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News and Press

News Archive 2008

Craegmoor News

Investing in mental health 'makes economic sense'

Author Richard Layard in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has noted that a course of evidence-based psychological therapy for anxiety or depression costs £750 (€874) per person, results in significant improvements in symptoms, and, over the two years following therapy, results in increased time in work and increased economic output to the value of £1,880 (€2,190) per person (BMJ 2006; 332: 1030-2).

Link to article.

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard, February 2006
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard


Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Economist

Demonstrably durable

Firms will find it harder to dislodge cheaper imports from their home markets and will struggle to keep up with their euro-area peers abroad. The old remedy of a lower exchange rate is no longer available. For that reason “it is far from self-evident that it is better to be inside the euro than outside it,” says Francesco Caselli, of the London School of Economics. In 1992, the last time Europe lived through such currency-market squalls, both Britain and Italy were forced to devalue their currencies against other EU nations. Neither country regretted it, says Mr Caselli.

This article appeared in the Economist on the 30th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Business Spectator

Measuring the fear index

Nick Bloom, in a recent column for Vox.EU, uses links he has identified in his academic research between uncertainty shocks as measured by changes in expected volatility of the S&P 100 – the so-called investor fear index – and GDP growth to predict the length and depth of the current downturn.

This article appeared in Business Spectator on the 24th December 2008.
Link to article.


‘The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation’ by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
'Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?’ by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sharewatch

REFILE-Spain risks homegrown 'subprime' crisis

"The Spanish central bank didn't allow our banks to take American crap because they had their own crap...they were extremely exposed to the Spanish housing market," said economist Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Sharewatch on the 23rd December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 23/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

The World Today

Linda Yueh interviewed on UK economic prospects.

This interview was broadcast on the World Service on the 19th December 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

FT - blog Economists Forum

Normality is just a few policy steps away

Nick Bloom, assistant professor of economics at Stanford University, provides the best available evidence of how an economy is likely to react to a temporary bout of volatility.

This article appeared in the FT - Economists Blog on the 18th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation’ by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
‘Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?’ by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008
‘What Drives Good Management Around the World?’ by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report,‘Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter’ by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Power players from the fields of Eton

Profiles of former Eton pupils, mentioning that Lord Layard was the first director of the London School of Economics's Centre for Economic Performance

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on the 18th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

RGE Monitor

Normalcy is just a few bold policy steps away

Nick Bloom, from Stanford, provides the best available evidence of how an economy is likely to react to a temporary bout of uncertainty.

This article appeared in RGE Monitor on the 17th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liverpool Daily Post

Rob Merrick on politics - Ignorance is Bliss

IT WAS meant to be the big policy idea of the 21st century – but now ridicule awaits any politician who suggests it. Professor Richard Layard, a Labour peer and don at the London School of Economics, convinced some ministers it was now possible to measure happiness.

This article appeared in the Liverpool Daily Post on the 17th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage


News Posted: 17/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liverpool Daily Post

Ignorance is Bliss

Professor Richard Layard, a Labour peer and don at the London School of Economics, convinced some ministers it was now possible to measure happiness. As a result, some schools focus on the "well-being" of their children, following something called the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning programme.

This article appeared in the Liverpool Daily Post on the 17th December 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard
Download

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage


News Posted: 17/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Amdocs on Marketwatch

When 0% isn't low enough

That's not really the case, and it is why the Fed statement stressed the wide-ranging open market operations it will use to inject money into the economy and drive down interest rates along the entire interest-rate curve, not just at the short end.

"We need to have significant inflation: 2 per cent is not enough to improve solvency significantly, and we may experience 5-10 per cen for a year or two," Johnson and Peter Boone of the London School of Economics wrote in a recent posting on WSJ.com."Inflation has major drawbacks and creates its own risks, but compared to the alternatives, it would be a relief."

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation/Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

IRN (ITN)

Linda Yueh interview

Linda Yueh discussed the UK inflation rate in an interview.

This interview was broadcast on IRN on the 16th December 2008.
[No link]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

World Update

Linda Yueh interviewed on slowing growth in China and Japan.

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on 15th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Republika, Serbia

Crni (finansijski) oktobar u Velikoj Britaniji

... je nego u svim vecim razvijenijim državama (‘Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain’, Centre for Economic Performance – LSE, 2007).

This article appeared in Republika, Serbia.
Related Publications
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling
by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Express.be Antwerpen, Belgium

De ultieme gids voor geluk in barre tijden

‘Eigenlijk zijn we sociale dieren en de meeste vreugde die we ervaren komt dan ook van andere mensen,' zegt de Britse sociaal-wetenschapper Richard Layard.

This article appeared in Express.be on the 11th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Stumbling and Mumbling (blog site)

Does job search work?

History suggests plans to make the jobless look harder for jobs might not work. In her new paper Barbara Petrongolo studied the impact of the introduction of Jobseekers Allowance in 1996, which required the unemployed to search harder for jobs. She found that tougher search requirements did succeed in getting people off unemployment benefits initially. But, tougher search requirements, she says “were not successful in getting people into new, lasting jobs.”

This article appeared in the blog site stumbling and mumbling on the 11th December 2008. Link to article.

Related Publications
‘The Unemployment Trap’by Barbara Petrongolo in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008.
‘What are the Long-Term Effects of UI? Evidence from the UK JSA Reform’ by Barbara Petrongolo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 841, December 2007.


Related Links
Barbara Petrongolo webpage
Labour Markets Programmewebpage

News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Worldwide Exchange

Dr Linda Yueh, LSE, appeared on the programme discussing China’s consumer prices rising at the slowest pace in two years.

This interview was broadcast on CNBC on the 11th December 2008.
[No link]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation webpage

Linda Yueh also gave an interview on the China, Korea and Japan financial summit on the World Today, BBC World Service.

News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Job creation is responding to needs of society

Professor Christopher Pissarides and Dr Rachel Ngai, both of the LSE, write in response to an article about public sector-driven job growth that "is critical of the kind of job creation that by international standards is a healthy development."

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 10th December 2008.
Link to article

Related Links
Rachel L Ngai webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Link exchange

YESTERDAY we linked to bad news for those hoping to preserve the environment in the face of a withering economy. Luckily, not everyone believes that the two crises are in opposition. Ralf Martin argues that lessons from the economic crisis can illuminate the world's handling of the environment:

This article appeared in the Economist online on December 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘CEP carbon offsetting survey’ on CEP blog page. Details
‘Modern Management: Good for the Environment or Just Hot Air?’, by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Ralf Martin and Raffaella Sadun, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 891, October 2008
Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin, article in CentrePiece, Volume 11 Issue 3 Winter 2006
Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis published in February 2006

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Tories target 'problem families.' to break cycle of dependency

Shadow secretary Chris Grayling suggests that entire "problem families" should be targeted for intervention by social services to break a cycle of benefit dependency and educational failure that limits social mobility in Britain. Labour insists that social mobility is rising, but a London School of Economics study concluded that it has not improved in the past 30 years.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on the 9th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh interviewed on the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue and agreement on financial sector opening.

This interview was broadcast on RBC Daily on the 8th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

King stands by with new shock therapy

Fear and uncertainty themselves can have a powerful impact on economies - and blunt the effect of policy action. Nick Bloom, an economist at Stanford University, has carried out research on 16 'uncertainty shocks', and found that they tend to paralyse decision-makers.

This article appeared in the the Guardian on the 7th December 2008.
Link to article

Related Publications
‘The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation’ by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
‘Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?’ by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008
‘What Drives Good Management Around the World?’ by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report,‘Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter’ by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 07/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

So happy together

The Young Foundation has been working recently with Professor Richard Layard, of the LSE, together with various local authorities on practical ways to increase happiness.

This article appeared in the Times (Body and Soul) on the 6th December 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research pages webpage

News Posted: 06/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror, Sri Lanka

Should the CFO Reign Supreme over HR?

Ten years ago, the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (London) reported on a 100-company study of how HR contributes to profits. It found HR’s contribution was 19% on profits and 18% on productivity, whereas competitive strategy and new technology contributed a mere 1% and R&D about 8 % of the above. (The Sheffield Effectiveness Programme: University of Sheffield and Centre for Economic Performance of LSE 1998). There is no doubt that the human relations climate of the organization has a significant influence upon performance. Some of these variables, which impact performance, are recognition and rewards for good work, employability, relationships, work-life balance and health.

Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A Path to Profit? Teamwork at the Top’, by Michael A. West, Malcolm G. Patterson and Jeremy Dawson in CentrePiece Volume 4 Issue 3, Autumn 1999
‘The Effectiveness of Top Management Groups in Manufacturing Organisations’ by Michael West, Malcolm Patterson, Jeremy Dawson and Steve Nickell, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 436, November 1999

Related Links
Stephen Nickell webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

CRA European Competition Practice

Brussels conference hosts a debate on the impact of the credit crunch on competition policy

In a conference in Brussels on 3rd December 2008, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, Professor John Van Reenen debated the impact of the credit crunch on competition policy with John Fingleton, CEO of the UK Office of Fair Trading, Philip Lowe, Director General of DG-COMP at the European Commission and Professor Xavier Vives. He raised the issue that the relaxation of rules on state aid and mergers could be storing up problems for the longer-term as once subsidies are given out, they become increasingly hard to take back.

His presentation can be found here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed by Vladimir Pavlov on Chinese growth and rural subsidies.

This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 2nd December 2008.
Link to article.


Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Easier

Over a million pensioners rely on property for retirement

Almost 1.7 million pensioners are relying on property to fund their old age, according to a report from price comparison and switching service uSwitch.com. Sadly, this group alone has already seen almost £45 billion disappear from their retirement fund in just 12 months as the average house price has dropped almost £30,000. Dr Tim Leunig , Professor at the London School of Economics, says: "Relying on the state to look after you in retirement is a recipe for poverty in old age so starting to save as young as possible is good advice for everyone. The current downturn in tax revenues and big increase in Government borrowing makes it even harder for the Government to fund the pension promises made in good times. Future state pensions could be lower than people expect, increasing the benefits of private saving.

This article appeared in Easier on December 1st 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Week Magazine, USA

Briefing: Holding on to happiness in hard times

“We are basically social animals, and most of our enjoyment comes from other people,” says British social scientist Richard Layard.

This article appeared in The Week Magazine on the 1st December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 01/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Pensioners lose £45bn in property slump

Credited quote from LSE professor Dr Tim Leunig.

This article appeared in the Independent on the 1st December 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Tim Leuing webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Nursing Standard

NHS set to learn lessons from Royal Mail in cutting sick leave

A leading economist has suggested a method for reducing NHS staff absences, based on a model that saved the Royal Mail millions of pounds. David Marsden, professor of industrial relations at the London School of Economics, is due to address health service managers next week and tell them how his review of Royal Mail policies helped reduce staff absence from 7 per cent to 5 per cent in three years. As a result of the review, Royal Mail managers now have regular contact with employees reporting sick.

This article appeared in Nursing Standard on the 29th November 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, ‘The Value of Rude Health’ by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related Links
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 29/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

You and Yours

Dr Tim Leunig, lecturer in economic history at LSE, commented yesterday in a piece about high speed trains.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on the 29th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Worldwide Exchange

Dr Linda Yueh, CEP associate, commented on how bad things are for the Chinese economy.

This interview was broadcast on CNBC the 29th November 2008.
[No Link]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also interviewed on:
BBC World Service (Arabaic Service) - "BBC Extra"

News Posted: 29/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

News

Linda Yueh interviewed for main bulletin on slowing growth in China.

This interview was broadcast on the 26th of November 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh in article on China's investments in the Ukraine

This article appeared in RBC Daily on the 25th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

FinFacts

Global Financial Crisis: Warnings of danger from 2001 and a Fed all bark but no bite - with monumental consequences

The 82-year-old monarch had the main aspects of the current global financial crisis explained to her during the inauguration of a new building at the London School of Economics (LSE). The origins and effects of the crisis were explained to her by Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the LSE's management department, the Press Association reported. Prof Garicano said afterwards: "The Queen asked me: 'If these things were so large, how come everyone missed them? Why did nobody notice it'?"

This article appeared in FinFacts on the 25th November 2008
Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal Blogs, NY

Guest Post: Inflation Should Be Just Around the Corner

Peter Boone is chairman of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity, and a research associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on the 24th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

More 4 News

More 4 News

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the pre-Budget report.

This interview was broadcast on More 4 News on November 24th 2008.
[No link to article avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

National Post - Canada

Great Depression of Small 'D'?

The Great Depression obliterated GDP, but Nicholas Bloom, assistant professor of economics at Stanford University, wrote this week that 2009 will be tough but still result in an overall shrinkage in world GDP of 3%.

This article appeared in the National Post Canada on the 21st November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
"The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation" by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718a
"Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?" by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008
"What Drives Good Management Around the World?" by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, ‘Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter’ by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.


Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

News

Linda Yueh on the rise of China and impact on the U.S.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jeezera English on the 21st November 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
UTVi (India) - “Business Scene” discussing the financial crisis and Citigroup.
CBC Radio One (Canada) - “The Current” interviewed on flagship morning programme on the wider implications of China’s economic stimulus package

News Posted: 21/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Metro - London

We just need a break

The importance of the work done by organisations such as the FHA is underlined by Richard Layard, the government's 'happiness tsar' and author of the book Happiness: Lessons From A New Science. 'Holidays are vital for personal well-being. It's tragic that so many people still have no holidays away from home,' Layard says.

This article appeared in the Metro on the 21st November 2008. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 21/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Personal Finance - Cape Town, South Africa

Retrain your mind to be wealthy and happy

A study by British economist Richard Layard into the relationship between wealth and happiness in the United States showed that while real income per person had steadily increased between 1945 and 2000, the percentage of the population who regarded themselves as very happy had remained constant at about 30 percent, Bradley says.

This article appeared in Personnal Finance on the 21st November 2008.
Link to article.

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 21/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC 2

Newsnight

Linda Yueh spoke on unemployment in China.

This interview was broadcast on Newsnight on the 20th November 2008.
[No link]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

The week in higher education

He was mocked in the Daily Mail for "stammering" when asked by the Queen, on a royal visit, to explain why no one had foreseen the credit crunch. But Luis Garicano , director of research at the department of management at the London School of Economics, has hit back: "I had no intention of chatting about corgis." In The Guardian on 18 November, he wrote that he had prepared a detailed explanation of the meltdown for the monarch, scotching reports that he had been startled by her question. He added: "The Queen posed a serious question. The answer defines our future."

