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News and Press

News Archive 2007

Personnel Today

Most employers fail to tackle stress at early stage

Article refers to a 2006 study by Richard Layard (CEP) at the London School of Economics which claimed a £750 course of cognitive behavioural therapy was both cheaper and more effective than drug-based solutions.

This article appeared in Personnel Today online on December 4, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Colleges soon big enough to go out on their own

The latest education bill opens up the possibility that further education colleges can create their own qualifications. The bill's proposal is nonetheless heading towards a more flexible situation than is found in most of Europe, says Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in The Guardian on December 4, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2007      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Rise in graduates over-qualified for jobs

One in three graduates is in a job that does not require a degree, according to new research that suggests mass higher education is producing a cohort of over-qualified young people whose career ambitions may never be ­fulfilled. The research from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance will add weight to criticisms that government policies aimed at producing growing numbers of graduates are flawed as there is insufficient demand for their skills.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Overqualification, Job Dissatisfaction and Increasing Dispersion in the Returns to Graduate Education by Francis Green and Yu Zhu, Manpower Human Resource Laboratory Discussion Paper No.005, November 2007.
MHRL Briefing Paper

Related links
Francis Green, Research Associate at CEP and Professor of Economics, University of Kent webpage
Yu Zhu, Research Associate at CEP and University of Kent webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 23/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

24 Dash

Grammar schools labelled 'ghettos for wealthy'

Researchers based at the London School of Economics also found that the decision to expand grammar education in Northern Ireland had boosted average exam results. Access to grammar schools in Northern Ireland was widened in 1989 so another 15 per cent of all pupils could attend. The research said: ‘An expansion of grammar school places is potentially beneficial to both (higher and lower income) groups but access to grammar schools is very unequal.’

This article appeared in 24 Dash online on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Grammars 'need to open up'

According to latest research, a grammar school education can have "net positive effects", but selection systems are skewed hugely in favour of well-off families. One study by the Centre for Economic Performance — based on selective education in Northern Ireland — found that expanding the number of grammar school places in the late 1980s boosted GCSE grades across the province.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Finnish Broadcasting Company (YLE) News

'Maailmanpolitiikan arkipäivää'

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the economic causes of China’s growing number of billionaires.

This article appeared in the Finnish Broadcasting Company (YLE) News on November 18, 2007
No link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Libération, France

Britanniques aux rapports

Un rapport, publié l’an dernier par la prestigieuse London School of Economics, a révélé qu’un nombre énorme de Britanniques souffrent de dépression, alors que moins de 25% d’entre eux suivent un traitement.

This article appeared in the Libération, France on November 17, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

The MBA under attack

A study by Nick Bloom, an assistant economics professor at Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, concludes that companies using the most widely accepted management theories taught by business schools outperform their peers in productivity, sales growth and return on capital.

This article appeared in the New York Times on November 17, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What drives good management around the world? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Grammar school policy

A report earlier from the London School of Economics said allowing children from working-class backgrounds into grammar schools would boost their results and overall national performance.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Depression ails our economy

Professor Richard Layard at the London School of Economics argues that depression, anxiety and other forms of mental illness have overtaken unemployment as the greatest social problem in the UK.

This article appeared in the Irish Times November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

PresseBox - Rastatt, Germany

14th Handelsblatt Annual Congress on 'Strategic IT Management' 28 - 30 January 2008, in Berlin

"Without making changes to the internal organisation, additional IT investments do not make any significant difference," says Centre for Economic Performance Director John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in PresseBox - Rastatt, Germany on November 14, 2007
Link to access press release

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Marketplace - Los Angeles, CA, USA

Bhutan's waning Gross Happiness Product

British economist Sir Richard Layard specializes in the economics of happiness. He was recently in Bhutan advising the country's cabinet.

This article appeared in the Marketplace - Los Angeles, CA, USA on November 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 14/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

You and Yours

Professor John Van Reenen appeared on the programme discussing working hours.

The You and Yours programme was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on November 13, 2007
Link to programme

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Best practice

Speaking at the launch of the NPC last month, Macri said: ‘According to research from McKinsey and the London School of Economics the combination of improving technology, management capability and innovation can yield productivity improvements of up to 20 per cent. That's why bringing together the expertise of both organisations [the IMI and Microsoft] delivers real insight on how to address productivity and gives executives from the private and public sector the opportunity to explore how these kinds of solutions can be applied to their own organisations.’

This article appeared in the Irish Times on November 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Hurryet (Turkey)

Yaand#351;larand#305; 18-30 arasand#305;nda Meslekleri ve paralarand#305; var ama hálá aileleriyle yaand#351;and#305;yorlar

To encourage youths to leave the family home, the Italian government announced that next year’s Budget will include financial incentives to youths living on their own in rented accommodation. Marco Manacorda interviewed.

This article appeared in the Hurryet (Turkey) on November 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Mamma's Boys? Why Most Young Italian Men Live With their Parents’ by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti in CentrePiece magazine, Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.
‘Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure. Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents?’ by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, CEP Discussion Paper No 536.

Related Links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets research programme webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera - English

Frost over the world

Linda Yueh gave an interview, discussing the global credit market.

This interview was broadcast on November 9, 2007
Link to broadcast

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Advertiser, Australia

Do yourself a favour: spread some happiness by spending more time with your family during the holiday season

There is a growing academic interest in trying to measure happiness. Still, it might seem incongruous to some of us that an economist would want to think about happiness, yet Richard Layard is an eminent economist who has thought in depth about happiness, and recently written a book on the subject. Professor Layard was founder-director of the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and is a member of the House of Lords. He reports that people are social creatures who generally are happiest when relating with others.

This article appeared in The Advertiser, Australia on November 9, 2007
No link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 09/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Secondary Education.com

Long hours in class do not lead to better jobs

Children who spend long hours in school do not necessarily perform better, or gain better jobs or higher earnings in adult life, according to a report by Professor Jörn-Steffen Pischke, of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Secondary Education online on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Impact of the Length of the School Year on Student Performance and Earnings: Evidence from the German Short School Years in The Economic Journal, 117, October 2007, pp.1216-1242

Related links
Steve Pischke webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

New Statesman

Why Brown won't read THAT book

Off to Israel to speak at a conference with Richard Layard on “happiness and wealth”.
Article by Anthony Seldon

This article appeared in the New Statesman on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Too much social mobility in Britain

The common belief that Britain is socially immobile comes from a study published in 2005 by the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Poorest towns 'falling behind'

Britain's poorest towns and cities have fallen further behind under Labour despite a £30 billion barrage of regeneration initiatives, according to a study. The researchers, led by Dr Tim Leunig of the London School of Economics, warned that as a result of the widening gulf more people were seeking to escape ‘in search of the better opportunities that they rightly realise exist elsewhere’.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Policy Exchange pamphlet co-authored by Tim Leunig
Summary.

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Research Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Northern Echo
Poorest towns 'falling behind'
Cotswold Journal
Tiscali Money
Leigh Journal
Ledbury Reporter
Hawick News
Bolton News
Burnley Citizen
Blackpool Gazette



News Posted: 07/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio

Radio 5 Live

Dr Tim Leunig appeared on the programme, discussing his new research which found the £30bn spent on urban regeneration in the last decade has had no real impact.

This interview was broadcast on November 7, 2007
[No link to broadcast]

Related Publications
Policy Exchange pamphlet co-authored by Tim Leunig
Summary.

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio

Radio Northampton

Sandra McNally gave an interview discussing government proposals to extend the school leaving age to 18.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Northampton on November 5, 2007
[No link to broadcast]

Related Publications
Higher Education and the Labour Market by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Stephen Machin publications page
Sandra McNally publications page

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Too many graduates? Apparently not

A report published this week by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally from the London School of Economics, found there is no problem of "over-supply" or "over-qualification" of university leavers.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Higher Education and the Labour Market by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Stephen Machin publications page
Sandra McNally publications page

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Generosity to researchers could be a profitable move

A study by Mark Schankerman suggests scientists given higher royalties earn more in licensing income for universities, reports Zoe Corbyn.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement
Subscriber link only

Related Publications
Harnessing Success: Incentives for Invention and Technology Transfer in Universities by Mark Schankerman. Article in
Mark Schankerman publications page

Related links
Mark Schankerman webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Economists' rule change puts US on top of world

The US rose to top spot in a closely watched economic league table yesterday, as its economy was praised for its market efficiency and ability to innovate. John van Reenen, a professor at the London School of Economics, who has published widely on international comparisons of productivity, said: "The obsession with a country's exact place in the ranking is the inappropriate transfer of the tools of sport into the economics of reality."

