aversion on the Phone', Christos Genakos, Costas Roumanias and Tommaso Valletti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1373, September 2015
'Evaluating a Decade of Mobile Termination Rate Regulation', Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1282, July 2014
Evaluating a Decade of Mobile Termination Rate Regulation, Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, The Economic Journal, Volume 125, Issue 586, August 2015

Related links
Christos Genakos webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The National

The National View, October 7: The scary thing is, many will like what May says

A London School of Economics study says there’s no connection between what people born in this country get paid and immigration.

This article appeared in The National on 7 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio - Investment Perspectives

Are we taking care of UK infrastructure? Anna Valero, LSE, joins us on the line

''We are the builders'' - So George Osborne declared at this years Tory Conference. Is he right, or are we neglecting our National Infrastructure? Anna Valero, research economist at LSE, joins us to walk through the arguments.

The interview was broadcast on Share Radio's Investment Perspectives show on October 7, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Related publications
Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BCS

Planes, trains and automatons

Professors of economics Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (from Uppsala University and London School of Economics respectively) recently released the findings of a study, which found that while some low skilled workers could be under threat, automation will increase the need for higher skilled labour, particularly in advanced manufacturing.

This article apperaed on BCS on 7 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Robots at Work Georg Graetz, Guy Michaels, March 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1335

Related Links
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Market Mogul

Which is more important: Happiness or Economic Growth?

One man who has addressed the issue directly is Richard Layard, co-editor of the World Happiness Report, 2012. He outlines in an article how the income only accounts for less than 2% of the measurable determinants of happiness.

This article appeared in Market Mogul on 7 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2015, John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Is Theresa May right about immigration?

According to a study by the London School of Economics, there is “little evidence of a strong correlation between changes in wages of the UK-born (either all or just the less skilled) and changes in local area immigrant share over this period”.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 7 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

T and T online

Un nou studiu confirmand Utilizarea roboand stimuleazand dezvoltarea and productivitatea

Un studiu recent, elaborat de Georg Graetz de la Universitatea Uppsala si de Guy Michaels de la London School of Economics [1] analizează impactul economic al roboților industriali, ajungând la concluzia că utilizarea roboților a ridicat rata medie de creștere a țărilor analizate cu 0,37% - ceea ce reprezintă 10% din media totală a creșterii produsului intern brut (PIB).

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Newsbeat Online

Immigration - what you need to know before debating it with your mates

The Centre for Economic Performance says there is no evidence of immigration having a negative impact on jobs or wages. In fact, it suggests that immigration is more likely to make wages fairer, because the pressure from highly skilled immigrants can cause the top wages to fall. The centre's analysis also found little connection between areas with the biggest rises in immigrants and rates of unemployment of UK-born people.

This article apperaed on Newsbeat Online on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

New Statesman

Why Theresa May is wrong about immigration

An LSE study, too, has found “no evidence of an overall negative impact of immigration on jobs, wages, housing or the crowding out of public services.

This article appeared in the New Statesman on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Roberto Perrone Programme

BBC Three Counties Radio

The London school of economics says that wages have not been driven down by immigrants but the economy.

This programme was broadcast on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Director

Why flexible working is smart working

From an individual standpoint, a study by the LSE showed that employees who can work from home are more productive than office-bound colleagues: they are less distracted, save time on commuting and are grateful for the flexibility.

This article appeared in the Director on 6 October 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer, John Van Reenen, January 2006 Paper No' CEPSP16Related Links

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

WXII-TV Online

Opinion: Are we hurting kids at school?

In 2013, more than a hundred teachers, writers and academics -- including Lord Layard, director of the well-being program at the London School of Economics -- wrote to the education secretary to protest Britain's education policies. The quest for school readiness, they asserted, had gotten terribly out of hand, foisting "the tests and targets which dominate primary education" upon 4-year-olds.

This article appeared in WXII-TV Online on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Facts and Fiction in the UK Immigration Debate

A study by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, meanwhile, found no evidence of overall negative impact of immigration on jobs, wages, housing or public services in the UK.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 6 Octocber 2015. Link to article

Related Publications Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Education: Too much, too soon?

CNN Online

In 2013, more than a hundred teachers, writers and academics -- including Lord Layard, director of the well-being program at the London School of Economics -- wrote to the education secretary to protest Britain's education policies. The quest for school readiness, they asserted, had gotten terribly out of hand, foisting "the tests and targets which dominate primary education" upon 4-year-olds.

This article appeared on CNN Online on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Academic research cuts through Theresa May's immigration claims

In her address to the Conservative party conference, the home secretary delivered a pointed speech saying that ''there is no case, in the national interest, for immigration of the scale we have experienced over the last decade''. But are her claims supported by academic research? ... Although immigration increases the number of people living in the UK, it is up to the government to decide whether to build more infrastructure and housing. A 2014 study by Diego Battiston shows that, while immigrants are slightly more likely to live in social housing, the main reason why Britons find it hard to find places is the scarcity of property. A 2012 paper by Charlotte Geay presents evidence that, prima facie, the proportion of non-native English speakers in a year group has a detrimental impact on the educational attainment of native speakers at the end of primary school. However, this impact is modest and reflects factors including that immigrant children tend to go to less prestigious schools. Finally, in 2012 Jonathan Wadsworth showed that immigrants in the UK tend to use GP services and hospitals at roughly the same rate as the native born population, and are just as likely to self-report poor health.

This article was published by the Financial Times on October 6, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Immigration and the access to social housing in the UK', Diego Battiston, Richard Dickens, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1264, April 2014
'Non-native speakers of English in the classroom: what are the effects on pupil performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012
'Musn't grumble. Immigration, health and health service use in the UK and Germany', Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1166, September 2012
'The impact of immigration on the structure of male wages: Theory and evidence from Britain', Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006
The impact of immigration on the structure of wages: Theory and evidence from Britain, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Journal of the European Economic Association, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp120-151, February 2012.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Object Connect.com

le robot collaboratif de demain

Ce type d’amélioration permet alors d’augmenter significativement les cadences et la productivité. En effet, Graetz et Michaels ont pu grâce aux données de la Fédération internationale de robotique estimer à 16% la part de l’augmentation des gains de productivité (selon hbr.org) liée à la robotique.

This article appeared on Object Connect.com on 5 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015 'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Le Soleil

Sa juste part d'impôt

Le Québec assumerait annuellement des pertes fiscales de quelque 800 millions $, évalue le ministère des Finances en extrapolant les résultats d'une étude réalisée par Gabriel Zucman, qui était en 2014 professeur adjoint à la London School of Economics. Toujours en utilisant la même étude, le ministère estime à 47 milliards $ les capitaux québécois placés dans des paradis fiscaux.
Quebec will assume an annual tax loss of approximately $ 800 million, the Ministry of Finance estimated by extrapolating the results of a study by Gabriel Zucman, which in 2014 was assistant professor at the London School of Economics. Still using the same study, the ministry estimated $ 47 billion Quebec capital invested in tax havens.

Related Links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Global Government Forum

Britain to get new Infrastructure Commission

Britain’s chancellor of the exchequer has today announced the creation of a new independent body to advise the government on new infrastructure projects.

This article appered on Global Government Forum on 5 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation. Report of the LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute of Government and Centre for Economic Performance LSE. January 2013. The LSE Growth Commissioners are: Philippe Aghion, Tim Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen.

Related links
Philippe Aghion webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission webpage

News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Ecologist

Tory Conference: pledge the UK to the Global Apollo Program

The Tories have an opportunity to show real leadership on energy and climate change this week, writes Richard Layard - by making the UK the first country to sign up to a global research effort to replace fossil fuels with renewables as the world's primary power source.

This article appeared in The Ecologist on 5 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE News - Press Release

LSE recommendations behind UK government's new Infrastructure Commission

The UK government's new Infrastructure Commission, unveiled at the Conservative Party Conference today (Monday 5 October), was one of the key recommendations of the LSE Growth Commission, which reported in the autumn of 2013. The new commission will be chaired by Lord Adonis and will explore how the UK can improve its construction of major road, rail, air, housing and energy projects. Growth Commission report The LSE Growth Commission, led by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE with the Institute for Government, identified key elements of a long-term growth strategy for the UK. One of its main recommendations was the need for new institutional structures, including an Infrastructure Planning Commission, to create the strategic vision required to stimulate investment in national infrastructure, particularly in transport and energy.

The press release was published online by LSE News on October 5, 2015
Link to the release here

Related publications
Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation. Report of the LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute of Government and Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. January 2013.
The LSE Growth Commissioners are: Philippe Aghion, Tim Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen.

Related links
Philippe Aghion webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission webpage



News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

Another centre to address lack of FE research as UCL's Institute of Education looks at post-14 education and work

A third FE research centre has launched just a year after Professor Lady Alison Wolf decried how the sector was ''woefully short of good, up-to-date research''. ... The work of the new centre, said Mr Grainger, would complement that of other sector organisations involved in research, including the Further Education Trust for Leadership (Fetl) and the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER). Meanwhile, a fourth research body remains in the planning stages at the Education and Training Foundation (ETF).

This article was published online by FE Week on October 5, 2015
Link to article here

News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Shops and call centres are not the answer for those in the wilderness

Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics has studied unemployment in former industrial areas and says every city needs the equivalent of an export sector - something to bring money from outside the area, whether it's a hospital, a university, or a successful business sector. Without that, areas fall into long-term decline. ''The areas that have negative labour demand shocks like this are the areas that lose population; then the housing stock is bigger than is needed for the population.'' That can depress property prices, and at worst, chronic urban decay sets in.

This article was published in The Observer on October 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage



News Posted: 04/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The rocky road to regeneration of post-industrial areas

Ever since Thatcher's Teesside stroll, breathing life into blighted areas has met with mixed success. Understanding what might work is a step in the right direction.
Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics has studied unemployment in former industrial areas and says every city needs the equivalent of an export sector - something to bring money from outside the area, whether it's a hospital, a university, or a successful business sector. Without that, areas fall into long-term decline.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage



News Posted: 03/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

FT.com

‘The Hidden Wealth of Nations: The Scourge of Tax Havens', by Gabriel Zucman

This is the message of a provocative new book by Gabriel Zucman, a 28-year-old assistant professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. In Zucman’s view, tax havens are a fast-growing danger to the world economy and policymakers need urgently to step up their efforts to curb them.

This article appeared in the FT.com on 2 October Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations, Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423 Details
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV

This Morning

CEP study on the use of mobile phones in the class room mentioned

This programme was broadcast on 2 October 2015 on ITV. Link

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Friday Magazine

Happy cafés

Lord Richard Layard, founder of Action for Happiness, a professor at the London School of Economics and international expert on health and well-being, says: ‘We all want to be happy and we want the people we love to be happy.‘ Happiness means feeling good about our lives and wanting to go on feeling that way. Unhappiness means feeling bad and wanting things to change.’ The best society then is one in which there is the least misery and the most happiness, he says. ‘We wanted to spread more happiness in the community and the world.’

This article appeaerd in Friday Magazine on 2 October. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Express

Teacher faces sack after clash with boy over phone

A recent study by the London School of Economics found test scores rose by an average of six per cent when mobiles were banned from the classroom.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 2 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Kent

News

Discussion of LSE research on banning mobile phones from classrooms

This was broadcast on BBC Radio Kent on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 01/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Deutschlandfunk - Online

GroßbritannienMindestlohn als kluger Schachzug

Professor Alan Manning von der London School of Economics hat seit 1999 die Entwicklung des nationalen Mindestlohns in Großbritannien untersucht. "Die Befürchtung, das würde jede Menge Arbeitsplätze kosten, hat sich als ungerechtfertigt herausgestellt. Jahrelang sind am unteren Ende die Löhne gesunken, deswegen sind Mindestlöhne eine berechtigte Korrektur."
Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics has studied the evolution of the national minimum wage in the UK since 1999th "The fear that would cost a lot of jobs, has been found to be unjustified. For years, wages have fallen at the lower end, which is why minimum wages are a legitimate correction."

This article apperaed in Deutschlandfunk on 1 October 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics Alan Manning, May 2014 Paper No' CEPCP419 in CentrePiece Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 01/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mother Jones

Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Suffolk

News

Debate on banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE [CEP] research.

The news item was broadcast by BBC Radio Suffolk on September 30, 2015
Link to broadcast here

See also
BBC Radio Shropshire
News
Discussion of LSE research on banning mobile phones from classrooms

BBC Hereford and Worcester
News
Discussion of banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE research

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

'London effect' in schools due to gradual improvements not policies, says report

LSE report says primaries improving since 90s and abolition of Inner London Education Authority led to pupils' success
One of the researchers, Jo Blanden of the University of Surrey, said: ''London's schools have become extremely good at helping poor children succeed. This is despite the incredible diversity of their pupils. ''This success is likely to lead to better jobs and more social mobility among those educated in the capital.''

This article was published by the Guardian on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Brand Republic

My Media Week Sue Todd

First is the up and coming Spark event, where, among other things, we will be revealing some new research around the evolving role that premium content experiences play in consumers’ lives. We discuss the role that Paul Dolan, professor of Behavioral Science at the London School of Economics, will play at the event and how the panel and interactive elements will work.

This article appeared in Brand Republic on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Quartz

This school has banned all technology in the classroom--and at home

A study by the London School of Economics suggests that banning mobile phones at school is worth the equivalent of an extra week of classes in terms of students’ development.

This article appeard in Quartz on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

The $5 cereal that provoked a London mob

In the East London case, wrote Paul Cheshire, an emeritus professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, via email, ''the very early relatively poor but mainly educated/drop-out pioneer gentrifiers - typical of most processes of gentrification moving into areas of architectural interest in mainly inner city neighborhoods when those are still rundown and largely occupied by working class or refugee poor - are being replaced by richer and more market-oriented still mainly liberal professional and successfully university educated successor gentrifiers, who are a good bit richer and (commercially) fashion-conscious''. The ''pioneer gentrifiers'' were attracted not just to East London's cheapness but also its edginess, which they believe the richer groups are eroding.

This article was published online by The Atlantic (USA) on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage



News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

We ought to be appalled to see what's happening to the greenbelt

This was based on a study by Professor Paul Cheshire, of the London School of Economics, which declared that...

This article was published by The Times on September 30, 2015
[Subscription needed to view article.]

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage



News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The EU should pay cash to areas to compensate them for high immigration, says Labour

Research by the London Schools of Economics and Centre for Economic Performance published earlier this year found that mass immigration to Britain had had no overall negative effect on wages or unemployment. The study found no connection between how much immigration an UK county had seen between 2004 and 2012 and the area’s level of unemployment or changes in wage patterns.

This article appeared in the Independent on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Resources on skills supply and demand already exist

We already have two sets of pioneering work being undertaken in the UK to address this very problem. One is the JPMorgan Foundation funded work at the Institute of Public Policy Research working with US business Burning Glass; while the second is the creative use of the US data set O*NET by researchers at the Centre for Vocational Education Research, based at the London School of Economics and funded by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills.

This article was published in the Financial Times on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Can a smartphone be a tool for learning?

Ministers pointed to research by the London School of Economics, which suggested a ban on phones could make a significant difference to the most disadvantaged children by reducing distraction from learning.

This article appeared on BBC Online on 29 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Essex

Dave Monk show

Richard Murphy interviewed about research into effect in schools of banning mobile phones.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Essex Radio on September 29, 2015
Link to interview here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Teaching Times

Impact of smartphones on behaviour in lessons to be reviewed

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article was published online by Teaching Times on September 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Business

The successes and shortfalls of treating mental illness

London School of Economics Professor Richard Peter Layard, author of Thrive, discusses progress made in treating mental health and the impact of mental illness on the global economy. He speaks on 'Bloomberg Surveillance'.

The interview was broadcast by Bloomberg Business on September 29, 2015
Link to the interview here

Related publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M. Clark, Penguin, July 2014.
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mapi

The Robot Revolution

Two analysts from the Brookings Institution in D.C. recently published an article in the Harvard Business Review in which they revealed recent results and discussed a 2015 paper from London’s Centre for Economic Performance.4The authors of the paper, Georg Graetz of Uppsala University and Guy Michaels of the London School of Economics, offer what the HBR article refers to as some of the “first rigorous macroeconomic research” on robots.5 Graetz and Michaels employ new data from the International Federation of Robotics to analyze the use of industrial robots across 14 industries and 17 countries between 1993 and 2007. They find that manufacturing’s use of robots during that period increased the annual growth of average labor productivity and GDP by a significant 0.36 and 0.37 percentage points, respectively.

This article appeared on Mapi on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015 'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

Is Wealth Inequality Hidden in Tax Havens? Piketty's Co-Author Thinks So

The economist Gabriel Zucman, a protégé and co-author of the French economist Thomas Piketty, has published a new book that attempts to document money hiding out in tax havens. Mr. Zucman’s book, “The Hidden Wealth of Nations,” documents just how dramatic the recent rise has been.

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea030.pdf Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Fusion

Eight percent of the world's wealth might be hidden in tax havens

A new estimate from Berkeley economist Gabriel Zucman says that as much as 8% of the world’s wealth, totaling $7.6 trillion, might be “hidden” in places like Switzerland and the Cayman Islands, which are home to special corporate entities that allow funds to be shielded from tax regimes.

This article appeared in Fusion on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations, Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423 Details
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

If Everyone Gets Electricity, Can the Planet Survive?

In the long term, sustainable, reliable supplies of terawatts of energy need to be researched, developed, and scaled. Solar and wind are already playing an exciting and rapidly expanding role in powering the developing world. But countries also need electricity at night when the air is still. A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a “global Apollo program” to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

On the Wight

Medina College bans all use of mobile phones: Here's one parent's view

In the Spring of this year, Medina College headteacher, Richard Williams, asked parents what they thought about introducing a ban on mobile phones in school. He quoted research which shows that banning mobile phones from schools improves GCSE results. Even used outside of lessons there is the pressure of social media, which can bring up cyber-bullying issues.

This article appeared in On the Wight on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business 24

sondaj impozitare averi mari

Cercetarile efectuate, separat, de Philip Vermeulen, economistul Bancii Centrale Europeane, si de Gabriel Zucman de la London School of Economics arata ca averile celor superbogati - ascunse de fisc si despre care persoanele in cauza nu amintesc cand sunt chestionate - sunt mai mari decat se stie. La aceeasi concluzie a ajuns si Banca Mondiala, cand a rectificat diferentele din datele veniturilor, eliminand progresele facute in perioada 1998-2008 in reducerea diferentei dintre bogatii si saracii lumii, spun cei de la Bloomberg.
Research conducted separately by Philip Vermeulen, economist at Bank Central European, and Gabriel Zucman at the London School of Economics shows that the wealth of the super-- hidden tax and about which the persons involved do not remember when surveyed - are higher than He knows. The same conclusion reached and the World Bank, when corrected differences in data revenues, eliminating progress made during 1998-2008 in narrowing the gap between rich and poor world, say those from Bloomberg.

This article appeared on Business 24 on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Relocate Global

Immigration: the great debate

Sir David Metcalf, chairman of the MAC and emeritus professor at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, invited evidence from businesses and trade organisations by September. He received dozens of submissions over two months, most stressing the importance of being able to attract the "brightest and best" for the future growth of the economy.

This article appeared in Relocate Global on 28 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Essex Chronicle on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

BBC World News

Joan Costa Font comments on the elections in Catalonia

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on 27 September 2015 Link

Also on:
National Public Radio Link

Related Links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Libero 24x7

Lavoro la domenica, Italia avanti a Gran Bretagna, Francia e Germania

Chi l’avrebbe mai detto? Siamo più liberali degli inglesi. È questo il risultato di uno studio del Centre of Economic Performance della London School of Economics and Political Sciences pubblicato il marzo scorso, e ripreso di recente da #Treunumbers, sito di informazione economica giornalistica diretto da Marco Cobianchi, improntato sulla nozione secondo la quale tutto ciò che accade nel mondo può essere raccontato attraverso un grafico, una tabella, un numero.

This article appeared in Libero 24x7 on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Evaluating the Impact of Sunday Trading Deregulation Svetoslav Danchev, Christos Genakos, March 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1336

Related Links
Christos Genakos webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sowetan Live

Cellphones turning kids into zombies - Schools must nip scourge in the bed

In fact, a study was done in Britain by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy of the London School of Economics that proved phone-less classrooms improve performance.

This article appeared in Sowetan Live on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Il Sole 24 Ore Online

Se la Spagna diventa il nuovo anello debole d'Europa

A differenza del partito di Grillo, però, Ciudadanos ha chiare posizioni liberiste in economia, avendo scelto come consigliere economico Luis Garicano, professore alla London School of Economics con dottorato a Chicago.

This article appeared on Il Sole 24 Ore Online on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article was published online by the Essex Chronicle on September 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Common Ground

I am a conservative, I conserve

Their destruction is done with the aim of cutting taxes and reducing government. Yet many thinkers, such as Lord Richard Layard, professor emeritus at the London School of Economics, argue that taxation is a good thing for creating a state of balance between work and life.