This article appeared in Times Higher Education on the 20th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicanois an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance .
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 20/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Islington Gazette

Job losses 'to hit bars and eateries'

Professor Christopher Pissarides , of the London School of Economics, agreed the outlook for bar and restaurant workers in Islington was grim. He said: "I would expect bars and restaurants to be hit because they are small companies that cannot afford to keep workers on if there is a short-term fall in demand."

This article appeared in the Islington Gazette on the 19th November 2008.
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Prospect

More mobile than we think

In 2005, the Sutton Trust funded and publicised the work of three economists—Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Paul Gregg —who burrowed into the British cohort studies (social data on a big sample of individuals born in a particular year) and found a significant decline in upward mobility between the cohort born in 1958 and that born in 1970. They attributed this fall to the growing income inequality of the 1980s and to the expansion of higher education being monopolised by the better off.

This article appeared in Prospect on the 19th November 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

La Gaceta

'Suprimir las AFJP es una de las peores medidas imaginables'

La economista tucumana Tenreyro, que trabaja en Londres, dijo que la medida del Gobierno es una apropiación ilegal de fondos privados. MADRID (Especial para LA GACETA, Irene Benito).- La economista tucumana Silvana Tenreyro considera un error sin paliativos la iniciativa del Poder Ejecutivo Nacional de regresar al régimen único de reparto que existía antes de la reforma previsional de 1994 (creó el sistema de capitalización con la “Es una de las peores medidas imaginables: una intervención de las AFJP). apropiación ilegal de bienes privados que desalienta el ahorro de los particulares, pieza esencial para el crecimiento”, afirma Tenreyro desde el Reino Unido, donde vive y trabaja como profesora en la prestigiosa London School of Economics and Political Sciences.

This article appeared in La Gaceta on the 19th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Silvana Tenreyro webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss the global economic drivers.

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on November 18th 2008 (no link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on the UK inflation figure on the BBC News channel.

News Posted: 18/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Response I did not stammer when the Queen asked me about the meltdown

Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the department of management, London School of Economics, comments on the Queen discussing the economy with him.

This article appeared in the The Guardian on the 18th of November 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Dispatch Online - South Africa

A lightness of being in tough times

In his 2005 book, Happiness, prominent British economist Richard Layard argues that people in the wealthiest nation the world has ever had, the United States, are no happier today than they were in 1950.

This article appeared in Dispatch online, South Afrcia.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 17/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Citizen Economists

Breaking the mold: the U.S. productivity miracle

All other things being equal, high productivity growth—a rise in the ability to create more with less of anything—remains the central driver for a nation’s economy, and United States productivity is world renowned (and envied). A discussion paper published by the Centre for Economic Performance in April 2007 (authored by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen), entitled “Americans do IT better: US multinationals and the productivity miracle,” found that this demographic extends beyond international borders. The CEP discussion paper gives special emphasis to the flexibility of the U.S. business model in adopting technological changes to suit its needs and increase its efficiency.

This article appeared in Citizen Economists on the 15th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘It Ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do I.T.’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06
‘It Ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do I.T. – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using U.S. Affiliates’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Office for National Statistics
‘Americans do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 788, April 2007


Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Good question, Ma'am. But some people did see it coming

Alan Beattie comments on Professor Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 15th November 2008.

Related links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”

News Posted: 14/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC 4

World News Today

Dr Linda Yueh, CEP associate, discussed the legacy of the Bretton Woods conference.

This interview was broadcast on the 14th November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation webpage

News Posted: 14/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh interviewed about China's economic growth figures.

This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 13th November 2008.
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

UTV India

News

Linda Yueh interviewed on European markets and growth.

This interview was broadcast on UTV, India on the 13th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable).

Related links:
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

The World Today

Linda Yueh was interviewed on China’s economy and policy direction.

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on the 8th December 2008.
[no link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

The Queen has missed her vocation. She'd be wonderful as a polite Paxman asking the questions we ALL want the answers to

Tom Utley praises the Queen for pressing Professor Luis Garicano over the credit crisis and suggests that perhaps she could ask awkward questions at a number of other institutions, including the BBC and the Government.

This article appeared in the the Daily Mail on the 7th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 07/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Blde.de

Hier macht Prinz Philip ein Nickerchen

Den Kopf aufgestützt, den Mund leicht geöffnet, die Augenbrauen hingebungsvoll zusammengezogen – und die Augen fest geschlossen! Ihre Majestät Queen Elizabeth II. (82) war mit Ehegatte Philip an die Eliteuniversität, London School of Economics” eingeladen und ließ sich dort von führenden Finanzexperten die Krise erklären, die derzeit die Welt erschüttert.

This article appeared in blde.de website on the 6th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related links Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 06/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5

Five Live Drive

Interview with Professor Luis Garicano, in which he talked about his conversation with Her Majesty The Queen about the credit crunch, at the opening of the New Academic Building.

Related Links

Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also mentioned in BBC Radio Bristol News:
Reference to Her Majesty The Queen opening the New Academic Building and asking why nobody saw the credit crunch coming.

News Posted: 05/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Employment for Students

'university is increasing social mobility'

University students looking for graduate jobs in London may be interested to hear that Labour policy is helping to improve social mobility, according to new government research. And it cites research from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, which shows the mobility improvements only started to take effect in 2000.

This article appeared on Employment for Students website on the 4th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 04/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Scotsman

Is victory truly in sight in the class struggle?

Privileges and the lack of them are difficult to measure: Figures published yesterday suggest that, between 1970 and 2000, social mobility neither improved nor deteriorated. However, findings from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies seem to show that there have been encouraging signs since then. But are we really becoming more socially mobile and is the evidence overwhelming? Jo Blanden, a lecturer in economics and associate of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, is not convinced. She is quick to point out that Britain was already starting from a poor threshold.

This article appeared in the Scotsman on the 4th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility? by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 04/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The seizing up eases up

Leader looks at new government findings about social mobility and disagrees with the view that the "class gap" is closing. Cites report from LSE which suggested that chances to progress at work have increased since 2000.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 4th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 04/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Britain's class divide is over

Richard Dickens of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE and the University of Sussex, said: "After a very long period of increase, there is some evidence that inequality is finally falling due to increases in employment among women in particular."

This article appeared in the The Daily Telegraph on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Three background papers by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight, are published by the Centre for Economic Performance and the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion.
Link to papers

Link to the report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, "The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants and Low-Paid Families’ by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight

Related Links
Richard Dickens webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Public Service Online

Social mobility 'improved since 2000'

Findings provided for the unit by Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies have indicated that a child's academic achievement - measured by the number of GCSEs they pass - is becoming less dependent on their family's wealth.

This article appeared in Public Service Online on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobilityin Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 03/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

ePolitix

Social Mobility rising says No.10

The paper suggested that between 1970 and 2000, social mobility - the ability of people to move up the income ladder into different jobs from their parents - did not change.

This article appeared on ePolitix website on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008. ‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007 Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 03/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

‘Easier’ to get on and up in Britain
’Striking’ fall in equality? A study, from academics at Bristol University and the London School of Economics, finds that family background appears to have less influence on educational attainment than it once did. The research was discussed on the programme broadcast at 7.50a.m.

This was broadcast on Radio 4 on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 03/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Social mobility 'improving' in UK

Gordon Brown has made social mobility a focus of his premiership.

This article appeared on the BBC News website on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
'A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Class gap closing, research claims

Research to be published tomorrow by Downing Street will claim that one of the most enduring and damaging criticisms of the government, that it has presided over a decline in social mobility, is no longer true. Despite the low mobility of recent years, disclosed in a report by the London School of Economics that compared children born in the 1950s and 1970s, some have managed to move up the income scale.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on the 3rd November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications ‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) , Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage webpage


News Posted: 03/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Put your coat on and enjoy the real world

A year or two ago we had Richard (Lord) Layard’s treatise on the subject of happiness as a developing science.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 2nd November 2008.
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard link to details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Well being programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 02/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Britain's class divide is all in the past claims Labour research

Government research is set to reveal a narrowing class divide, despite Gordon Brown claiming Labour had much to achieve on this four months ago. Labour is set to publish the research, by academics at the London School of Economics and Bristol University, as proof that young people's social standing is no longer linked to that of their parents

This article appeared in Daily Mail on November 2nd 2008.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 02/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Der Handel

Planungshürden Groß hilft Klein

German magazine published an article based on Raffaella Sadun's research on supermarkets and the British high street.

This article appeared in Der Handel magazine in November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?’ by Raffaella Sadun, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.888, August 2008
‘Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?’ is also an article in CentrePiece Volume 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage


News Posted: 01/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Changing class grows easier

Despite the low mobility of recent years, disclosed in a report by the London School of Economics that compared children born in the 1950s and 1970s, some have managed to move up the income scale.

This article appeared in the Times on November 1st, 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
'A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 .

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


News Posted: 01/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Macleans.ca Canada

A silver lining for Russia

Already, oil prices have dropped below the budget-critical $70 per barrel. If they go much lower, Russia will start running a deficit. Its rainy day reserves, designed to deal with low oil prices in times of crises, can only sustain the country for up to a year and a half. So far, there’s no sign the bottom has been reached, says Peter Boone , an associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics: “The world is at the start of what appears to be a potentially deep, global recession, and could expect demand for oil to fall sharply.”

This article appeared on Macleans.ca website on 30th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation programme webpage


News Posted: 30/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

RxPG News, Los Angeles

IZA Prize 2008 goes to British economists Layard and Nickell

Lord Richard Layard is Emeritus Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE) and a Labour life peer in the House of Lords.
Link to article.

Details of the award have been posted on the CEP’s website homepage.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Richard Nickell webpage

News Posted: 30/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

IZA-Preis geht an Briten

Für ihre Erkenntnisse über die Wirkung von Arbeitsmarktinstitutionen werden die beiden englischen Arbeitsmarktökonomen Richard Layard, emeritierter Professor der London School of Economics, und Stephen Nickell von der Universität Oxford mit dem IZA-Preis 2008 ausgezeichnet. *The article in Handelsblatt has announced that Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell have been awarded the IZA (Institute for the Study of Labour) Prize in Labor Economics 2008.*
The official announcement this morning from IZA says:
The IZA Prize in Labor Economics 2008 goes to the outstanding European labor economists Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell for their path-breaking work on the relationship between labor market institutions and unemployment. Their research provided a theoretical and empirical framework for the analysis of equilibrium unemployment and the impact of labor market institutions on economic performance. Shaping the views of scholars and policymakers on how to address unemployment, the contributions of Layard and Nickell have served to illuminate the policy discourse in Europe and increased academics’ understanding of the nature and causes of involuntary joblessness. Their 1991 book “Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market” (co-authored with Richard Jackman) and their 1999 chapter “Labor Market Institutions and Economic Performance” in the Handbook of Labor Economics have become modern classics in labor economics. Layard and Nickell’s approach incorporates stocks as well as flows into and out of unemployment in a way that previous models had neglected. Their work thus provides a unified framework for studying the sources of unemployment and the determinants of unemployment dynamics. In particular, it highlights the importance of understanding the impact of labor market institutions on labor market performance.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt on the 30th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage

News Posted: 30/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

finchannel.com, Georgia

LSE: Low-income families are now more able to work their way out of poverty

Researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance and Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion at LSE have found that wage mobility - how much a person's earnings change from year to year - has risen since 2000. Long-run inequality - the difference between how much the poorest and richest people earn over a number of years - has fallen.

This article appeared in the finchannel.com website, Georgia on the 30th of October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

IZA Prize 2008

IZA Prize 2008 goes to British economists Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell

The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn, Germany, has selected Lord Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell to receive this year's IZA Prize in Labor Economics.

The award honours their path-breaking work on the relationship between labour market institutions and unemployment. Their research provided a theoretical and empirical framework for the analysis of equilibrium unemployment and the impact of labour market institutions on economic performance.

According to the award statement, the contributions of Layard and Nickell have illuminated the policy discourse in Europe and increased academics' understanding of the nature and causes of involuntary joblessness.

Lord Richard Layard was the founder-director of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics. He is now Programme Director of the Wellbeing Programme at the CEP. Lord Richard Layard is also Emeritus Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE) and a Labour life peer in the House of Lords.

Stephen Nickell is an Associate of the Labour Markets Programme at CEP and a warden of Nuffield College, University of Oxford. He was previously a Professor of Economics at LSE and a member of the Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee.

[Photo: Steve Nickell] [Photo: Richard Layard]

Steve Nickell (left) and Richard Layard (right)

The IZA Prize Ceremony will take place at the Petersberg Hill near Bonn on 1 December 2008 as part of IZA's 10th anniversary celebrations.

The full press announcement from CEP is here CEP Press Announcement on Thursday 30 October 2008: IZA Prize 2008 goes to the British economists Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell

The IZA Prize Ceremony will take place at the Petersberg Hill near Bonn on 1 December 2008 as part of IZA's 10th anniversary celebrations. Speaking at the event will be White House Council of Economic Advisers Chairman, Edward Lazear and Professor Richard Freeman, Senior Research Fellow at CEP and Harvard economist. Professor Freeman was recipient of the IZA Prize in Labor Economics 2007.

For more information about the prize and about Richard Layard and Steve Nickell's work please see

Award Statement of the IZA Prize Committee

Press Statement of the IZA Prize Committee

Richard Layard's CEP Biography Page

Steve Nickell's CEP Biography Page

News Posted: 30/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Express

Recession threat to families

In their study The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants And Low-Paid Families, researchers analysed the earnings of a random sample of 1% of the British population over 30 years. They found the gap between rich and poor was finally shrinking after two decades of rising inequality. But this could be threatened by recession if unemployment hits the most disadvantaged in society, researchers said. Co-author Abigail McKnight, of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics (LSE) said the experience of past recessions would suggest the current financial crisis could hit wage mobility.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on the 29th October 2008.
Link to article.

Link to report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants and Low-Paid Families by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight.

Related Links
Richard Dickens webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Debt Management Today

Recession 'might depress wages'

The coming recession could make it much harder for low-income families to lift themselves out of poverty, a report suggests. Academics at the London School of Economics said that the gap between rich and poor was beginning to shrink after widening for the past 20 or so years.