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
What drives good management around the world? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily

Aharon business news - Russia

Linda Yueh was interviewed on China’s industrial policy with its investments in African banks.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on October 31, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Related links Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/10/2007      [Back to the Top]

ATL Education News - UK

Students 'study wrong subjects'

According to the Times, a new study from the Centre for Economic Performance has shown that students are studying the wrong subjects at university, which is leading to oversupply in certain sectors and shortages in others.

This article appeared in ATL Education News - UK on October 31, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
Higher Education and the Labour Market by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally.
Article in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2 Autumn 2007

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 31/10/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

New homes target 'not enough to avert crisis'

Government plans to build three million more homes by 2020 are nowhere near enough to avert a crisis that could see an entire generation unable to get on the property ladder, a report by the independent body – the National Housing and Planning Advice Unit - has warned. Stephen Nickell, one of the study's authors, said yesterday: "If we fail to act then a generation of buyers will be unable to get a foothold on the housing ladder, not just in London, but across large swathes of England."

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on October 29, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Stephen Nickell is an Associate of the Labour Markets Research Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Stephen Nickell webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2007      [Back to the Top]

PNN - Richmond, VA, USA

Workers are more productive on certain days of the week

According to a new study from the Centre for Economic Performance, employers could benefit by reorganizing working time - perhaps by concentrating employees’ hours in the middle of the week or introducing greater flexibility in work schedules.

This article appeared in PNN - Richmond, VA, USA on September 20, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper – Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week? by Alex Bryson and John Forth
Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects? by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 20/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

Handing off the family business

McKinsey researchers working with the London School of Economics studied 700 manufacturing companies in France, Germany, Britain and the United States last year and ranked them based on various performance measures like sales growth and market valuation. The survey found no difference between a family-run company and the typical one.

This article appeared in The New York Times on September 18, 2007
Link to article

Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK's Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries' by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Court blow to Microsoft as it loses appeal against record £343m fine

The Centre for Economic Performance said:
"First, by illegally bundling Windows Media Player into its ubiquitous Windows operating system, Microsoft has driven rival media player firms out of the market.
"Second, by refusing to provide critical technical information about Windows, it has severely disadvantaged rival manufacturers who needed this information to make their server-operating systems run smoothly with Windows-dominated personal computer operating systems."

This article appeared in The Scotsman on September 18, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The European Commission versus Microsoft: Competition Policy in High-Tech Industries by Christos Genakos, Kai Uwe Kühn and John Van Reenen
Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007

Related links
Christos Genakos webpage
Kai Uwe Kühn webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Microsoft loses appeal against £342m EU fine over software sharing

Christos Genakos, a research associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, said: “This ruling has reestablished the credibility of EU's competition policy and proves decisively that there is scope for intervention even in fast-evolving industries.”

This article appeared in The Times on September 18, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The European Commission versus Microsoft: Competition Policy in High-Tech Industries by Christos Genakos, Kai Uwe Kühn and John Van Reenen
Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007

Related links
Christos Genakos webpage
Kai Uwe Kühn webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Trendy subject taught with aplomb

Professor Luis Garicano is one of a new breed of young economists who is bringing a technical discipline to life for the business community. From this month, he is director of research in the department of management at the LSE.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on September 17, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Research Programme at CEP.
Luis Garicano webpage

Further press cuttings
Friday 21 September
Expansión, Spain
La OCDE apea a España de la 'Champions League' de las economías más productivas
Article includes comments from Luis Garicano, scientific director of research at LSE’s Department of Management.
[No link available]

News Posted: 17/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Diversity and research top agenda for dean of Aston

Profile of Michael West, dean of Aston Business School. He joined Aston in 2001 from the London School of Economics, where he worked in the centre for economic performance.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on September 17, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Professor Michael West was previously associated with the Labour Markets Programme at CEP.
Present details.

News Posted: 17/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

CEP Press Release

The Microsoft Decision

Today’s dismissal of Microsoft’s appeal against the European Commission by the European Court of First Instance is a landmark decision for competition policy and the future of the technology sector... Link to full press release


Related Articles
The European Commission versus Microsoft: competition policy in high-tech industries, Centrepiece Summer 2007, Volume 12, issue 1

News Posted: 17/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

CNN, USA

Casualties of the credit boom

Economist Andrew Charlton from the London School of Economics believes the US housing slump and high levels of personal debt are part of the same problem: People on low incomes getting in over their heads with either housing stock or personal debt they cannot afford.

This article appeared in CNN, USA on September 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Laurie Taylor column

What is your degree worth to an employer? According to Anna Vignoles, a leading education economist, student tuition fees should be based on the worth of the degree to employers. Dr Anna Vignoles is a research associate in the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE.

This article appeared in the THES on September 14, 2007
Link to article [subscribers only]

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

News Posted: 14/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

CNBC Europe

Squawk Box

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the US-China agreement on product standards.

This interview was broadcast on CNBC Europe, Squawk Box on September 13, 2007
No link to the interview is available.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

CareandHealth (press release)

Speech in the House of Commons, by Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP

Richard Layard’s argument for funding talking therapies mentioned in the House of Commons speech given by the Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP. [No working link]

This article appeared in Care and Health - London UK on September 13, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Publications
'The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders' by Richard Layard
Download

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Holy alliance

The government claims to be following parents' wishes in opening more religious schools: they tend to be popular and often have good exam results. Yet a study in 2006 by researchers at the London School of Economics showed that this apparent success was due to the social characteristics of the children they admitted, rather than to superior teaching or ethos.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006 by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva
In brief: 'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Labour and the unions - down tools, lads

Today’s unions are a shadow of those that humiliated James Callaghan’s government in the 1970s. A decade of steady economic growth, says Alex Bryson, has eroded the premium that unionised workers earn over their unorganised brethren.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues:  The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’.
Download
‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.768, December 2006.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

FT Report - Recruitment: secret ingredients of an efficient workplace

Research from the Centre for Economic Performance suggests that Tuesday may be the most productive day of the week with the longest number of daily hours worked on average.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper - ‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?'
Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, ‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Sit down, thugs, and get your wellbeing books out

Happiness certainly has its protagonists. Anthony Seldon, headmaster of Wellington College, believes firmly in teaching it. He says it is more than just an ‘airy-fairy aspiration’, and that it can be learnt in timetabled classes. Richard Layard, of the London School of Economics, goes farther. He says that the ‘secrets of happiness’ should be the central purpose of any good school.

This article appeared in The Times on September 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 12/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

What really makes us happy?

Academics such as Richard Layard, who wrote the critically acclaimed 2005 bestseller Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, suggests that everything from health to our friends,family and even our working lives are vital.

This article appeared in The Independent on September 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 12/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Firms face recruitment ban for exploiting migrant workers

The promise to take a tougher approach on the enforcement of penalties against firms that employ illegal migrants came as the home secretary, Jacqui Smith named Professor David Metcalf, a London School of Economics industrial relations expert, as the first chairman of the migration advisory committee.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

Irish Independent

Workers of the world unite ... on Tuesdays

Research by Britain's Centre for Economic Performance found that Tuesdays account for 18.8pc of a typical week's work, while Friday contributed only 16.8pc.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent - Dublin, Ireland on September 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?', Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper, August 2007 Download
‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 12/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

Bangkok Post - Thailand

Man gives dog kiss of life

London's Centre for Economic Performance found workers were sluggish on Mondays, perked up on Tuesday, then became tired as the week went on.

This article appeared The Bangkok Post - Thailand on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?', Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper, August 2007 Download
‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

TV

Linda Yueh appeared discussing US-China trade and China's economic growth.