This article appeared in Common Ground on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Through the roof

Much green-belt land is far from green: one-third of London’s and three-quarters of that in Cambridge is intensive arable land, estimates Paul Cheshire of the London School of Economics, who says there is enough green-belt land in Greater London to build 1.6m houses.

This article appeared in the Economist on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Governments Still Don't Know Which Policies Help Entrepreneurs

These are the sorts of questions the excellent What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth looks at. It recently delved into the evidence around innovation policy and will have a report out on the matter soon. I caught up with its Director Professor Henry Overman to find out more about what works in innovation policy.

This article appeared on Forbes on 25 September 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Henry Overman webpage
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth webpage

News Posted: 25/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The National

Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp: Brexit is not the panacea we need for all EU's problems

THE Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics predicts the range of Brexit economic scenarios from something akin to the global financial crisis (-10 per cent GDP) to a best case scenario of a -2.2 per cent annual loss of GDP. Other credible think tanks are more positive but none predict a boom time following a Brexit, so the case for a No vote would appear to be based more on British Nationalism than economic pragmatism.

This article appeared in The National on 25 September 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related videos
Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe'. Interview with Thomas Sampson. View video here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

WWNO-FM - Online

Catalonia prepares for crucial vote Sunday

The separatists face many obstacles. If they wanted an independent Catalonia to stay in the European Union and continue reaping the benefits of membership , they would have to re-apply to join. The EU is anxious to deter secession elsewhere in Europe and – therefore – Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics said – the Catalonian separatists would be rebuffed. And then they might well have second thoughts.

This article appeared on WWNO-FM Online on 25 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 25/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Governments still don't know which policies help entrepreneurs

Henry Overman interviewed by Philip Salter
It's easy to make policy, but it's hard to make the right ones. These are the sorts of questions the excellent What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth looks at. It recently delved into the evidence around innovation policy and will have a report out on the matter soon. I caught up with its Director Professor Henry Overman to find out more about what works in innovation policy.

This article was published online by Forbes on September 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Urban Economics and Urban Policy Programmewebpage
What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth website



News Posted: 25/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The National

Gordon MacIntyre-Kemp: Brexit is not the panacea we need for all EU's problems

THE Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics predicts the range of Brexit economic scenarios from something akin to the global financial crisis (-10 per cent GDP) to a best case scenario of a -2.2 per cent annual loss of GDP. Other credible think tanks are more positive but none predict a boom time following a Brexit, so the case for a No vote would appear to be based more on British Nationalism than economic pragmatism.

This article was pubished online by The National on September 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related videos
Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe'. Interview with Thomas Sampson.
View video here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage



News Posted: 25/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

YLE Alueellinen tv-uutistoiminta Lounais-Suomen uutiset (Turku) - Online

EU och nationalismen

Det finns intressanta paralleller till den här problematiken i en studie gjord av doktor Joan Costa Font och professor Frank Cowell vid London School of Economics. De fann en stark länk mellan en ökning av den europeiska identiteten, en minskning av den nationella stoltheten och förändringar i ekonomiskt beteende. There are interesting parallels to this issue in a study made by doctor Joan Costa Font and professor Frank Cowell at the London School of Economics. They found a strong link between an increase in the European identity, a reduction of national pride and changes in economic behavior.

This article appeared in YLE Alueellinen tv-uutistoiminta Lounais-Suomen uutiset on 24 September 2015 Link to article

Related publications
European Identity and Redistributive Preferences Joan Costa Font and Frank Cowell, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1362, July 2015

Related links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Dala-Demokraten – Online (Sweden)

Ulf Lundén: Slå hål på skatteparadisen och rädda välfärden

Fotnot: Gabriel Zucman är biträdande professor vid London School of Economics och sysslar med empirisk forskning under ledning av Thomas Piketty.
Ulf Laila: punch holes on tax havens and save welfare
What if the Red-Green parties got a majority in the EU and dared to challenge the tax havens once and for all? The hidden riches of Luxembourg, the Cayman Islands and Switzerland threatens namely to undermine our entire democratic society. …
Footnote: Gabriel Zucman is Assistant professor at the London School of Economics and dealing with empirical research under the direction of Thomas Piketty.

This aritlce appeared in Dala-Demokraten Online on 24 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

News Week Europe

The most equal city in America

In a groundbreaking study released by the National Bureau of Economic Research, Emmanuel Saez, professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, and the director of its Center for Equitable Growth, and Gabriel Zucman, assistant professor at the London School of Economics, pinpointed when U.S. wealth inequality began its upward climb: 1978.

This article appeared in News Week Europe on 24 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Marketplace.org

Catalonia prepares for crucial vote Sunday

The separatists face many obstacles. If they wanted an independent Catalonia to stay in the European Union and continue reaping the benefits of membership, they would have to reapply to join. The EU is anxious to deter secession elsewhere in Europe and, therefore, said Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics, the Catalonian separatists would be rebuffed. And then they might well have second thoughts.

This article appeared in Marketplace.org on 24 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Lakeshore Public Media

Lakeshore Public Media

This weekend voters in Spain’s most prosperous region — Catalonia – go to the polls. They’re electing a new local government but the poll could have big repercussions for the rest of the country. Many regard the election as a vote for independence which could — in theory — lead to the breakup of Spain. … The separatists face many obstacles. If they wanted an independent Catalonia to stay in the European Union and continue reaping the benefits of membership , they would have to re-apply to join. The EU is anxious to deter secession elsewhere in Europe and – therefore – Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics said – the Catalonian separatists would be rebuffed. And then they might well have second thoughts.

This article appeared in Lakeshore Public Media on 24 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Murphy's law unto himself

This leads into the second critique that Mr Murphy believes has been levelled against him: "that printing money causes inflation". I'm not sure this is really a critique at all: after all, one purpose of quantitative easing (ie, printing money) is to boost inflation. It is also not absurd to suggest that (normal) QE should be re-launched; after all, Britain's inflation rate currently hovers around 0%. I think the criticism is really that monetary financing of government deficits is a problem. As John van Reenen of the LSE argues: The Bank’s remit is to keep inflation under control not deal with the problems of under-investment in particular areas.

This article appeared in the Economist on 24 September 2015. Link to article

Related articles
‘Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia’, John Van Reenen, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, August 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle Media Group

Head resists calls to ban phones in class

Article on mobile phone use by children cites LSE report.

This article appeared in the Essex Chronicle on 24 September (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Employee benefits

Top tips for engaging staff in share schemes

A study conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) and the London School of Economics, and commissioned by Computershare, found that 75% of share scheme members are satisfied with their jobs compared with 65% of non-members. The Computershare Share plan survey results 2014, which surveyed more than 3,800 Computershare employees, also found that members of the scheme take less unplanned absence, are likely to put in more hours and feel a greater sense of loyalty to the firm.

This article appeared in Employee Benefits on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Common ground

I am a conservative, I conserve

Institutions such as railways, medicare, electrical power production and delivery, environmental protection, social services, schools and many other government agencies are being attacked, weakened and even privatized. These aspects of society are useful and helpful and are there for the common good. Their destruction is done with the aim of cutting taxes and reducing government. Yet many thinkers, such as Lord Richard Layard, professor emeritus at the London School of Economics, argue that taxation is a good thing for creating a state of balance between work and life.

This article apperaed on Common Ground on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Provincia

La batalla de las balanzas fiscales

En esa línea, Luis Garicano catedrático de la London School of Economics apuntó en un artículo que "la ganancia de separarse, como en un divorcio, no es lo que deja el marido de transferir, porque luego hay muchas duplicidades: se necesitan dos casas, dos coches? Cataluña y España necesitarían dos ejércitos, dos redes consulares?".
In that vein, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics said in an article that "would gain from spreading, as in a divorce, is not what the husband's transfer, because then there are many duplications: the need for two houses, two cars?" Catalonia and Spain needed two armies, two consular networks?

This article appeared in La Provincia on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

SecEd - Online

Mobile devices: research and inspiration

A similar study undertaken by the London School of Economics found that test scores increased by six per cent after mobile phones were banned from the classroom. Good research and obvious conclusions.

This article appeared in Sec Ed on 23 September 2015 link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La provincial.es

La batalla de las balanzas fiscales

In that vein, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics said in an article that "would gain from spreading, as in a divorce, is not what the husband's transfer, because then there are many duplications: need two houses, two cars?" Catalonia and Spain needed two armies, two consular networks?

This article appeared on La Provincial.es on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano link to article
Growth webpage

News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

European CEO

Greek democracy trumps economics

The job of finance minister is no easy feat at the best of times, especially in Greece. So is the job even doable?
European CEO speaks with Dr Dennis Novy an economist from the University of Warwick to find out the intricacies of the Greek government.

This article appeared in European CEO on 22 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Richard Layard interviewed

Richard Layard emeritus Professor of economics at the LSE interviewed on action for happiness campaign for increased happiness and kindness in the UK.

This interview was broadcast on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Kent

Paul Cheshire interview

Yes we spoke to Professor Paul Cheshire an economist and housing expert at the London school of economics he strongly believes that our greenbelt rules need shaking up in order to meet the house building crisis.

This programme was broadcast on 21 September 2015 Link to article

Also on:
BBC South East (TV)
Inside Out
This professor, an expert in housing and the economy at the London School of Economics says the current Green Belt policy should be shaken up. Link

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014 CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage Urban Economics Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Interview

Richard Layard, emeritus Professor of economics at the LSE interviewed on action for happiness campaign for increased happiness and kindness in the UK.

The interview was broadcast by BBC World Service on September 21, 2015
Link to interview here

Also on 1 other outlet

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

EIN News

Interfaith meeting and action for happiness event

In the afternoon, an enthusiastic and friendly audience of more than 2000 awaited His Holiness's arrival at the Lyceum theatre. He was met at the stage door by his old friend Lord Richard Layard, who with Director of Action for Happiness, Mark Williamson, escorted him to the stage. They were received with resounding cheers and applause. Dr Williams explained that a new course of training was being launched today on World Peace Day, called Exploring What Matters. He said that it is ever more important to bring people together to think about their lives and to help them make their lives happier.

This article was published online by EIN News on September 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

EIN News

Interfaith meeting and action for happiness event

In the afternoon, an enthusiastic and friendly audience of more than 2000 awaited His Holiness’s arrival at the Lyceum theatre. He was met at the stage door by his old friend Lord Richard Layard, who with Director of Action for Happiness, Mark Williamson, escorted him to the stage. They were received with resounding cheers and applause. Dr Williams explained that a new course of training was being launched today on World Peace Day, called Exploring What Matters. He said that it is ever more important to bring people together to think about their lives and to help them make their lives happier.

This article appeared on EIN News on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Razon

Colores primaries

Primary colours
But, when it comes to the truth, Sala i Martin has refused to discuss publicly with Luis Garicano, another heavyweight, Professor at the London School of Economics. The worst has been disappointing arguments that has exposed its refusal, more ad hominem that ad rem, mixed with class expressions of contempt as neighborhood thugs.

This article was published online by La Razon on September 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News online

If you see a little Piketty in this tax-haven book, that's fine

Look out, Thomas Piketty. Here comes Gabriel Zucman. With a slim new book that has the feel of Piketty's bestselling Capital in the 21st Century, Zucman, a baby-faced 28-year-old University of California-Berkeley economist, is taking his own swing at global capitalism. His target: tax havens that he says hide $7.6 trillion - about 8 percent of the world's net financial wealth.

This article was published online by Bloomberg News on September 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations, Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423
Details
'Inequality: Are we really 'all in this together'?', Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015 Abstract | Full paper

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Razon

Colores primaries

Pero, a la hora de la verdad, Sala i Martin se ha negado a debatir públicamente con Luis Garicano, otro peso pesado, catedrático de la London School of Economics. Lo peor ha sido los decepcionantes argumentos que ha expuesto para su negativa, más ad hominem que ad rem, mezclados con expresiones clasistas de desprecio como matones de barrio.
But, when it comes to the truth, Sala i Martin has refused to discuss publicly with Luis Garicano, another heavyweight, Professor at the London School of Economics. The worst has been disappointing arguments that has exposed its refusal, more ad hominem that ad rem, mixed with class expressions of contempt as neighborhood thugs.

This article appeared in La Razson on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Richmond Times - Dispatch

Politifact Virginia – Bernie sanders says top 0.1% in U.S. have almost as much wealth as bottom 90%

We decided to examine Sanders' statement that the richest 0.1 percent has nearly as much as the bottom 90 percent. Its a standard line in Sanders' speeches. Warren Gunnels, policy director of Sanders' presidential campaign, said the senator's source for the statistic is a Nov. 13, 2014, article in The Guardian, a British newspaper. As our colleagues at PolitiFact Wisconsin have written, the article reported on the findings of a research paper, about wealth inequality during the past 100 years. The study was commissioned by the National Bureau of Economic Research, a nonpartisan organization in Cambridge, Mass., which is best known as the arbiter for determining when the U.S. economy falls into recession. The authors of the study were economists Emmanuel Saez of the University of California, Berkeley, and Gabriel Zucman of the London School of Economics. Using tax records, they made estimates for 2012 on wealth - that is, the value of all assets, such as a home, and savings and retirement accounts, minus all debts, such as mortgages and credit card balances.

This article was published by the Richmond Times - Dispatch on September 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Inequality: Are we really 'all in this together'?, Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015 Abstract | Full paper

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Richmond Times

Politifact Virginia – Bernie sanders says top 0.1% in U.S. have almost as much wealth as bottom 90%

We decided to examine Sanders’ statement that the richest 0.1 percent has nearly as much as the bottom 90 percent. It’s a standard line in Sanders’ speeches. Warren Gunnels, policy director of Sanders’ presidential campaign, said the senator’s source for the statistic is a Nov. 13, 2014, article in The Guardian, a British newspaper. As our colleagues at PolitiFact Wisconsin have written, the article reported on the findings of a research paper, about wealth inequality during the past 100 years. The study was commissioned by the National Bureau of Economic Research, a nonpartisan organization in Cambridge, Mass., which is best known as the arbiter for determining when the U.S. economy falls into recession. The authors of the study were economists Emmanuel Saez of the University of California, Berkeley, and Gabriel Zucman of the London School of Economics. Using tax records, they made estimates for 2012 on wealth -- that is, the value of all assets, such as a home, and savings and retirement accounts, minus all debts, such as mortgages and credit card balances.

This article apperaed in the Richmond Times on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations, Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423
Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together? Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth webpage webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Guardian.com

Will Lidl's living wage smash the UK's low-pay cartel?

Writing at the end of 2006, David Metcalf, a professor of industrial relations at the LSE and an expert on labour markets, cited over 25 British studies of its impact. “The conclusions are clear-cut – the minimum wage has not had an adverse impact on jobs … Those workplaces with a high fraction of low-wage workers in 1998 have had similar employment growth to workplaces with just a few, or no, low-paid employees.”

This article appeared in the Guardian online on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Why has the British National Minimum Wage had little or no impact on Employment? David Metcalf, The Journal of Industrial Relations, Volume 50, Issue 3, June 2008
Why Has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment? David Metcalf, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.781, April 2007

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Times

Look out Piketty – here comes Gabriel Zucman

With The Hidden Wealth of Nations [Gabriel] Zucman is positioning himself as this year’s Piketty - and he has a message for Ireland. … “People haven’t really made the link between tax evasion and rising inequality. They see big companies and the very wealthy avoiding taxes, but they don’t understand how this is part of this dramatic increase in inequality. My hope is to bring more attention to this.”

This article appeared in the Irish times on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
The Hidden Wealth of Nations Gabriel Zucman, The University of Chicago Press, September 2015 ISBN: 9780226245423
‘Inequality: are we really ‘all in this together’?’ Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, April 2015

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Inverse

Teens' test scores go up when their schools ban cell phones

Schools that ban mobile phones see a boost in student’s grades, a large-scale U.K. study has found. And European schools are following suit. The research published by the London School of Economics examined 91 schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester, and Manchester, and found that a no-phone zone generated improvements equivalent to students getting five good passes on General Certificates of Secondary Education. That bump — roughly 6 percent across the board — was greater even than schools that allowed students to keep their phones so long as they were switched off.

This article appeared in Inverse on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Copenhagen Post.dk

Public school bans mobile phones

A public school in Skægkær north of Silkeborg has decided to ban the use of mobile phones during classes in order to reduce distractions. … Research by the London School of Economics revealed that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones showed a sustained improvement in exam results.

This article appeared on The Copenhagen Post.dk on 21 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

9am

Richard Layard interviewed on happiness.

This programme was broadcast on Sky News on 21 September 2015 (no link available).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Richard Layard interviewed on happiness

This programme was broadcast on 21 Setpember 2015 on BBC Radio 4 (no link available)

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Kent

News

Paul Cheshire interviewed on housing shortage in the South East and how building on the greenbelt necessary and acceptable to do so when within 2 km of a railway station.

This programme was broadcast on 21 September 2015. Link to article

See also:
BBC South East (TV)
Inside Out
This professor, an expert in housing and the economy at the London School of Economics says the current Green Belt policy should be shaken up.
Link to article here

Related Publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website



News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Action for Happiness: secular ethics

Article by Richard Layard
Nothing causes more misery than pre-occupation with self. So in a largely secular age, we desperately need a movement to promote positive, ethical living. We have inspirational teachers like the Dalai Lama, but frail humans need regular meetings with like-minded people to uplift and inspire their daily lives. That is how the churches have operated and it is not easy to lead a good life in isolation. Nearly all of us need to meet regularly with others to discuss and affirm our commitment. That is why in 2011 we founded Action for Happiness, with the Dalai Lama as our patron. This may seem a strange name for an ethical movement. But ethics is not about the hair-shirt. It is about principles for living together which lead to happy and fulfilling lives all round. For this, people need to understand what makes themselves happy but above all they need a passionate desire to make others happy - a spirit of unconditional benevolence.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

John Van Reenen interviewed on Corbynomics

This programme was broadast on 19 September on BBC Radio 4 (no link available).

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV News Anglia

News

There was a great piece of research from the London School of economics which said that in schools that have a hard ban on mobile phones, the results go up, on average, by 6%.

This programme was broadcast on ITV Anglia on 18 September 2015 Link

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 18/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

France 24 (TV)

Dennis Novy interview

Dennis Novy live interview on the Greek election.

This programme was broadcast on France 24 on September 18, 2015
(no link available).

Also on:
Al Jazeera

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Cambridge News

Cambridgeshire headteacher explores banning mobile phones

The new Cottenham principal said research by the London School of Economics found that on average schools that have a ''hard ban'' on mobile phones see a 6 per cent increase in their results.

This article was published by the Cambridge News on September 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage



News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Cambridge News

Cambridgeshire headteacher explores banning mobile phones

The new Cottenham principal said research by the London School of Economics found that on average schools that have a "hard ban" on mobile phones see a 6 per cent increase in their results.

This article appeared on Cambirdge News on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV1 Anglia West

News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Kepa.fi

Veroparatiiseissa on vähintään kahdeksan prosenttia maailman varallisuudesta

Tätä on tutkittu tieteellisesti tosi vähän, mutta esimerkiksi Thomas Pikettyn oppilas Gabriel Zucman on arvioinut, että veroparatiiseissa olisi noin kahdeksan prosenttia varallisuudesta. Hän käytti erittäin nokkelaa menetelmää tutkiessaan pankkien dataa
This has been studied scientifically true a bit, but, for example, Thomas Pikettyn a student of Gabriel Zucman has estimated that tax havens should be around eight per cent of the wealth. He used a very clever method in examining banks ' data.

This article appeared on Kepa.fi on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Relationship breakdown: family stability is vital for a thriving society

Letter in support of the institution of the family from Professor Richard Layard, London School of Economics and 67 others
SIR – Relationship breakdown currently costs Britain an estimated £47 billion a year, but just £7.5 million of government funding is made available for prevention. There is an increasing demand for support in this area, yet many cannot afford to access support services, even when they are subsidised by charities.

This article appeared in the Telegraph on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Germany's economy will grow faster because of the million refugees it is helping, study finds

The economic benefits of migration are well-researched and established. A study published by the London School of Economics earlier this year found that immigration to Britain had not increased unemployment or reduced wages in areas where it had occurred.

This article appeared in the Independent on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Also in:
Belfast Telegraph
Germany’s economy will grow faster because of the million refugees it is helping, study finds
A study published by the London School of Economics earlier this year found that immigration to Britain had not increased unemployment or reduced wages in areas where it had occurred. Link to article

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Confidencial Colombia

La economia de la felicidad

In the 70's, the New Yorker Richard Easterlin Economist concluded that, once past a certain level of income in the richest nations, happiness not increased as a result of higher revenues. Today we know for scientific research and the findings of the English economist Richard Layard, the rent acts as a powerful factor correlated with happiness, but that is a kind of momentary happiness, which runs out as falls into a vicious cycle of dissatisfaction by wanting to always have something better than 'the of to the side' and because once achieved one higher income soon generated an adaptation to this higher standard of living where the greatest happiness obtained is quickly lost. In response to this human problem, the economy of personal development flourishes. This entails two main lines: services to individuals and services to organizations and institutions.