This article appeared in Debt Management Today on the 29th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Three background papers by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight, are published by the Centre for Economic Performance and the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion
Link to papers

Link to the report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, ‘The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants and Low-Paid Families’ by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight.

Related Links
Richard Dickens webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Business Daily

Linda Yueh was interviewed for the programme on reasons to be cheerful during this financial crisis.

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on the 29th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme website


News Posted: 29/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4

Recession threat to families

Recession could stop more families from working their way out of poverty, researchers have warned. But co-author Abigail McKnight, of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics (LSE) said the experience of past recessions would suggest the current financial crisis could hit wage mobility. "It is not necessarily that recession will lead to a fall, but we definitely are in danger of one," she said.

This interview was broadcast on Channel 4 News on the 29th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Three background papers by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight, are published by the Centre for Economic Performance and the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics. Link to papers
Link to report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation ‘The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants and Low-Paid Families’ by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight.

Related Links
Richard Dickens webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Mirror

Recession threat to families

Recession could stop more families from working their way out of poverty, researchers have warned. Co-author Abigail McKnight, of the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics (LSE) said the experience of past recessions would suggest the current financial crisis could hit wage mobility.

This article appeared in the Mirror on 29th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Three background papers by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight, are published by the Centre for Economic Performance and the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion.
Link to these papers

Link to the report by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation: ‘The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants and Low-Paid Families’ by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight

Related Links
Richard Dickens webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Further press cuttings:
Braintree, Witham & Dunmow Times
The Echo


News Posted: 29/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4

Channel 4 News

Dr Jonathan Wadsworth , CEP, discusses race in a time of recession.

This was broadcast on Channel 4 news on 28th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘On the Relative Gains to Immigration: A Comparison of the Labour Market Position of Indians in the USA, the UK and India’, Jonathan Wadsworth and Augustin de Coulon, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.851 February 2008.
Labour Market Effects of Immigration’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, in CentrePiece Magazine 12(3), February 2008.
‘Immigration to the UK: The Evidence from Economic Research’ by Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Policy Analysis, December 2007.
‘The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754 October 2006.

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Children worry about careers more than bullying

That finding tallies with a separate study, also published today, conducted by the influential educational charity the Sutton Trust. The London School of Economics researchers found that widespread poor education and careers advice is preventing large numbers of academically able pupils from non-privileged homes going on to higher education.

This article was published in the Guardian on the 28th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Information, Advice and Guidance in Schools: A Brief Literature Review’ by Sandra McNally. Appendix 3 in Report to the National Council for Educational Excellence from the Sutton Trust, Increasing Higher Education Participation Amongst Disadvantaged Young People and Schools in Poor Communities Link to report

Related Link
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Poor advice hinders university access

Report finds 'swathes' of state school pupils are missing out due to inadequate careers guidance Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, who carried out a review of research on schools' careers and education guidance packages, said they had not improved.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28th October 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage


News Posted: 28/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Landfall in Asia

Comment written by Linda Yueh on how China is well placed to weather the storm of the market slump.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 28th October 2008.
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Employment for Students

Graduates from top universities earn more

University leavers looking for graduate jobs in London earn more on average if they are from top ranking institutions, it has been claimed. According to the London School of Economics (LSE), students from the top 25 per cent of universities in the UK can expect to earn up to 16 per cent more than those with an equivalent degree from an institution in the bottom quarter, reports the Journal.

This article appeared in Employment for Students website on 27th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of Centrepiece, Vol 13 Issue 2 Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
Link to CEE discussion papers

Related links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

News Posted: 27/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Single parents transform workforce

A surge in female employment – and corresponding drop in working men – is one of the forces that has transformed Britain’s labour market since the eve of the last major recession in the early 1990s. As the nation again heads into a downturn, research by the Financial Times suggests one effect will be to hand even greater economic power to women, as the gap between the two sexes' employment rates contracts still further. Alan Manning of the London School of Economics highlights another flaw in the idea that men and women might complement each other in the labour market. “A lot of people meet their partners at work, so they might both lose their job at the same time,” he points out.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 27th October 2008. Link to article

Related Publications
The Gender Pay Gap by Alan Manning in CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006
'The Part-time Pay Penalty' by Alan Manning and Barbara Petrongolo CEP Discussion Paper No.679 March 2005
'The Gender Gap in Early Career Wage Growth' by Alan Manning and Joanna Swaffield CEP Discussion Paper No. 700 July 2005 CEP Discussion Paper No.700 July 2005.
The Women and Work Commission (2006) Shaping a Fairer Future

Related Links
Alan Manning's webpage
Labour Markets webpage


News Posted: 27/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The great financial stich-up

But the laudable aim of sharing out risk wasn't the cause of our current financial problems. Column by Tom Cunningham.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 26th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Tom Cunningham webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Moscow News

The buck stops here

“By recapitalizing the West, China and other emerging economies can preserve their export markets by helping the world's richest economies weather the storm and prevent a drawn out recession, or even depression," Linda Yueh told the BBC.

This article appeared in the Moscow News on 24th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Mature Times

More possessions - but are we any happier than 50 years ago?

Readers often tell us that, even though they "didn't have much" in the way of money or possessions, life was much happier a few decades ago than it is now. And many feel especially sorry for today's young children, who cannot run or play freely in the streets for fear of violence, are frequently starved of basic human love and affection - but remain isolated with their computers living in a 'virtual world'. Economist Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, has studied surveys of happiness over a period of time. He claims that once people can afford the basics, happiness does not increase with income, and that levels of happiness have not changed in the UK over the last 30 years - despite the doubling of living standards.

This article appeared in Mature Times on the 24th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness:Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 24/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Le Temps

La Chine appelée à sauver le monde

La crise financière est au menu du sommet Asie-Europe qui s'ouvre ce vendredi à Pékin. «La Chine dispose de 2000 milliards de dollars de réserves, fait remarquer Linda Yueh, professeure à l'Université d'Oxford et à la London School of Economics. Elle est dans une position d'aider les Etats-Unis et l'Europe à faire face à la crise de crédit.» Selon elle, il s'agit pour la Chine de préserver ses marchés d'exportation. Les marchés européen et américain absorbent plus de 60% des exportations chinoises.

This article appeared in Le Temps on the 24th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme website

News Posted: 24/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Child poverty costs Britain at least 25bn a year, study says

Continuing child poverty means that Britain has to pay at least 25 billion pounds a year due to the extra burden on state services. Jo Blanden and Steve Machin of CEP wrote the background report to this study from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

This article appeared in the Independent on 23rd October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Estimating the costs of child poverty by Donald Hirsch is based on three reports, one of which is ‘The GDP Cost of the Lost Earning Potential of Adults Who Grew Up in Poverty’ by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Stephen Machin.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Kirstine Hansen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programm webpage

News Posted: 23/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Cost of child poverty is at least 25bn a year

Researchers have found that the government spends £12bn a year on services to remedy consequences of childhood deprivation such as poor health, low educational attainment, crime and antisocial behaviour. Although not mentioned, Jo Blanden and Steve Machin of CEP wrote the background report to this report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 23rd of October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Estimating the costs of child poverty by Donald Hirsch is based on three reports, one of which is ‘The GDP Cost of the Lost Earning Potential of Adults Who Grew Up in Poverty’ by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Stephen Machin

Link to article
Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Kirstine Hansen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The financial cloud's silver lining

Comment written by Linda Yueh on how if a new system of international economic law emerges as a result of the banking crisis, it could benefit all nations.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 23rd October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

PM

Alex Bryson interviewed on the result of the GMB trade union - voting today to settle for a pay cut rather than face substantial redundancies.

This interview was broadcast on 23rd October 2008.
No link avaliable

Related Links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sympatico MSN Finance Canada

Canadians struggle with what they earn

By pursuing money this way, we are, says economist Richard Layard, doomed to keep running on a "hedonic treadmill" that will only lead to trouble.

This article appeared in Sympatico MSN Finance, Toronto, Canada on the 21st October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 21/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC 4

World News Today

Linda Yueh of the CEP Globalisation Programme gave an interview on China's economic growth prospects.

This interview was shown on BBC4, World News Today on the 20th October 2008.
No link avaliable.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further Interviews
BBC World Service - World Update
CNN - Business International

News Posted: 20/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

US News and World Report

The economy faces a makeover

Economist Nick Bloom thinks both Europe and the United States will sink into a severe recession next year, with gross domestic product contracting by 3 percent and unemployment rising by a total of about 3 million.

This article appeared in the US News and World Report on the 20th October 2008
Link to article.

Related Publications
"The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Esitmation and a 9/11 Simulation" by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718
"Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?"by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008
"What Drives Good Management Around the World?" by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Financial Crisis: World Round Up

BBC News is running a series of commentaries this week by economists on the challenges facing the global financial system. Today, Linda Yueh considers the implications for China.

This article appeared on the BBC News website on 20th October 2008.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada)

Could market meltdown be a chance to slow down?

As British economist Richard Layard notes in his book Happiness, over the past 50 years, people in what used to be the richest country in the world, the United States, saw their living standards more than double. And yet, all indications reveal that over the same period, they are no happier.

This article appeared in the Globe and Mail, Toronto on October 18th 2008.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard


Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage webpage


News Posted: 18/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

Russian elite look to Kremlin for aid as wealth evaporates

Analysts said the financial crisis could strain the unspoken pact between Putin and the tycoons, who have been allowed to prosper as long as they do not challenge his rule. "They're going to be fighting to get money from the Kremlin, and behind the scenes, people inside the Kremlin will be fighting to get control of assets," said Peter Boone, an associate at the London School of Economics who studied the Russian economy for investment banks. "That's when the politics get tough."

This article appeared in the Washington Post on October 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liverpool Daily Post

Dr Tim Leunig stands by attack on Liverpool

THE under-fire academic who said Liverpudlians should give up on their city, yesterday said he would not change a single line of his controversial report.

This article appeared in the Liverpool Daily Post on October 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Cities Unlimited: Making Urban Regeneration Work’ by Tim Leunig and James Swaffield. Edited by Oliver Marc Hartwich. Published by Policy Exchange.
‘Where to Build Britain’s New Houses?’ by Tim Leunig. Article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008.

Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Charge Elite Students More

Researchers affiliated with the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, say a university education significantly raises earning power, particularly among graduates of Britain's elite universities.

This article appeared in Times Higher Education, News in Brief on October 16th 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?’by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of Centrepiece.


Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Economics of Education webpage


News Posted: 16/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Critic to debate Liverpool future

The author of a controversial report which suggested that people in Liverpool should move south in search of a better life is visiting the city. The London School of Economics lecturer [Dr Tim Leunig] will lock horns with other speakers such as councillor Warren Bradley, who was one of the biggest critics of the report in August.

This article appeared in BBC News on October 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Cities Unlimited: Making Urban Regeneration Work’ by Tim Leunig and James Swaffield. Edited by Oliver Marc Hartwich. Published by Policy Exchange.
‘Where to Build Britain’s New Houses?’ by Tim Leunig. Article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008.

Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today Programme

Dr Tim Leunig was the subject of ‘Thought for the Day’ on October 15th 2008.

Link to programme

Related Publications
Cities Unlimited: Making Urban Regeneration Work by Tim Leunig and James Swaffield. Edited by Oliver Marc Hartwich. Published by Policy Exchange.
‘Where to Build Britain’s New Houses?’ by Tim Leunig, article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008.

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Witan Jardine

Graduates from top universities earn more

Degrees obtained from top universities "significantly" increase earnings of graduates, new research from the London School of Economics (LSE) has revealed.

This article appeared in Witan Jardine on October 15th 2008.

Related Publications
"Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?" by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of Centrepiece Vol 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage


News Posted: 15/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Women in Technology

Earning power 'boosted' by best universities

Graduates who have attended what are deemed to be the UK's top universities are likely to earn "significantly more money during their career, a new study has found. According to the London School of Economics (LSE), university degrees in general boost earning power, but this increases again for graduates of the best 25 universities, the Guardian reports.

This article appeared in Women in Technology on October 15, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Career Engineer

LSE: Top engineering graduates' will earn significantly more

A university degree significantly raises the earnings of graduates, especially those from the best universities, Iftikhar Hussain, from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, told the Guardian.

This article appeared in the Career Engineer - London UK on October 15th 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers details

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

How to manage the banks

The Treasury plans to invest up to $250 billion in individual banks and has already allotted half that amount to nine leading banks. For now, the key questions are: Will the plan work? And what consequences will it have for our financial system and our economy? Several issues bear examination.
Article co-written by Peter Boone chairman of the charity Effective Intervention at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Washington Post on October 15, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

United Television (UTV) News - India

News

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the U.S. financial crisis and presidential elections.

This interview was given to United Television (UTV) News - India on October 13, 2008
[No link available.]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also appeared on
India Business Day

News Posted: 13/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

'Sunrise with Eamonn Holmes'

Linda Yueh interviewed on the financial crisis.

The interview was given to Sky News on October 13, 2008
[No link available.]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Reuters News - USA

Kremlin holds key as crisis threatens oligarchs

"There is going to be an enormous political battle over who is going to be bailed out by the government's reserves," said Peter Boone, an associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article appeared in Reuters News on October 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also in
Sharewatch
Kremlin holds key as crisis threatens oligarchs
Easybourse
La crise met le Kremlin en position de force face aux oligarques
"Une énorme bataille politique va se jouer pour déterminer qui sera renfloué au moyen des réserves gouvernementales", déclare Peter Boone, de la London School of Economics and Political Science.

News Posted: 13/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Times

Time is running out for a rescue

For a start, according to the Stanford University economist Nick Bloom, the recent volatility of the stock market is on a par with the 1929 crash and subsequent episodes in that period when the Depression took hold. Bloom, who spends some of his time at the London School of Economics, is one of a number of economists who think it is not the level of the stock market that counts but the extent to which it fluctuates.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on October 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?' By Nick Bloom in CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 1 Spring 2008
Further reading: Nick Bloom (2007), 'The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks', Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 718, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Don't worry about inflation

Comment by Tom Cunningham (CEP Macro Programme) on how we should be worrying about deflation, not inflation.

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tom Cunningham webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

The rich and the rest

Two analyses from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance shed new light on the economic gulf between the rich and the rest.