This interview appeared on Bloomberg TV on September 11, 2007
[No link to broadcast]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Smith names head of new migration advisory body

The home secretary today announced that David Metcalf would be the new chair of the committee set up to control the flow and quality of migrant workers. Mr Metcalf, professor of industrial relations at LSE, will spearhead the independent Migration Advisory Committee, which will advise ministers on which occupations should qualify as being short of necessary skills.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
BBC News Online
Head named for immigration panel

News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

ABC online

WorkChoices will demoralise employees: economist

Professor Richard Freeman, from Harvard University's [sic] Centre for Economic Performance, has told a Brisbane industrial relations conference that WorkChoices discourages efficient bargaining between employers and workers.

This article appeared in ABC online - Australia on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Union demise is plain to see in the yawning wealth gap

Each year the news get worse, union membership falls further, the outlook is grimmer. This year, research from the Centre for Economic Performance says falling membership has left union finances "in a parlous state".

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues: The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’. Download
Article in the forthcoming Autumn 2007 issue of CentrePiece magazine which summarises ‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, CEP Discussion Paper No. 768, December 2006.
Also forthcoming in Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations, Elsevier Press.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The brothers' blues

In 1979 approximately half of British workers carried a union card; barely one in four does so today. Tellingly, the big issue this week - as in most recent disputes - is public-sector pay. The fear of litigation keeps public servants' subs flowing, but only one private employee in six now pays their dues. Today a Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) report highlights the effect on unions' solvency. That should not just worry the brotherly barons, but ordinary workers as well. Trade unions, after all, secure higher pay for their members and other benefits too; without them the industrial workers whose pensions disappeared with the dotcom bubble would never have won compensation.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues:  The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’.
Download
‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.768, December 2006.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Weakened unions retain power to influence

Union membership has halved since 1979 and become increasingly concentrated in the public sector. The resulting strain on union finances means that many do not have the resources to reach out to new professional workers to replace those members lost in traditional manufacturing industries, warns the Centre for Economic Performance on Monday.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on September 10, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues: The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’. Download
Article in the forthcoming Autumn 2007 issue of CentrePiece magazine which summarises ‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, CEP Discussion Paper No. 768, December 2006.
Also forthcoming in Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations, Elsevier Press.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

Conservatives.com

David Cameron: Meeting economic challenges of the future

In a speech given at the London School of Economics David Cameron (Conservative Leader) said "Research done here at LSE's Centre for Economic Performance shows that on average a British worker has to work an extra day each week, just to produce the same as an equivalent worker in France."

This article appeared online on Conservatives.com on September 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?', Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper, August 2007 Download
‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

Further press cuttings
Sify - taramani, Chennai, India
Friday - the laziest day for workers!
The study, conducted by London's Centre for Economic Performance, also found that workers are the most productive on Tuesdays.

News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

Online Recruitment - UK

Trades Unions supporting HR management

Britain’s trade unions may not be a barrier to employer use of Human Resource Management, according to new research from the Policy Studies Institute (PSI) and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). The study by Alex Bryson, Dr. Rafael Gomez, Professor Paul Willman and Professor Tobias Kretschmer, examines the links between HRM policies and forms of union and non-union worker voice at the workplace.

This article appeared in Online Recruitment - UK on September 10, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues: The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’. Download
Article in the forthcoming Autumn 2007 issue of CentrePiece magazine which summarises ‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, CEP Discussion Paper No. 768, December 2006.
Also forthcoming in Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations, Elsevier Press.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Rafael Gomez webpage
Tobias Kretschmer webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Mission to control labour flow

A leading academic and founder member of the Low Pay Commission is to spearhead a key element of the government's programme to control the flow and quality of migrant workers. David Metcalf, professor of industrial relations at the London School of Economics, is to chair the independent Migration Advisory Committee, which will advise ministers on which occupations should qualify as being short of necessary skills.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on September 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

CEP News:

Union Blues: The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain's Trade Unions

The membership of Britain's trade unions continues to decline and, despite a series of mergers, most of them face severe financial difficulties. Alex Bryson and Paul Willman examine their organisational failings and find a glimmer of hope in the handful of success stories - unions representing professional workers. This article, which is forthcoming in the autumn 2007 issue of CentrePiece magazine, summarises 'Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions' by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, CEP Discussion Paper No. 768, December 2006 (http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp0768.pdf) and forthcoming in Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations.

News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Tuesday proves super for work

Tuesday is not known as super for nothing. Not only is it the day when US presidential primaries are usually held, it is also the day on which Britons put in the most work hours, according to research published on Saturday. Friday is conversely the day on which we put in the least work, the paper by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on September 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?', Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper, August 2007 Download
‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

News Posted: 08/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Workers are laziest on Fridays

A study from London’s Centre for Economic Performance found workers were sluggish on Mondays, perked up on Tuesday then became tired as the week went on

This article appeared in The Sun on September 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?', Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper, August 2007 Download
‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

Further press
The Daily Mail
On Tuesday we work on Friday we shirk
We work fewer hours on a Friday than any ohter day of the week, according to researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance.

News Posted: 08/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview
Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
Details

News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

World Business Review

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss sovereign wealth funds.

This interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service, 'World Business Review' on September 7, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

Christian Science Monitor

'What makes a terrorist' and why the popular theories may be wrong

Review of the book What Makes a Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism, written by the economist Alan Krueger. Krueger's book is based on a set of three lectures he gave at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2006.

This article appeared in Christian Science Monitor on August 28, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview here.

Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consequences'. Details

News Posted: 28/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The American

The decline and fall of declinism

Article cites research by John Van Reenen and others at the London School of Economics mentioned in the New York Times on the management of firms.

This article appeared in The American online on August 28, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Chrisos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



News Posted: 28/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Cameron should count on happiness

Richard Layard, one of those responsible for coming up with the idea of the non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment in the 1980s, has become a strong advocate of policies designed to maximise happiness.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Spiked

Towards an age of abundance

Article refers to Richard Layard’s research into happiness. He is emeritus professor of economics at LSE.

This article appeared in Spiked online on August 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Business

The economics of happiness: just state control with a smile

One of the key pieces of evidence that happiness economists rely upon are statistics spanning several decades in various countries showing increasing GDP but happiness flatlining. The reason for this, given by Lord Layard from the London School of Economics, and others, is the persistence of income inequality, which they claim offsets any happiness gained from a larger economy.

This article appeared in The Business on August 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

LaVocel - Italy

Il gap manageriale del vecchio continente

Tradizionalmente, gli economisti sono stati restii a partecipare al dibattito sul rapporto fra management e produttività. Questo atteggiamento è attribuibile principalmente alla mancanza di dati che documentassero in modo sistematico le diverse pratiche manageriali adottate dalle imprese. Nel corso degli ultimi anni, il Centre for Economic Performance della London School of Economics ha condotto una serie di ricerche finalizzate a colmare questo vuoto. Fra il 2004 ed il 2006 abbiamo misurato sistematicamente le pratiche manageriali di circa 4,000 imprese manifatturiere in 12 paesi, fra l‘Europa, gli Stati Uniti e l’Asia.

This article appeared in LaVocel - Italy on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 21/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Bouncing into schools

Britain is at the bottom of the European social mobility league table, as John van Reenen and Stephen Machin show in this summer's Fabian Review.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Schools Are the Best Tools for Tackling Social Mobility by John Van Reenen and Stephen Machin in The Fabian Review, Summer 2007: The Education Issue

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

What can human resources expect from Gordon Brown as Prime Minister

Recent research by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance suggests that effective management throughout the organisation is a key criterion for organisational success.

This article appeared in Personnel Today on August 20, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 20/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times - Adviser

Continental Divide: US and Europe

Economists have had relatively little to say about the role of management in driving productivity and other key performance indicators. This is largely because there has been an absence of good quality data on management practices. At the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics has been carrying out a large research project that attempts to fill this void using a new survey approach to measure management practices in a systematic way in more than 4000 manufacturing firms across Europe, the US and Asia.