This article was published online by Confidencial Colombia on September 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Confidencial Colombia

La economia de la felicidad

En los 70, el economista neoyorkino Richard Easterlin concluyó que, una vez superado un determinado nivel de renta en las naciones más ricas, la felicidad no se incrementaba como consecuencia de mayores ingresos. Hoy sabemos por investigaciones científicas, y por los hallazgos del economista inglés Richard Layard, que la renta actúa como un poderoso factor correlacionado con la felicidad, pero que es un tipo de felicidad momentánea, que se agota porque se cae en un círculo vicioso de insatisfacción por querer siempre tener algo mejor que 'el de al lado' y porque una vez alcanzado un ingreso mayor, se genera pronto una adaptación a este nivel de vida más alto en donde se pierde rápidamente la mayor felicidad obtenida. Como respuesta a esta problemática humana, la economía del desarrollo personal florece. De ésta se derivan dos líneas principales: los servicios a particulares y los servicios a organizaciones e instituciones.
In the 70's, the New Yorker Richard Easterlin Economist concluded that, once past a certain level of income in the richest nations, happiness not increased as a result of higher revenues. Today we know for scientific research and the findings of the English economist Richard Layard, the rent acts as a powerful factor correlated with happiness, but that is a kind of momentary happiness, which runs out as falls into a vicious cycle of dissatisfaction by wanting to always have something better than ' the of to the side ' and because once achieved one higher income soon generated an adaptation to this higher standard of living where the greatest happiness obtained is quickly lost. In response to this human problem, the economy of personal development flourishes. This entails two main lines: services to individuals and services to organizations and institutions.

This article appeared in Confidencial Colombia on 16 September 2015 link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Noticias de Hoy

Sala-i-Martin llama ''maton de barrio'' a Luis Garicano

The Coordinator of the economic program and citizens Social (C's), Luis Garicano, has invited the Economist Xavier Sala-i-Martin, favourable to the independence of Catalonia, to discuss the economic implications of that independence in television or radio, but Sala-i-Martin, ''bullyboy'' has called Garicano, insists an ''academic'' debate first.

This article was published online by Noticias de Hoy on September 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage



News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Birmingham Post

Could life be better with less technology?

... the wrong person. Expert on happiness, Professor Paul Dolan of the London School of Economics, believes that ...

This article was published by the Birmingham Post on September 16, 2015
[No link available to the article.]

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage



News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Global Apollo Programme Press Release

Apollo Programme: Top global scientists and business leaders back Paris clean energy plan

  • David Attenborough, Brian Cox, Paul Polman, Jeffrey Sachs and Arunabha Ghosh all sign letter calling for action by UN climate conference in December

  • The international group of experts and CEOs back a new 'Global Apollo Program' to coordinate and invest in renewable R&D

  • Attenborough releases new video urging world leaders to back Global Apollo Program
  • 27 world-leading scientists, executives, academics and politicians have called on nations to adopt the Global Apollo Program (GAP) by the time of the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December.
    A letter published today, signed by David Attenborough, Brian Cox, Paul Polman, Carlo Carraro, Nilesh Jadhav and other respected figures argues that ''A sensible approach to tackling climate change will not only pay for itself but provide economic benefits to the nations of the world''. The GAP plan for internationally coordinated RD&D (research, development and demonstration) into renewable energy technology was proposed in June by a group of top scientists, economists and energy experts including Nicholas Stern, Gus O'Donnell, Richard Layard, David King, Martin Rees, Adair Turner and John Browne. The aspiration of the Program is to make renewable energy cheaper than fossil fuels by increasing government spending on research to at least $15bn a year globally for the next 10 years. Watch this video to learn more about GAP.

    The letter comes at the same time as a video from Sir David Attenborough urges support for the Program. You can watch the video here

    See also
    Letter published on 16th September, 2015
    We the undersigned believe that global warming can be addressed without adding significant economic costs or burdening taxpayers with more debt. A sensible approach to tackling climate change will not only pay for itself but provide economic benefits to the nations of the world. The aspiration of the Global Apollo Program is to make renewable energy cheaper than coal within 10 years. We urge the leading nations of the world to commit to this positive, practical initiative by the Paris climate conference in December. The plan requires leading governments to invest a total of at least $15 billion a year in research, development and demonstration of clean energy. That compares to the $100 billion currently invested in defence R&D globally each year. Public investment now will save governments huge sums in the future. What is more, a coordinated R&D plan can help bring energy bills down for billions of consumers. Renewable energy gets less than 2% of publicly funded R&D. The private sector spends relatively small sums on clean energy research and development. Just as with the Apollo space missions of the 1960s, great scientific minds must now be assembled to find a solution to one of the biggest challenges we face. Please support the Global Apollo Program - the world's 10 year plan for cheaper, cleaner energy.

    Related links
    About the Global Apollo Program
    The Global Apollo Program (GAP) is a 10 year project which aspires to make renewable energy cheaper than fossil fuel. The initial aim is to get leading nations to commit to more publicly funded research and development of renewable technology (with a target of 0.02% of GDP). The report's authors are Sir David King (the UK government's former Chief Scientist), Lord Gus O'Donnell (the former head of the UK civil service), Lord Richard Layard (London School of Economics), Lord Nicholas Stern (author of the ''Stern Review'' of Climate Change), Lord John Browne (ex-CEO of BP), Lord Adair Turner (the former chair of the Financial Services Authority) and Lord Martin Rees (Former President Royal Society).

    See GAP plan here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Notícias de Hoy

    Sala-i-Martin llama ''matón de barrio'' a Luis Garicano

    The Coordinator of the economic program and citizens Social (C's), Luis Garicano, has invited the Economist Xavier Sala-i - Martin, favourable to the independence of Catalonia, to discuss the economic implications of that independence in television or radio, but Sala-I-Martin, "bullyboy" has called Garicano, insists a "academic" debate first.

    This article appeared in Notícias de Hoy on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Reader's Digest online

    5 Reasons to feel optimistic on a rainy day

    Your perception of the weather is what brings about negative feelings, the study authors suspect. “If it is sunny every day you get used to it and the sunshine doesn’t make you any happier,” Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics, said to the Telegraph.

    This article appeared in Readers Digest on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    IZA World of Labor

    Today's featured article

    Offshoring has little net effect on domestic employment, while pushing domestic workers toward more complex jobs
    Gianmarco Ottaviano (LSE, UK, University of Bologna, Italy, and IZA, Germany)

    This article appeared in IZA World of Labour on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Trade Programme webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Irish Times

    Information technology and schools

    Sir, – At last the penny is dropping among educationalists that technology in the classroom can be a hindrance to learning. A study by the London School of Economics in 2014 found that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones to school showed a sustained improvement in exam results, compared to schools that allowed students to carry mobile phones. The improvements in education standards, by eliminating the distraction of phones, was most pronounced in disadvantaged schools.

    This article appeared in the Irish Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BlueandGreen Tomorrow

    Apollo-scale clean energy research plan proposed by leading figures: Global Apollo Programme

    We went to the moon. Not because it was easy but because it was hard. In an open letter to the Guardian, leading figures have called today for an ambitious initiative to make clean energy cheaper than coal launching the Global Apollo Programme…. The signatories below choose to save our fragile planet. Join them. … Richard Layard London School of Economics

    This article appeared on Blue and Green Tomorrow on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    See also:
    GreenWiseBusiness.co.uk
    Leading global scientists and business chiefs back Paris clean energy plan Link to article
    Click Green
    Top global scientists and business leaders back Paris clean energy plan Link to article
    Energías renovables - Online
    Panorama - Top global scientists and business leaders support Paris clean energy plan Link to article

    Related publications
    In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Ireland leads the way as eurozone homes market begins to recover

    "I am sceptical of attempts to aggregate house price data because there is no such thing as a European real estate market," said Christian Hilber, a housing expert at the London School of Economics. "Real estate markets are inherently local. Even within individual states there are big differences driven by local demand and supply condition.”

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Urban Programme webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Clean energy cheaper than coal? Yes we can

    ......of Royal Meteorological Society, Dr Fatima Denton African Climate Policy Centre, Denys Shortt CEO, DCS Group, Adair Turner Former chairman, Financial Services Authority, Gus O'Donnell Former cabinet secretary, Richard Layard London School of Economics, Professor John Shepherd, Martin Rees Astronomer royal and five others

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CERRE

    Evaluating market consolidation in mobile communications

    An increase in market concentration in the mobile communications industry generates a true economic trade-off. This is the important finding of a new, original report. The CERRE report is co-authored by Tommaso Valletti, Frank Verboven and Christos Genakos.

    This article was published by CERRE on September 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Loss Aversion on the Phone', Christos Genakos, Costas Roumanias and Tommaso Valletti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1373, September 2015
    'Evaluating a Decade of Mobile Termination Rate Regulation', Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1282, July 2014
    Evaluating a Decade of Mobile Termination Rate Regulation, Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, The Economic Journal, Volume 125, Issue 586, August 2015

    Related links
    Christos Genakos webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Free lunch: the productivity pessimists

    A thorough study for the RF itself by John van Reenen and João Paulo Pessoa found, as late as 2012, that there had been virtually no divergence between productivity and workers’ pay for the last 40 years, when the numbers were properly accounted for.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 15 September 2015. Link to article

    Related publications
    Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
    Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality , Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Growth Programme webpage

    News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Vozpopuli - online

    La polémica sube de tono: Sala-i-Martin llama al economista de C's ''matón de barrio''

    Como adelantaba Vozpópuli, el coordinador del Programa Económico y Social de Ciudadanos (C's) Luis Garicano ha invitado al economista Xavier Sala-i-Martin, favorable a la independencia de Cataluña, a discutir en televisión o en la radio sobre las implicaciones económicas de la independencia, pero Sala-i-Martin, que ha llamado "matón de barrio" a Garicano, insiste en celebrar primero un debate "académico", es decir, a puerta cerrada.
    As it ahead of Vozpopuli, the Coordinator of the economic program and citizens Social (C's) Luis Garicano has invited Economist Xavier Sala-i - Martin, favourable to the independence of Catalonia, to discuss the economic implications of independence in television or radio, but Sala-I-Martin, "bullyboy" has called Garicano, insists they celebrate the first "academic" debate, behind closed doors..

    This article appeared in Vozpopuli online on 15 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Periodista Digital Spain

    El economista independentista Xavier Sala-i-Martin llama 'matón de barrio' a Luis Garicano (C's)

    ...tan grande" cuando "se convierte en político". Pero el catedrático de la London School of Economics y miembro del Comité...

    This article appeared in Periodista Digital Spain on 15 September 2015 Link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Israel Herald

    Britain mulls ban on smartphones, iPads in classrooms

    In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 15 September 2015. Link to article

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Le Monde.fr

    Migrants: dissiper les fantasmes

    However, other studies show that the influx of immigrants has negative effects on the median salary (but not on employment) natives working in low-skilled sectors such as the building and public works, so on the remuneration of those with which immigrants are directly in competition, i.e. mostly workers from a wave of previous immigration Ortega, Javier and Verdugo , Gregory (2015), The impact of immigration on the local labor market outcomes of blue collar workers: panel data evidence. CEP discussion paper, CEPDP1333. Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), London, UK).

    This article was published by Le Monde.fr on September 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Impact of Immigration on the Local Labor Market Outcomes of Blue Collar Workers: Panel Data Evidence', Javier Ortega and Gregory Verdugo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1333, February 2015

    Related links
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Javier Ortega CEP Publications webpage



    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio Wiltshire

    News

    Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

    This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    ORF.at

    Vom Lernen in der ''smarten'' Schule - news.ORF.at

    Für ein Verbot spricht eine Studie zum Thema, mit der die London School of Economics im Mai aufhorchen ließ. Wie die BBC berichtete, erhöhten sich die Leistungen der Schüler nach dem Verbot der Smartphones um sechs Prozent. Besonders schwache Schüler aus ärmeren Familien profitierten laut der Studie von der Verbotsmaßnahme. Die fehlende Ablenkung habe den Fokus der Schüler wieder vermehrt auf den Unterricht gelenkt, so die Forscher.
    A study on the issue of the London School of Economics in may prick up their ears had talks for a ban. As the BBC reported that the student increased after the ban of smartphones by six percent. According to the study, particularly weak students from poorer families have benefited from the prohibition. Missing distraction have again increasingly directed focus of the students on teaching, according to the researchers.

    This article appeared on ORF.at on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    NDTV India - online

    UK orders probe into classroom disruption by smartphones

    In a recent study, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The LSE report also found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    This article appeared on NDTV India online on 14 September 2015. link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Planning and Building Control

    Investigation into the impact of smartphones on behaviour in lessons

    The government recognised technology can expand the learning experience when used appropriately. However, the growth of personal devices is hindering teaching. A report from the London School of Economics found banning mobile phones from the classroom could significantly benefit learning. The study, undertaken in May, could add as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year.

    This article appeared in Planning and Building Control on 14 September 2015 link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    Phones and tablets could be banned in classrooms

    A recent study published by the London School of Economics showed that schools where such technology was banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6%. The study also revealed that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit student’s learning as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over the academic year.

    This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    Phones and tablets could be banned in classrooms



    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    History News Network

    Has Labour Let Down British Voters?

    So what does [Jeremy] Corbyn plan to do? … Forgotten are the positives of the Blair years. After becoming leader in 1994, Blair swiftly modernized the Labour Party. He embraced Third Way thinking, which used the proceeds of free market policies to fund social justice programs. The results proved startling. Between 1997 and 2007, GDP grew by 2.89 % a year, the highest rate by far amongst the major European economies. This unprecedented prosperity financed investments in public infrastructure. London School of Economics research illustrates how Labour revitalized social services that had been neglected for decades. Thousands of new teachers, doctors, and nurses were employed and hundreds of schools and hospitals built. Funding for the National Health Service increased. Access to social services, health education, and childcare was expanded for minorities and people living in impoverished inner cities and remote rural areas. A minimum wage was established and extensive retraining offered to the long-term unemployed. A system of tax credits and indirect taxes on consumption redistributed wealth without raising income tax rates

    This article appeared on History News Network on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related publications
    UK Economic Performance Since 1997: Growth, Productivity and Jobs Dan Corry, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen, CEP Report, November 2011
    UK Economic Performance Since 1997: Growth, Productivity and Jobs , Dan Corry, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.24, December 2011

    Related links Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Growth Programme webpge

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Sky News

    News

    Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

    Also on:
    BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

    This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Nigeria Sun

    British classroom-disruption by smart phone users faces major probe - Nigeria Sun

    A study by the London School of Economics found that banning devices from class could benefit pupils by as much as an extra week of learning over a school year.

    This article appeared in the Nigeria Sun on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    i (The paper for today)

    Kidz wiv mobys do me ed in (no LOL)

    There is ample evidence that academic results improve when phones are banned from schools. Research by Louis-Phillipe Beland and Richard Murphy at the London School of Economics proved that a phone-less classroom improves performance, most of all for those from low income families. Last month, Michael Wilshaw, head of Ofsted called for omnipresent, blasted phones to be barred in all schools.

    This article appeared in I (the paper for today) on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    i (The paper for today)

    Phones could be barred from class to help behaviour

    In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results. In Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy wrote: “The results suggest that low-achieving students are more likely to be distracted by the presence of mobile phones, while high achievers can focus in the classroom regardless of whether phones are present. … banning mobile phones could b a low-cost way for schools to reduce educational inequality.”

    This article appeared in I (the paper for today) on 14 September 2015 Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    No pay rise? Blame the baby boomers' gilded pension pots

    Economists have previously failed to make the connection between private pension scheme deficits and workers' current wages, according to John Van Reenen, an economics professor at the London School of Economics and a leading expert on the labour market. Brian Bell, an associate professor at Oxford University consulted by the author, said the huge sums involved would deepen the already growing inequality between generations.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on 14 Spetember 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Brian Bell webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Inquiry looks at mobile phones' effect on how children behave

    A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning phones from the classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Government considers classroom ban on smartphones and tablets

    A recent London School of Economics study suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve school results.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    A child can't learn with a mobile phone in the classroom

    There is ample evidence now that academic results improve when phones are banned from schools. A research study by Louis-Phillipe Beland and Richard Murphy at the London School of Economics proved that a phone-less classroom improves performance, most of all for those from low-income families.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 14 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Times

    Smartphones could face ban from classes

    Ofsted, the schools inspectorate, has raised concerns about secondary pupils using their phones at school. LSE academics released a study in May suggesting that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

    This article was published by The Times (main) on September 14, 2015
    Link to article here and subscribe for full access.

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE Business Review

    In family-owned businesses, professional CEOs work longer hours than owner-CEOs

    That time difference adds 2.6 percent extra productivity for the professionals, finds an LSE-Columbia-Harvard team. An emerging body of evidence indicates that family management may actually be detrimental for performance. One study estimates a 4 percent profitability loss for Danish firms due to having a family manager rather than a professional manager. Another finds that family firms have worse executive selection because they prefer to hire a less qualified family manager rather than an external professional manager: this accounts for a 6 percent productivity loss for family CEO firms relative to firms owned by dispersed shareholders.

    This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on September 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Family business: management effort and firm performance, Oriana Bandiera, Andrea Prat and Raffaella Sadun. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Managing the family firm: evidence from CEOs at work', Oriana Bandiera, Andrea Prat and Raffaella Sadun, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1250, December 2013

    Related links
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Yahoo! News (UK)

    Smartphones and tablets could be banned from classrooms

    Behaviour expert Tom Bennett is to look into the impact of devices used by pupils under an expansion of his investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor behaviour, Schools Minister Nick Gibb said. It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. Mr Bennett said: ''Technology is transforming society and even classrooms - but all too often we hear of lessons being disrupted by the temptation of the smartphone. ''Learning is hard work and children are all too aware of this. So when they have a smartphone in their pocket that offers instant entertainment and reward, they can be easily distracted from their work. ''This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue, and behaviour challenges more broadly, to uncover the real extent of the problem and see what we can do to ensure all children focus on their learning.'' In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

    This article was published online by Yahoo! News (UK) on September 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Women CEOs in social enterprises earn 29% less than their male counterparts

    Research finds that women CEOs in social enterprises earn significantly less than their male counterparts. But it also finds that women are happier with their jobs. Saul Estrin, Ute Stephan and Suncica Vuji unpick the paradox.

    This article appeared in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog. Link to article

    Related publications Do women earn less even as social entrepreneurs? Saul Estrin, Ute Stephan and Suncica Vuji, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1313, November 2014

    Related links
    Saul Estrin webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Spiegel online (Germany)

    Wie Wirtschaftsflüchtlinge Deutschland geprägt haben

    Dabei können auch die Armutsmigranten ein Land bereichern. "Wer wandert, ist motiviert und bringt oft genug Kenntnisse und Fähigkeiten schon mit", sagt der Wirtschaftshistoriker Albrecht Ritschl von der London School of Economics. "Die sprichwörtliche amerikanische Tellerwäscherkarriere ist eine Einwandererkarriere."
    Here, even the Armutsmigranten can enrich a country. "Who wanders, is motivated and has often knowledge and skills already enough", says the economic historian Albrecht Ritschl from the London School of economics. "The proverbial American rags to riches career is a career of immigrants."

    This article appeared in Spiegel online on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage


    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Irish Independent – online

    Britain to consider a ban on smartphones in the classroom

    Britain could ban smartphones and other personal electronic devices, like tablets, from the classroom over fears that they cause too much disruption to lessons. In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester, which suggested that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

    This article appeared in the Irish Independent (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Svenska Dagbladet online (Sweden)

    Garage säljs som bostäder – p-platser kostar miljoner

    Under perioden mellan 1994 och 2012 borde man ha byggt över två miljoner fler hus. De höga priserna beror på en kronisk brist på bostäder, anser Paul Cheshire, professor i ekonomisk geografi på London School of Economics.
    In the period between 1994 and 2012 should have built more than two million more houses. The high prices are due to a chronic lack of housing, thinks Paul Cheshire, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

    This article appeared in Svenska Dagbladet on 13 September 2015. Link to article Related links

    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) Website

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    24 heures online

    Corbyn peut plomber le futur électoral du Labour

    Most of the currents of the party had indeed indicated during the previous weeks that they thought Jeremy Corbyn ineligible in 2020 and that they did not support any policy that was very left. "The economic plan of Corbyn does not commit to eliminate the deficit", said John Van Reenen, Professor at the London School of Economics. "Moreover, since his return to power in 1997, Labour had curbed the power of the unions and put an end to its ambition to nationalize all the tools of production. Jeremy Corbyn wants to question these advances."

    This article appeared on 24 heures online on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Gloucester Citizen

    Should mobile phones be banned from schools entirely?