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Spend it Like Beckham by Andreas Georgiadis and Alan Manning appears in the latest issue of CentrePiece Volume 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
The article summarises ‘Spend It Like Beckham? Inequality and Redistribution in the UK, 1983- 2004’ by Andreas Georgiadis and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 816, August 2007.

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Andreas Georgiadis webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Silicon.com

US firms get more out of IT than UK rivals

Three pieces of government-backed research have confirmed that effective use of IT can give companies a "significant" productivity boost. The first paper, 'It ain't what you do it's the way that you do IT' from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that US multi-national enterprises in the UK are eight per cent more productive than their UK counterparts. The researchers said more than 80 per cent of this productivity advantage can be explained by better use of IT.

This article appeared in Silicon.com on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005/6
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. - Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Office for National Statistics
'Americans do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 788, April 2007

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Degrees from top universities boost earning power

Researchers from the LSE have found that a degree from a university in the top quarter of all universities, such as Oxford or Cambridge, will lead to wages that are 10-16 per cent higher than a degree from a university in the lowest quarter.

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily

World news

Linda Yueh interviewed in the paper on the interest rate cuts in Asia.

This article appeared in RBC Daily - Russia on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Top universities 'should charge higher fees'

Students at top universities should be prepared to pay extra because they normally earn much more after graduating. The additional cash is needed to fund higher staff salaries at Britain's most prestigious universities, said the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the London School of Economics. Three academics - Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj - analysed the salaries of students graduating from university in 1985, 1990, 1995 and 1999.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal

Depression, recapitalization, greenspan

Nicholas Bloom on the voxeu blog warns we might be on the precipice. “The crisis is shaping up to be a perfect storm – a huge surge in uncertainty that is generating a rapid slow-down in activity, a collapse of banking preventing many of the few remaining firms and consumers that want to invest from doing so, and a shift in the political landscape locking in the damage through protectionism and anti-competitive policies.”

This article appeared in an online blog in the Wall Street Journal on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?' By Nick Bloom in CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 1 Spring 2008
Further reading: Nick Bloom (2007), 'The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks', Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 718, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

US News and World Report

Credit crisis to greens: drop dead

Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom finds the good news in the coming global recession.

This article appeared in the US News and World Report on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?' By Nick Bloom in CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 1 Spring 2008
Further reading: Nick Bloom (2007), 'The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks', Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 718, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Breakfast

Dr Tim Leunig, lecturer in economic history at LSE appeared on the programme this morning discussing the government’s bank bail out.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 5 Live Breakfast programme on October 8, 2008
[No link available.]

Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

VOX

The credit crunch may cause another great depression

Article by Nick Bloom on his prediction of a recession for 2009 that he now believes was too optimistic an outlook.

This article appeared in VOX online on October 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Esitmation and a 9/11 Simulation by Nick Bloom. Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also discussed in the Economist blog:
Ghosts of the past
I ALSO read the piece by Nick Bloom to which Richard Baldwin refers and felt it to be over the top.

News Posted: 08/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Public Service Onlilne

Social mobility 'improved since 2000'



News Posted: 03/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Public Service Onlilne

Social mobility 'improved since 2000'



News Posted: 03/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

A mortgage from Tesco?

Raffaella Sadun, of the London School of Economics, has found that supermarket chains, denied an out-of-town site, are more likely to set up in town centres themselves, bringing the battle straight to the high street.

This article appeared in the Economist on October 2, 2008
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?’ by Raffaella Sadun, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.888, August 2008
‘Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?’ is also an article in CentrePiece Volume 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008 to be published during October.

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 02/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Wage settlements yet to feel the pinch, says pay specialist

On the day the national minimum wage rose to £5.73 an hour, the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics produced an updated analysis showing that there is "no evidence of significant job losses for the workers most affected by the minimum wage" since its introduction in 1999.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on October 2, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘The National Minimum Wage: The Evidence of its Impact on Jobs and Inequality’ by Mirko Draca, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis, September 2008.
Download

Related Links
Mirko Draca webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Labour claims to narrow the class divide - at last

Ministers will claim tomorrow that social mobility - people’s ability to move up the income scale and into different jobs from those of their parents - is finally improving. The government will seize on the study, by academics at the London School of Economics and Bristol University, to counter opposition claims that Labour has presided over an entrenching of the class divide and growing income inequality, and that this is one of its biggest policy failures.

Link to article

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in Centrepeice Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005.


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

News Posted: 01/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today Programme

Dr Tim Leunig, senior lecturer in Economic History at LSE, was interviewed on Wednesday about the banking crisis.

This interview was broadcast on October 1, 2008
Link to programme

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Small retailers are backed into a corner

Research published last week by Raffaella Sadun, research officer at the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics, says that the policy has contributed to the decline of independent stores. The report, Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?, estimates that approximately 15% of the decline in employment among independent retailers from 1998-2004 was due to the decrease in the number of out-of-town megastores.

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 1, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?’ by Raffaella Sadun, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.888, August 2008
‘Does Planning Regulation Protect Independent Retailers?’ is also the lead article in CentrePiece Volume 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008 to be published during October.

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

En the web

Provincial spite

If Doctor Tim Leunig, a reader in economic history at the London School of Economics, ever had doubts that northerners were a chippy bunch, they have surely been dispelled by the response to his report Cities Unlimited.

This article appeared in En The Web on September 26, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Cities Unlimited: Making Urban Regeneration Work by Tim Leunig and James Swaffield. Edited by Oliver Marc Hartwich. Published by Policy Exchange.
Where to Build Britain’s New Houses? by Tim Leunig. Article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
LSE Press Release for Cities Unlimited: Making Urban Regeneration Work

News Posted: 26/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

Grant Awarded

SERC researchers granted NHPAU Research Innovation Fund awards to help study housing affordability

Research led by economic geographer Dr Christian Hilber, of the London School of Economic and Political Science is one of 3 chosen studies granted a National Housing and Planning Advice Unit (NHPAU) Research Innovation Fund award.

The project - The Effects of Supply Constraints on Housing Costs: Empirical Evidence for England and Assessment of Policy Implications - will assess to what extent legal or planning constraints in different parts of the country affect the cost of land, and how this relates to differing housing affordability problems across the regions and sub-regions.

Another project led by housing economist Professor John Muellbauer has also been awarded. Mortgage Possessions in the UK: a Regional and National Analysis seeks to understand the causes of recent increases in the rates of mortgage possessions and will attempt to forecast future trends at a national and regional level.

For further details about the projects and the award please see the NHPAU RIF press release (in Adobe PDF).

The National Housing and Planning Advice Unit (NHPAU), the independent body set up to advise all levels of government on housing supply and affordability, has announced the first awards from its Research Innovation Fund - set up earlier this year to drive forward research into housing affordability issues.

Reported 22 September 2008

News Posted: 22/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Evening Standard

Brown had to act over HBOS

GIVEN the extraordinary events being played out on global capital markets, should we even be shocked by Lloyd's TSB gobbling up HBOS to create a new banking behemoth? Yes, we should, and not just because of its sheer size some 38 million people will bank or borrow with the combined group.

John Van Reenen's letter was printed in Readers' Views section of The Evening Standard on September 19, 2008
[No link available.]

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 19/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Credit crunch future predictions

Evan Davis hosted a live debate from the Willis Building in the City of London to reflect on the past year of economic turmoil, and to discuss where the credit crunch mess will lead next. The BBC Radio 4 programme The Credit Crunch Mess - What Next? featured contributions from some of the City's leading figures, who gave their predictions for the year ahead. Linda Yueh (CEP Globalisation Programme) warns that more banks could fail.

This article appeared online on BBC news on September 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

Socialist Worker

Class politics are alive and kicking in Britain

A report for the London School of Economics last year found that social mobility in Britain hadn’t improved in 30 years, and the country was “stuck at the bottom of international league tables when it comes to social mobility”.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker on September 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Credit crunch future predictions

Evan Davis hosted a live debate from the Willis Building in the City of London to reflect on the past year of economic turmoil, and to discuss where the credit crunch mess will lead next.
The BBC Radio 4 programme The Credit Crunch Mess - What Next? featured contributions from some of the City's leading figures, who gave their predictions for the year ahead. Linda Yueh (Centre for Economic Performance) warned that more banks could fail.

This article appeared on BBC News online on September 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

The 'same ol' is actually good enough for many

Do common management techniques such as setting targets, monitoring performance and "lean" manufacturing actually help companies become more productive and profitable? An extensive new study suggests the answer is yes. Researchers from Stanford University, the London School of Economics and consulting firm McKinsey & Co. interviewed plant managers and examined financial data. They found U.S. factories to be the best-managed and most-productive, though the authors sound warnings for the U.S. as well.

This article appeared in the the Wall Street Journal on September 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Better Management Sustain Growth in China and India?, Nick Bloom and Rebecca Homkes, CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World?, Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Work-Life Balance: the Links with Management Practices and Productivity, Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 11, Issue 1, Summer 2006
'Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Tobias Kretschmer webpage
Rebecca Homkes webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management and Organisational Practices and their Impact on Productivity and Growth Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Faith schools work. Until you take the faith away

Figures from the research group, the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, suggest that on average in all English local education authorities, 17.3 per cent of pupils get free school meals; the average in Catholic schools is 12.5 per cent. But as Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance points out, the data do not prove that schools are socially selective.

This article appeared in the Independent on August 31, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?’, by Steve Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Steve Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/08/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The price isn't right

We know why pricing got so complicated. But can governments do anything about it?
Article written by Tom Cunningham, Occasional Research Associate with the Macro Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tom Cunningham webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/08/2008      [Back to the Top]

New Straits Times - Persekutuan, Malaysia

HARDEV KAUR: Doha round fails to deliver after years of talk

Then again, developing countries, according to the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, were anxious to avoid the mistakes of the round, the Uruguay Round (1986-1994), where they exchanged concrete liberalisation commitments for poorly defined promises of assistance that did not materialise.

This article appeared in the New Straits Times (Persekutuan, Malaysia) on August 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Doha Round: Freer and Fairer Trade?, by Emanuel Ornelas, CEP Policy Analysis, July 2008

Related Links
Emanuel Ornelas webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/08/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Forcing people to work for benefits will do nothing to alleviate poverty

A 2006 report from LSE said: ‘There are more mentally ill people on incapacity benefits than the total number of unemployed people on benefit," but that "only a quarter of those who are ill are receiving any treatment’. Instead of giving people the help they need to recover, Labour wants to torture them until they stop claiming benefits.

This article appeared in The Scotsman on July 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders. A Report by the Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 24/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

I can help you change your life

Take the biggest prize of all, personal happiness. Lord Richard Layard, founder-director of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance - and former government ‘happiness tsar’ - is a man on a mission. In his book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (2005), he brings together vast quantities of research on why we don't feel better and what we can do about it. But despite the 25 pages of references, it is aimed firmly at a popular market.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education on July 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

The National (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates)

Living in the laps of luxury

Once your salary has reached a basic threshold – about $20000 (Dh 73460) a year, according to the British economist Richard Layard – further increases in income add less and less to your sense of well-being.

This article appeared in The National (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) on July 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 10/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

Francia: ejemplo de educación superior

Article co-written by Professor Luis Garicano, director of the School’s Department of Management and Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in El Pais on July 6, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

The education boom has proved a curse for the poor

Gordon Brown spoke last week: "I want to see a Britain that is far more upwardly mobile ... But it cannot be achieved without people themselves adopting the work ethic, the learning ethic and aiming high." He had warm words for the richness of untapped potential and praised Labour's great leap forward in education, more GCSEs, more degrees - all true and all good.
But on the day he spoke, the nation's social mobility experts assembled at the LSE [CEP]. A roll call of top economists and sociologists arrived at the same devastating conclusion: education has done virtually nothing to improve social mobility. Worse still, as a greater number of people gain more qualifications, the less socially mobile the country has become.

This article appeared in the Guardian on July 5, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Accounting for Intergenerational Income Persistence: Non-Cognitive Skills, Ability and Education' by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Lindsey Macmillan, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 73, September 2006
Cycles of Disadvantage by Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons, in CentrePiece, Volume 11, Issue 1, Summer 2006
This article summarises The Persistence of Poverty across Generations: A View from two British Cohorts by Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons, published for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation by The Policy Press

Life Opportunities: The Evidence on the UK's Declining Social Mobility Jo Blanden, Centre for Economic Performance Election Analysis, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, February 2005
More details on the research discussed here are in Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin - a report supported by the Sutton Trust. This paper has been published as: Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, 'Educational Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility' in Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles (eds.) What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK, Princeton University Press, 2005.

'Mobility Has Fallen' by Jo Blanden, in CentrePiece Volume 7, Issue 2 Summer 2002 [No link available]
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
This paper has been published as: 'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Chapter 6 in M. Corak (ed.), Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp:122-146. Details
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 517, January 2002

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Intergenerational mobility, an issue at the forefront of social policy, was the subject of an important one-day conference at the London School of Economics on June 23 2008. Programme details
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

Regen.net (London, UK)

Income only partly explains happiness

London School of Economics professor Richard Layard has been telling us the answer is no. Here in Britain we're six times more affluent than in the 1950s, but polls suggest we're a tad glummer.

This article appeared in Regen.net on July 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Southern Star (Cork, Ireland)

11th in World League Table!

There is some evidence, it seems, that wealth does not make you happy. Worse still, there is some evidence according to Richard Layard, the founder-director of the Centre for Economic Performance (based in the London School of Economics) that, in a cluster of western countries, rises in income per head do not cheer people up one little bit, but make them miserable.

This article appeared in The Southern Star (Cork, Ireland) on July 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Europe Tonight

Linda Yueh gave an interview discussing the impact of the Lisbon treaty on Asian economies.

This interview was shown on CNBC - Europe Tonight on July 1, 2008
[No link to interview available.]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The NHS at 60 - the cost of health

A series of four programmes to be broadcast on Tuesdays at 9-9.45am aimed at stimulating thinking about priorities for funding within the NHS, and to raise questions of public values.
LSE Emeritus Professor Richard Layard will be putting the case in the first programme for more funding of psychotherapy for people who are suffering from depression and Professor Sube Nanerjee from King's College will put the case for early intervention in cases of dementia. Dr Lawrence Phillips, Visiting Professor of Decision Sciences at the School will comment about the process of decision making for these competing treatments, in particular how competing values and differences in perspective can be accommodated in taking decisions.