This article appeared in the The Financial Times - Adviser on August 17, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 17/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

New Matilda

Economics: A Sub-Prime Morality Play

Article by Andrew Charlton
Global financial markets went pear-shaped last week. They do that from time to time. The details are always different but the underlying cause of the problems is always the same: a prolonged boom makes people greedy, those greedy people take too many risks, subsequently come unstuck, and take other people down with them.

This article appeared in NewMatilda Online on August 16, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia's Economic Superheroes, Andrew Charlton, July 2007, Visit publisher's website

Related Links
Andrew Charlton's webpage

News Posted: 16/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World TV

World News Today

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss US-China trade relations in the aftermath of the recall of more Chinese toys.

The interview was broadcast on BBC World TV on August 14, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
August 15, 2007
Al Jazeera - Inside Story
Interviewed in aftermath of recall of Chinese toys
August 16, 2007
BBC Radio 4 - Today
Interviewed to discuss worsening U.S.-China trade relations with China’s ban on pork imports from the U.S.
August 20, 2007
BBC World Service, Burmese Service
Interview broadcast for 'International Business Analysis' on the wider applicability of China's Special Economic Zones
August 21, 2007
BBC World Service - Newshour
Interviewed to discuss US-China trade relations
August 24, 2007
CNBC Europe - Squawk Box and CNN - World Business Today
Interviewed to discuss China's interest rate rise and markets

News Posted: 14/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

American Enterprise Institute - Washington DC

What really buys happiness

According to British economist Richard Layard, "If we make taxes commensurate to the damage that an individual does to others when he earns more"—the damage to others' happiness, that is--"then he will only work harder if there is a true net benefit to society as a whole.”

This article appeared in American Enterprise Institute - Washington DC on August 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

SmartMoney - Russia

Ñåìåéíûå öåííîñòè

Jose V. Rodriguez Mora, co-author with Maia Guell (Centre for Economic Performance) and Chris Telmer, was interviewed by a Russian journalist from SmartMoney regarding intergenerational mobility.

This article appeared in SmartMoney - Russia on August 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility and the Informative Content of Surnames’, Discussion Paper No.810, Centre for Economic Performance, July 2007 by Maia Guell, Jose V. Rodriguez Mora and Chris Telmer


Related links
Maia Guell webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Worldwide Exchange

Linda Yueh was interviewed for the CNBC 'Worldwide Exchange' television programme to discuss China's trade and PPI data releases.

The interview was broadcast on CNBC - Worldwide Exchange on August 10, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
BBC News 24
Interviewed to discuss US-China trade relations in the aftermath of the recall of yet more Chinese toys.
[No link to interview]

News Posted: 10/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Money Week

Is Britain too reliant on the financial sector?

Interest-rate hikes have “hit families hard”, said Gabriel Rozenberg in The Times. Home repossessions have jumped by 30% to a seven-year high, while Morgan Stanley is forecasting a sharp consumer slowdown in the second half as five rate hikes begin to bite. Retail sales are finally beginning to show signs of slowing, last month notching up the lowest annual growth since November...

Article refers to CEP Productivity & Innovation Policy Briefing

This article appeared in Money Week Online on August 10, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis: UK Productivity During the Blair Era, June 2007
Download document

Related Links
CEP Productivity & Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Japanese Press

An article on British Labor Reform published in a Japanese Newspaper. Interviews with John Van Reenen and Alan Manning of the Centre for Economic Performance featured.

This article appeared on August 9, 2007
[No link]

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Business Standard - India

Deepak Lal: happiness, growth and capitalism

And the Labour peer Richard Layard has written an influential book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. What are we to make of all this?

This article appeared in the Business Standard - India on August 7, 2007
Link to subscriber only article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Herald, Scotland

Inspiring a Neet solution

According to a report from the London School of Economics published in June, Scotland's Neet generation of young jobless is costing the country £1.7bn a year in crime, lost productivity and educational under-achievement. Almost one in five young people in Scotland are not in work, education or training, but the £2m a week cost of jobseekers allowance is only a fraction of the real loss to the economy.

This article appeared in the Herald on August 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Princes Trust Report
The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK, Sandra McNally & Shqiponja Telhaj, April 2007, Download Report

Related Links
Sandra McNally's webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj's webpage
The Prince's Trust website


News Posted: 04/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Bytestart

We have to stop meeting like this

Article refers to research from the School showing that overall UK productivity is lower than in industrial rivals such as France, Germany and the US.

This article appeared in Bytestart Online on August 3, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis: UK Productivity during the Blair Era, June 2007, Download PDF

Related Links
CEP Productivity & Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stirring the melting pot

Asian migrants, and especially the Muslims among them, seem rather more prone than others to feeling British, relative to the length of time they have spent in the country. According to Alan Manning and Sanchari Roy of the London School of Economics, who reworked data from the Labour Force Survey, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis are especially apt to describe themselves as British , though they are commonly thought to be worse than most at fitting in.

This article appeared in The Economist on August 2, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Culture Clash or Culture Club? The Identity and Attitudes of Immigrants in Britain by Alan Manning and Sanchari Roy in CentrePiece, Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Culture Clash or Culture Club? The Identity and Attitudes of Immigrants in Britain by Alan Manning, Sanchari Roy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.790, April 2007

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Sanchari Roy webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Australian

Don't get sniffy at 'affluenza'

British economist Richard Layard has another solution that would please [Clive] Hamilton [director of the Australia Institute]. Slug the rich with high taxes until inequality is cured.

This article appeared in The Australian on August 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Further press cutting
The Australian
Promises that cannot be kept
Article refers to a series of lectures on Happiness given by Richard Layard, emeritus professor of economics at LSE.

News Posted: 01/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Burmese service - International Business Analysis

Linda Yueh discussed China's trade surplus and economic growth on the programme.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on July 30, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Kathimerini - Greece

Greek coverage of CEP/McKinsey management study

Coverage of the CEP/McKinsey group management study in the top Greek newspaper "Kathimerini".

This article appeared in Kathimerini - Greece on July 28, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 28/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Kathimerini - Greece

Management practice

[No link to article available]

News Posted: 28/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC

BBC 1 - 'Ten o'Clock News

Linda Yueh appeared discussing the UK’s stance toward sovereign fund investments by countries such as China.

This interview was broadcast on July 25, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

On Line opinion -Australia

It's the society, stupid!

Highly influential British economist Lord Richard Layard's Happiness, convincingly demonstrates our inability to recall or predict what makes us happy.

This article appeared online on On Line opinion - Australia on July 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Related publication Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Land for Housing

Local bid for housing land can boost supply

Article by Tim Leunig, an Associate of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance and lecturer in Economic History, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Land for Housing on July 25, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Links
Related links Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Taipei Times

Nurturing your own ideas is key to productivity

Reinforcement for this view comes from a new report from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, McKinsey & Co and Stanford University entitled Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, which supports the common-sense notion that the way firms are managed is one of the most important ways of distinguishing between them.

This article appeared in the Taipei Times on July 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Chrisos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The changing face of inequality

Richard Layard in his work on happiness argues that such inequality is one of the most potent causes of the unpopularity of market economy.

This article appeared in The Guardian on July 24, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Scottish Left Review

An appetite for change

As Richard Layard (2005) points out, over the past 30 years we have increased material wealth hugely, while failing to improve human happiness.

This article appeared in the Scottish Left Review - UK on July 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Toffeeweb

Overlooked. Look here.

According to a study carried out for The Prince's Trust by the London School of Economics, published in April, the proportion of NEETS nationally is around 18 per cent, roughly one in five. That's a heck of a lot.

This article appeared online on Toffeeweb on July 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Linda Yueh discussed the investments of China and Singapore in Barclays in aid of its bid for ABN Amro.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 4's Today programme on July 23, 2007
[No link to broadcast]

Second interview on topic
CNN, 'World Business Today'


News Posted: 23/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

City Journal

What really buys happiness?

According to British economist Richard Layard, "If we make taxes commensurate to the damage that an individual does to others when he earns more" -- the damage that an individual does to others when he earns more”—the damage to others’ happiness, that is—“then he will only work harder if there is a true net benefit to society as a whole. It is efficient to discourage work effort that makes society worse off.”