    A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

    This article apperaed in the Gloucester Citizen on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Solihull and Warwickshire Guardian - online

    Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from Birmingham classrooms

    Mr Gibb said ministers needed to be sure the advice given to teachers “is fit for the 21st century when even primary school pupils may be bringing in phones or tablets.” It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. And a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester in May by the London School of Economics suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

    This article appeared in the Solihull and Warwickshire Guardian (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Times Online (Education)

    Schools ponder classroom ban on ‘distracting' mobile phones

    Behaviour expert Tom Bennett is to look into the impact of devices used by pupils under an expansion of his investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor behaviour, Schools Minister Nick Gibb said. It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. Mr Bennett said: "Technology is transforming society and even classrooms - but all too often we hear of lessons being disrupted by the temptation of the smartphone. "Learning is hard work and children are all too aware of this. So when they have a smartphone in their pocket that offers instant entertainment and reward, they can be easily distracted from their work. "This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue, and behaviour challenges more broadly, to uncover the real extent of the problem and see what we can do to ensure all children focus on their learning." In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

    This article appeared on Yahoo News on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Telegraph (web)

    Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

    In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

    This article appeared in the Telegraph (web) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    MSN UK

    Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

    In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

    This article appeared on MSN UK on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Express

    New move to ban mobiles in all schools

    In May, the London School of Economics found banning mobiles from classrooms could benefit learning by as much as an extra week of schooling over an academic year. The report found a ban, sought by chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw, would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    This article appeared in the Sunday Express on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Sunday Mirror

    Bid to ban use of mobiles in class

    "We will now probe deeper into behaviour more generally to ensure that no child has to put up with having their education disrupted by misbehaviour." A study by the London School of Economics found that banning devices from class could benefit pupils by as much as an extra week of learning over a school year.

    This article appeared in the Sunday Mirror on 13 September 2015. No link is available.

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sun (UIster)

    Kids' mobile ban in every school

    Mr Bennett added: "This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue." The London School of Economics study said low-achievers and children from poor families would benefit most from a clampdown. Schools minister Nick Gibb said: “Our aim is to ensure that no schoolchild has to put up with having their education disrupted by misbehaviour.”

    This article appeared in the Sun (Ulster) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

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    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Telegraph

    Smartphones and tablets could face classroom ban

    More than 90 per cent of teenagers have mobile phones, but a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where they were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6 per cent. There is currently no Government policy about mobile phone use in schools.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    Behave, class, your mobiles are at risk

    According to the DfE, a 2013 survey found that a third of schools banned mobile phones outright, with a further fifth limiting their use in lessons. In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could boost students' learning by an extra week's worth of schooling over an academic year.

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

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    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Al Jazeera International

    News

    Joan Costa Font interviewed regarding the push for Catalan independence in Spain.

    The interview was broadcast by Al Jazeera International on September 12, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related links
    Joan Costa Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 12/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Jerusalem Post

    After Freud, CBT offers hope

    “I was first here in 1987 and then attended a workshop on social phobia two years later. Israelis in the field are a wonderful group of people,” he said. Clark, one of the world’s leading experts on CBT, was with British labor economist Richard Layard the main driver behind the UK’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies program. Together with Layard, Clark wrote a popular 373-page book, Thrive: The Power of Psychological Therapy, in 2014 to explain mental illness and what can be done to relieve it. CBT, he wrote, refers to a variety of interventions, depending on which emotional problem is involved. Among the techniques are imagery, distraction, motivational self-talk, relaxation, biofeedback, development of adaptive coping strategies (e.g. minimizing negative or self-defeating thoughts) and changing maladaptive beliefs about pain. People with phobias or obsessive compulsion disorder are exposed to the cause of their problem gradually, and so are gradually liberated from it.

    This article appeared in the Jerusalem Post on 12 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 12/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian.com

    Higher Education Network What will Jeremy Corbyn's win mean for UK universities?

    John Van Reenen, professor of economics at the London School of Economics, says: This policy will win Corbyn some support among students and middle-class parents, who will save money sending their kids to university at the expense of lower-income families whose kids do not go to university. Having loans with higher fees has been the right way to go as there is a direct tie between costs and benefits. Making them income-contingent, so no one has to pay anything back until they get the average wage, means that the risk for those on lower incomes is largely removed. We should have kept a more generous maintenance grant for those from very low-income families – it was a mistake by the chancellor to make these into loans.

    This article appeared in the Guardian online on 12 September 2015 link to article

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 12/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Business Magazine (Romania)

    Analysts: Greece will remain in ''intensive care'' for a long time, in the absence of substantial aid

    Christopher Pissarides, London School of Economics, the winner of a Nobel Prize, said that Greece still has structural problems such as low productivity and lack of competitiveness. Greece is likely to need international aid for a longer period of time than the 3 to 4 years.

    This article was published in Business Magazine (Romania) on September 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macroeconomics Programme webpage



    News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    IBERONEWS (Spain)

    Ojo! Este es el gran problema y mayor riesgo para los países emergentes

    Pero no es el unico que comparte ese punto de vista. Tambien Luis Garicano, profesor de la London School of Economics, analizaba los retos a los que se enfrenta la economia global en los proximos anos en un encuentro reciente, en el que tambien ponía el foco en la situacion en la que se encuentran los citados emergentes.
    Eye! This is the big problem and increased risk for emerging countries
    But he is not the only one who shares this point of view. Also, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics, analysed the challenges faced by the global economy in the coming years at a recent meeting, which also put the focus on the situation.

    This article was published online by IBERONEWS (Spain) on September 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Ibero News (Spain)

    ¡Ojo! Este es el gran problema y mayor riesgo para los países emergentes

    Pero no es el único que comparte ese punto de vista. También Luis Garicano, profesor de la London School of Economics, analizaba los retos a los que se enfrenta la economía global en los próximos años en un encuentro reciente, en el que también
    But he is not the only one who shares this point of view. Also, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics, analysed the challenges faced by the global economy in the coming years at a recent meeting, which also put the focus on the situation.

    This article appeared on Ibero News on 11 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Lancashire Telegraph

    Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?

    However, according to a recent study published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the test scores of students aged 16 improved by 6.4 per cent after schools banned mobile phones.

    This article appeared in the Lancashire Telegraph on 11 September 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    Lancaster and Morecombe Citizen online
    Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?
    Asian Image
    Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Economista online

    Rivera ve 25.400 millones de desfase en los Presupuestos

    Rivera sees 25,400 million gap in the budget approved by the PP for 2016
    Albert Rivera, President and the economic team of the party have denounced the General State budgets drawn up by the people's Party for 2016 to hide a hole of more than 25,400 million. According to the economists Luis Garicano, Francisco de la Torre and Toni Roldan, the accounts for the next year are coloured by a blatant electioneering.

    This article was published online by El Economista on September 10, 2015
    Link to article webpage

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 10/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The National Herald online

    World Press View: Greek Elections, Political Uncertainty Muddle Recovery

    Nobel Prize winning economist Christopher Pissarides of the London School of Economics said Greece still ...

    This article was published online by The National Herald on September 10, 2015
    Link to article here [subscription needed]

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 10/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Bloomberg View

    The 0.01%? Another wealth gap matters more

    Economists Emmanuel Saez of the University of California-Berkeley and Gabriel Zucman of the London School of Economics have been studying wealth inequality for a long time. Here is their graph of the divergence in wealth between the super-rich and the rest.

    This article was published online by Bloomberg View on September 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Inequality: Are we really 'all in this together'?, Gabriel Zucman, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015 Abstract | Full paper

    Related links
    Gabriel Zucman webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 10/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Pais

    Garicano: ''En los presupuestos faltarán 25.000 millones''

    Garicano: ''budgets will be 25,000 million''
    The leaders of citizens believe that the General State budgets drawn up by the people's Party for 2016 hides a hole of more than 25,000 million. So Luis Garicano, Francisco de la Torre and Toni Roldan have secured during the presentation of the economic team of the party of Albert Rivera, who has made a critical descarnada of government accounts. ''Just need to appoint Minister of finance Santa Claus'', said De la Torre, exportavoz of the inspectors and number two of the lists from the training to the Chamber of Deputies.

    This article was published online by El Pais on September 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Is Theresa May right about immigration?



    News Posted: 07/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Welt online

    Willkommen in Deutschstadt!

    ...Produktivitat und dadurch zu mehr Wachstum'', sagt etwa Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor an der London School of Economics (LSE).
    ''Urbanisation leads to higher productivity and therefore to more growth,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, associate professor at the London School of Economics (LSE).

    This article was published online by De Welt online on September 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



    News Posted: 04/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    RIETI - Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry, IAA

    What is Brexit and why it matters

    Article by Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano
    As the deadline gets closer, the United Kingdom (UK) public debate is heating up on an event that, one way or another, could change the identity of the European Union (EU) and its economic relations with Japan and the rest of the world: the referendum on the UK's membership of the EU in 2017 (or possibly even earlier) to which the UK Prime Minister and his Conservative party committed since 2013.

    This article was published online by RIETI on September 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

    Related links
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 04/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio Gloucestershire

    News

    ...the role of smart phones in the classroom its after research from the London school of economics suggested exam results improve in schools...

    This broadcast was made by BBC Radio Glouchestershire on September 3, 2015
    Link to interview here

    Related Publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 4

    You and Yours

    Martin Knapp comments on costs of NHS beds and cost of private provision.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4, Your and Yours show, on September 3, 2015
    Link to programme here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Almeria

    Alemania sufre de amnesia

    ... Tambien lo estudio el historiador Albrecht Ritschl, de la London School of Economices (LSE). En medio de la Guerra Fria, los...
    Germany suffers from amnesia
    Also studied it the historian Albrecht Ritschl, of the London School of Economices (LSE). In the midst of the cold war, the allies spared debt owed by Germany. 'Ritschl showed that debt cancellation was equivalent to up to four times the total of the economic output of the country in 1950 and laid the foundations for rapid post-war economic recovery,' said the London University in a release last year. The equivalence between the situation facing Germany in 1945 and which faces Greece today is not an argument accepted by everyone.

    This article was published online by El Almeria (Spain) on September 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Department of Economic History webpage



    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Mailonline

    Economists warn Corbynomics could be 'highly damaging' to Britain

    Leading economists have warned that Jeremy Corbyn's economic policies are 'likely to be highly damaging' and renationalising industry could actually 'make things worse'. In the new letter to the Financial Times, the authors - who include Professor Patrick Minford of Cardiff Business School, Professor John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics and former Treasury minister Kitty Ussher, said they wanted to dispel the view that Corbyn's policies had won support across the discipline.

    This article was published online by the Mailonline on September 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Corbynomics has not been thought through seriously

    Centre for Economic Performance's Director, Professor John Van Reenen among economists signing a letter critical of Labour Party leader candidate, Jeremy Corbyn's economic plans.

    The letter was published by The Financial Times on September 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    See also:
    The Financial Times
    Economists pen rejection of 'damaging' Corbyn plans
    ''The letter is signed by some economists associated with the Conservatives, including Prof Patrick Minford of Cardiff Business School, and those who have vehemently criticised the policies of George Osborne, the chancellor, such as Prof John van Reenen of the London School of Economics.''
    Link to article here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LBC Radio

    James O'Brien

    Mention of research from London school of economics about mobile phones in the classroom.

    The research was mentioned on LBC Radio's James O'Brien show on September 2, 2015
    Link to the broadcast here

    Related Publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Yahoo! News (UK)

    Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

    Two economics professors have studied the impact the machines have had on employment, and their findings painted a positive picture. Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity and employment in a variety of countries between 1993 and 2007 to see if the trepidation about the increased use of robots has been well founded.

    This article was published online by Yahoo! News (UK) on September 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    Yahoo! Canada
    Will machines take your job?

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    96.4 Eagle Radio online

    Eagle Radio - News - Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

    Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity ...

    The interview was published online by Eagle Radio News on September 2, 2015
    [Link unavailable]

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Hamburger Abendblatt

    Handyverbot an immer mehr Schulen

    A recent study by the Centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics is quite the supporters of cell phone bans. The authors Louis-Philippe BELAND and Richard Murphy had compared student performance before and after a cell phone ban was issued at their schools. Therefore improved the test results for 16 years without a Smartphone to 6.41 percent. The conclusion of scientists: Less distraction promotes the learning progress and beneficiary audit services. In particular previously underachieving students from financially weak conditions would have benefited. Their benefits increased by 14 percent.

    This article was published by Hamburger Abendblatt on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Drives and Controls (magazine)

    Robots have 'contributed 10% to GDP growth' since their arrival

    The economic benefits of industrial robots installed since the early 1990s have been similar to those of the railways in the 19th century, US highways in the 20th century, and information and communications technologies more recently, according to a new analysis by two economics professors. Georg Graetz of Uppsala University in Sweden and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics analysed statistics across 14 industries in 17 developed countries and found that robots have made a 'substantial' contribution to productivity and growth.

    The article was featured in Drives & Controls Magazine published September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Acteurspublics

    Plus ou moins d'autonomie : à chacun son école…

    ...Unprecedented and profound mutation in the English system", says Stephen Machin, Professor of Economics at the University College of London (UCL).

    This article was published online by Acteurspublics on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here [Subscription needed.]

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CVER blog

    The past and future of apprentices

    The Centre for Vocational Education Research's Claudia Hupkau looks at what can be learnt from past apprentices growth for the government's 3 million apprenticeship target.
    With GCSE results recently out, many students are now facing the decision of whether to do A-levels or whether to opt for different types of further education, for instance an apprenticeship or a college course. Given the recent efforts of the government to encourage firms to increase the number of apprenticeships for young people, they are set to become an ever more relevant option for those recently out of school. The government has set itself a target of 3 million new apprenticeships over this parliament. Measures have been taken to help secure the funding of these 3 million new places via a new apprenticeship levy (see a commentary by Hilary Steedman here). How firms will be encouraged to actually create those places is a question that is yet to be answered.

    This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Claudia Hupkau webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Centre for Vocational Education Research webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LBC 97.3

    Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

    Two economics professors have studied the impact the machines have had on employment, and their findings painted a positive picture. Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity and employment in a variety of countries between 1993 and 2007 to see if the trepidation about the increased use of robots has been well founded.

    This article was published online by LBC 97.3 on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    ptb.be

    Tax-shift: Un gouvernement du 1% qui trompe enormement

    ...realisee par Henrik Jacobsen Kleven, professeur d'economie à la London School of Economics, montre au contraire,...
    Tax-shift: A Government of the 1% who are greatly mistaken
    However, the reasoning of the Government is not resistant to the facts. A recent study [19] by Henrik Jacobsen Kleven, Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics, shows on the contrary, 'that the currently discussed measures could lead to a decrease in the employment rate.' [20] this is clearly summarized in a single chart. [21]

    This article was published online by ptb.be (Belgium) on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Henrik Kleven webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Washington Journal - CSPAN

    Could robots replace workers?

    Discussion of LSE research on robots.
    HOST: THE LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS DID A STUDY ON THE USE OF ROBOTS. SOME OF THE THINGS THEY FOUND OUR THAT IN 17 COUNTRIES THE USE OF ROBOTS INCREASED...

    The filmed interview was broadcast by the Washington Journal - C-SPAN on September 1, 2015
    Link to the video here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio Newcastle

    News

    Mention of research on mobile phones in the classroom.

    Broadcast on BBC Radio Newcastle on September 1, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    theguardian.com

    Keep mobile phones out of the classroom

    A recent large-scale study found that banning mobile phones improved exam results by 2%, even when gender and class had been accounted for. At first glance it seems an insignificant rise but the impact is equivalent to one extra week of school a year. The researchers from the London School of Economics centred their work on 91 schools and the exam results from 130,000 pupils since 2001. For those entitled to free school meals or with special educational needs the ban was doubly effective. Investigations such as this throw into question whether mobile phones could, in fact, intensify inequality.

    This article was published online by theguardian.com on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    MSN UK
    Keep mobile phones out of the classroom

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Sky News

    Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

    Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity and employment in a variety of countries between 1993 and 2007 to see if the trepidation about the increased use of robots has been well founded. The pair examined data on the use of robots provided by the International Federation of Robotics. They also studied economic performance indicators across 14 industries and 17 countries, including the United States, Australia, South Korea and many European nations. The professors found that ''industrial robots increased both labour productivity and value added''.

    This article was published online by Sky News on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Tendencias21

    Guest Reviews: Ecoomia solidaria

    Solidarity Economy: Conversations with the Dalai Lama about altruism, development and compassion
    The Mind and Life Institute was born in 1987 ... the Professor Emeritus of Economics at the London School of Economics, Lord Richard Layard exposes an interesting paper, 'The economy of Happiness', in which he talks about why happiness levels have remained stagnant, despite unprecedented increases in income and the quality of life of mankind.

    This article was published online by Tendencias21 on August 28, 2015
    Link to article here
    Translation here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 28/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC

    News Story



    News Posted: 25/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    It's time to lay siege to the robber barons of high finance

    It's a powerful and timely point. Rent extraction and rising inequality are two sides of the same coin. Research by Brian Bell and John Van Reenen last year suggested that up to two-thirds of the increase in the overall share of wages taken by the top 1 per cent of earners since 1999 is due to a massive increase in bankers' bonuses. Nor was there any decline in bankers' share of earnings after the financial crisis. In other words, rising inequality is largely a problem of bankers' pay.

    This article was published by The Independent on August 24, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Bankers and their Bonuses', Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.35, February 2013

    Related links
    Brian Bell webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 24/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Harvard Business Review

    Companies like Amazon need to run more tests on workplace practices

    Leaders could also test whether specific work conditions or policies affect workers' performance. ... Nick Bloom of Stanford University and his colleagues conducted a randomized experiment on working from home using a NASDAQ-listed Chinese travel agency called CTrip, which has 16,000 employees. Employees who volunteered to work from home were randomly assigned to either work from home or in the office, and their performance was monitored for the next nine months. The results: Working from home led to a 13percent increase in productivity, greater work satisfaction, and lower turnover.

    This article was published online by the Harvard Business Review on August 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013
    Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Al Jazeera TV

    News

    Dennis Novy interviewed. The topic was the resignation statement of the Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras, and what it means for the bailout programme and the Greek economy.

    The interview was broadcast by Al Jazeera television on August 20, 2015.
    Interview broadcast at 6pm, 7pm and in a recorded interview later.

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Economist

    Hiding in plain sight

    In any recession, young people tend to suffer first. Moreover, unemployment among 16-24-year-olds was edging up even before the financial crisis. Youngsters have since faced a ''double whammy'' of scarcity of work and falling real wages, says Stephen Machin of the London School of Economics (LSE). Those who are unskilled, a group of which Britain has a larger share than most, were particularly badly hit.

    This article was published in The Economist on August 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?, Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece 20 (1) Summer 2015 pages: 2-5
    'Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals', by Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1284, July 2014

    Related links
    Brian Bell webpage
    Anna Bindler webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Democratic Audit

    A howl for the past rather than a serious fight for the future: Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

    Article by John Van Reenen
    Voting for Jeremy Corbyn as leader is a gut reaction to Labour's electoral defeat. Corbyn does point to some real economic problems facing Britain but his policies are based largely on the kind of wishful thinking that is endemic in UK politics and both blights Labour's past. His popularity lies in Labour's failure to defend its own record in government. The party needs to learn from its successes as well as its evident recent failures if it wants to re-build, writes John Van Reenen.

    This article was published online by Democratic Audit on August 17, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go?, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015

    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015
  • VIEW accompanying video here

  • Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Innovation and Infrastructure, LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute for Government and the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen et al., January 2013
  • VIEW accompanying video here
  • Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 17/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    City AM

    Can Alexis Tsipras survive as Greece's Prime Minister?

    Article by Dennis Novy
    Alexis Tsipras will be able to survive, for one simple reason: there’s no better alternative. The Greeks don’t want to leave the Eurozone. The last months have shown that the government's previous approach hasn't worked. Predominantly, this is because of too much resistance from other countries, particularly Germany. But now, Tsipras has changed course. The opposition tends to agree with this move. But huge challenges remain. The economy is down at depression level, unemployment is sky high, and there are imbalances across the Eurozone. What is really needed is institutional reform of the EU.

    This article was published by City A.M. on August 17, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 17/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Herald Sun (Australia)

    Male teacher drought may hurt boys

    THERE'S plenty to be said for life as a primary school teacher: ... A study by the London School of Economics found male students were more ...

    This article was published by The Herald Sun (Australia) on August 16, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Students' Perceptions of Teacher Biases: Experimental Economics in Schools' by Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 133, January 2012
    Pupils' progress: how children's perceptions influence their efforts, Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2011/2012

    Related links
    Amine Ouazad webpage
    Amine Ouazad CEP publications webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

    News Posted: 16/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

    Article by John Van Reenen
    Unlike most commentators I have actually read Corbyn's ''The Economy in 2020'' as well as the 1983 manifesto. Corbyn's document has several major advantages. First, at 8 pages it is much shorter and second, it does not (yet) commit the UK to leaving the European Union (a very silly idea). Indeed, Corby-nomics strikes many of the right notes. Low productivity is holding down wages and inadequate infrastructure in housing, transport and energy is, in turn, depressing productivity. This resonates with my findings in the LSE Growth Commission.