This debate was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on July 1, 2008
Link to programme

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders A Report by the Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/07/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial News

Fear is the key to a vintage slump

That uncertainty in turn accounts for the substantial increase in the degree of financial market volatility, which is the subject of a paper by Nick Bloom wherein - like Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke - Bloom takes a long-range look at stock market volatility.

This article appeared in Financial News on June 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Esitmationa nd a 9/11 Simulation by Nick Bloom. Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Hang the high-speed train, just give commuters a seat

None of the proposed high-speed lines goes south of London. It’ll still be sardines all the way to Surbiton and beyond. That’s one reason why Tim Leunig, an independent expert on rail at the London School of Economics, is less than enamoured of high-speed plans. "They would be a complete waste of money," he says. Leunig argues that high-speed rail is fine for traffic between very large urban centres, such as London and Paris, but of little use in solving Britain’s capacity problem. "We need to get back to thinking about what our railway is for," he says. He notes that "about 70% of rail journeys begin or end in London, and the three busiest stations are Waterloo, Victoria and Liverpool Street".

This article appeared in the Times on June 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

UTV News (India)

Beat the street

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss inflation and interest rates in emerging markets June 27th and repeated over the weekend.

This interview was broadcast on UTV News (India) on June 27, 2008
[No link to interview]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

Grant winners

Forty-nine 2008 Postdoctoral Fellowships have been awarded by the British Academy across the humanities and social sciences. Award winner: Ralf Martin, London School of Economics - How to induce innovation to address climate change?

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement on June 26, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin in CentrePiece 11(3), Winter 2006
CEP Policy Analysis, Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies by Ralf Martin, February 2006

Related Links
Ralf Martin webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

eGov monitor

Local involvement leads to happier communities

The Wellbeing Project is jointly led by the Young Foundation, the Improvement and Development Agency and Professor Lord Richard Layard, from the London School of Economic's Centre for Economic Performance. A new report from the Local Wellbeing Project examines how active citizenship can contribute to wellbeing by investigating empowerment initiatives in three very different local authorities: Hertfordshire, Manchester and South Tyneside.

This article appeared in eGov monitor on June 26, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Report, Is There a Formula for Happy Communities? by Mandeep Hothi with Nicola Bacon, Marcia Brophy and Geoff Mulgan

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Young Foundation webpage


News Posted: 26/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC

Ten O'Clock News

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the prospects of the Chinese economy and impact on the UK.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC Ten O'Clock News on June 25, 2008
[No link to interview available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Will this man make you happy?

The government's 'happiness tsar', Richard Layard, thinks he knows why we're all so miserable - we're overpaid, over-materialistic and lonely. But, he tells Stuart Jeffries, he has a plan to banish the blues in Britain, once and for all. Professor Layard runs the Well-Being project at LSE.

This article appeared in the Guardian on June 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders from the Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 24/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Magazine Veja

O custo do ilusionismo econômico

Magazine Veja reviews Economia sem Truques by Carlos Eduardo Gonçalves and Bernardo Guimãraes, Elsevier, 2008.

The book teaches economics from its most basic principles. Due to its unusual examples and irreverent writing, it has been called the "Brazilian version of Freakonomics", but it is focused on important policy questions.

Press coverage includes:

News Posted: 24/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Newshour

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the outcome of the Jeddah oil summit.

The interview was broadcast on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's programme 'Newshour' on June 23, 2008
[No link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

China's reduction of energy subsidies

Linda Yueh was interviewed for both the BBC's 'World Business Report' and 'The World Today' programmes to discuss China's reduction of energy subsidies.

The interview was broadcast on two BBC World Service programmes - World Business Report & The World Today on June 19, 2008
[No link to interviews]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Asian banks' holdings

Linda Yueh was interviewed on Asian banks' holdings of US Treasuries.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on June 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

PetroChina

Linda Yueh interviewed on PetroChina’s bond issuance.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on June 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Conde Nast Portfolio (New York, NY, USA)

Happiness is...

In his 2005 book, Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, one of Britain's leading economists said, "We should monitor the development of happiness in our countries as closely as we monitor the development of income."

This article appeared in Conde Nast Portfolio (New York, NY, USA) on June 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Red Orbit (Dallas, TX, USA)

Disproportionality in special needs education in England

Ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic groups not only experience different educational and special educational outcomes, but in an unequal society, they also experience different social outcomes in terms of health, employment, income, and so on (see, e.g., Blanden, Gregg, & Machin, 2005;…)
CEP/Sutton Trust Report: 'Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America’ by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg, Alissa Goodman and Steve Machin referenced in article on disproportionality in special needs education research.

This article appeared Red Orbit (Dallas, TX, USA) on June 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Sutton Trust Report with CEP, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin, April 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Bright pupils missing out on university, study shows

About 60,000 school leavers a year who were among the highest academic performers in their class are failing to reach university, new research shows. Anna Vignoles, the lead researcher at the Institute of Education, University of London [and associate at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE], said: ‘This research shows clearly that the main reason why poorer students do not go to university to the same extent as their wealthier peers is that they have weaker academic achievement in school.’

This article appeared in the Guardian on June 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Marketing Magazine (Ireland)

Ads under attack

John Fanning questions the argument made by author Oliver James that advertising is a bad influence on society.
Although the subject of happiness and the fulfilled life have been discussed ever since man emerged as homo erectus, it has taken on a renewed lease of life since the Nobel Prize for economics was awarded for the first time to a psychologist, Daniel Kahneman, in 2002 for his studies in hedonic psychology and was the subject of British peer Richard Layard's Happiness: Lessons From a New Science.

This article appeared in Marketing Magazine (Ireland) on June 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Delivering on absence management at Royal Mail

A London School of Economics (LSE) report out last month found that between 2004-07, Royal Mail reduced absence rates for its 167,000-strong workforce from 7% to 5%. About 3,600 employees who had previously been absent were back at work, saving the group £227m.

This article appeared in Personnel Today on June 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 12/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

'Black Tuesday' - the Chinese investors (translation)

Linda Yueh was interviewed about China’s stock market volatility.

This article appeared in RBC Daily on June 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Finchannel.com

Is there a formula for happy communities?

A report from the Wellbeing Project, jointly led by Professor Lord Richard Layard, from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, shows if people can control the circumstances that affect their lives their wellbeing will be improved.

This article appeared in the Finchannel.com on June 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Report, Is There a Formula for Happy Communities? by Mandeep Hothi with Nicola Bacon, Marcia Brophy and Geoff Mulgan
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Young Foundation webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Further press cuttings
Thursday 12 June
LSE Briefing
Is there a formula for happy communities?
A report from the Wellbeing Project, jointly led by Professor Lord Richard Layard, from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, shows that if people can control the circumstances that affect their lives their wellbeing will be improved.

News Posted: 11/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

How do you survive as a greengrocer?

According to Dr Tim Leunig, small independent food shops are being replaced by small independent aromatherapists, cosmetic surgeons, weight control clinics, makeup artists, reflexologists and sauna parlours.

This article appeared in the Guardian on June 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC One

World Business Report

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss the agenda of the G77 + China conference.

This interview was broadcast on BBC One - World Business Report on June 10, 2008
[No link]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Pulse

How to...Influence commissioning of mental health care

Work by Lord Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, showed that mental health is Britain’s biggest social problem, costing 4% of the GDP. The political push he generated resulted in the introduction of the DHs Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme.

This article appeared in Pulse on June 9, 2008
Link to article (then subscribe)

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Boston Globe

Making friends

Since friendship offers so many benefits to individuals and society, some scholars argue that government has a role in promoting it. Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, is involved in an initiative in the UK called the Good Childhood Inquiry, which has deemed friendship one of the six criteria of a good childhood. Toward that end, it recommends play spaces for children and youth centres for adolescents.

This article appeared in The Boston Globe on June 9, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: Happiness and Values
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Wellbeing of Children Seminars: jointly organised by the CEP and The Children's Society as part of the The Good Childhood Enquiry.
Details

News Posted: 09/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Independent - Ireland

A trouble shared can be a trouble doubled

Just when happiness economist Richard Layard is trying to persuade the British to dispose of their stiff upper lips and embrace cognitive therapy, along come a crowd of Yanks telling them that that the Royals' mantra was right all along: "Don't explain, don't complain."

This article appeared in the Independent - Ireland on June 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Newshour

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss a meeting of the US and Asian powers on stabilizing oil prices.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service - Newshour on June 7, 2008
[No link]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily

Risks are greater than the profit

Linda Yueh was interviewed on risk in China’s real estate market.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on June 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

Nick Bloom’s column argues that the wave of uncertainty troubling the markets will likely induce a recession – and render policy instruments powerless to prevent it.

This article appeared online in Vox on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Wall Street Journal
Secondary sources: recession?, Obama bailout, $4 gas
Writing for the voxeu blog, Nicholas Bloom says that the credit crisis will likely lead to recession. “So the current situation is a perfect storm — a huge surge in uncertainty that is not only generating a rapid slowdown in activity but also limiting the effectiveness of standard monetary and fiscal policy to prevent this.”

Economist's View (blog site)
Will the credit crunch lead to recession?
Nick Bloom’s article argues that "A recession looks likely," and that policy won't be able to prevent it from happening.

Saturday 14 June
Kathimerini (Greece)
"The credit crisis will probably lead to widespread recession." Article by Nick Bloom on how the credit crunch is inevitable given the state of uncertainty in the markets.
Link to article

News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Resource Investor

Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

In an article for Resource Investor, Nick Bloom writes "Much like the credit crunch today, the Great Depression began with a stock market crash and a meltdown of the financial system."

This article appeared in Resource Investor (Herndon, VA, USA) on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Korea Herald

International employment forum opens in Seoul

A two-day international forum on employment began in Seoul yesterday to map out a plan for how to achieve job creation while promoting economic growth. Participants include Christopher Pissarides Norman Sosnow Chair in Economics at LSE.

This article appeared in the Korea Herald on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Chris Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

ThirdSector

Opinion: Our crucial role in tackling inequality

Last year, a report by the London School of Economics showed that parental background continues to exert a very powerful influence on the academic progress of children.

This article appeared in ThirdSector on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

More4 News

Interview

Linda Yueh discussed the global food summit in an interview.

This interview was broadcast on More4 News on June 3, 2008
[No link to article]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Chinesen und inder sind schlechte Manager - noch

Chinesische und indische Unternehmen sind im Durchschnitt deutlich schlechter geführt als Firmen aus Europa, zeigt eine neue Studie der London School of Economics. Aber die neuen Wettbewerber lernen schnell dazu. Wenn die Europäer nicht aufpassen, werden sie bald eingeholt.
[Translation: Chinese and Indian enterprises are on the average clearly more badly led than companies from Europe, show a new study London School of Economics. But the new competitors learn fast in addition. If the Europeans do not watch out, they are soon caught up.]

This article appeared in Handelsblatt on June 2, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Can Better Management Sustain Growth in China and India? by Nick Bloom and Rebecca Homkes in CentrePiece 13/1 Spring 2008

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Rebecca Homkes webpage
Productivity and Innovation research programme webpage
Anglo-German Foundation webpage

News Posted: 02/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Kiel Institute for the World Economy

Stephen Redding and Silvana Tenreyro selected as two of the winners of the 2008 Excellence Award in Global Economic Affairs

Dr Stephen Redding, programme director of the globalisation programme at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), and Silvana Tenreyro, lecturer in economics in the Department of Economics, LSE, have been selected as two of the winners of the 2008 Excellence Award in Global Economic Affairs by the Kiel Institute for the World Economy.

The aim of the award is to build a community of the brightest young researchers in the area of global economic affairs. The researchers are given intellectual, financial, and administrative support to pursue focused programmes of research in designated areas.

Dr Stephen Redding is currently director of the globalisation programme at the Centre for Economic Performance and a reader in the Economics Department, LSE, and a research fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research and the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Prior to joining LSE, he worked as a research economist at the Bank of England on the relationship between international openness and economic growth. He was awarded a Philip Leverhulme Prize Fellowship during 2001-04 for his research on international trade and economic growth.

Silvana Tenreyro has been at LSE since 2004, before which she worked as an economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. She is currently a research associate in the macro programme at the CEP and a research affiliate at the Centre for Economic and Policy Research. Her work on global affairs include 'Technological Diversification,' with Miklos Koren (CEP discussion paper 0824), 'The Timing of Monetary Policy Shocks' with G. Olivei (American Economic Review, 2007) and 'Volatility and Development,' with M. Koren (Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2007). She said: 'I am very grateful for the award.'

Danny Quah, head of the Economics Department and professor of economics said: 'Both these awards point to the tremendous contributions already made and yet to come still in these economists' exciting research on global economic affairs.'

The award will be presented at the Kiel Institute in June 2008. For further information on the award, see: http://www.ifw-kiel.de/prizes/eagea/eagea_e.htm



News Posted: 02/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

August Lösch Prize 2008

Frédéric Robert-Nicoud awarded prize for research in New Economic Geography

The City of Heidenheim an der Brenz and the August Lösch Association jointly grant the prestigious August Lösch Prize.

The prize was created in 1971 and first awarded in 1972 by the City of Heidenheim in honour of August Lösch (1906-1945), one of the founders of modern Regional Science, and a former citizen of Heidenheim.

The prize is intended to reward outstanding academic research in the field of Regional Science. The prize carries an award of Euro 4000. Joint recipients will share this amount.

The August Lösch Prize 2008 has been awarded to Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, Ph.D., London School of Economics and Political Science, for his research in the field of New Economic Geography.

The award ceremony will be in Kiel, July 5th, 11.00 a.m., at the German Library of Economics (ZBW), adjacent to the Kiel Institute for the World Economy.



News Posted: 02/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

LSE Magazine

Low social mobility in UK

Two articles on CEP research appear in the latest issue of LSE Magazine:
Low social mobility in UK
Social mobility in the UK remains at the low level it was for those born in 1970, with recent generations of children’s educational outcomes still overwhelmingly tied to their parents’ income. This is one of the key findings from a report by Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Stephen Machin of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, funded by the Sutton Trust.
p.33

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Can pay regulation kill?
Findings of research by Professor John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance and Carol Propper of Bristol University suggest that a ten per cent increase in the gap between the wages paid to NHS nurses and those paid to women working in the private sector locally raises the fatality rate among people admitted with a heart attack by five per cent.
p.34

Related Publications 'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance' by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research, Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online.