This article appeared in City Journal (New York, NY, USA) on July 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde

Epoque: En attendant le bonheur

Relevant que plus de richesse ne crée pas nécessairement plus de bonheur, Richard Layard, professeur à la London School of Economics, propose en utopie quelques critères d'une société heureuse fondée sur le lien social, le respect, la confiance, l'empathie, le travail sur soi, la compassion.

This article appeared in Le Monde, France on July 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Want to be productive? Grow your own ideas

Reinforcement for this view comes from a new report from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, McKinsey & Co and Stanford University entitled Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, which supports the common-sense notion that the way firms are managed is one of the most important ways of distinguishing between them.

This article appeared in The Observer on July 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

Our ill-trained youth will kick Britain out of the economic elite

Article refers to a report from the House of Lords economic affairs select committee titled Apprenticeship: A Key Route to Skill.
Richard Layard was a member of the Select Committee and Hilary Steedman was 'Specialist Adviser' for the inquiry.

This article appeared in The Sunday Telegraph on July 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Apprenticeship: A Key Route to Skill. Volume 1: Report
House of Lords Select Committee on Economic Affairs. 5th Report of Session 2006-07. Published July 20, 2007
Skills for All Research publications webpage

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Skills for All research webpage
Education and Skills webpage

News Posted: 21/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

The Left's 'inequality' obsession

Says British economist Richard Layard, "If we make taxes commensurate to the damage that an individual does to others when he earns more" -- the damage to happiness, that is -- "then he will only work harder if there is a true net benefit to society as a whole. It is efficient to discourage work effort that makes society worse off."

This article appeared in The Wall Street Journal on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Further press cutting
Spiked - London, UK
Black's fall: 'a morality play for us all?'
Professor Richard Layard and others inform us that money doesn't bring happiness.

News Posted: 19/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The pioneering technique that's helping to combat depression in the classroom

Richard Layard, director of the Well-Being Programme at the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance warned that a climate of individualism in Britain and America was preventing children achieving happiness.

This article appeared in The Independent on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard
Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 19/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Brisbane Times

Profile: Andrew Charlton

Profile of Andrew Charlton, the Sydney-born economist, who is a research fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Brisbane Times on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes (2007) by Andrew Charlton
Random House: Australia. Release – July 2007.
Details

Related links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Youngsters opt to do nothing

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics calculates that the number of neets aged 16 to 24 increased by 15 per cent between 1997 and 2006, from 1.06m to 1.24m.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Business Brief

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss China's released GDP and CPI figures.

Her interviews were broadcast on July 18, 2007
BBC World Service, 'Business Brief'
BBC World Service, 'The World Today'
BBC World Service, 'World Business Report'

Further press cutting
July 19, 2007
CNBC, 'Worldwide Exhange'
[No links available]

Further links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Spiked - London UK

Black's fall: 'a morality play for us all'

Professor Richard Layard and others inform us that money doesn't bring happiness.

This article appeared online on Spiked - London, UK on July 18, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 18/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

US-Unternehmen managen am besten

Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen quoted in article discussing recent management practice and productivity research report from the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group. This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on July 17, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
July 16, 2007
Handelsblatt
Von wegen Sozial-Klimbim
July 23, 2007
Handelsblatt
Der entzauberte Mythos

News Posted: 17/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Cairns Post

Busting the myth

Andrew Charlton, on the other hand, is a renowned Australian economist working at the prestigious London School of Economics. He's eminently qualified to talk about the facts and forces driving our financial system and the markets and wealth swirling around within it. And he's got a message for everyone sucked in by the ‘myth of Australia's economic superheroes’. ‘The Howard Government has been carried from one election victory to another on the crest of an economic wave that it did not create’ Charlton writes in his new book Ozonomics.

This article appeared in The Cairns Post - Australia on July 14, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes (2007) by Andrew Charlton
Random House: Australia. Release – July 2007.
Details

Related links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Where money seems to talk

In a 2005 book, Richard Layard, a British scholar, said family circumstances, employment and health all mattered more to a sense of well-being than income. Rich countries might be happier than poor ones, but beyond a threshold, the connection weakens, and more cash would not buy more happiness—so the theory goes.

This article appeared in The Economist on July 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 12/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

UK 'good at IT despite poorly-managed firms'

Nick Bloom, one author of a study of management practices and productivity from the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group, says that "Family firms that hand down the position to the eldest son are typically very badly managed." The report says that private equity could help UK industry by buying out badly-run family businesses. "Private equity-owned firms are some of the best managed, while traditional family firms are some of the worst," the CEP's Raffaella Sadun , another author, said.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on July 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Multinational managers in India rival US for skill

Multinational manufacturers in India have a management capability second only to equivalent companies operating in the US, according to a survey published today by McKinsey, the strategy consultants, and the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on July 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Vocus
There's only room for one big boss at Alliance Boots
According to research out today from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and McKinsey, by handing their businesses down to their children, entrepreneurs may be sustaining a long 'tail' of underperforming companies and holding back the UK's score for good management practice compared with, say, the US.
[No link available]


News Posted: 12/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times - India

Bright young things take multinational path

According to John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, the US’s good standing stems from the country’s high degree of worker flexibility and tough competition.

This article appeared in The Financial Times - India on July 11, 2007
[Link to article no longer active.]

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage



News Posted: 11/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Love and low taxes

Professor Richard Layard has spent the last few years marshalling hard evidence in support of concrete steps - in terms of education, for example – that could help to make a difference to levels of misery.

This article appeared in the Guardian on July 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 11/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Worldwide Exchange

Linda Yueh appeared on CNBC to discuss China’s trade surplus.

This interview was broadcast on July 10, 2007
[No link available]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
CNN - World Business Today
Interviewed for a discussion on China's trade surplus.
BBC World Service Radio - Newshour
Interviewed to discuss regulatory reforms in China.

News Posted: 10/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Capitalism and freedom fries

Guy Michaels and Xiaojia Zhi have a counterexample. It seems that market forces have not yet stopped American businessmen indulging the Francophobia that swept the nation in the run-up to the invasion of Iraq.

This article appeared in the Economist on July 9, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Freedom Fries by Guy Michaels and Xiaojia Zhi, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 815, July 2007

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

ABC Net

Will Elliot and Andrew Charlton

Will Elliot and Andrew Charlton in conversation with Richard Fidler. Dr Charlton is a research officer in the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE. He has written a book called Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes. He claims that politicians have a a lot less power over the economy than they would like us to believe.

This interview was broadcast on ABC Net on July 9, 2007
Link to article and broadcast

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes (2007), Andrew Charlton.
Random House: Australia. Release – July 2007.

Related links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Exduco.net - Tuscany, Italy

How productivity benefits from competition

Chad Syverson, associate professor of economics at the University of Chicago and a productivity specialist spoke to students and faculty at a Brown Bag lunch lecture hosted by The Becker Center of Chicago Price Theory and sponsored by Vishal Verma, ’07 (XP-76), May 10 at the Charles M. Harper Center. His lecture mentioned the Centre for Economic Performance study on productivity – how Nick Bloom’s and John Van Reenen’s research included interviewing managers at 750 medium-sized firms in the United States, United Kingdom, France and Germany. The study correlated high management evaluations with high productivity, Syverson said. Two factors influenced productivity: the amount of competition and “prima geniture,” in which a family-owned firm passes leadership down to the eldest son.

This article appeared online on Exduco.net - Tuscany, Italy
Link to article

Related Publications
Bloom, N. and Van Reenen, J. (2007), ‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 09/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Power to the people should be way ahead

According to Richard Layard's groundbreaking book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, there is compelling evidence to suggest a link between levels of human happiness and public control over political decisions.

This article appeared in The Scotsman on July 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 07/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Montreal Gazette

Happiness is a serious business

The best introduction to this new sophistry is by Professor Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, published by Penguin in 2005.

This article appeared in Montreal Gazette on July 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 07/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

Risk-loving Americans counter U.S.'s foreign debt

What accounts for Americans’ better performance? In a report last week, Goldman Sachs economist Ed McKelvey points to a recent study by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reene that found U.S.-owned companies in the U.K. are 3% more productive than other multinationals.