    This article was published online in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go?, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015

    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015
  • VIEW accompanying video here

  • Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Innovation and Infrastructure, LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute for Government and the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen et al., January 2013
  • VIEW accompanying video here
  • Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 15/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Daily catch-up: in other, non-Corbyn, news, here be idiots and other research findings

    More evidence of the success of the academy schools programme was published yesterday. A new paper by Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE finds that ''the first round of academy conversions that took place in the 2000s generated significant improvements in the quality of pupil intake and in pupil performance''.

    This article was published online by The Independent on August 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education', Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

    Related links
    Andrew Eyles webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 14/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Visa changes for skilled migrants may force firms overseas, says watchdog

    David Cameron's plan to toughen visa rules for foreign workers could backfire by forcing British companies to expand overseas and hitting the quality of university research, the Government's immigration advisers warned yesterday. They also concluded there was little evidence of skilled recruits from overseas undercutting the pay levels of British workers.

    This article was published in print by The Independent on August 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The 'investor route' to UK citizenship, David Metcalf. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    David Metcalf CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 14/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    City AM

    Business warns Tories over migration curbs

    It remains unclear whether the levy would be introduced as a one-off cost or an annual tax. Sir David Metcalf, a former London School of Economics professor who chairs the MAC, echoed Lloyds yesterday, saying that as a result, salary thresholds ''should not be considered in isolation''.

    This article was published by City AM print edition on August 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The 'investor route' to UK citizenship, David Metcalf. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    David Metcalf CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 14/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE Business Review

    Industrial robots boost productivity and growth, but effect on jobs is an open question

    Article by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels
    The authors say that: ''Industrial robots boost productivity and growth, but effect on jobs is an open question''.

    This article was published online by the LSE Business Review on August 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 13/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CIO.com

    Understanding Google's alphabet structure (I think, alpha bet

    Stanford economics professor Nicholas A. Bloom explains how Alphabet will make investors comfortable: ''There are two benefits of the new structure. One is visibility, in that with the split it makes it easier to model the main search business from the distracting moonshots. The second benefit is it contains the moonshots, because as separate businesses it is much harder to fund them under the radar''.

    This article was published online by CIO.com on August 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 13/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    MSN News US

    Maybe you don't need to worry about robots taking your job

    In a new paper from London's Center for Economic Research [sic] George Graetz, of Uppsala University, and Guy Michaels, of London School of Economics found that industrial robots have actually driven labor productivity and economic growth.

    This article was published online by MSN News US on August 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in
    Wednesday 12 August
    Business Insider
    Maybe you don't need to worry about robots taking our jobs one day
    Business Insider Australia
    Maybe you don’t need to worry about robots taking our jobs one day

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage


    News Posted: 13/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Times Higher Education

    Unknown variables

    In a recent discussion paper for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, Stephen Machin, professor of economics at University College London, and Richard Murphy, assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin, found that the fees paid by growing numbers of overseas postgraduates studying in the UK have helped to subsidise additional places for domestic learners.

    This article was published by The Times Higher Education on August 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers, Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
    'Paying Out and Crowding Out? The Globalisation of Higher Education' by Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1299, September 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 13/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Coventry and Warwickshire

    News

    Dennis Novy interviewed on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) in the light of households in Kenilworth protesting with the message to protect the NHS from TTIP.

    This article was published by BBC Coventry & Warwickshire on August 12, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related publications
    TTIP: is free trade coming to the North Atlantic?, Dennis Novy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 3, Winter 2015.

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 12/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Essex Chronicle

    Go back to school

    It's a well-known fact that Essex is blessed with an excellent choice of schools, in both the public and private sectors. And thanks to some research published a couple of years ago by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the link between schools and house prices is now a proven fact.

    This article was published by the Essex Chronicle on August 12, 2015
    [No link available]

    Also in
    Brentwood Gazette
    Go back to school
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Journal of Urban Economics, Volume 75, May 2013, Pages 15-28
    Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume Autumn 2012
    'Valuing School Quality Using Boundary Discontinuities', Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.132, January 2012
    'Houses and Schools Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market. EALE 2010 Presidential Address', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Olmo Silva webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    News Posted: 12/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC World Service

    BBC World

    Dennis Novy interviewed lived on BBC World on Grexit, discussing the Greek bailout and long-term issues re huge imbalances in the Eurozone.

    This interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service on August 11, 2015
    [ No link available. ]

    See also:
    BBC Radio Ulster
    Evening Extra Programme
    Dennis Novy interviewed, answering questions on Greece and 'Grexit': what has happened today? What the repercussion are likely to be? What will happen next?
    Radio Live New Zealand
    Dennis Novy interviewed live. The topic was Greece and the latest bailout package.

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Gulf Today

    Hammond's migrant remarks 'shameful'

    A study by researchers at the London School of Economics earlier this year found that immigration to Britain has not increased unemployment or reduced wages.

    This article was published by The Gulf Today on August 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    EA019: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses Series, February 2015

    Related links
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Market Programme webpage



    News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Agerpres.ro (Romania)

    RECORDURI: Cea mai fericita tara din lume

    Records: the happiest country in the world
    On April 24, 2015, the 2015 Edition of the happiness of the world (World Happiness Report) was published. The work includes a happiness measure, taking into account 158 countries for 2012-2014. ... The report on the world's happiness is coordinated by Professor John Helliwell University of British Colombia, Lord Richard Layard, director of welfare at the London School of Economics, and Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Colombia University, U.S., and Adviser to the UN Secretary-General.

    This article was published online by Agerpres.ro (Romania) on August 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2015', John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Dawn.com

    Life satisfaction

    On average, sexual-minority adults are more likely to be single, tend to have worse health and are less likely to be employed than heterosexuals, say Nattavudh Powdthavee of the London School of Economics and Mark Wooden of the University of Melbourne.

    This article was published online by Dawn.com on August 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'What Can Life Satisfaction Data Tell Us About Discrimination Against Sexual Minorities? A Structural Equation Model for Australia and the United Kingdom', Nattavudh Powdthavee and Mark Wooden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1267, May 2014

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Building-Projects.co.uk

    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change

    [Gabriel] Ahlfeldt, an Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science, says as long as outward growth is prevented by policies such as the 'green belt', the city will need to grow vertically as the population increases.

    This article was published online by Building-Projects.co.uk on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    Social House Building & Maintenance
    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change
    Building Construction Design
    London faces skyscraper pressure unless planning laws change

    Related links
    Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website



    News Posted: 10/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent (web)

    The Government says it is going to crack down on people who employ illegal migrants

    There is very little evidence to suggest that migration has a significant negative impact on wages or employment. A study by researchers at the London School of Economics earlier this year found that immigration to Britain has not increased unemployment or reduced wages.

    This article was published online by The Independent on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    EA019: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses Series, February 2015

    Related links
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Market Programme webpage



    News Posted: 10/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Harvard Business Review

    Entrepreneurs, economic growth, and the enlightenment

    Consider a paper presented at the Summer Session of the National Bureau of Economic Research by Raj Chetty, Bloomberg Professor of Economics at Harvard University, ''Innovation Policy and the Lifecycle of Inventors.'' (The presentation was a preliminary version of research that Chetty has done with other researchers at Harvard, the Office of Tax Analysis, and the LSE; the slides are no longer available on the web, but the researchers will release a new version in a few weeks.) In it, Chetty and colleagues explore the relationship between the propensity to file a patent and socioeconomic status by linking millions of individual tax records to around 1.5 million patent filings, which allows them to ''characterize the lives of inventors.'' (No one is suggesting that filing a patent is the equivalent of being Elon Musk, but it's at least directional.)

    This article was published online by the Harvard Business Review on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related articles
    Vox
    The great invention gap between rich and poor kids - and why it matters

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 10/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Industrial robots have boosted productivity and growth, but their effect on jobs remains an open question

    Article by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels
    Robots may seem dangerous not only to cinema action heroes but also to the average manufacturing worker. To assess whether such concerns are well founded, Guy Michaels and Georg Graetz analyse the labour market effects of industrial robots, which have been widely adopted in the past 25 years.

    This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 10/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Guardian

    Universities can learn from schools when it comes to improving teaching quality

    Article by Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy
    Rather than reinventing the wheel, universities should pay careful attention to what has already been learned in schools around effective teaching.

    This article was published by The Guardian on August 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Economics of Higher Education website
    Education and Skills Programme webpage



    News Posted: 10/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Prospect Magazine

    The tube strike's biggest benefit: working from home

    A society where more workers got to use the duvet office would be a happier, more productive one
    In 2014, Stanford University academics compared the performance of remote employees to those in the office at Ctrip, China's largest travel company. The study found that, contrary to the assumption that remote workers might slack off, they are in fact 13 per cent more productive than their desk-bound colleagues. Most of this improvement came from an increase in the amount of time spent working, with the employees in the experiment taking fewer breaks and less time off for sickness. Such findings have been supported in the UK. An LSE study found that employees who are able to work from home are more productive ''because they are less distracted, grateful for the flexibility and the time they save on commuting is ploughed back into work.''

    This article was published online by Prospect Magazine on August 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013
    Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 05/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog

    Industral robots have boosted productivity and growth but their effect on jobs remains an open question

    Robots and automated processes have become a feature of many modern workplaces, but what impact do such innovations have on productivity and jobs? Using a new dataset, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels present an analysis of the economic effects of robots since the early 1990s, noting that they have made a substantial contribution to productivity and aggregate growth. They also write that while fears of robots destroying jobs on a large scale have proven unfounded, there is evidence that they may reduce the employment of low and middle-skilled workers.

    This article was published online by LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog on August 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 05/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Living Well

    How a cognitive footprint may put the heat on dementia

    It was some considerable interest that I read a contribution in dementia policy, co-authored by one of my previous bosses, Prof Martin Rossor. The other co-author was Prof Martin Knapp from LSE.

    This article was published online by Living Well on August 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    See also:
    Talking Nutrition
    Nutrition missing from the Lancet's cognitive footprint of dementia prevention
    In the leading medical journal The Lancet, Rossor and Martin Knapp frame the challenge in reducing the disease burden of dementia as a ''cognitive footprint''.

    Monday 3 August
    Medical News Today
    Would a 'cognitive footprint' of activities and interventions help meet the global challenge of dementia?
    A novel conceptual framework for tackling the global challenge of dementia has been proposed in an article published in The Lancet. Martin Rossor (Professor of Clinical Neurology, University College London) and Martin Knapp (Professor of Social Policy, London School of Economics) have suggested modelling a ''cognitive footprint'' of activities, interventions and policies.

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 04/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Lindedin.com

    We need clean energy innovation, and lots of it

    Article by Bill Gates
    Last month, during a trip to Europe, I mentioned that I plan to invest $1 billion in clean energy technology over the next five years. This will be a fairly big increase over the investments I am already making, and I am doing it because I believe that the next half-decade will bring many breakthroughs that will help solve climate change. As I argued in this 2010 TED talk, we need to be able to power all sectors of the economy with sources that do not emit any carbon dioxide.

    This article was published online by Linkedin.com on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change

    Article by Richard Layard
    Leading thinkers across the worlds of science, public service and academia have launched a new global programme to combat climate change. Richard Layard outlines their proposal for big public investment in research that will dramatically reduce the costs of clean energy.

    This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Not running a hospital - blog

    The board has to be on board

    Those of us who have run hospitals where we've been serious about achieving improvements in quality and safety know that without a highly committed board of trustees, the results will never be sustainable. And so it is lovely to see documentation of that premise in a new article by Thomas C. Tsai, Ashish K. Jha, Atul A. Gawande, Robert S. Huckman, Nicholas Bloom, and Raffaella Sadun in Health Affairs.

    This article was published online in the Not running a hospital - blog on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related journal article
    Hospital Board And Management Practices Are Strongly Related To Hospital Performance On Clinical Quality Metrics, Thomas C. Tsai, Ashish K. Jha, Atul A. Gawande, Robert S. Huckman, Nicholas Bloom and Raffaella Sadun, Health Affairs, August 2015 vol. 34 no. 8: 1304-1311.

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    New Statesman

    The record-breaking solar plane is grounded – is there still hope for clean energy?

    This autumn sees the launch of the Global Apollo Programme: a green research initiative that wants governments to match, in today's money, the sums spent putting men on the moon. At a time of increasing austerity, requests to increase green spending are unlikely to go down smoothly. ''Dream on'' might be the response of some, but in Solar Impulse there's a reminder that we can re-fashion the Apollo spirit - and its corporate support - for a more connected, caring age. Flying by Yeats's Cloths of Heaven, it reminds us to: ''Tread softly because you tread on my dreams''.

    This article was published by The New Statesman on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    In brief... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Share Radio

    News

    Guy Michaels of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, discusses the use of robots in industry.

    This interview was broadcast by Share Radio on August 2, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Aitkenage.com

    Scouting teaches morals and more

    In the book A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age by Judy Dunn and Richard Layard, they reference a study which reports only seven percent of adults say children have a stronger sense of moral values than those in the past and 66 percent say they are not as strong. They also report that when asked whether today's children have a stronger sense of community than that of the past, only 5 percent said yes and 69 percent say not as strong.

    This article was published online by Aitkenage.com on August 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age, Richard Layard and Judy Dunn, Penguin (5 Feb 2009) ISBN-10: 0141039434 ISBN-13: 978-0141039435 £9.99
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Independent

    Recovery of UK economy is the slowest since records began, say unions

    ... Top economists echoed the TUC's concerns yesterday ... Growth in recent years has been ''anaemic'', according to University College London's Professor Stephen Machin, and research director at the Centre for Economic Performance. ''The productivity growth has been pretty lacklustre, and we are getting closer to the pre-downturn levels but it's taken a lot longer than the previous two recessions, so I'm not sure that [motoring ahead] is the right phrase to be using.''

    This article was published by the Independent on August 1, 2015
    Lik to article here

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    CEP Real Wages Updates webpage



    News Posted: 01/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Royal Economic Society

    Media Briefings - Mobile phone charges: New evidence of consumer benefits from termination rate regulation

    Telecoms regulators can now be confident that their market interventions to reduce mobile operators' prices for connecting calls - so-called termination charges - will benefit consumers. That is the central conclusion of research by Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, published in the August 2015 issue of the Economic Journal. An earlier study by these economists detected a 'waterbed' effect, in which price caps on termination charges led to significant price increases for mobile phone subscribers. But with mobile penetration very high these days and mobile-to-mobile traffic far exceeding fixed-to-mobile traffic, the new study finds that regulators should no longer worry about possibly adverse consequences of regulatory cuts on what customers end up paying. Nor is there any strong indication that cuts have weakened mobile operators’ ability to compete by making new investments.

    This press release was published online by the Royal Economic Society on August 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Evaluating a Decade of Mobile Termination Rate Regulation, Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, The Economic Journal, Volume 125, Issue 586, August 2015
    'Testing the 'Waterbed' Effect in Mobile Telephony', Christos Genakos and Tommaso Valletti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.827, October 2007

    Related links
    Christos Genakos webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Journalist's Resource.org

    Robots at work: the economic effects of workplace automation

    In a March 2015 paper, Robots at Work, Georg Graetz of Uppsala University and Guy Michaels of the London School of Economics concentrate on the economic effects of industrial robots. They base their research on data collected from 1993 to 2007 in the United States and 16 other countries.

    This article was published online by Journalist's Resource.org on July 31, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 31/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    FTAlphaville blog

    Disrupting FREEDOM!

    So if innovation seems to be booming, why has productivity growth been muted? A common argument is that the effect of innovation is being incorrectly measured. The advent of the Sharing Economy, which forms a chapter in this report, and free services help support this theory. Much of this is coming out of the Digital Economy and Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom recently said ''You can't be in the Valley without thinking we're in the middle of a productivity explosion.'' Most people don't live in Silicon Valley and an alternative argument, that overall investment spending has remained low post the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) is well founded.

    This article was published online by FT Alphaville blog on July 30, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 30/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Abolishing student grants and raising fees above £9,000 heaps more debt on poorest students

    Article by Gill Wyness
    There were a surprising number of announcements relating to higher education in George Osborne's budget this week. One of the most controversial was the announcement that university maintenance grants for lower-income students in England and Wales are to be scrapped from September 2016 and replaced with loans. The £9,000 annual fees that universities charge students will also be allowed to increase by inflation for those universities ''offering high teaching quality''.

    This article was published online by The Conversation on July 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015

    Related videos
    CEP #ElectionEconomics 'Higher Education' video interview with Gill Wyness.
    View video here.

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    News Posted: 10/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    George Osborne's magic has fooled us, for now

    A large body of empirical evidence suggests either that reasonable minimum wages do not destroy jobs at all, or that they do not destroy very many. The evidence is, of course, mixed and contested. Much of it comes from the US and concerns the experience of teenagers, who - in the words of Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, ''represent about 2 per cent of hours worked and 98 per cent of the studies of the minimum wage''. But it is clear enough that if modest increases in the minimum wage were disastrous for jobs, we would know that by now.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on July 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Manning, A. (2015) Shifting the Balance of Power: workers, employers and wages over the next parliament, in Gavin Kelly and Conor D'Arcy (Eds) (2015) Securing a Pay Rise: the path back to shared wage growth, Resolution Foundation

    Related podcast
    The minimum wage in the UK and beyond, Alan Manning
    LSE Works: Centre for Economic Performance public lecture, 26 February 2015

    Related links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Community Programme webpage
    Alan Manning CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 10/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    China Central TV Europe (CCTV.com)

    United Kingdom: Latest budget crunch and tax cuts plus parallel

    John Van Reenen interviewed on the UK budget.

    This interview was broadcast by China Central TV Europe (CCTV) on July 9, 2015
    Link to broadcast here
    [Interview with Prof Van Reenen starts around 02.30]

    Related publications
    'Austerity: Growth Costs and Post-Election Plans', John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015
    Details.

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CVER Event

    Minister hosts BIS/CVER Professional and Technical Education Seminar

    The Minister of State for Skills, Nick Boles MP, hosted a Ministerial Seminar on Professional and Technical Education Routes, jointly organised by the Centre for Vocational Education Research and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills on 9 July.

    Experts were asked to share their vision of what an education system that can deliver high quality professional and technical skills at intermediate and higher levels should look like. Andreas Schleicher, OECD Head of Education and Skills, introduced the meeting with an overview of the state of the English intermediate skills and education compared to other OECD countries (View his presentation). Delegates were invited to address the following broad question, which was then the focus of discussion at the seminar (conducted under 'Chatham House' rules):

    What should we do to address the issues that face technical and professional education in this country? Including:
    • What provision (e.g. curriculum and qualifications) is needed to deliver high-quality technical and professional education, and why?
    • Which providers (e.g. schools, colleges, universities, independent training providers) are needed to deliver high-quality technical and professional education, and why?
    • How do we ensure that there are clear and coherent routes from initial skills development to the most advanced technical and professional training?
    A fuller report of the meeting is available online, as well as the participants' submissions. The outcome of these discussions will feed into the work of the Centre for Vocational Education Research. We are very happy to receive comments and suggestions on this area of research, which can be sent to cver@lse.ac.uk

    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CNN International Europe - The Business View

    News

    Albrecht Ritschl is interviewed on market crashes and China.

    The interview was broadcast by CNN International Europe - The Business View News on July 9, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Market Mogul

    Consequences of a Brexit

    The Centre of Economic Performance (known as the CEP) claim that Britain could have its GDP fall by 8%. In essence, the CEP claim that in a worst case scenario Britain could face loses similar to the ones that were experienced during the global financial crisis. From an optimistic view point and under ideal conditions, the CEP claim that the British GDP will only fall by 2.2%. Essentially, an EU exit could potentially cause the UK economy to contract. EU skeptics argue that this contraction is only temporary and that the elimination of strict regulations in the financial sector will outweigh the transitory contraction of the UK economy.

    This article was published online by The Market Mogul on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

    Related CEP videos/podcasts
    Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson.
    View the video here

    Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    National Herald

    When Greece forgave German debt

    ... creditors, in exchange for pro-market reforms'', said Professor Albrecht Ritschl of the London School of Economics. West Germany was able to borrow on international markets again, and, free ...

    This article was publishe donline by the National Herald on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here (subscription needed)

    See also:

    Detektor.fm
    Schuldenschnitt in Griechenland? Deutschland bekam das schon mehrfach

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Business Reporter

    Greece to submit last ditch bailout proposals

    Leading academics from the London School of Economics have called on both Greece and its international creditors to adopt a more responsible approach.

    This article was published online by Business Reporter on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    See also:
    20minutes.fr
    3:55 p.m.: Professors from the prestigious University London School of Economics protest against austerity in Greece
    Twenty-six teachers and academics from the prestigious London School of Economics (LSE) call in an open letter at the end of fiscal austerity in Greece and maintenance of the country in the euro area. They explain that ''the institutions must agree to a relaxation of fiscal austerity, at least until that Greece is on track for a recovery [economic]. The austerity during a recession is bad policy and worse recession. Continued austerity measures (..) delays the recovery''.
    Link to article here

    RTBF
    La London School of Economics se mobilise pour la Grèce
    The famous London university published an open letter urging the leaders of the Eurozone and Greece to work for a reasonable solution to avoid a ''Grexit'' harmful to both parties.
    Link to article here

    Related links
    LINK TO OPEN LETTER HERE
    Francesco Caselli webpage
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
    Henrik Kleven webpage
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Johannes Spinnewijn webpage
    Silvana Tenreyro webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Gabriel Zucman webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    VOA News

    London professors call for easing of Greek austerity

    Twenty-six members of the faculty at the London School of Economics (LSE) have called for Greece's creditors to ease the austerity measures they have imposed over the last five years. In an open letter, the professors write, ''The institutions have to agree to a relaxation of fiscal austerity, at least until Greece is on the recovery path. Austerity during a recession is the wrong policy as it deepens the recession.''