The articles appeared in LSE Magazine on June 1, 2008
Link to magazine

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Voice of America

China branch

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the economic implications of the Sichuan earthquake.

This interview was broadcast on the Voice of America (China branch) on May 31, 2008
[No link available]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Post (USA)

The gifts and costs of greed

But, as Richard Layard and others have pointed out so forcefully, this consumerism, this restless seeking after yet more possessions, does not make us happy.

This article appeared in The Washington Post on May 30, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 30/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

A star-studded cast

Profile of Nick Bloom, an associate in the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement on May 29, 2008
Link to article

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

How to feed the world

Tim Leunig writes: “We may not like nuclear power, tofu burgers or curtailing our chickens' freedom, but if that is the price we have to pay for fewer children in less developed countries to go to bed hungry, then that, surely, must be a price worth paying.”

This article appeared in the Guardian Comment section on May 28, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Newshour

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss Taiwan-China economic relations.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service - Newshour on May 26, 2008
[No link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Gym fixes it for Royal Mail absentees

A study by LSE this month claimed that if other UK business sectors with poor absence records adopted Royal Mail’s combination of health/rehabilitation programmes and rigorous absence monitoring, they could save £1.45 billion a year.

This article appeared in the Times on May 25, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the CEP Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 25/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily

Russian news

Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on the economic losses stemming from the earthquake in China:

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on May 22, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Planning Daily

Economist calls for cut in planning red tape

Planning laws should be relaxed in areas of intense housing demand so more homes can be built and to aid economic growth, an academic from the London School of Economics has argued. Tim Leunig, a lecturer in economic history, said in a report published this week that the lack of planning laws helped the economic boom of the nineteenth century in Britain.

This article appeared in Planning Daily online on May 21, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Where to Build Britain’s New Houses by Tim Leunig in CentrePiece 13/1 Spring 2008

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Pravda

O jedlo sa svet satial' nepobije

Linda Yueh quoted in an article on the global food crisis.

This article appeared in Pravda (Slovakia) on May 20, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Royal Mail health initiatives save £227m in three years

Royal Mail saved £227m in three years by providing health screening and physiotherapy for its employees. If other organisations followed suit it could save the UK as much as £1.5bn a year, a study by the London School of Economics (LSE) has suggested… the best and most trusted mail company in the world," said the report's author David Marsden, a professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in Personnel Today on May 20, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the CEP Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 20/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

The World Today

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss corruption in China and the Sichuan earthquake.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service - The World Today programme on May 19, 2008
[No link available]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further interviews
Monday 12 May
CNBC Europe Tonight
Discussing the economic implications of the earthquake in China.
Monday 19 May
BBC News Channel (formerly News 24)
Discussing the Chinese Government's handling of the Sichuan earthquake
Tuesday 20 May
BBC World Service - Hewshour
Discussing the economic implications of the Sichuan earthquake
[No links available]

News Posted: 19/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Miller-McCune .com, USA

Should the government make us happy?

The UK is doing more than any other [Western] country in the way of happiness policy, partly thanks to the efforts of Lord Richard Layard, a politician and economics professor who wrote Happiness: Lessons From a New Science, a virtual blueprint for happiness by government.

This article appeared online in Miller_McCune.com on May 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 19/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Irish Independent

Ireland's affluenza epidemic: would we want it any other way?

Economist Richard Layard wrote on this topic in Happiness: Lessons from a New Science where he cited the rise of mental illness and alcohol intake as indicators that all is not well in society.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent on May 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 18/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

PM's new homes 'not green enough'

The debate about where new homes should be built has raged for decades, but as economic historian Tim Leunig argues in a report to be published this week, Britain's planning laws are stifling economic growth. Leunig, a lecturer in economic history at the London School of Economics, argues that Britain could never have become the powerhouse of the industrial revolution if its towns and cities had been unable to expand at a blistering pace during the 19th century.

This article appeared in the Guardian on May 18, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Where to Build Britain’s New Houses by Tim Leunig in CentrePiece 13/1 Spring 2008

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Die Zeit

Asiatische Bosse überschätzen sich oft

A German news item on the CEP/McKinsey and Anglo-German Foundation research into management practices in China/India.

This article appeared in Die Zeit (Germany) on May 15, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Can Better Management Sustain Growth in China and India? by Nick Bloom and Rebecca Homkes in CentrePiece 13/1 Spring 2008

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Rebecca Homkes webpage
Productivity and Innovation research programme webpage
Anglo-German Foundation webpage

News Posted: 15/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

If you're richer, you're happier

Perhaps the most successful are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard and Affluenza by Oliver James but there has been a host of others.

This article appeared in the Times on May 14, 2008
Link to article.

Related Publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 14/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Politics Today

ESRC: Closing the productivity gap in Ireland

The ESRC Public Policy Seminar research briefing ‘Sub-sectoral productivity in Nothern Ireland’ is funded jointly by the ESRC and the DETI (Northern Ireland). The briefing accompanied a one-day seminar that explored the issue of Northern Ireland’s productivity held in Belfast on 22 April 2008.
The briefing featured presentations by the two seminar speakers Dr Chiara Criscuolo (BSc, MSc, PhD), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Professor Richard Harris (BA, MA, PhD), Director of the Centre for Public Policy for Regions (CPPR) and the Cairncross Professor of Applied Economics at the University of Glasgow.

This article appeared in Politics Today on May 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Chiara Criscuolo webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Further press cutting
Wednesday 14 May
Genetic Engineering News (New Rochelle, NY, USA)
Closing the productivity gap in Northern Ireland
The briefing features presentations by the two seminar speakers Dr Chiara Criscuolo (BSc, MSc, PhD), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.

News Posted: 13/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

La Repubblica

Classe dirigente, un flop manager e politici superpagati e inefficienti

Article in Italian newspaper presenting a chart taken from the management survey research carried out by Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in La Repubblica (Italy) on May 13, 2008
[No link available]

Related Publications
Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Details

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Further press cutting
Tuesday 27 May
Corriere Della Sera.It
[No link available]

News Posted: 13/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Class warriors who betrayed the underclass

A report last year by Professor Steve Machin, of the London School of Economics, showed that the expansion of higher education in the 1980s and 1990s entrenched social immobility because the poor's schools were not good enough to exploit new opportunities. Children from poor homes were found to be just as likely to under-perform now as 30 years ago, while the link between adults' education and that of their children is far stronger in Britain than in many other developed nations. The report said of social mobility: ‘The trend of worsening has stopped, but the UK remains very low in the developed world rankings.’

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on May 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Article also mentioned in
The Australian
Tuesday 13 May
The more things change, the more they stay the same

News Posted: 11/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sol 24 Ore

Quando il falco fa volare i tassi

Article cites the Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.855 by Carlo Rosa.
Nowadays market participants are facing a particularly uncertain and volatile economic environment. For this reason financial operators are increasingly paying attention to the communication made by central banks to get some clues about the future economic outlook. In this respect, central bank balance-of-risk statements are very important to better predict the monetary policy maker’s future moves, such as changes in policy rates. The fundamental question is whether all central bank declarations carry the same weight. New research by Carlo Rosa shows that the response of market interest rates to the surprise component of Fed announcements, i.e. the difference between what the Fed announces and what the market expects the Fed to announce, is much larger compared to the reaction induced by European Central Bank’s declarations. Why is it the case that the response of market rates to statements made by different central banks differ so greatly? Contrary to the conventional wisdom, I find that the Fed is more open and transparent than the ECB, and thus better able to steer asset prices in the desired direction.

This article appeared in Sol 24 Ore (Italy) on May 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Talking Less and Moving the Market More: Is this the Recipe for Monetary Policy Effectiveness? Evidence from the ECB and the Fed’ by Carlo Rosa, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.855, February 2008

Related links
Carlo Rosa webpage
Macro Programme webpage

Also appeared in:
Faz (Germany)
Tuesday 6 May
(No link available)

News Posted: 10/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta

Promoting resilience in the classroom

As the eminent British economist Richard Layard says in his recent theory on the science of happiness, happy and socially competent individuals are in the end more productive in both schools and society.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta on May 9, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 09/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Hong Kong places on the yuan (translated from Russian)

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the increase in transaction fees for RMB purchases in relation to China's portfolio flows.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on May 8, 2008
Link to article

Related links Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Britain to set tougher rules on recruiting migrant labour

Jobs to be classed as ‘shortage occupations’ will be decided by a new migration advisory committee headed by David Metcalf, professor of industrial relations at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the the Financial Times on May 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Journal of Turkish Weekly

Book Review - What makes a terrorist: economics and the root causes of terrorism

Alan B Krueger, economy professor at Princeton University and adviser to the US National Counterterrorism Center, studies the effects of poverty and lack of education on terrorism in What Makes a Terrorist. The author bases his book on three lectures he gave at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2006.

This article appeared in the Journal of Turkish Weekly on May 6, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Alan Krueger webpage
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview
Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consequences'
Details

News Posted: 06/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

Risks mount for stressed traders as markets gyrate

Two Citigroup workers , including a trader, fell from office blocks in London and Miami in 2006. ‘The pressure on traders when the market goes wrong is always huge,’ said Tim Leunig, a lecturer in the economic history department at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). ‘There will be a lot of bitten fingernails today. It is exactly the same, you can lose you job, your standard of living and you won't get it back, that's pressure.’

This article appeared in Reuters news on May 5, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also in
Birmingham Post
Rise in suicides as credit crunch stress gets to traders

News Posted: 05/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

British Journal of Psychiatry

Invited commentary on ... Proposals for massive expansion of psychological therapies would be counterproductive across society

Although at face value the motion concerns the validity of our concepts of mental illness and whether mass cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) in [Richard] Layard will lead to greater happiness.

This article appeared in the British Journal of Psychiatry on May 2, 2008
Open and subscribe

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 02/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Health Insurance and Protection

Tackling absence 'would save £1.45bn a year'

Addressing sickness absence rates in the worst performing industry sectors would save the economy £1.45bn a year, a report has estimated. The study by the London School of Economics (LSE) assessed the effects of a £46m sickness absence management programme introduced by Royal Mail.

This article appeared in Health Insurance and Protection on May 2, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 02/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Royal Mail strategy to tackle sick days reaps big savings

Royal Mail has saved many times the cost of a 46m ($91m) investment in sickness absence management in a programme that could generate savings of 1.45bn a year if applied to the worst-affected parts of the economy, according to a new LSE report. Article includes comments from Professor David Marsden who conducted the research.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 2, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, ‘Value of Rude Health’ by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the CEP Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 02/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Prospect magazine, Issue 146 May 2008

Safe as houses

In his article, Tim Leunig predicts that average house prices will not fall by more than 10 per cent over the next year, and in five years they will be higher in real terms than today.

This article appeared in Prospect Magazine, Issue 146, May 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Clinics at work cut sicknotes, says study

David Marsden, a professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said there would be a huge bonus for the economy if similar schemes could be introduced in the 13 industrial sectors with the poorest occupational health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on May 1, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

News Posted: 01/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Happy mediums

Western developed nations are facing a growing problem of adolescent depression, which has huge costs to wellbeing, educational achievement and, ultimately, economic competitiveness. The answer, Martin Seligman has suggested is to get to children early enough, and provide them with emotional skills to handle the ups and downs of teenage years. His work has caught the interest of the economist Lord (Richard) Layard, and of Geoff Mulgan, director of the Young Foundation, who are working with South Tyneside, Manchester and Hertfordshire to develop a programme of work in their Local Wellbeing Project.

This article appeared in the Guardian on April 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders, The Centre for Economic Perormance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge, ‘The Teaching of Values’, by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
The Local Wellbeing Project
The Local Wellbeing Project brings together the Young Foundation with the UK’s foremost expert on practical ways to increase happiness, Professor Lord Richard Layard from the LSE and the Improvement and Development Agency (IDeA), leaders in local government innovation. Hertfordshire, Manchester and South Tyneside local authorities have signed up as project partners.

News Posted: 30/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Slate - USA

The doctor is in your PC

In June 2006, a policy group at LSE led by Lord Richard Layard, a Labor peer, economist, and the author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, announced that mental illness was incapacitating the country.

This article appeared in the Slate magazine on April 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders, The Centre for Economic Perormance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

ajc.com

SINGLE PARENTING: Some richer, some poorer

A numbers game: Divorce isn't necessarily a ticket to poverty, but it does widen the income gap.

This article appeared on ajc.com on the 24th April 2008.
Link to article .

Related Publications
The Effect of Marital Breakup on the Income Distribution of Women with Children’, Guy Michaels and Elizabeth O. Ananat
Published in Journal of Human Resources, 43(3):611-629 (2008).
Previous version published as Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 787, April 2008

Related Links
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets webpage

Also published in:
Baltimore Sun - Apr 27, 2008
Raleigh News and Observer - Apr 30, 2008
South Carolina State - Apr 25, 2008
Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel - May 2, 2008

News Posted: 24/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

People Management

HRD 2008: Influx of Chinese talent 'a mixed blessing'

Linda Yueh’s recent speech at the Human Resource Development 2008 Conference was covered in People Management magazine. (subscribe to access full article)

This article appeared in the People Management magazine on April 18, 2008
Link to article and subscribe

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today programme

Professor Richard Layard appeared on the programme discussing a new film called ‘Happy Go Lucky’ with the director of the film, Mike Leigh. Professor Layard is emeritus professor of economics at London School of Economics and founder of the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 - The Today Programme on April 18, 2008
Link to interview

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 18/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

New York Times - 'Freakonomics' Blog

The economics of happiness, Part 2: Are rich countries happier than poor countries?

Richard Layard has argued that “there is no evidence that richer countries are happier than poorer ones — so long as we confine ourselves to countries with incomes over $15,000 per head.”

This article appeared in the New York Times - 'Freakonomics' Blog page on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage


News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on China's new banking regulations.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Visible measure that help reduce absenteeism

According to a London School of Economics' analysis of health and well-being policies across the group, such initiatives have saved the Royal Mail as much as £227m over three years by cutting absence across its 180,000 strong workforce from seven to just under five per cent between 2004 and 2007.