This article appeared in The Wall Street Journal on July 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

How axing grammars let down millions of pupils

A study by Jo Blanden and other researchers confirms that those born poor in Britain have a worse chance of improving their lives than children anywhere else in the developed world. It pointed to the failure of the education system as the overwhelming reason why poor children in Britain have less chance of climbing the ladder and winning good jobs than those in any other wealthy country.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail on June 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

UK 'one of worst countries for social mobility'

Working-class children in Britain are less likely to climb the social ladder than in any other developed nation, a report showed yesterday. Prof Steve Machin, from the London School of Economics, which carried out the Sutton Trust study, said: ‘We had a very big expansion of the higher education system in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but contrary to many people's expectations this actually reinforced social immobility.’

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Expansión, Spain

El día soñado de Brown

John Van Reenen, director del Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics, asegura, en cambio, que las críticas a Brown son ‘un poco injustas’. Según Van Reenen, quienes otorgan el mérito ‘a las reformas de Thatcher, al buen hacer del Banco de Inglaterra o a las importaciones baratas desde China’, olvidan que el Gobierno pudo oponerse a todo ello, pero no lo hizo.
(Source: Lexis Nexis News)

This article appeared in Expansión, Spain on June 26, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Blair's Economic Legacy. 'In brief' article by John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1, Summer 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Hemscott Analyst

UK productivity lags behind France, Germany, US

Poor management continues to hamper performance and UK productivity still lags behind France and Germany. A study from the LSE links this problem to the preponderance of family-owned firms in the UK, something maintained by the country's inheritance tax regime.

This article appeared online on Hemscott Analyst on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage



News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

VNUNet.com

Lack of innovation is causing UK productivity gap

The London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance has found GDP per hour worked in the UK is 13 per cent lower than Germany, 18 per cent lower than the US and 20 per cent lower than France.

This article appeared online on VNUNet.com on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Northern Echo

Milburn addresses housing problems

This week, a London School of Economics study found that British children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives than in most other wealthy countries. It said ten years of a Labour Government had done no more than prevent the decline in social mobility in the Seventies and Eighties from worsening.

This article appeared in the Northern Echo on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Firstrung - London, UK

Social mobility in Britain lower than other advanced countries and declining

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) have compared the life chances of British children with those in other advanced countries for a study sponsored by the Sutton Trust, and the results are disturbing.

This article appeared in Firstrung.com on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Times

News in brief - Children 'in a poverty trap'

Children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives in Britain than those in most other wealthy countries. But a London School of Economics study found that a decline in social mobility in the 1970s and 1980s has levelled off, suggesting that new Labour may have stopped things getting very much worse.

This article appeared in The Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Britain narrows productivity gap

Britain has narrowed its productivity gap with France and Germany in the past decade but poor management is still hampering performance, a study showed today. The study by the LSE's Centre of Economic Performance (CEP) said that if Britain had closed the 20 per cent gap with France in output per hour worked, the average Briton could have a pay rise of 20 per cent or take a day off a week and the country would still be as wealthy.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Labour's school reforms 'haven't helped the poor'

The Sutton Trust released the preliminary research findings of the social mobility study which it commissioned from academics at the London School of Economics. The study said: ‘Social mobility remains weak in the UK compared to other developed nations.’

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

UK productivity still trails competitors

Gordon Brown’s ambition of matching the growth in productivity of the world’s big economies appears as elusive as ever after research, by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE published on Monday said there was ‘still a major productivity challenge’.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Education 'fails poorer children'

Professor Steve Machin, from CEP, said: "We had a very big expansion of the higher education system in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but contrary to many people's expectations this actually reinforced social immobility."

This interview was broadcast on BBC News at 10 O'Clock on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde

Sandra McNally: Sous Tony Blair, le système éducatif britannique s'est incontestablement amélioré

Sandra McNally est chercheuse au Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics et auteur d’une analyse sur la politique éducative de Tony Blair .

This article appeared in Le Monde (France) on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Has Labour Delivered on the Policy Priorities of ‘Education, Education, Education’? by Sandra McNally
Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analyses Listing

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Q and A: grammar school policy

A report earlier this month from the London School of Economics said allowing children from working-class backgrounds into grammar schools would boost their results and overall national performance.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1, Summer 2007


Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

In the News

Call for UK productivity improvement

Britain faces a ‘major productivity challenge’ if it is to catch up with other European countries, a report claims today. The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE) has identified a positive upturn in productivity since 1991 after decades of disappointing post-war performances.

This article appeared in In the News online on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No: 788, April 2007
Bloom, N. and Van Reenen, J. (2007), ‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Further Press Cuttings
Mform
Adfero - London UK
Call for UK productivity improvement
The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE) has identified a positive upturn in productivity since 1991 after decades of disappointing post-war performances.
BBC Radio 4
Today Programme
John Van Reenen was interviewed regarding Britain’s productivity challenge this morning on the Today Programme. [No link]

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today Programme

Special report on new LSE research, in conjunction with the Sutton Trust, on the current state of social mobility in Britain.

This report was broadcast at 7.09a.m. on BBC Radio 4's the Today Programme on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Kicking away the social ladder

Article refers to a 2005 study by Stephen Machin’s group at LSE, which found the US and Britain were less mobile than other advanced countries.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on June 24, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Globe and Mail

Bogota's urban happiness movement

London School of Economics professor Richard Layard, who wrote the seminal Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, was an adviser to Tony Blair's first Labour government.

This article appeared in the Globe and Mail (Canada) on June 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 23/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Globe and Mail

Happy is as happy learns

Richard Layard, an economics professor at the London School of Economics and the author of his own happiness manual, Happiness: Lessons From a New Science, is now rolling out well-being courses for 11-to-13-year-olds in Manchester, Hertfordshire and South Tyneside.

This article appeared in the Globe and Mail (Canada) on June 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 23/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Star

Aversion to patriotism, desperation for change

Commenting on Tony Blair’s plan for a ‘Britain Day’, Alan Manning, a labour market economist at LSE said: ‘I'm in favour of emphasizing that Britain stands for certain values – tolerance, freedom of expression to name two – but I think it is a mistake to think that the vast and overwhelming majority of Britons from all walks of life wouldn't sign up to that right now without being asked.’

This article appeared in The Star (Toronto, Canada) on June 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Culture Clash or Culture Club? The Identity and Attitudes of Immigrants in Britain by Alan Manning and Sanchari Roy in CentrePiece, Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Culture Clash or Culture Club? The Identity and Attitudes of Immigrants in Britain by Alan Manning, Sanchari Roy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.790, April 2007

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Sanchari Roy webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

How the US has kept the productivity playing field to its advantage

When many of the people in competitor nations look at our US economy, they are rather anxious about us. And the latest evidence coming out of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics suggests that they may be the ones with the right idea.

This article appeared in The New York Times on June 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Published by the Office of National Statistics (ONS).

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

CNN

World Business Today

Linda Yueh appeared discussing the listing of PetroChina and the growth of the Chinese economy.

This broadcast aired on June 20, 2007
No link available to the broadcast.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Kansas City News

Pursuit of happiness

Recently, Lord Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, argued that happiness should be taught alongside core subjects such as English and math.

This article appeared in the Kansas City Star on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Schools need to get serious on teaching values

A Letter from Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 19, 2007
Link to published letter

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Political Affairs Magazine

Tony Blair's real legacy - minimum wage and union recognition

Tony Blair’s critics should not dismiss significant policy achievements of the past ten years. Recent research by Professor David Metcalf of LSE reveals the UK’s first national minimum wage has lifted out of poverty tens of thousands of low-paid workers with no detrimental impact on job creation.

This article appeared in Political Affairs Magazine on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment? by David Metcalf, CEP Discussion Paper No.781, April 2007

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek

Central banks - talk isn't cheap

The conventional wisdom has it that when a central bank cuts or raises interest rates, markets move in response to the shift. But new research by the London School of Economics claims that what really moves markets isn't the rate change itself - what's most important is how central bankers speak about their plans for the future.