    This article was published online by VOA News on July 9, 2015
    Link to article

    Link to open letter here

    Related links
    Francesco Caselli webpage
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
    Henrik Kleven webpage
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Johannes Spinnewijn webpage
    Silvana Tenreyro webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Gabriel Zucman webpage
    Macro Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Summer budget: High hopes for the productivity plan - is enough being done?

    Article by Anna Valero
    In the 2015 summer budget, George Osborne at last identified the UK's productivity performance as an important issue that needs to be tackled. Here, Anna Valero reviews some of the measures ahead of further detail on the government's productivity plan due out tomorrow.
    The issue of productivity was left out of the March budget and somewhat ignored during the general election campaign - much to the dismay of economists, for whom weak productivity performance since the financial crisis is the number one problem facing the UK economy. Therefore, Osborne's post-election announcement that dealing with weak productivity would be a priority in this parliament was welcome news.

    This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
    Further info here

    Related CEP video/podcast
    'Productivity and Business'. Interview with Anna Valero.
    Low productivity is probably the greatest challenge facing the UK economy.
    View video here

    Related links
    Anna Valero webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Budget 2015: will Osborne's medicine be a driver for productivity and growth?

    Article by John Van Reenen
    The most eye-catching announcement in today's budget was the National Living Wage. Now, this might be nothing more than a big hike in the minimum wage, but such increases can be beneficial. There remains though a justified fear that this 11% increase decided by political fiat rather than careful independent consideration will result in job losses - and is not the ideal way to address the fundamental issue at hand.

    This article was published online by The Conversation on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Big ideas The UK's National Minimum Wage, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 14, Issue 2, Autumn 2009

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    John Van Reenen CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Budget 2015: Osborne is right to raise wages, but a clearer productivity plan is required

    Article by John Van Reenen
    Yesterday, George Osborne delivered the new government's first budget in which he surprised many by hiking the minimum wage significantly. John Van Reenen reviews the measures introduced, writing that the Chancellor is right to want to raise wages, but the best way to do this and maintain employment is through concrete plans to raise productivity. The budget, however, contained too little detail on what the productivity plan contains.

    The article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    John Van Reenen CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Smaller retailers wary of losing Sunday edge

    Dr Christos Genakos, of the London School of Economics, studied the impact of decisions to ease Sunday trading rules in 30 European countries between 1999 and 2013. He found the reforms boosted net employment by 7-9 per cent, because they spurred new entrants and higher headcounts in existing retailers.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on July 8, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Evaluating the Impact of Sunday Trading Deregulation', Svetoslav Danchev and Christos Genakos, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1336, March 2015

    Related links
    Christos Genakos webpage
    Productivity and Innnovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 08/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    London Essays

    London's 'digital economy'

    Article by Max Nathan
    Despite the recent hype, London's digital sector appears to have shrunk since 2010, with much of the 2000s surge wiped out, and has only recently turned the corner.

    This article was published online by London Essays on July 6, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dr Max Nathan webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    News Posted: 06/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Straits Times (Singapore)

    Fear all working robots, not just big bionic arms

    A February study by economists Georg Graetz of Uppsala University and Guy Michaels of the London School of Economics (LSE), using data from the International Federation of Robotics, has shown that robots of the same quality have become almost 80 per cent cheaper between 1990 and 2005. In the 17 countries they studied, increasing use of robots raised annual growth of labour productivity by 0.36 percentage point, a figure which is ''fairly comparable to the estimated total contribution of steam technology to British annual labour productivity growth of around 0.35 percentage point, which was, however, sustained over a period that was about four times longer, from 1850-1910'', the researchers noted.

    This article was published online by the Straits Times (Singapore) on July 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists

    Press Release: Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muûls, Laure B. De Preux and Ulrich J. Wagner - Erik Kempe Award 2015

    Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muuls, Laure B. De Preux and Ulrich J. Wagner have received the 2015 Erik Kempe Award for their paper 'Industry Compensation Under Relocation Risk: A Firm-Level Analysis of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme', American Economic Review, 104 (8), 2482-2508, 2014.

    The European Association of Environmental and Resource Economics (EAERE) announced the award on June 29, 2015
    For details see

    Related publications
    'Industry Compensation Under Relocation Risk: A Firm-Level Analysis of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme', Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muuls, Ulrich J. Wagner, Laure B. de Preux, CEP Discussion Paper No.1150, June 2012

    Related links
    Laure B. De Preux webpage
    Ralf Martin webpage
    Mirabelle Muuls webpage
    Ulrich J. Wagner webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 29/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Sky News TV

    News A.M.

    Dennis Novy live interview, commenting on the dramatic developments on Greece and the Eurozone crisis.

    This interview was broadcast by Sky News on June 29, 2015
    Link to interview here [Starts at 9.40am]

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 29/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 4

    News

    Christopher Pissarides interviewed about closure of Greek banks.

    The interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 News on June 29, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 29/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CNBC

    Greece must sign a deal: 13 economists

    In the following op-ed, 13 prominent economists from around the world call on Greece to sign a credible agreement with the Europeans immediately.
    CEP's Professor Christopher Pissarides, Nobel Laureate, London School of Economics and University of Cyprus a co-signee.

    This article was published online by CNBC on June 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 29/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Deutsche Welle

    'Vote yes, Greeks,' Nobel economist urges

    Nobel Prize-winning economist Christopher Pissarides tells DW why he is deeply disappointed with the Greek government's mismanagement of the debt crisis. He also explains what Germany could have done better.

    This article was published by Deutsche Welle on June 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 29/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Al Jazeera

    ''Newshour'' Programme

    Dennis Novy gave a live interview, commenting on the dramatic developments on Greece and the Eurozone crisis.

    The interview was broadcast by Al Jazeera on their ''Newshour'' Programme
    Link to the interview here [Starts at 10pm]

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    On a runway and a railway to nowhere

    Infrastructure is the nearest thing in modern politics to motherhood and apple pie. Everybody, on left and right, can agree that more and better infrastructure is what Britain needs. Unfortunately it is also the thing that governments, including this one, are hopeless at delivering. ... A start would be to take the politics out of infrastructure, as recommended by the London School of Economics Growth Commission. Only an optimist would believe, however, that Britain's failing to think big and plan big can be overcome any time soon.

    This article was published in The Sunday Times on June 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Francesco Caselli webpage
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    LSE Growth Commission website
    Macro Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    Greece battles to save its banks

    Unemployment stands at more than 25%. ''People will be much worse off,'' said Christopher Pissarides, a Nobel prizewinner based at the London School of Economics. Investors are braced for a slump on global stock markets tomorrow.

    This article was published by The Sunday Times on June 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    Desperate Greece puts it to the people

    ''I don't understand what kind of economics they have in their minds, or who is deciding that this is economics,'' said Christopher Pissarides, a Nobel prizewinner at the London School of Economics. ''Who is going to invest in Greece under these circumstances? There is no place in Europe with a worse corporate environment.''

    This article was published by The Sunday Times on June 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    No 10 adviser: Charge super-rich £3m to settle in UK

    DAVID CAMERON'S top immigration adviser has suggested the introduction of a £3m ''entry fee'' for Russian oligarchs and other wealthy foreigners who want to stay in Britain, with some of the proceeds used to help stem the tide of immigration. In an interview with The Sunday Times, Sir David Metcalf, chairman of the influential migration advisory committee (MAC), said the sale of 100 fast track ''investor visas'' each year would raise £3bn over a decade. ... They get the rule of law, good schools, access to capital markets and we are giving them money as well.'' Metcalf, who is emeritus professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said some of the money raised from settlement fees for the super-rich could be also spent on improving the skills of British workers.

    Thuis article was published by The Sunday Times on June 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The 'investor route' to UK citizenship, David Metcalf. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Gates to double investment in renewable energy projects

    Bill Gates (co-founder of Microsoft) interviewed: ...
    Tens of billions of dollars should therefore be spent by governments on research and development in renewables over coming years, three times current levels, to identify reliable sources of ''zero-carbon'' power that can be exploited at scale, Mr Gates said. ''Because there's so much uncertainty and there are so many different paths, it should be like the Manhattan Project and the Apollo Project in the sense that the government should put in a serious amount of R&D.''

    This article was published in The Financial Times on June 25, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change', David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner
    Download the report from here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Global Apollo Programme webpage

    News Posted: 25/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC News

    BBC News

    Interview with LSE Professor and Economics Nobel Prize winner Christopher Pissarides on proposed austerity measures in Greece.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC News on June 25, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 25/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Free lunch: The wrong tax reform

    For the first question, the argument for lowering the rate is that a higher rate makes people behave in such a way that there is less income to be taxed in the first place. So a higher rate may not bring in much more money for the government - and may in theory shrink the total revenue. Whether this is the case with the UK's top rate is not obvious. In part this is because it has only been left unchanged for short periods - the 50p rate lasted three years and everyone expects the Tories to lower the 45p rate as soon as they see fit - so any behavioural change reflects people's attempts to time their tax burden rather than a long-term effect of a stable rate. But Alan Manning from the London School of Economics reports that the range of estimates agree on a small if uncertain effect on government revenues.

    This article was published by the Financial Times on June 25, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Top rate of income tax', Alan Manning, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
    Details here

    Related video
    'Top rate of Tax'
    If politicians want to raise the top rate of tax, they need to do more to tackle tax avoidance and evasion. That is the main argument of Alan Manning.
    View video here

    Related links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Community Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 25/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    VG Nett

    Mobil-forbud ga bedre karakterer

    Texas-universitetet om studien som er publisert av Centre for Economic Performance ved London School of Economics and Political Science. - Mobiltelefoner kan være forstyrrende, legger han til ...
    Mobile prohibition gave better grades
    A large study from the University of Texas in the United States shows that for those schools who have practiced a ban on cell phones during school hours, its students produce better exam grades.

    This article was published online by VG Nett on June 24, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 24/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Voice of America

    Greek debt deal may be short-term-fix

    Follow-up interview, Dennis Novy on latest Greece negotiations.

    This interview was broadcast by Voice of America on June 23, 2015
    Link to interview here

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC World Service (radio)

    World update, with Dan Damon, 10:30am

    Dennis Novy interviewed, speaking about latest Greece negotiations.

    This interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service World Update programme on June 23, 2015
    Link to interview here [Ca. 32min 35sec into the programme (total length: about 4 mins)]

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Sky News

    9:30 am Live TV interview

    Dennis Novy on the latest Greece negotiations.

    This interview was broadcast by Sky News on June 23, 2015

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage


    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    International Business Times

    EU referendum: price tag of Brexit could be £100bn as trade deals become undone

    Yet not only would it take years for the UK to reach new agreements, it is not as likely to strike a good deal. The ''UK's bargaining position would be much weaker as it would be negotiating over access to its own market and not the EU internal market'', according to John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Last year he co-authored a report titled 'Brexit or Fixit? The Trade and Welfare Effects of Leaving the European Union'. ''It's one of the many areas,'' he continued, ''where people do not appreciate the economic benefits of being within a bigger bloc.''

    This article was published online by the International Business Times on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Brexit or Fixit? The Trade and Welfare Effects of Leaving the European Union, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Joao Paulo Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Policy Analysis No.16, May 2014

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    The divide is growing between what employers and ministers want students to study

    Article by Sandra McNally
    From this September, all pupils at secondary school will have to study English, a language, maths, science and history or geography at GCSE. This is the English Baccalaureate, or Ebacc, which education minister Nicky Morgan has insisted are core academic subjects that should be taken by all children. The director of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), John Cridland, does not approve: he has called for GCSEs to be phased out and replaced with an exam system that gives equal value to vocational subjects.

    This article was published by The Conversation online on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    A moonshot to save a warming planet

    A report entitled A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, written by a number of high-profile British scientists and economists, offers a bold answer. It argues that carbon-free energy has to become competitive with fossil fuels. ''Once this happened, the coal, gas and oil would simply stay in the ground.''

    This article was published by the Financial Times on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CNBC

    China says hello to Mr. Roboto

    A paper by Uppsala University and the London School of Economics in February revealed that industrial robots do increase labor productivity and raise a country's average growth rate by 0.37 percentage points.

    The article was published online by CNBC TV on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in
    Yahoo! Finance
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Cameron wants wage rises to replace benefits

    Iain Duncan Smith, the welfare secretary, has exhorted companies to ''pay their full share'' of workers' remuneration rather than leaving it to the state to prop up incomes through tax credits. Professor Steve Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics said there was no evidence demonstrating that social security payments to low-wage workers enabled companies to pay people less.

    The article was printed by The Financial Times on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Real Wages and Living Standards, Stephen Machin, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
    CEP Real Wages Updates research series by David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin webpage

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Chron

    The Economist tallies the cost of excessive land-use regulation

    Similar work by Paul Cheshire and Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economics, estimated that in the early 2000s this regulatory shadow tax was roughly 300% in Milan and Paris, 450% in the City of London, and 800% in its West End. The lion's share of the value of commercial real estate in Europe's most economically important cities is thus attributable to rules that make building difficult.

    This article was published in the blog Chron on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Land use planning: the impact on retail productivity, Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011
    'Evaluating the Effects of Planning Policies on the Retail Sector: Or do Town Centre First Policies Deliver the Goods?', Paul Cheshire, Christian Hilber and Ioannis Kaplanis, Spatial Economics Research Centre Discussion Paper No.66, January 2011

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    The secret of happiness (it's not what you think)

    Money, as the song lyric has it, can't buy you love - or happiness. Happiness, as Richard Layard's research shows, depends much more on the quality of our personal relationships than on our income. In many ways, the most important external factor in well-being is whether we feel this closeness.

    This article was published by the Huffington Post on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage

    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Il Foglio

    In Spagna c'è chi si oppone all'idea di sussidiare l'ozio. E da noi?

    ...nero su bianco dal responsabile economico del partito Luis Garicano, economista della London school of Economics e precedentemente a Chicago, dove e stato allievo del premio Nobel per l'economia ...
    The proposal was put in black and white by the responsible party's Luis Garicano, an economist at the London school of Economics and previously in Chicago, where he was a student of Nobel Laureate Gary Becker. In essence the ''salarial complement'' is nothing more than the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) of which he had spoken as opposed to income of citizenship.

    This article was published online by Il Figaro on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here in Spanish
    and here in translation.

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Bear Market News - Of Plutocrats and Plutocracy

    Forget the 1%: It is the 0.01% who are really getting ahead in America

    A new paper by Mr Saez and Gabriel Zucman of the London School of Economics reckons past estimates badly underestimated the share of wealth belonging to the very rich. It uses a richer variety of sources than prior studies, including detailed data on personal income taxes (which the authors mine for figures on capital income) and property tax, which they check against Fed data on aggregate wealth.

    This article was published online by Bear Market News - Of Plutocrats and Plutocracy on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gabriel Zucman webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Gabriel Zucman CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Kiel Institute for the World Economy

    Global Economy Prize 2015 awarded

    On Sunday June 21, the Kiel Institute for the World Economy and its partners, the City of Kiel and the Schleswig-Holstein Chamber of Commerce, have awarded the eleventh Global Economy Prize at the Kiel City Hall. The following persons have been honored as masterminds of a cosmopolitan, market-oriented and caring society: ... Sir Christopher A. Pissarides, Cypriot-British scientist and professor of economics at the London School of Economics and professor of European Studies at the University of Cyprus, Nobel Memorial Prize laureate in economics.

    This release was published online by the Kiel Institute for the World Economy on June 22, 2014
    Link to the press release here

    Related links
    Christopher Pissarides webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Coventry and Warwickshire

    Shane O'Connor's Breakfast Show

    8.50am: live radio interview
    Dennis Novy interviewed, speaking about Greece and the looming IMF deadline.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Coventry and Warwickshire on the Shane O'Connor Breakfast Show on June 22, 2015
    Link to broadcast here (about 1 hour 50 mins in)

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    FE Week

    New 'data driven' BIS Vet research centre hits the spot

    The new aims and role of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) has become clearer since a consultation event this month, as Andrew Morris explains.
    The new Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), funded by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) was the focus of attention at a major gathering of college leaders and researchers this month. Directed by Professor Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the new research centre will be developing much needed evidence aimed at improving the delivery of vocational programmes and involvement of employers. A clearer picture of routes to employment and better information about their value should be the result.

    This article was published by FE Week on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage

    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Observer

    Walk away from Greece at your peril

    See: Comment by georgep76 3dago - below the cartoon
    Germany has been described as the biggest ''debt transgressor'' of the 20th Century, with restructurings in 1924, 1929, 1932 and 1953. Total debt forgiveness for Germany between 1947 and 1953 amounted to somewhere in the region of 280% of GDP, according to economic historian Albrecht Ritschl of the London School of Economics. Today, Greece has an external debt-to-GDP ratio of roughly 175% (by comparison, Germany's external debts currently stand at about 145% of GDP).

    This article was published by The Observer on June 21, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related article
    Debating Europe
    Should Greek debt be forgiven as German debt was in 1953?

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 21/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    InfoPLC

    La robotica y automatización no destruye empleo

    The study 'Robots at Work' (Robots at work), published in February 2015 analyzes the impact of the growing automation in the economic development of 17 countries. Its authors Georg Graetz of the University of Uppsala and Guy Michaels, of the London School of Economics, however, come to a different conclusion. On average, a good part of the growth of 10% of GDP and 15% of the productivity gains were attributable to greater use of the robot. Experts found no employment reduction, but rather an increase in wages.

    This article was published online by InfoPLC on June 21, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 21/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC News

    7pm News

    Dennis Novy interviewed, speaking about Greece and the looming IMF deadline.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC News on June 21, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 21/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Next Big Future.com

    Robots having a steam engine like effect on productivity but are NOT killing jobs overall so far

    Despite ubiquitous discussions of robots' potential impact, there is almost no systematic empirical evidence on their economic effects. Researchers analyzed for the first time the economic impact of industrial robots, using new data on a panel of industries in 17 countries from 1993-2007. We find that industrial robots increased both labor productivity and value added. Our panel identification is robust to numerous controls, and they found similar results instrumenting increased robot use with a measure of workers' replaceability by robots, which is based on the tasks prevalent in industries before robots were widely employed. We calculate that the increased use of robots raised countries' average growth rates by about 0.37 percentage points. We also find that robots increased both wages and total factor productivity. While robots had no significant effect on total hours worked, there is some evidence that they reduced the hours of both low-skilled and middle-skilled workers.

    This article was published by Next Big Future.com on June 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 20/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    ZulieferMarkt (Germany)

    Robotik als Jobmotor VDMA: Automation schafft Arbeitsplatze

    Scientists Georg Graetz of the Uppsala University and Guy Michaels of the London School of Economics come to the following conclusion: the average over 10 percent of increase of the gross domestic product and 15 percent of the productivity gains went back on the increased use of robot. However, a reduction of employment experts discovered, still gave a rise in wages. ''This suggests, that technical progress has enhanced human work'', Schwarzkopf said.

    This article was published online by ZulieferMarkt (Germany) on June 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 19/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    TES News

    ‘Encouraging a growth mindset is not just about boosting academic achievement'

    First Richard Layard, my colleague in the Lords, blogged about why schools should teach character as well as competence. Their research at the LSE, using the British Cohort Study, found that the strongest predictor of a satisfying adult life is a child's emotional health, and least important is academic achievement.

    This article was published online by Times Education Supplement (TES) on June 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 19/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Voice of America

    Agreement uncertain at Greek debt summit

    But Associate Professor of Economics at Britain's University of Warwick, Dennis Novy, expects neither success nor disaster at Monday's summit. ... Novy says default would not immediately create a crisis because key creditor nations like Germany and France want to avoid a Greek departure from the euro.

    This article was published by Voice of America on June 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 19/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Stern

    Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

    A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
    The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

    This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Entrepreneur

    The tough tradeoffs we make deciding to work from home or not

    Professor Nicholas Bloom from the Department of Economics at Stanford University, with his graduate student James Liang, conducted an interesting experiment at Chinese travel website Ctrip's call center. Employees could choose to work from home for a period of nine months. The results of the study were surprising, to say the least.

    This article was published online by Entrepreneur on June 18, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Evening Standard

    Reading volunteer, 80: I'm proof of an old dog can help young people learn some very useful tricks

    This month marks four years since we launched our award-winning Get London Reading initiative to improve literacy in primary schools. So far more than 800 Evening Standard readers have become one-to-one reading volunteers with our campaign partner Beanstalk, helping over 2,370 pupils in 300 schools. Here, Robert Cassen, a professor at the London School of Economics, shares his experience as a reading volunteer raw recruit.
    Article by Robert Cassen
    Making a Difference in Education: What the Evidence Says, by Robert Cassen, Sandra McNally and Anna Vignoles, was published by Routledge in May.