The article is referring to the Centre for Economic Performance Royal Mail study by David Marsden.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 17, 2008
[No working link available]

Related Publications
'Human Resource Practices and Employment Stability: Evidence from the European Structure of Earning Survey - ESES', by Simone Moriconi and David Marsden, work in progress
'Incentive Pay Systems and the Management of Human Resources in France and Great Britain', by Richard Belfield, Salima Benhamou and David Marsden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.796, May 2007

Related links
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Pay Inequalities and Economic Performance (PIEP) Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times - Adviser

A perfect storm is brewing

Article by Nicolas Bloom, fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.
"One of the most outstanding effects of the recent credit crunch is the huge surge in stock market volatility. Going back 70 years to the Great Depression - this was the last time that volatility was persistently high."

This article appeared in the Financial Times Adviser Online on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Will the credit crunch lead to recession?’ by Nick Bloom.
Article in forthcoming CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, May 2008.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage


News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed commenting on China's sovereign wealth fund investments in energy companies such as BP and Total.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on April 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Haaretz.com (Israel)

Private attorneys in the service of the state

Article written by Eran Yashiv discusses how money buys good defense and how a government's failure to invest in excellent professionals is detrimental to the state. The author is an associate professor of economics at Tel Aviv University and a research fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in
Link to article

Related links
Eran Yashiv webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

NY Times - Freakonomics

The fiscal costs of marriage and divorce

This morning’s inbox leads me to two observations: 1) There is some excellent research out there about marriage and divorce. 2) There is no shortage of ways for imaginative advocates to distort the findings of this research. Let me begin with the first point: an intriguing paper by Elizabeth Ananat and Guy Michaels, forthcoming in the Journal of Human Resources.

This article appeared in the New York Times on the 15th April 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 15/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Voice of America

Business scene

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the UK’s more welcoming stance of Chinese sovereign wealth fund investments.

This interview was broadcast on Voice of America (radio) - Business Scene on April 15, 2008
[No link available.]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further media appearances
Wednesday 16 April
Dawn TV - News Eye (Pakistan)
Linda Yueh appeared to discuss China-Pakistan economic relations.
[No link available.]

News Posted: 15/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

CEP Achievements

Richard Layard one of only four 'non-American' Fellows

We would like to congratulate Professor Richard Layard who has been elected to become a Fellow of the Society of Labor Economists (SOLE). By the honorary title of Fellow, the Society recognizes labor economists who have made contributions of unusual distinction to the field. Fellows are selected through a process of nomination and election by previous Fellows.

The newly elected Fellows will be publicly announced at the SOLE meeting being held in New York on 9-10 May 2008.
Details and Programme

Richard Layard is Programme Director of the Wellbeing Research Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.

News Posted: 15/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

CBC.CA News (Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

Tired of looking on the bright side? Me too, I think (Richard Handler: The ideas guy)

I reach for Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. He is no mere psychologist. He is an economist who has aptly summarized all the research in this field. He also sits in Britain's House of Lords. This is a very upbeat book for an economist. But then, the investigative side of me wants to conclude, sitting in the House of Lords must have its advantages.

This article appeared in CBC.ca News (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) on April 15, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 15/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Left behind, and unhappier

Comment by Jonathan Rutherford that includes references to research from CEP with the Sutton Trust on social mobility; the Good Childhood Enquiry (CEP Well-being of Children Seminars beginning Summer 2008) and CEP research for The Primary Review (University of Cambridge).

This article appeared in the Guardian on April 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Summary of the Report download
Aims for Primary Education: The Changing National Context. Primary Review Research Survey 1/3, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, January 2008

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage
Well-being of Children Seminars webpage

News Posted: 14/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Cost of living

Just because a pay arrangement offends against the principles espoused in economic textbooks does not mean that it is a problem in practice. It is not easy to prove that the theoretical concern is a practical problem, but researchers – Emma Hall and Carol Propper of the University of Bristol, along with John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance have convincingly done so using data from 1996-2001.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

ABC Radio International

Smoking economics

Smoking bans in public places are often just shifting the problem, according to an international researcher. UK economist Francesca Cornaglia has analysed American data and found that non-smokers at home, including children, are the losers, given that smokers are prevented from smoking in restaurants, cinemas and the like.

This interview was broadcast on ABC Radio International - 'Life Matters' on April 9, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

Related links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

News-Medical.net (Australia)

Smoking bans and taxes, do they work

Dr Francesca Cornaglia, an economist, says smoking bans in bars and restaurants could be forcing smokers back to home.

This article appeared in News-Medical.net (Australia) on April 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

Related links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


Further press cuttings
The Age (Australia)
No smoking: the drawbacks
Tax hikes on cigarettes may not improve the health of smokers, because smokers compensate by extracting more nicotine from each cigarette, according to research by British economists Francesca Cornaglia and Jerome Adda.

News.com.au (Australia)
Pub smoking bans 'may be harming kids'
Research by economist Francesca Cornaglia has found higher levels of passive smoking among children in the US since bans on smoking in pubs and restaurants.

News Posted: 08/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Richer, healthier but not happier

Article by Steve Schifferes (Economics Reporter, BBC) that refers to research on social mobility from the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared on BBC News online on April 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Summary of the Report download

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage


News Posted: 08/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Fund Strategy

Asia experts see good prospects despite recent falls

Article covering a recent speech by Linda Yueh in which she focused on the macroeconomic side of recent developments in China.

This article appeared in Fund Strategy magazine on April 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

ABC News online (Australia)

Cigarette price hike 'leads to more intense smoking'

Francesca Cornaglia spoke at the Australian National University in Canberra to challenge several policies aimed at reducing the harm associated with smoking.

This article appeared on ABC News online (Australia) on April 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

Related links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 07/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liberal Democrats - London, UK

Government must wake up to cost of mental health

Danny Alexander writes "Richard Layard’s report highlighted the cost of mental health four years ago, yet the Government is still commissioning reviews rather than tackling the problem."

This article appeared in Liberal Democrats - London, UK on March 17, 2008
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Christina Patterson: Britons long for sunshine (but know it will rain)

Richard Layard's Happiness: Lessons from a New Science was hailed by Mr Balls as "seminal" and by fellow Etonian David Cameron as "a powerful case that public policy should not be oriented towards maximising wealth, but rather towards increasing happiness".

This article appeared in the Independent on March 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

In the line of fire when push comes to shove

Armies of arbitrators may be required if local pay in the health service takes off. Writing in Health Service Journal , Simon Stevens, a visiting professor at the London School of Economics, quotes research that suggests centralised pay-setting for NHS nurses can lead to higher death rates and lower productivity in some areas. The onus, and the power, to resolve the situation lies with foundation trusts, Stevens says. Nursing unions may need convincing.

This article appeared in the Times on March 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press Release on LSE Press and Information News webpage.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Mehr Wettbewerb kann töen - zentrale Lohnfindung auch

Competition study covered in the "Wissenswert" column, together with a related study by Carol Propper, Emma Hall and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on March 3, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Is it worth it?

Researchers at the Centre for the Economics of Education have used data on earnings, social class and education to distinguish the effects of private schooling from other advantages that students at such schools may enjoy (such as having richer, better-educated parents). Francis Green, one of the researchers said “Private education is a consumption good, not just an investment. Long gone are the days of spartan dormitories and cold showers—kids in the private sector now have fabulous science labs and sports facilities, and access to a huge range of subjects and activities.”

This article appeared in the Economist on February 28, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for private and state school teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Le Temps

Ça pourrait être pire; Affaires intérieures

En 2005, par exemple, un conseiller du gouvernement britannique, par ailleurs professeur à la London School of Economics, Richard Layard, recommanda d'inscrire la recherche du bonheur en tête du manifeste du parti travailliste. C'était une piste, volontariste, trop avant-gardiste cependant pour être adoptée. (Source: Lexis)

This article appeared in Le Temp on February 27, 2008
[No link to article.]

Related publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

SMOKING DURING PREGNANCY:

A clarification of the findings of the recent study by Centre for Economic Performance researcher Emma Tominey

The findings of my publicly funded research on the effects of smoking during pregnancy on babies' birth weighthave been widely misinterpreted.

To be absolutely clear, the study does not conclude that it is harmless for mothers to smoke during pregnancy.

On the contrary, I find that mothers who smoke during pregnancy will give birth to babies of poorer health. Mothers should therefore be encouraged to quit for the entire duration of their pregnancy.

My analysis of data on the lives of 6,500 children and their mothers indicates a negative impact of maternal smoking on babies’ health whatever the level of education a mother has attained. But smoking is especially damaging for mothers who leave school by the age of 16. These are also the mothers most likely to smoke during pregnancy.

This means that policy should be targeted towards these mothers, who need extra help to quit smoking. It does not mean that more educated"middle class" women are not at risk - it merely means that their risk is lower than that of less educated women.

And it is certainly not the case that mothers can smoke for the first five months of pregnancy, as smoking during pregnancy damages the health of the child.

The largest ill effects of smoking are experienced by babies born to mothers who smoke for the entire nine months of pregnancy. On the other hand, if mothers alter their lifestyle during the first five months, which includes quitting smoking, then they can improve the birth weight of their child.

One reason for this finding could be that babies gain most of their body weight during the last trimester of pregnancy. To understand how the harm accumulates during pregnancy, we would have to look at other outcomes as well as at birth weight, such as child asthma and sudden infant death syndrome, which other studies show to be driven by maternal smoking during pregnancy.

There are important policy messages to draw from this research. Smoking cessation policies alone are not enough; help is also needed for mothers to address many other issues including nutrition and alcohol avoidance. Lower educated mothers should be a particular focus.

Finally, it is important that mothers keep trying to quit smoking throughout their entire pregnancy, as there is more time to help smoking mothers quit than we thought.
Notes
  1. In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy (http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp241.pdf) by Emma Tominey was published in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3 Winter 2007/08. CentrePiece is the magazine of the Centre for Economic Performance. It is published three times a year. Cover price £5; subscription rates on application to +44 (0)20 7955 6963.
  2. The Centre for Economic Performance is an independent ESRC funded research centre based at the London School of Economics. Its members are from the LSE and a wide range of universities within the UK and around the world.
  3. For more information contact Emma Tominey on mobile number 07723363680; Email: e.p.tominey@lse.ac.uk; e.tominey@ucl.ac.uk or Helen Durrant on +44 (0)20 7955 7395; Email: h.durrant@lse.ac.uk.




News Posted: 27/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Middle-class criminals cost millions in taxes

The hidden economy has increased at a rapid rate in the past few years, especially among affluent home-owners, according to Professor Christopher Pissarides, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. One of his studies found that most self-employed people who declared average earnings of £35,000 had similar spending patterns as PAYE employees who earned £50,000, suggesting that a significant amount of the self-employed's earnings - the cash payments - had not been not declared.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on February 25, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Pissarides, C.A. and Weber, G. (1989), An Expenditure-based Estimate of Britain’s Black Economy, Journal of Public Economics, 39, 17-32.

Related links
Chris Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Closer look at peer groups

Does segregation matter? It’s a question hanging in the air this week after research by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. The study suggests that low-achieving pupils go to low-ranking schools – and high achievers go to high-ranking schools. Researchers Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj say, in CentrePiece (Winter 2008): ‘The average ability of pupils going into the “best” comprehensive schools is way above the average ability in the worst.’ In religious and grammar schools the difference is even more marked.

This article appeared in the Times on February 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Times

The week's news in review - Smoking risk to babies

Middle-class women who smoke while pregnant do little harm to their unborn babies. Smokers from poorer backgrounds do risk damage to their children, but only because they combine cigarettes with alcohol and a poor diet. Emma Tominey, from the London School of Economics, studied data on 3,368 mothers and 6,860 children taken between 1973 and 2000. Smoking during pregnancy reduced birth weight by 5.6 per cent, but when adjusted for other factors it accounted for just 1.8 per cent.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on February 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE Publications webpage

Also in
The Sunday Times
This divorce payout madness is getting out of control - Comment by Rod Liddle (Scroll down)
Women who smoke during the first five months of pregnancy do not harm their babies at all – and if they smoke during the latter stages of pregnancy the effect upon their unborn child is “negligible”, provided they eat decent food.

Monday 18 February
The Star, South Africa
Smoking in pregnancy harmless - for the rich
Middle-class women who smoke in early pregnancy do almost no harm to their unborn baby. A new study has concluded that only women from poorer backgrounds damage their babies by smoking, because they tend to combine it with alcohol and a poor diet. The study by the London School of Economics also casts doubt on the traditional view that smoking during early pregnancy does the most harm to the baby.
Access by subscription

News Posted: 17/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Kiddicare - Peterborough, UK

New research downplays impact of smokingi n pregnancy

In her research report, Emma Tominey, research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, conceded however that smoking is not completely harmless.

This article appeared in Kiddicare - Peterborough, UK on February 15, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Further press cutting
Thursday 14 February
Tobacco.org
Smoking during pregnancy hurts poor most
A British report suggests smoking while pregnant may be less damaging to a foetus than many people have been led to believe. Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said the effects are almost negligible if women stop smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, The Times reported Thursday.

News Posted: 15/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - UK

Top state schools 'take the best'

The pattern has emerged because of a "lack of choice", say researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance, based in London.

This article appeared on BBC News - UK on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
ATL (the Education Union) News
Top schools 'cream off' pupils
Research conducted by the Centre for Economic Performance has shown that faith and grammar schools take the best pupils at age 11.

News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post - New York, NY, USA

The media lucky sperm club

A new book titled Management Practice & Productivity: Why They Matter, is based on a study by Nick Bloom …, and John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post - New York, NY, USA on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Bloom, Dowdy, Dorgan and Van Reenen (2007), Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter
For full details of the survey methodology, including all the questions, see Bloom and Van Reenen (2006), ‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices across Firms and Nations’, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 716 and forthcoming in the Quarterly Journal of Economics
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Nick Bloom’s Management Practices Publication webpage

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Full steam ahead?

“When economic uncertainty increases, you have this temporary freeze,” says Nick Bloom.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

State schools are being 'divided along class lines into grammars or ghettos'

While grammars select pupils using an ability test open to all, top performing comprehensives tend to be located in affluent areas and effectively select by mortgage the London School of Economics warns.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Also in
Evening Standard
State schools are being 'divided along class lines into grammars or ghettos'
Many comprehensives are either ‘grammars’ or ‘ghettos’ because schools are still divided by ability, a study says today. Bright children from better-off backgrounds do well in sought-after comprehensives while pupils in poor areas tend to end up struggling in low-performing sink schools. The divide shows little sign of diminishing despite years of Labour policies aimed at boosting social mobility, say researchers from the London School of Economics.