This article appeared in Newsweek magazine on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Words and Deeds: Market Reactions When Central Banks Talk by Carlo Rosa and Giovanni Verga, in CentrePiece 12/1, Summer 2007

Related links
Carlo Rosa webpage
Giovanni Verga webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Belfast Telegraph

Exams plan spiralling out of control

The 11-plus is on the way out, but the jury is still out on the question of academic selection. Grammar school supporters are already highlighting a report from the London School of Economics which found that selective education benefited children from a working class background.

This article appeared in the Belfast Telegraph on June 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance Magazine

Faith primary schools no better than secular, study finds

Pupils in faith primary schools do no better than children in secular state primaries once covert selection has been eliminated, research from the London School of Economics has found.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils? by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece 12/1
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Trumpet

Schools flunk dropout test

The education system in Britain is failing. The London School of Economics labels the 1 million unemployed, non-student young people in Britain a “lost generation” that is proportionally twice the size of those in Germany and France.

This article appeared in The Trumpet on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Parents 'buying' places at grammar schools

A report published this week by the London School of Economics said that a grammar school education could be very beneficial to children from poor backgrounds. But it warned that many could not get in because admissions procedures were skewed against them.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today programme

LSE Professor Richard Layard was interviewed about unemployment, followed by a discussion with Lord Desai, emeritus professor of LSE.

This interview was broadcast on June 15, 2007
7.30-8am listen again slot

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman, Oxford University Press (Latest edition, 2005).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Happiness lessons

This week Lord Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, argued that happiness should be taught alongside core subjects such as English and maths.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Schools urged to teach children how to be happy

Children should learn about moral values and the way to happiness from a new cohort of school teachers specifically trained for the job, according to new academic research by Richard Layard, of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Grammar schools improve grades

Allowing children from working-class backgrounds into grammar schools boosts their results and overall national performance, according to new research from the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Alien nation

The London School of Economics has just published a fascinating paper that explores who feels themselves to be British in the UK today and who subscribes to British values - that great bugbear of Gordon Brown.

This article appeared in The Guardian 'comment is free' column on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Culture Clash or Culture Club? The Identity and Attitudes of Immigrants in Britain by Alan Manning and Sanchari Roy
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Sanchari Roy webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

How to avoid financial meltdown by gaining a foothold on your personal debts

Dr Linda Yeuh from London School of Economics, says: "Base rate will peak towards the end of the year at or close to 6 pc. As long as inflation is under control, it could come down in a couple of years."

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further press cutting
June 13, 2007
CNBC Europe, 'Squawk Box'
Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss China-EU trade talks

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Call for happiness to be taught in schools

In an article to be published today by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, Richard Layard said schools had a central role to play in countering a large rise in emotional disturbance by teaching children how to be happy

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Labour is failing

The government is failing to capitalise on economic growth because of tax hikes and rising inequality. Britons take prosperity for granted and are focusing on the Government's failure to turn higher taxes into public service improvements, said John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Source: Lexis Nexis. No link to article.

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Blair's Economic Legacy. 'In brief' article by John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Exam results boosted by the grammar effect

The findings, from researchers at the respected Centre for Economic Performance, cast doubt on Conservative policy on grammar schools after the party abandoned support for selective education.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Study shows grammars benefit poor pupils

The row over academic selection was reignited last night after a study by the London School of Economics concluded that more grammar schools would boost the results of working class pupils and raise education standards nationwide.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Home ground disadvantage

Get ready to challenge your assumptions – inner-city schools aren’t so bad after all say researchers from the London School of Economics. The study, Urban Density and Pupil Attainment, found evidence of small but significant benefits from education in schools in densely urbanised settings.

This article appeared in The Times on June 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Urban Density and Pupil Attainment’ by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.80, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE, May 2007.

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

If you're not a fat cat or a footballer, new problems keep on popping up

Incidentally, people who still have social consciences and who are worried about the way the world is going can take heart from a paper by the eminent labour economist David Metcalf, of the London School of Economics. Its very title - Why has the British national minimum wage had little or no impact on employment? - gives the game away. For all those predictions by (usually) right-wing economists that a minimum wage would produce economic disaster, it hasn't happened. Indeed, Metcalf concludes: 'The national minimum wage has raised the real and relative pay of low-paid workers, tempered wage inequality and contributed to the narrowing of the gender wage gap.' It has not had adverse effects on employment; nor has it been inflationary.

This article appeared in The Observer on June 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
'Why has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment?' by David Metcalf, Discussion Paper No.781, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, April 2007.

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

How we have grown up in 50 years of change

Article refers to research by Anna Vignoles, of the LSE's Centre for Economics of Education, which has shown surprising changes in school life for the thousands of people in the study.

This article appeared in The Observer on May 20, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
Education Policy in the UK by Anna Vignoles and Stephen Machin, CEE Discussion Paper No.57, March 2006

Related Links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Use IT or lose it

Nick Bloom, of Stanford University, and Rafaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, of the London School of Economics, find that British factories of American multinationals are more productive than the country's other foreign-owned establishments, which in turn are sharper than locally owned rivals. The Americans not only use much more IT per worker, but they also exploit it more effectively: even for a given amount of IT capital, their productivity is higher.

This article appeared in the Economist on May 17, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005/6
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. - Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Office for National Statistics
'Americans do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 788, April 2007

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

On finding the silver lining behind every dark cloud

Article refers to research into happiness by Professor Richard Layard.

This article appeared in Gulf News on May 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details


Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 15/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

Young People Now - London UK

Youth unemployment: The real deal?

The New Deal's architecture was devised by Professor Richard Layard (CEP) and was based largely on studies of Sweden's labour market.

This article appeared in Young People Now - London UK on May 9, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4 - News

FactCheck: Labour's election pledge cards

John Van Reenen has estimated that the 'value added' by the New Deal programme amounts to around 17000 extra young people in work per year.

This broadcast was made on Channel 4 News on May 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Happiness tsar' warns of therapy funding shortage

Professor Richard Layard is concerned that patients suffering from anxiety and depression will not benefit unless cash is set aside for training up therapists.

This article appeared in The Independent on May 6, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Download

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 06/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

How to plant the seeds of happiness

Richard Layard suggests ‘happiness’ lessons in school: hour-long classes conducted by specialist teachers, to cover topics such as good parenting and critical attitudes towards the media.

This article appeared in The Sunday Telegraph on May 6, 2007
Link to article

Related publication The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard
Download


Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 06/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Face to faith

Richard Layard sees meditation as beneficial for both the body and the spirit and helpful in developing a positive outlook on life.

This article appeared in The Guardian on May 5, 2007
Link to archived 'comment is free'

Related publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 05/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

How to let happiness find you

Richard Layard is a leading proponent of the idea that public policy can make a real difference to the quantum of happiness in society. He argues that happiness can be taught in schools by raising children’s “emotional intelligence” and thereby helping them to understand what makes for happy lives.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on May 4, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Download

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

Further Press Cuttings
Earth times (USA)
Prof says kids must be taught happiness
Richard Layard, a Labor peer and professor of economics at the London School of Economics, said students should be taught how to manage feelings, proper attitudes about work and money, how to channel negative emotions and even how to take a critical view of the media.
ShortNews.com - The News Community
Professor recommends kids get happiness lessons
Richard Layard has recommended that British kids be given lessons in how to be happy.

News Posted: 04/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

ITV News

Schools need 'happiness lessons'

Professor Lord Layard, from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has called for a new generation of teachers specialising in emotional intelligence to spearhead a revolution in education.

This feature was on ITV News on May 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Download

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage



News Posted: 03/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

Clare Hall Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values'

Specialists Are Needed To Teach Values, Says Richard Layard

Delivering the Ashby Lecture at the University of Cambridge on Wednesday, 2nd May, Richard Layard will argue that we need a new specialty of teachers specifically trained to teach values. There are scientifically evaluated approaches to the teaching of emotional intelligence; they need to be used in every school.

More and more children are suffering from emotional disturbance and a major purpose of schools must be to help develop good and happy people. The study of Personal, Social and Health Education should continue to the age of 18, and university applicants should give evidence of good project work in this area.

Download the lecture 'The teaching of values'(PDF)

Related Links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage

Richard Layard's Home Page

Richard Layard's Wellbeing Research Programme



News Posted: 02/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation - which funds research into social policy - brought out a report on poverty among ethnic minority groups. Professor Stephen Machin interviewed on Radio 4.