    This article was published in The Evening Standard on June 18, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    Making a Difference in Education: What the Evidence Says, Robert Cassen, Sandra McNally and Anna Vignoles, Routledge, May 2015 Details

    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage

    News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    MIT Technology Review

    Who will own the robots?

    In fact, there is not much evidence on how even today's automation is affecting employment. Guy Michaels and his colleague Georg Graetz at the London School of Economics recently looked at the impact of industrial robots on manufacturing in 17 developed countries. The findings tell a mixed story: the robots did seem to replace some low-skill jobs, but their most important impact was to significantly increase the productivity of the factories, creating new jobs for other workers. Overall, there was no evidence that the robots reduced total employment, says Michaels.

    This article was published online by MIT Technology Review (English translation) on June 16, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 16/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Harvard Business Review

    Robots seem to be improving productivity, not costing jobs

    Provided in a new paper from London's Center for Economic Research [sic], the analysis offered by George Graetz and Guy Michaels of Uppsala University and the London School of Economics, respectively, offers some of the first rigorous macroeconomic research and finds that industrial robots have been a substantial driver of labor productivity and economic growth. To fuel their analysis, Graetz and Michaels employ new data from the International Federation of Robotics to analyze the use of industrial robots across 14 industries in 17 countries between 1993 and 2007. What do they find? Overall, Graetz and Michaels conclude that the use of robots within manufacturing raised the annual growth of labor productivity and GDP by 0.36 and 0.37 percentage points, respectively, between 1993 and 2007. That might not seem like a lot but it represents 10 percentof total GDP growth in the countries studied and 16 percent of labor productivity growth over that time period.

    This article was published online by The Harvard Business Review on June 16, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 16/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Investment Europe

    Brexit: What's at stake for the UK

    Deutsche Bank has been the first one to fire a warning shot over the UK vote to leave the EU, but others are certainly already preparing too, says Dr. Dennis Novy, associate professor in the department of Economics at the University of Warwick argues. ''It is now clear that Britain will have an EU referendum. Businesses do not like uncertainty. Not surprisingly, many - like Deutsche Bank - are reviewing whether they should stay in Britain or move resources towards continental Europe. The key question is: What would an 'independent' Britain look like? We don't know. It would certainly be a much weaker player on the global stage,'' he explains.

    This article was published by Investment Europe online on June 16, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go? The economic consequence of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 16/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Challenges.fr (France)

    Grosse querelle autour du numerique et des emplois

    Georg Graetz of the Swedish University of Uppsala, and Guy Michaels, of the London School of Economics, consider them, that the automation of services as the industry will perform well, but on one, or even two generations. In the meantime, their work bearing on what happened in fifteen years in seventeen countries show that scanning earned approximately half a point of growth per year without harming employment.

    This article was published online by Challenges.fr (France) on June 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 14/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Charleston Gazette (West Virginia)

    Should I stay or should I go? Britain's EU question

    The democratic nature of this debate is a helpful reminder as to why history matters. If Britain does withdraw from the European Union, the cost for families and the national economy will be immense. As reported in the Guardian, The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics predicts the price of withdrawal from the EU to be between 2 and 9.5 percent of GDP. This is a figure equivalent to between $56 billion and $280 billion of British GDP in 2014. Fittingly then, historical discussion has not been relegated to somnolent conference talks. Rather, it has taken place in venues of public debate like the periodical History Today, the Guardian, the Times Higher Education Supplement, the Huffington Post UK, and broadcasters like the BBC, which anyone with an Internet connection can contribute to and access.

    This article was published by The Charleston Gazette (West Virginia) on June 14, 2015
    [No link available]

    Related publications
    'Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU', Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series Details
    See also #ElectionEconomics video. Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson, part of the CEP #ElectionEconomics series

    Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 14/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 4

    News

    Paul Cheshire discusses using limited amount of London's green belt for housing.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 News on June 14, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related Publications
    The Green Belt: A Place for Londoners?, by SERC, Quod and London First, published 24 February 2015
    Turning Houses into Gold: The Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    News Posted: 14/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post (Germany)

    Mensch und Roboter: zusammen unschlagbar

    Humans and robots: together unbeatable
    The current study ''Robots at Work'' by Graetz and Michaels (Uppsala University and London School of Economics), which examines the impact of increasing automation on the economic development of 17 countries, concludes that: On average, over 10 percent of the increase in gross domestic product and 15 percent of the productivity gains were due to the increased use of robots. This is comparable to the influence of the steam engine in the industrial revolution.

    This article was published by The Huffington Post on June 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 13/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Radio Sputnik (Russia)

    News

    Dennis Novy did an interview with Radio Sputnik, a Russian radio station. The topic was Greece and the Eurozone crisis.

    The interview was broadcast by Radio Sputnik (Russia) on June 12, 2015
    Link to interview here

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 12/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Gotteborgs-Posten (Sweden)

    Ledarskapets kvalitet avgör elevernas prestationer

    Quality of leadership determines student achievement
    There is a clear link between management quality and students' academic achievements. It shows an international research study of 1,800 schools in eight countries. Additionally distinguished schools by having a higher quality of management work, writes among others Nicholas Bloom, professor of economics at Stanford University.

    This article was published by Gotteborgs-Posten (Sweden) on June 12, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Does Management Matter in schools?, Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, The Economic Journal, Volume 125, Issue 584, May 2015
    'Does Management Matter In Schools?', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.1312, November 2014

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Renata Lemos webpage
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 12/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian.com (web)

    Osborne plan has no basis in economics

    Letter from Ha-Joon Chang, Thomas Piketty, David Blanchflower and others
    Emeritus professor of Economics, Cambridge University Prof Hugh Willmott, CASS Business School Prof Steve Keen, Professor of Economics, Kingston University Dr Henning Meyer, Research Associate of the Public Policy Group, London School of Economics Prof John Van Reenen, Professor of Economics, London School of Economics Prof Ismail Erturk, Senior Lecturer in Banking, University of Manchester Prof Susan Himmelweit, Emeritus Professor...

    The letter was published by The Guardian.com (web) on June 12, 2015
    Link to the published letter here

    Related links John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 12/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Scientific American

    How to be a better parent

    Further evidence: children in a London School of Economics and Political Science study from 2014 who had two overweight biological parents were 27 percent more likely than other kids to be overweight, yet adopted children of overweight parents were almost as equally more likely to be heavy - 21 percent.

    This article was published by the Scientific American on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Vertical Transmission of Overweight: Evidence From English Adoptees', Joan Costa Font, Mireia Jofre-Bonet and Julian Le Grand, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1324, January 2015

    Related links
    Joan Costa Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Mundo

    El pacto de gobierno incumple el programa económico de C's

    Citizens violate their economic program in the Andalusian pact
    No sign of economist [Luis] Garicano's proposals to simplify administration.
    Queues at a theater to hear an economic program of a party was an unprecedented scene in this country. That happened in the Teatro Goya in February to listen to Albert Rivera concrete measures economist Luis Garicano, of the London School of Economics, proposed to reset Spain. Almost none of these reforms, however, has been cast in the pact between the Andalusian Socialists and Citizens for Susana Diaz president is vested in the Hospital of the Five Wounds, headquarters of the Andalusian Parliament.

    This article was published by El Mundo on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Mirror.co.uk

    The 6 everyday habits that cost you money

    Why? It could be because most of us just are wired a certain way. ''Most of what we do simply comes about rather than being thought about'', said Paul Dolan, professor of behavioural science, London School of Economics. ''We act on emotion and impulse, sometimes in ways that improve our wellbeing but other times to our detriment.''

    This article was published online by the Mirror.co.uk (web) on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Bloomberg

    The Pulse

    Dr Keyu Jin was interviewed about China's industrial output gains.

    The interview was published online by Bloomberg's The Pulse on June 11, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related links
    Keyu Jin webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    NewsRT.co.uk

    Which universities offer the most financial support?

    One of the reasons for this, according to Gill Wyness, a researcher in education policy at the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics and a lecturer at the University College London Institute of Education, is that students simply don't have enough information. ''There has never been a way for students to compare what they are entitled to'', she says. ''It's only through trawling through individual university websites that they can find the information.''

    This article was published online by NewsRT.co.uk on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    SNS.se

    SNS Analys nr 31. Styrning och ledning i skolan

    Article by Nicholas Bloom and Renata Lemos
    There is a clear link between management quality and students' academic achievements. It shows an international research study by Stanford Professor Nicholas Bloom in collaboration with three other scientists. The study includes 1,800 schools in eight countries. Another conclusion is that independent schools is distinguished by having a higher quality of management work.

    The article was published by SNS.se on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Does Management Matter in schools?, Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, The Economic Journal, Volume 125, Issue 584, May 2015
    'Does Management Matter In Schools?', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.1312, November 2014

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Renata Lemos webpage
    Raffaella Sadun webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Spectator

    Right to reply - Jonathan Portes on Niall Ferguson

    ...in 2013, I wrote that the evidence was 'mixed on wages, with some evidence of downward pressure for the lower paid'. He argues that the latter statement contradicts the former. In the intervening five years, we've had new evidence and the UK labour market has changed, so it wouldn't be surprising if economists thought that the impacts in 2013 weren't necessarily the same as in 2008. But, in fact, as a recent summary of the evidence (by Jonathan Wadsworth, of the LSE and a member of the government's independent Migration Advisory Committee) put it: ''There is still no evidence of an overall negative impact of immigration on jobs and wages...any negative impacts on wages of less skilled groups are small.''

    This article was published by The Spectator on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    EA019: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses Series, February 2015

    Related links
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Market Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Jersey Post

    To text, or not to text in the classroom...?

    In fact, according to academics at the London School of Economics, the effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week's schooling across the academic year.

    This article was published by the Jersey Evening Post (USA) on June 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Foreign Policy Magazine

    Embroiled in endless conflict, how is Israel the 11th happiest nation in the world?

    ...its roster of contributors includes John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, and Jeffrey D. Sachs who is, among other things, special advisor to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Overall, the report is a pretty impressive...

    This article was published by Foreign Policy Magazine on June 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2015', John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Which universities offer the most financial support?

    Universities spend huge amounts of money on bursaries and scholarships - over £400m in 2014. Yet there is no evidence that the level of financial support offered to students by institutions has any impact on their choice of where to study. One of the reasons for this, according to Gill Wyness, a researcher in education policy at the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics and a lecturer at the University College London Institute of Education, is that students simply don't have enough information.

    This article was published in The Guardian on June 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    UK property crisis scuppering aspiration

    Britain's politicians say they are keen to reward aspiration, but soaring house prices are a significant block to achieving this. Professor Christian Hilber, from the London School of Economics, explains to Ferdinando Giugliano how this can be fixed.

    This film was published by The Financial Times on June 9, 2015
    Link to interview here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    News Posted: 09/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Vox

    The case for a Global Apollo Programme to limit climate change

    Article by Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Nicholas Stern, Adair Turner
    If clean energy were cheaper than dirty energy, climate change would halt. Making clean energy cheaper is a problem - like putting a man - on the moon that can be cracked if the effort is properly organised and financed. This column proposes a ten-year 'Global Apollo Programme' to achieve the necessary price reversal.

    This article was published online by Vox on June 8, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 08/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The New India Express

    Indices signal need for people centric plans for a happier and fairer India

    In the freedom to make life choices, too, India performs poorly. There are many inherent inhibitions in this freedom, mainly for women. Richard Layard, director of the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and one of the study's editors, says: ''A positive outlook during the early stages of life is inherently desirable, but it also lays the foundation for greater happiness during adulthood''.

    This article was published by The New India Express on June 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The World Happiness Report 2015, John F. Helliwell, Lord Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs, published by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 05/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Bloomberg

    Spain's problem isn't the deficit, it's jobs, says Ciudadanos

    Spain needs to strip away the barriers to creating high-quality jobs instead of focusing on budget cutting if the country is to tackle its deficit problem, according to Luis Garicano, the economic policy chief at pro-market party Ciudadanos. If Spain reforms its universities, reduces the cost of permanent labor contracts and creates incentives for business start-ups, the budget deficit will take care of itself, said Garicano, who is also a professor at the London School of Economics. The lure of making easy money through political contracts is diverting ambitious young people who might otherwise be starting businesses and creating jobs, he added.

    This article was published by Bloomberg News on June 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in:
    Washington Post
    Spain's Problem Isn't the Deficit, It's Jobs, Says Ciudadanos

    La Repubblica Spain's Problem Isn't the Deficit, It's Jobs, Says Ciudadanos

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productitivy and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 04/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Korea Times

    China's jobless growth miracle

    Article by Keyu Jin
    Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang recently cited job creation as vital to his country's ''ultimate goal of stability in growth''. His observation could not be more accurate. In fact, one of the most baffling features of China's economic rise is that, even amid double-digit GDP growth, employment grew at a measly 1.8 percent average annual rate from 1978 to 2004. Households, it seems, have largely missed out on the benefits of economic development in China.

    This article was published by The Korea Times on June 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Keyu Jin webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 04/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Spiegel online

    Handys im Unterricht: Lehrer bringt Störsender mit - und wird suspendiert

    That a ban on mobile phone use by pupils in schools may be quite useful, has now been proven by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy on behalf of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. The scientists compared the performance of students in four English towns with a ban on mobile phones in their schools.

    This article was published by Spiegel online on June 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in
    Watson.ch
    Lehrer geht mit Störsender gegen Handys im Unterricht vor – und wird suspendiert

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 04/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    South China Morning Post

    China must set free its smaller businesses to create jobs

    Article by Keyu Jin
    Keyu Jin calls for greater credit access and lower entry barriers for China's private-sector firms to flourish and create employment.

    This article was published by the South China Morning Post on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Keyu Jin webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Epoch Times

    Too Many or Too Few Workers? Another Look at the Chinese Employment Market

    However, Keyu Jin of the London School of Economics now says the Chinese economy is not creating enough jobs.

    This article was published by The Epoch Times on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Keyu Jin webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Hindu

    India central to green energy plan: U.K. climate change envoy

    India will be a member of a consortium of countries that will implement the Global Apollo Programme - a plan to find ways within the next 10 years of making green energy clean cheaper to produce than energy drawn from coal, gas or oil. This is the only way the internationally accepted limit of 2 degrees centigrade increase in global emperature that will avert a climate crisis can be met. The plan - which seeks to bring the creative spirit that put the first humans on the moon through the Apollo mission to the challenge of reversing climate change - is the brainchild of a group of UK experts drawn from academia, business and government. The group includes Sir David King, UK's climate change envoy and former United Kingdom Chief Scientific Adviser, Lord Nicholas Stern, author of the Stern Report, Lord Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal, Lord Richard Layard, Director of Wellbeing Programme, London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and Lord John Browne, ex-BP chief.

    This article was published by The Hindu on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Clean Technica

    Global Apollo Programme aims to tackle climate change

    In the deepest chill of the Cold War, then-president of the United States John F. Kennedy announced to the country, and the world, that ''we choose to go to the moon.'' The Apollo Programme placed a man on the moon within the decade, and now, a new Apollo Programme has been launched, but this time its aims are to tackle climate change.

    This article was published online by Clean Technica on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Daily Kos

    ''We managed to put a man on the moon. Now we need to put clean energy on Earth.''

    ''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

    This article was published online by the Daily Kos on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Information (Denmark)

    Apollo skal inspirere til billig og ren energi

    A number of Britain's leading experts in the field of climate research are focused on achieving the goal of solving the world's most pressing problem: the continued global temperature rise.

    This article was published online by Information (Denmark) on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' Report. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CVER News

    CVER at the LSRN Workshop

    Sandra McNally introduced the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the Learning and Skills Research Network (LSRN) Strategic Workshop held in London on June 3rd 2015. The Network brings together those interested in research on vocational education and training (VET) and is an excellent platform for networking between practitioners, researchers and policy makers. The workshop was an opportunity to learn about the work of the Commission on Adult Vocational Teaching and Learning and the Education Training Foundation (a presentation was given by Richard Atkins, Principal at Exeter College, and Jenny Williams, Director of Vocational Education and Training, ETF).

    During the discussion following Sandra's presentation, several priorities for CVER were highlighted by participants. These include the following:
    • The need to get a better understanding of the VET sector in England as a whole, describing the different actors that are involved (the individuals that participate, the institutions that provide training and the employers who engage staff in training) and the different paths taken by learners.
    • The need to look beyond earnings when measuring success of vocational education and training, for instance by evaluating the impact of VET on social mobility and wellbeing more generally.
    • Understanding the role employers might play in informing research and the importance of gaining a better understanding of the benefits of VET to employers and society at large. Such research is necessary in order to be able to get more firms interested in engaging in training and hiring apprentices.
    Data quality and completeness were a concern to many participants, and strategies to overcome those limitations were discussed. CVER is pursuing a three year research agenda, which is scrutinised by our Steering Group, and is a dynamic process. Events like the LSRN Strategic Workshop enable us to meet practitioners and VET researchers of other disciplines, which in turn feeds back into the design of our research programme. It can also lead to interesting partnerships to trial and evaluate policy interventions that can only be implemented with the help of other organisations. We are very happy to receive comments and suggestions on our activities and research, which can be sent to cver@lse.ac.uk.

    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Festival Economia Trento

    Affari di famiglia: nepotismo politico e carriere nelle imprese italiane

    Marco Manacorda filmed giving a talk at the Festival of Economics on Trento.
    There is abundant anecdotal evidence but poor empirical evidence of the benefits enjoyed by the relatives of politicians in the labor market. Analysis of data about the universe of Italian politicians, combined with a sample of employees in the private sector, seems to confirm this hypothesis: the advantage in terms of career derived from having a political family is positive and significant. This phenomenon seems to be particularly pronounced where there is greater availability of public resources, and fades when the number of politicians competing for these resources is high and where the corruption evident are less common, suggesting that nepotism is a substitute for the pure corruption.

    The video was filmed for the Festival of Economics in Trento on June 2, 2015
    View the video here

    Related links
    Marco Manacorda webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    New Scientist

    New Apollo programme wants moonshot budget to boost renewables

    ''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

    This article was published by the New Scientist on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Global Apollo programme seeks to make clean energy cheaper than coal

    Lord Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics and member of the Apollo group, said it was barely believable that the world only spent 2% of its R&D money on its ''most pressing problem'' of climate change and clean energy. He said: ''We do not think this problem can be conquered unless we reduce the cost of renewable energy below the cost of dirty energy.''

    This article was published online by the Guardian on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Heart London (Radio)

    News

    Discussion of Paul Dolan's recent comments on what makes people happier.

    This interview was broadcast by Heart London (Radio) on June 2, 2015
    [No link available]

    Also on
    BBC Newcastle
    Swansea Sound
    Magic FM

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC World Service

    News

    Interview with Lord Layard regarding launch of the 'Apollo' programme to make renewables cheaper than fossil fuels.

    The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service News on June 2, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    We need a global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change

    Article by Richard Layard
    The target for GAP is to reduce the cost of clean energy and to do it fast.

    This article was published by The Huffington Post on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Property puzzle

    Partly as a result London house prices per square foot are now the second highest in the world after Monaco, according to the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. The problem is acute: the average UK home now costs a first-time buyer five times their income, up from 2.8 times in the early 1980s. That has in turn fuelled demand for rented accommodation, pushing up the costs and eating up increasing amounts of state subsidy.

    This article was published online by the Financial Times on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research, Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015

    Related CEP videos/podcasts
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing'
    View video here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Leading scientists join campaign to end use of coal within 10 years

    Leading academics, including former government chief scientist Sir David King, past president of the Royal Society Lord Rees, and economists Lord Stern and Lord Layard, in effect said that the world cannot be saved from global warming unless coal - the dirtiest fossil fuel - is put out of business.

    This article was published by The Independent on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    ANSAen Business

    Relatives of politicians 'earn more'

    Having a politician relative adds an average of 500 euros a year to one's salary, according to a new study by two Italian economists. This is equal to a 3 percent increase in an average paycheck. In comparison, every additional year of education adds an average of 6 percent to one's salary, according to the study by Marco Manacorda, professor of economics at the Queen Mary University of London and research associate at the London School of Economics, and Stefano Gagliarducci, professor at Rome Tor Vergata University.

    This article was published online by ANSAen Business on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Marco Manacorda webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Marco Manacorda CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Richard Layard: ‘Money is not the only thing affecting people's happiness'

    The Chris Blackhurst interview from 13 July 2014
    How could we become a happier nation? One pioneering economist has spent the best part of a decade arguing that we simply must find an answer to this question - gaining the support of David Cameron, who backed the notion of happiness as ''the new GDP''. That economist won't let it drop. He wants to reignite the whole debate and go further still.