News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Top state schools 'still skim off the best pupils'

Children from middle-class backgrounds are still dominating the best state schools, an authoritative report has claimed. The study by the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the London School of Economics, lays bare the failings of the comprehensive education system. Faith-based secondary schools and grammar schools cherry-pick the most talented children at the age of 11, the reports says.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

We don't need any more immigrants, says Labour adviser

Adair Turner outlined his views in a speech to the Centre for Economic Performance last year and submitted them to the Lords economic affairs committee.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Adair Turner is an Associate of the Centre for Economic Performance Policy Committee
Adair Turner webpage

News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Business Zone

We have to stop meeting like this

In fact, the same survey mentioned earlier revealed that employees believe 37% of the meetings they attend do not need to be conducted face-to-face, and can in fact be counter-productive. In addition, with further research from the London School of Economics showing that overall UK productivity is lower than in industrial rivals such as France, Germany and the US, perhaps it is time we re-evaluated just how many meetings we attend.

This article appeared in Business Zone on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

China investment

Linda Yueh gave an interview to journalist Vladimir Pavlov on the investment strategy of China’s sovereign wealth fund.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on February 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Hard work ahead to promote apprenticeships

In an article co-written with Iain Vallance (former president of CBI), Professor Richard Layard says: "Now at last a government has acknowledged that for very many people the best way to learn is while earning - through apprenticeship. It is this, linked to part-time education relevant to the job, that is going to close our skills gap."

This article appeared in the Financial Times on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Little India

What price happiness?

Says Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics and author of the 2005 book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science: ‘People don't want to think they live in a world of ruthless competition where everyone is against everyone. Valuable things are being lost, such as community values, solidarity.’

This article appeared in Little India online on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

Further press cuttings
Monday 11 February
Daily Telegraph
Family holidays: the expert's advice
Holidays, according to Professor Richard Layard, author of Happiness: A New Science, are vital to personal wellbeing. They are also, he says, extremely important for families.

News Posted: 10/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Paying the price

Hospitals in London and the south-east are having big problems recruiting and retaining permanent nurses because of centralised wage scales, say professors Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, with fatal consequences for patient care.

This article appeared in the Guardian on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press Release on LSE Press and Information News webpage.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Business

Job creation schemes

Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Houston Chronicle

Two experts see housing slump just beginning

The U.S. and European economic slowdown that may follow doesn't appear to be a threat to the surging Chinese economy, however, said Linda Yueh, an economics professor at the University of Oxford in England. China's economy will continue to grow even as exports fall.

This article appeared in the Houston Chronicle on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Who wants a recession

John van Reenen director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, calls that weeding-out process "creative destruction".

This article appeared in the Guardian on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Observer

Why too much care for your child can harm society

A recent London School of Economics report shows that Britain has the highest number of family firms managed by children of the founder; it is a managerial disaster, a potent explanation of our poor productivity. Few think to challenge the practice or endorse the call for higher inheritance tax to check it.

This article appeared in the Observer on February 3, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom, CEP Policy Analysis
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Connecting to the centre

Among developments that will benefit from the Tube extension are The Interchange at Dalston, a block of 34 flats; and the canalside 19-unit Union Wharf in Haggerston, both developed by Young Property. During the planning phase, Young commissioned research from the London School of Economics into the effect of new Tube stations on house prices. According to the statistics, which looked at the two most recent additions to London’s metropolitan railway network, the Jubilee line extension and the building of the Docklands Light Railway, new stations bring an uplift of about 7 per cent in property prices over and above the general market growth; and prices fall by 1.5 per cent for every kilometre further away you are from a station.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on February 1, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Valuing Rail Access Using Transport Innovations by Steve Gibbons and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 611, January 2004

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Financial Times
Bringing the suburbs closer
Dr Steve Gibbons, of the London School of Economics, recently published research into the effect of proximity to metropolitan railway stations on the price of houses. ‘Residential properties within walking distance of rail stations attract a significant price premium,’ he says. ‘Prices increase by about nine percentage points for each kilometre move towards a London Underground station or Docklands Light Railway station.’

Monday 4 February
Sydenham Town (Community website)
Good news for commuters
A new report from Dr Steve Gibbons shows the expected increases in property prices expected from proximity to metropolitan railway stations.

News Posted: 01/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4 - News

Factcheck: More police, less crime under Labour?

The effects of extra police on crime are surprisingly slippery to measure, says Olivier Marie, an LSE Research Economist at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared on C4 News on January 31, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can More Police Resources Reduce Crime? by Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005
CEP Election Analysis, Reducing Crime: More Police, More Prisons or More Pay? by Olivier Marie, April 2005
'Crime and Police Resources: The Street Crime Initiative' by Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.680, March 2005
'Crime and Benefit Sanctions' by Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.645, August 2004

Related links
Olivier Marie webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Press Association

Schools policy 'causes segregation'

Dr Steve Gibbons, research associate at the London School of Economics, said increasing competition between schools led to more social segregation. ‘There is some evidence that competition works but the bulk of the evidence internationally suggests that it doesn't,’ Dr Gibbons told the House of Commons schools select committee. His own research focusing on primary schools found that giving parents more choice and encouraging schools to compete for pupils could increase divisions between rich and poor.

This article appeared in Press Association on January 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Educational Impact of Parental Choice and School Competition by Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006/07
Choice, Competition and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No. 56, January 2006
'Competition and Accessibility in School Markets: Empirical Analysis Using Boundary Discontinuities' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, in Improving School Accountability: Check-ups or Choice edited by Timothy Gronberg and Dennis Jansen (Elsevier)
‘Urban Density and Pupil Attainment’ by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No. 80, May 2007


Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Steve Gibbons Publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Handing it down

Nick Bloom has studied the management of family firms where the father passes the business on to the eldest son. “We looked at 5,000 companies and we found that around a third of the medium-sized manufacturing firms were family owned. In about half of them the eldest son was the CEO. They are very badly managed.”

This article appeared on BBC News on January 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

News Posted: 29/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

THES

London School of Economics - Spatial economics gets centre

A new Centre for Spatial Economics is to be established at the London School of Economics. The centre, which has received funding of £2.4 million over an initial three years from a number of partners including the Economic and Social Research Council, will look at why there are disparities in economic growth at regional, city and local levels. Henry Overman, who is based at the LSE, has been named director of the new centre. Researchers from the universities of Newcastle, Glasgow, Oxford and Swansea will join the programme, which has been funded by the Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform, the Department for Communities and Local Government and the Welsh Assembly Government.

This article appeared in the THES on January 24, 2008
Link to article

Related links
Henry Overman is currently deputy director of CEP's Globalisation Programme.
Henry Overman webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

Two cheers for Wall Street

Nick Bloom quoted in article discussing the possible reasons for and future outcome of the current crisis for the US economy.

This article appeared in the New York Times on January 25, 2008
Link to article

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Paying a deadly price

Researchers — Emma Hall and Carol Propper of Bristol University, and John Van Reenen of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance — investigate the impact on medical care of imposing virtually uniform pay rates in the NHS throughout England, even though wages in the private sector vary widely among regions.

This article appeared in The Economist on January 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press Release on LSE Press and Information News webpage.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage

Further press cuttings
Wednesday 23 January
Guardian - Policy briefs
Pay problems for nurses
New research from the Centre for Economic Performance paints a bleak picture of how centralised pay for nurses impacts on patient care.
[No link available]

News Posted: 24/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Miller-McCune .com, USA

Urban sprawl increasing after all

Article refers to research conducted in 2006 by Dr Henry Overman, LSE, into residential development.

This article appeared in Miller-McCune.com, USA online on January 23, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Magazine article, In brief: Fat City: Does Urban Sprawl Lead to Human Sprawl? by Henry G. Overman, December 2006
CentrePiece 11 (3) Winter 2006 pages: 25
‘Fat City: the Relationship between urban sprawl and obesity’ by Jean Eid, Henry Overman, Diego Puga and Matthew Turner, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.758, November 2006

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Diego Puga webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

NHS pay system puts lives at risk in the south

Centralised pay settlements in the NHS are killing patients because hospitals cannot recruit sufficient skilled staff, according to leading economists. Wage controls under which nurses’ pay is set with relatively little extra for working in London or the south-east mean that hospitals in these high-cost areas struggle to recruit and retain staff, according to Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, professors at Bristol University’s Centre for Market and Public Organisation and the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on January 22, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press release on the LSE Press and Information Office News webpage

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage

Also in
Times
Nurses' low pay 'fatal in rich areas'
Hospitals in prosperous areas treat fewer patients and have worse results than those in poorer areas, says a team from Bristol and London in a report for the Centre for Economic Performance and the Centre for Market and Public Organisation.

News Posted: 22/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Gated developments: a scourge on society?

Lord Layard, a key government adviser on social issues and emeritus professor at the London School of Economics, is horrified by the rising popularity of gated communities. ‘The need to build, and the desire to live in, these gated communities is a terrible reflection on society,’ he says, adding that the idea of barriers blocking off roads that were once public was ‘scandalous’. ‘Demonstrating a lack of trust breeds an even further lack of trust,’ he says. ‘It is self-replicating.’

This article appeared in the Times January 20, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh gave an interview on China's potential investment in the UK.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 20, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Private schools' gain over state?

Now, though, new research from economists at the London School of Economics has highlighted one measurable way in which state schools are losing a valuable resource, namely teachers, to the independent sector. In their study of Competition for Private and State School Teachers, the LSE economists argue that there is a ‘loss’ to state schools, and an equivalent ‘bonus’ to private schools, in the net flow of publicly-trained teachers into the private sector.

This article appeared on BBC News on January 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for Private and State School Teachers by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 94, January 2008
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Failure to teach three Rs 'damaging economy'

Researchers at the London School of Economics say that children from working class areas are being sent to the worst schools and are struggling to master basic literacy and numeracy.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on January 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Birmingham Post
A huge contribution to the economy of the region
The university's [Birmingham] economic impact on Birmingham and the West Midlands is particularly interesting in the light of a study published last week, which says Britain is less productive than France, Germany and the United States because primary school children are failing to master the three Rs. Apparently, our workers' output is up to 25 per cent lower because they have failed to develop literacy and numeracy skills by the time they leave school. The study, by experts at the London School of Economics, found that a good grounding in basic skills at primary school is crucial to later success in the workplace.
[No link available]

News Posted: 19/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Scrapping admissions system would 'reduce inequality'

Scrapping the school admissions system that allocates places by postcode would help reduce inequality in achievement between rich and poor pupils, according to research published today by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally.

This article appeared in the Guardian on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Guardian
Minister warns schools accused of breaking law on admissions
A paper commissioned by the independent Alexander inquiry into primary education in England says that scrapping the system would do much "to level the playing field". Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally of London University argue that the home advantage "discriminates in favour of those who can afford to choose exactly where they live".

News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.

News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Which skills are vital to the British economy?

Britain's productivity lags as much as 25 per cent behind economic competitors such as Germany, France and the United States because workers lack basic skills in reading, writing and arithmetic, according to a report by researchers at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
IntheNews.uk
Primary schools 'need debate'
Concentrating on educating children so they can help Britain compete in the global economy may have its drawbacks, the Primary Review has warned.

News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Schools' failure at three R's is 'putting the economy at risk'

A study, by experts at the London School of Economics, found a good grounding in the three Rs at primary school is crucial to later success in the workplace.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Article also appeared in:
This is Money.co.uk
Economy 'at risk' from failure at three Rs
ThisisLondon.co.uk
Schools' failure at three R's is 'putting the economy at risk

News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Men 'find it harder to climb social ladder'

Men's chances of rising up the social scale in Britain have stalled because of greater competition from women and a slower rate of growth for top jobs, a study published yesterday by Oxford University reported. Their report is embarrassing for the Government, coming on the back of research by the London School of Economics that said the potential for children born in 2000 to move to a higher income bracket than their parents was as low as it was for children born in 1970.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on January 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Original 2005 Sutton Trust Report – Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Times

Private education boosts income

Attending a private school can boost your income by nearly 20 per cent. Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at the earning power of those born in 1958 and 1970. They found that the better teachers and smaller classes offered by independent schools were worth 19 per cent in extra income. By 2000, those educated in the private sector were earning about £ 5,000 a year more than their state school colleagues.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times January 13, 2008
[No link.]

Related Publications
Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper No.94, ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu.
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, paper by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu
The research on independent schools – ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ and ‘The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education’, two studies by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu – were presented at a Nuffield Foundation seminar in Oxford on Friday 11 January 2008.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
'The Economic Role of Independent Schools in Britain' research project webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Private schools still 'reproduce inequalities'

Francis Green and co-author Stephen Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) and professor of economics at University College London, say: "Since selection into the [independent schools], despite some bursaries and the assisted places scheme, is primarily based on families' ability to pay, and given the substantial returns achieved, it is hard to escape the conclusion that private schools have served to reproduce inequalities in British society."

This article appeared in the Guardian on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Competition for Private and State School Teachers' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008
'The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

A private education can boost earnings by a fifth

Academics at the London School of Economics said the private school "premium" of better exam results and admission to the top universities was worth 19 per cent in extra income to pupils, irrespective of parents' wealth. Professor Francis Green's (Centre for the Economics of Education) research shows that the gap between the independent and state sectors has been increasing over the past 50 years as above-inflation fee increases enable headmasters to employ more staff and improve facilities faster. This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Competition for Private and State School Teachers' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008
'The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

ATL Education News - UK

Inequalities developed at private schools

Research carried out at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics suggests that there is a widening gap in attainment between pupils from state schools and those from private schools.

This article appeared in the ATL Education News - UK on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for Private and State School Teachers by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 94, January 2008
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

IntheNews.uk

Private schools under attack

Professor Stephen Machin concludes independent schools' existence is widening social inequality in the UK.

This article appeared in IntheNews.uk online on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper No.94, ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu.
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, paper by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu
The research on independent schools – ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ and ‘The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education’, two studies by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu – were presented at a Nuffield Foundation seminar in Oxford on Friday 11 January 2008.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
'The Economic Role of Independent Schools in Britain' research project webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Deutsche Manager sind sehr gut

John Van Reenen interviewed on management research.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on January 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Management practices and organisational structures research webpage

News Posted: 07/01/2008      [Back to the Top]