    This article was published by The Independent on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage



    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Evening Standard (web)

    Revealed: The five things which can make you immediately happier

    A respected ''happiness expert'' has revealed five simple ways to make yourself feel immediately better. Paul Dolan, a professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, said the answer to feeling happier could be found by following simple steps. Speaking at the Hay Festival, he advised people seeking to be immediately happier

    This article was published online by The Evening Standard on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    World Magazine

    Study: Cellphones in schools hurt low-performing students

    Last month, a study from the London School of Economics for the first time provided hard evidence that banning phones in school boosts student achievement. ''Mobile phones now are a ubiquitous part of a teenager's life'', said Richard Murphy, an economist with the London School of Economics' Center for Economic Performance and one of the co-authors of the study. ''Practically all teenagers now own a mobile phone, but there's been no academic study looking at what impacts this new technology has had on students' academic attainment.''

    This article was published by World Magazine on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Times Live South Africa

    Five things you can do to be happier

    Earning more money, bagging the fabulous job you have always wanted, or travelling the world might seem like keys to happiness. But, according to ''happiness expert'' Paul Dolan, making simple changes is the key to bringing joy and purpose into your life. Dolan, a professor at the London School of Economics, claims that many of the things people believe will make them happy are fleeting and can actually alter their lives for the worse.

    This article was published by Times Live South Africa on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC London 94.9FM

    News

    Discussion of Paul Dolan's event at the Hay Festival, and the ways people can feel happier.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC London 94.9FM on May 31, 2015
    [No link available]

    Also on:
    BBC Radio 5 Live
    News

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 31/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    De Morgen

    Vijf dingen die je meteen kan doen om gelukkiger te worden

    More money, the job of your life may seem like the keys to a happier life. However it is no less true that happiness is, according to Professor Paul Dolan. Just small changes that bring joy and give meaning to life can provide great happiness. Dolan, who is a professor affiliated with the prestigious London School of Economics and who works as a government adviser, claims that the major changes that people think will make them happy may instead have a negative impact on their lives.

    This article was published by De Morgen on May 31, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 31/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Telegraph

    Prof: joy lies in simple activities

    According to happiness expert Prof Paul Dolan, making simple changes are the key to creating joy. Prof Dolan, of the London School of Economics, has claimed a work promotion may bring more stress, travelling can be lonely and above a £50,000 salary people aren't measurably happier.

    This article was published by The Sunday Telegraph on May 31, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 31/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Economist

    Trade unions: Back to the future

    WHEN Margaret Thatcher came to power in 1979 she set about bulldozing the trade unions, which had frequently brought Britain grinding to a standstill in the 1970s. On May 27th David Cameron indicated that his Conservative government would try to finish the job. Under a proposed new law, strike ballots would need a 50 percent turnout for industrial action to be legal; in the case of ''essential'' public services they would need the support of 40 percent of eligible members. Unions called the measures ''draconian''. Yet Mr Cameron's plans may turn out to be less effective than they look. Unions have lost much of the clout they once wielded. Since 1979 membership has dropped in both the private and public sectors, while the number of days lost to strikes has plummeted. The wage premium associated with union membership is around 5 percent, down from 15 percent in the 1990s. Deindustrialisation hastened unions' decline. The average age of a member is 44 and rising, according to Stephen Machin of University College London. The plan could backfire. The most successful unions, such as the RMT, usually command high enough turnouts for the new thresholds not to make much difference. Meanwhile the new law might galvanise members who have not voted before in strike ballots, thinks Alex Bryson of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. The public may even be more sympathetic to strikers if they feel unions are being unduly squeezed, he says. Rather than weakening the unions, Mr Cameron may end up strengthening them.

    This article was published by The Economist on May 30, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Alex Bryson webpage
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 30/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Washington Post

    Economists have figured out who's really to blame for exploding income inequality

    Corporate greed isn't good, but it might not be as bad for inequality as we thought - or at least not in the way we thought. Now it seems pretty obvious that inequality must have something to do with executive pay. After all, big-company CEOs only made 30 times as much as the average worker in 1978, but make 295 times as much today. The simple story is that corporate bigwigs have doled out cushy jobs on their boards to buddies who have rubber-stamped whatever pay packages they ask for, so that they're all but guaranteed to walk away with millions whether or not they're actually, you know, good at their jobs. Simple, but not quite right. That's because new research shows that, as Slate's Jordan Weissmann puts it, its not super-managers, but rather super-managers and everybody else at super-companies that are behind the growing income gap.

    This article was published by The Washington Post on May 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Firming up Inequality', Jae Song, David J. Price, Fatih Guvenen and Nicholas Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1354, May 2015

    Related links
    Nicholas Bloom webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 29/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 4

    More or Less Programme: Seven-day NHS

    Anna Sivropoulos-Valero interviewed on productivity.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4's More or Less Programme on May 29, 2015
    Link to interview here [Interview begins around 08:24.]

    Related publications
    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP 2015 Election Analyses No 21, March 2015

    Related CEP video/podcast
    #ElectionEconomics video: Productivity and Business. Anna Valero interview.
    View video here

    Related links
    Anna Sivropoulos-Valero webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 29/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Oldham Chronicle

    School phone ban boosts test results

    BANNING mobile phones in the classroom can boost test scores by more than 6 per cent, according to a new study. Researchers at the London School of Economics looked at secondary schools in four English cities, including Manchester, and surveyed test scores before and after the ban. It found low-achieving and low-income students improved the most. Report authors Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy said that despite the benefits of new mobile technology, phones caused distractions, reduced productivity and were detrimental to learning.

    This article was published by the Oldham Chronicle on May 26, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 26/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    CBC News (Nova Scotia, Canada)

    School cellphone bans raised grades says researchers

    About 85 per cent of Canadian high school students have a mobile phone, but two economics researchers have concluded cellphones are distracting in class. Their research paper concludes high school students score higher marks when cellphones are banned. The research began in England when Richard Murphy was at the London School of Economics. Murphy is now an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.

    This article was published online by CBC (Nova Scotia, Canada) on May 25, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 25/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Why French school curriculum and timetable reforms forced teachers onto the streets

    Article by Camille Terrier
    French teachers went on strike on May 19 to voice their disapproval of two major reforms that have been proposed by Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, the French education minister. The two reforms are very different: one centres on changes to the history and language curriculum and the other on schools' autonomy to manage the organisation of teaching. Yet both have sparked criticisms from teachers, unions and French intellectuals. Reforming secondary education has emerged as a recent priority in France. The most recent results of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which rank countries around the world based on tests of 15-year-olds and released last December, highlight increasing inequalities in achievement between low and high achievers in France. More disturbing is the fact that, among OECD countries, France is one of the countries where a pupil's social background is one of the strongest predictors of his or her subsequent achievement.

    This article was published online by The Conversation on May 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Camille Terrier webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    News Posted: 22/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian - teacher network

    Let the kids use their phones in class

    The London School of Economics showed that test scores of 16-year-old students were 6.4 percent higher after schools banned students from using mobile phones.

    This article was published by the Guardian - Teacher Network on May 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 20/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    HoHoLinks.com

    Education: Banning mobile phones could lead to better academic results, research suggests

    The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has released research that suggests the banning of mobile phones at school could lead to better academic results. The research paper, titled Ill Communication: The Impact of Mobile Phones on Student Performance, investigated the impact of banning mobile phones on student test scores. LSE surveyed schools in four UK cities of Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester and found that student performance in high stakes exams significantly increased post mobile phone ban.

    This article was published online by HoHoLinks.com Education on May 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    News Posted: 20/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    MTV News

    Did your school ban your iPhone? Here's why that actually isn't so bad

    It may seem like common sense that keeping smartphones away from kids would improve their performance at school. Now a study by the London School of Economics has the data to back it up. ... ''By surveying schools in four English cities regarding their mobile phone policies and combining it with administrative data, we find that student performance in high stakes exams significantly increases post ban,'' authors Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy wrote in the study's abstract. ''Our results indicate that these increases in performance are driven by the lowest-achieving students.''

    This article was published online by MTV News on May 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 20/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    WFXG FOX 54

    Study: No cell phones at school equals higher test scores

    The study by the London School of Economics found a link between banning smartphones in schools and increased test scores.

    This article was published online by WFXG FOX 54 on May 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Also in: KPLC TV, Fox Toledo, Live 5 WCSC, WDAM-TV, MyFox Birmingham, KOBI TV 5, MyFox Memphis, UTV44

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 19/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    WSOC-TV

    Kids do better when schools ban smartphones

    Schools that have banned students from carrying smartphones have seen an improvement in the children's test stores, reported CNN Money on a new study from the London School of Economics.

    This article was published online by WSOC-TV on May 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 19/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio Coventry and Warwickshire

    Phil Upton's 'Drive' Show

    Dennis Novy (CEP) interviewed on the comment by Lord Bamford, Chairman of JCB, that leaving the EU would not necessarily be a big problem for British business.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio Coventry & Warwickshire on May 18, 2015
    Link to broadcast here

    Related news story
    BBC News
    JCB boss says UK should not fear EU exit

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 18/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Mental health momentum mustn't give way to political expediency

    The authoritative How Mental Health Loses Out in the NHS study, published by the LSE in 2012, revealed that for people aged 65 or less, nearly half of all ill health was mental ill health.

    This article was published online by The Conversation UK on May 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    How Mental Health Loses Out in the NHS: Report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012
    In brief: Mental illness and the NHS, Richard Layard. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Mental Health Research webpage

    News Posted: 15/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Brexit - what would happen if Britain left the EU?

    Growth, trade, immigration, jobs, diplomacy: what would the impact be if a 2017 referendum pushed UK towards the exit? ...Another analysis by economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), part of the London School of Economics, calculated the UK could suffer income falls of between 6.3 percent to 9.5 percent of GDP, similar to the loss resulting from the global financial crisis of 2008-09. That is under the researchers' pessimistic scenario, in which the UK is not able to negotiate favourable trade terms. Under an optimistic scenario, in which the UK continues to have a free trade agreement (FTA) with the EU, losses would be 2.2 percent of GDP.

    This article was published by The Guardian on May 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU', Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses No.22, March 2015 Details
    #ElectionEconomics video, 'Britain and Europe'. Interview with Thomas Sampson posted on CEP's 'Economic Performance' YouTube channel.
    View Video

    Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 14/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 5

    5 Live Drive

    Anna Sivropoulos-Valero interviewed, on productivity.

    The interview was broadcast live on BBC Radio 5 on May 13, 2015

    Related publications
    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP 2015 Election Analyses No 21, March 2015

    Related links
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Anna Sivropoulos-Valero webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 13/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    How smart is it to allow students to use mobile phones at school?

    Article by Richard Murphy and Louis-Philippe Beland
    How does the presence of mobile phones in schools impact student achievement? This is an ongoing debate in many countries today. Some advocate for a complete ban, while others promote the use of mobile phones as a teaching tool in classrooms. So, the question is: Should schools allow the use of mobile phones?

    This article was published online by The Conversation on May 12, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

    News Posted: 12/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    What would you pay to be happy?

    Richard Layard, a British social economist and associate of Kahneman, found himself at the top table of Britain's New Labour government when it took power in 1997. The press gave him the title Happiness Tsar, and his 2005 book, Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, remains a hugely influential international bestseller.

    This article was published by The Guardian on May 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage

    News Posted: 10/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Le Monde

    Les ambiguïtés de la reprise britannique

    ... 400 000 emplois publics supprimes La realite est pourtant que son mandat a ete divise en deux parties. L'essentiel des mesures de rigueur a ete realise dans les deux premieres annees: hausse de la TVA, reduction drastique des depenses d'investissement, baisse des allocations sociales... ''Selon les calculs de l'Office for Budget Responsibility - organisme officiel de l'Etat -, cette politique a fait perdre deux points de croissance pendant les deux premieres annees'', rappelle John Van Reenen, directeur du Centre for Economic Performance.
    ... 400 000 deleted public employment reality is yet that its mandate was divided into two parts. The bulk of rigorous measures has been achieved in the first two years: VAT, drastic reduction in capital expenditures increase, decrease social benefits... ''According to the calculations of the Office for Budget Responsibility - official agency of the State -, this policy did lose two points of growth during the first two years'', recalls John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by Le Monde (France) on May 7, 2015
    Link to article here


    Related publications
    'Austerity: Growth Costs and Post-Election Plans', John Van Reenen, CEP 2015 Election Analyses No.20, March 2015
    Details here
    '#ElectionEconomics: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2015 UK General Election', Centre for Economic Performance, CEP 2015 Election Analyses No.34, April 2015
    Details here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 07/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Capital Radio Madrid

    News

    Javier Ortega, of the Centre for Economic Performance, interviewed on the UK 2015 General Election and issues of austerity.

    The interview was broadcast by Capital Radio Madrid (Spain) on May 6, 2015
    Link to the broadcast here (minutes 06:55 to 12:07)

    Related links
    Javier Ortega CEP publications webpage
    Labour Market Programme webpage



    News Posted: 06/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Capital Radio Madrid

    Las claves economicas de las elecciones britanicas

    John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, brings a summary of factors that may influence the choice of the ballot box.

    The interview on Capital Radio Madrid (Spain) was broadcast on May 5, 2015
    Listen to the full interview in information Capital here

    Related publications
    #ElectionEconomics: The research evidence on key issues for voters in the 2015 UK General Election, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analysis No.34, April 2015

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Growth Programme webpage



    News Posted: 05/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Digital start-ups question links to 'Tech City'

    ''Our ambition is to bring together the creativity and energy of Shoreditch and the incredible possibilities of the Olympic Park to help make east London one of the world's great technology centres,'' Mr Cameron said in 2010. According to research by the London School of Economics and National Institute of Economic and Social Research, the number of digital jobs in the area climbed from 16,578 in 2012 to 18,679 in 2013. ''Policy has certainly hugely raised awareness of the London tech scene,'' says Max Nathan.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on May 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    News Posted: 05/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Carbon Brief

    UK must reform climate policies to become global leader, say economists

    A steep reduction in UK emissions over the last two decades disguises a number of ineffective government policies, argues a new report from the London School of Economics. In a briefing on the key environmental policy issues ahead of the 7 May general election, three academics from LSE's Centre for Economic Performance look at the policies that aim to reduce the UK's emissions and examines their successes and failures.

    This article was published online by The Carbon Brief blog on April 30, 2015
    Link to the article here

    Related publications
    Energy and the Environment: a cold climate for climate change policies?, Jonathan Colmer, Antoine Dechezlepretre and Ralf Martin. CEP 2015 Election Analyses No.32, April 2015
    Accompanying video interview with Ralf Martin, 'Climate Chang'e. View video here
    More details here

    Related links
    Jonathan Colmer webpage
    Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
    Ralf Martin webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 30/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    City A.M.

    Two charts showing why more robots won't destroy jobs

    Most economies across the globe have a low, or even shrinking, share of manufacturing jobs. At the same, such firms are increasingly embracing the use of robots in the workplace.
    Brookings Institute researchers use two charts from CEP research by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels to illustrate why these two trends aren't linked.

    This article was published by City A.M. on April 30, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 30/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Wall Street Journal

    Robots may look like job-killers, but it's hard to see in the numbers

    There's no relationship visible in the numbers between the change in factory employment and robot use, says Mark Muro, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. In a blog post, he and Brookings colleague Scott Andes took a recent report by two European economists that found robots enhanced productivity in 17 countries in recent decades and checked to see how job losses stacked up among some of the biggest robot users.

    This article was published by the Wall Street Journal on April 30, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 30/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

    The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

    This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

    One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

    This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
    A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
    CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


    Related links
    Sandra McNally webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage

    News Posted: 28/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Share Radio

    Which economic policy would @johnvanreenen from LSE put in his manifesto

    CEP Director Professor John Van Reenen reveals the economic policy he would put in his election manifesto.

    The interview was recorded for Share Radio on 28 April 2015
    Link to the interview here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    CEP Election 2015 Policy Analyses Series webpage

    News Posted: 28/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Washington Center for Equitable Growth

    Today's must-must-read: Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels: robots at work

    'Robots at Work' - Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335 by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels posted on the 'Must-Must-Read' blog.

    The DP was posted on the Washington Center for Equitable Growth's 'Today's Must-Must-Read' blog on April 27, 2015
    Link to posting here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 27/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Brookings

    Robots are infiltrating the growth statistics

    There hasn't been much macroeconomic research on the impact of robots to persuade commentators to move from anecdote to analysis. However, new evidence begins to shed some light on the macroeconomic role of automation in the economy. In a new paper from London's Center for Economic Performance, George Graetz and Guy Michaels of Uppsala University and the London School of Economics, respectively, find that industrial robots have been a substantial driver of labor productivity and economic growth.

    This article was published online by Brookings on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage

    News Posted: 27/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website


    News Posted: 27/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Reuters

    Analysis - Productivity puzzle to tax UK election victor

    London School of Economics professor John Van Reenen said Britain was also suffering from government inaction over infrastructure such as high-speed broadband, roads and airports.

    This article was published online by Reuters on April 26, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

    News Posted: 26/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Policy Network

    The price of failure on TTIP may be high

    Article by Dennis Novy
    TTIP could be the most ambitious free trade agreement in history. It has the potential to benefit millions of consumers and might be the last opportunity for individual European countries to set high-standard global trade rules fit for the 21st century . If successfully concluded, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) would be the most ambitious free trade agreement in history. This is partly because of its sheer scale - the EU and the United States represent about 45 per cent of global output. It is also partly because of the attempt to tackle non-tariff barriers and regulation. In the past, trade agreements were mainly about cutting tariffs, and that was relatively easy.

    This article was published online by Policy Network on April 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 23/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Telegraph

    Are happy workers more productive?

    As Pret a Manger becomes the latest company to credit happy workers for improved profits, we examine the evidence that suggests smiling employees might keep the tills ringing.
    There is a slight problem with anecdotal evidence from trendy companies and laboratory experiments undertaken at Warwick. Dr Alex Bryson at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research says: ''You have to ask yourself about the believability of the experiment. How did they induce happiness? By showing a comedy clip. Even if you could induce higher wellbeing into individual workers that doesn't necessarily translate into improved profitability.''

    This article was published online by The Telegraph on April 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Alex Bryson webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Alex Bryson CEP publications webpage



    News Posted: 22/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Free lunch: read my lips

    In a recent briefing from the London School of Economics, Alan Manning writes that raising tax from 45 to 50 per cent has highly uncertain, but small, effects on the public finances. But what is clear is that if the higher rate leads to a fall in the tax base (the Laffer curve effect), it is certainly not because the highly paid work less but because they put more effort into tax avoidance. Now all the parties promise to reduce the revenue loss from tax avoidance. But even if they fail, the implication is that a higher top rate of income tax does not have noxious effects on the economy.

    This article was published by the Financial Times on April 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Top rate of income tax', Alan Manning, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
    Details here

    Related video
    'Top rate of Tax'
    If politicians want to raise the top rate of tax, they need to do more to tackle tax avoidance and evasion. That is the main argument of Alan Manning.
    View video here

    Related links
    Alan Manning webpage
    Community Programme webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage



    News Posted: 22/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    PC Pro

    The upsides and downsides of Tech City

    As far as the government is concerned, London's Tech City is a success. But what effect has it had on employment in the area - and what are the downsides? The LSE's Dr Max Nathan is trying to find out what has worked and what hasn't.

    This article was published by PC Pro magazine on April 21, 2015
    View article here

    Related links
    Max Nathan webpage
    Max Nathan publications webpage
    Spatial Economics Research website



    News Posted: 21/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Paying for higher education - what are the parties proposing?

    University financing has again emerged as a key battleground issue in the 2015 General Election. Should fees be regulated lower and if so, how will the cost be financed? Gill Wyness explores these questions.

    Published online as a blog article by LSE British Politics and Policy on April 21, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015

    Related videos
    CEP #ElectionEconomics 'Higher Education' video interview with Gill Wyness.
    Video link.

    Related links
    Gill Wyness webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    News Posted: 21/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Observer

    What would happen if Britain left the EU?

    One of the main arguments employed by those in favour of remaining in the EU is simply how difficult it would prove to leave. We are deeply integrated with our European allies - economically, militarily and culturally. It's likely that Brexit (and what an ugly neologism it is) would lead to plummeting stock markets and an economic recession, with losses to GDP calculated by the Centre for Economic Performance at up to 9.5% - worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

    This article was published in The Observer on April 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

    Related CEP videos/podcasts
    Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson
    View video here

    Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage



    News Posted: 19/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Hindu

    Labour Talks Tough on Immigration

    In a significant repositioning of Labour's views on immigration, Ed Miliband on Saturday pledged a series of measures to control immigration if his party is voted to power.

    Jonathan Wadsworth of the London School of Economics says
    'Fears about adverse consequences of rising immigration regularly seen in opinion polls have not, on average, materialised. It is hard to find evidence of much displacement of U.K. workers or lower wages. Any negative impacts on wages of less skilled groups are small.'

    This article appeared on The Hindu on 19th April 2015. Link to article

    Related links:
    CEP Election Analysis #19 - Immigration and the UK Labour Market
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

    Further Links:

    CEP's Election 2015 Coverage




    News Posted: 19/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    David Blanchflower: There is no doubt that leaving the Europ