This article appeared BBC Radio 4's The Today Programme on April 30, 2007
Link to broadcast

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills programme webpage

News Posted: 30/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The illusion of inclusion

According to The Cost of Exclusion by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, roughly one in five young people face a lifetime on benefits, running the risk of falling into crime and mental or physical ill-health.

This article appeared in The Independent on April 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Young People Now - April 11, 2007
Youth exclusion: Youth exlusion is costing the UK billions, say economists
Action to reduce youth exclusion could save the UK economy £3,650m a year, a report by the Centre for Economic Performance this week claims.
The Herald - April 11, 2007
A lesson for labour
Evening News 24 - April 11, 2007
the £62m cost of the jobless generation

Newsletter - April 11, 2007
Lack of jobs for young people 'is costing us millions'
Evening Chronicle - April 11, 2007
Huge cost of young jobless
Western Morning News - April 11, 2007
£5m cost of the lost generation
[No links available]

News Posted: 11/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Times

The 'lost generation' of young and jobless

The lifetime cost of educational underachievement will be £18 billion according the the report, The Cost of Exclusion by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. The report shows that by re-engaging young people and helping them turn their lives around, the UK economy could save billions.

This article appeared in The Times on April 10, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Herald

A disaster for Scotland

Research from the Centre for Economic Performance for The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group finds that 35,000 young people not in education, employment or training (NEETS) are costing Scotland a staggering £1.7bn a year. This is a disaster for the Scottish economy but worse - a tragedy for the thousands of youngsters who face a bleak future of long-term unemployment, poor health and early death.

This Editorial article appeared in The Herald on April 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Daily Record - April 10, 2007
£1.7 billion - the cost of lost generation
Focus - April 10, 2007
One in five young people rely on handouts
Evening Standard - April 10, 2007
£3.6bn cost of lost youth [No link]
Belfast Telegraph - April 10, 2007
Unemployed teens costing province £1.6m every week [No link]

News Posted: 10/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Labour's failure has lost us a generation

A large-scale study for The Prince's Trust by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj of the Centre for Economic Performance says that a 'lost generation' of unemployed young people is costing the economy billions of pounds a year in benefits, youth crime and educational under-achievement.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on April 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera

Mighty China

Linda Yueh joined David Frost on 'Frost Over the World' to discuss the challenges facing Chinese society today and whether an emergent China is really a threat to the world.

This item appeared on Al Jazeera television on April 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation programme webpage

News Posted: 07/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4 - News

Help get depressed off benefits

Richard Layard, a Professor of Economics, said every person receiving incapacity benefit because of mental problems was costing the state £750 per month. One in six people suffered from depression or anxiety disorders, yet only a quarter received any treatment, said Lord Layard, a Labour peer and founder of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This broadcast was made on Channel 4 News on April 3, 2007
Link to item

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

Birmingham Post

A workplace strategy focused on people

As a report from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE in October 2005 found, UK businesses have much to learn from their counterparts in the US in the way they use IT to improve productivity.

This article appeared in the Birmingham Post on April 3, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

Stumbling and Mumbling - 'blogosphere'

Metcalf on minimum wages

'Blogosphere’ coverage of David Metcalf’s paper asking why the National Minimum Wage has had so little effect on employment?

This article appeared in Stumbling and Mumbling online on April 2, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment? by David Metcalf. Discussion Paper No.781, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, April 2007.

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets webpage

News Posted: 02/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Toronto Star

Don't worry, be happy...or not?

An explosion in happiness research has consistently shown for some time now that the link between rising income and rising well-being has broken down. Leading British economist Richard Layard is among a fast-proliferating group of economists paying attention to this paradox at the centre of modern society.

This article appeared in The Toronto Star (Canada) on April 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Further press cuttings
The Sunday Telegraph - April 1, 2007
The real business
Some 15 per cent of the British population suffers from depression, and recent research from the London School of Economics says that this costs the economy more than pounds 17bn a year. Aim-listed Ultrasis hopes its Beating the Blues software will address this market and reward its 12,000 retail shareholders.

News Posted: 01/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Therapy on the cheap

The recent political interest in mental health is entirely driven by a concern to get levels of incapacity benefit down. What the government wants from mental health services is fast, cheap services. CBT has claimed to do just that and has been championed on Cif and in government by the economist Richard Layard.

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 29, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Allafrica.com

Zimbabwe: students' financial aid schemes vital

Article refers to 2005 research by LSE for the Sutton Trust, an education charity, which showed children born to poor families in Britain are less likely to fulfil their potential than in other developed countries.

This article appeared in Allafrica.com on March 29, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. Report for the Sutton Trust by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage

News Posted: 29/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Newshour

Linda Yueh was interviewed for the BBC World Service, "Newshour" to discuss the implications of Intel’s sizeable investment in China.

This interview was broadcast on March 26, 2007
[No direct link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Larger questions of urban sprawl

Research by economists [from the Centre for Economic Performance and University of Toronto] says sprawling neighbourhoods don't make people fat - they attract fat people.

This article appeared in The Observer on March 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
'Fat City: The Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Obesity' by Jean Eid, Henry G. Overman, Diego Puga and Matthew Turner, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.758, November 2006.
Urban Sprawl, article by Henry G. Overman in CentrePiece Vol.11, Issue 1, Summer 2006

Related Links
Henry G Overman webpage
Diego Puga webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Happy talk

At a ‘Wellbeing’ Conference, Richard Layard praises the advances made by positive psychology in the US – reductions in antisocial behaviour and depression. He supports a project to bring the scheme for 11-13 year olds to the UK.

This article appeared in The Observer on March 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 25/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

AlterNet - San Francisco, CA

Why having more no longer makes us happy

In the words of the economist Richard Layard, "We now know that what people say about how they feel corresponds closely to the actual levels of activity in different parts of the brain, which can be measured in standard scientific ways."

This article appeared in AlterNet - San Francisco, CA on March 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Race to close productivity gap

Britain has been slowly but steadily catching up in productivity to the US. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance points out: “Since the mid-1990s, American productivity growth has been exceptionally strong, so we have done well even to keep up.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further Press Cuttings
The Financial Times, Wednesday 22 March
The quest for improved productivity
Quote by John Van Reenen used again in article by Scheherazade Daneshkhu discussing the latest Budget announcement from Gordon Brown.
Link to article

News Posted: 21/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC News 24

World business report

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the progress of the WTO meeting in Jakarta. [No direct link]

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 - World on March 21, 2007
[No direct link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Sauk Valley

It's smart to invest in education

More than 80 percent of those in American prisons are high school dropouts. It costs about $22,000 annually to maintain each prisoner, demonstrating one cost of low educational attainment. In contrast, investing $4,800 per child in preschool education can reduce teenage arrests by 40 percent. The United States spends about two per cent of its gross domestic product on crime patrol, and another two per cent of GDP is lost to crimes that occur, according to Richard Freeman, a Harvard and LSE professor.

Richard Freeman is a Senior Research Fellow with the Labour Markets Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Sauk Valley News (CA) on March 20, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Letting off steam

In an attempt to understand his anger, journalist Will Storr, asks Richard Layard, one of the country's most respected economists and the author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science about the loss of happiness.

This article appeared in The Observer on March 18, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Christian Today

Faith schools better when competitive, research suggests

Research suggests that faith schools that operate their own admissions get better results when they have competition. Using a sample of 200,000 pupils in England, an institute at the London School of Economics (LSE) has published a study of school choice, the BBC reports. Faith schools - outside local authority control - were compared with community schools to measure the impact of parental choice. Researchers say when a faith school has no competition, its results are lower.

This article appeared in Christian Today on March 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
The Educational Impact of Parental Choice and School Competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva published in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

School choice could 'widen divisions'

Writing in the journal CentrePiece, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva from CEP say that Tony Blair's drive to give parents more choice over schools for their children could widen social divisions.

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. In CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07.
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.056, Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, January 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Northamptonshire Evening Telegraph

School choice 'could widen divisions'

In an article in CentrePiece magazine (published by the Centre for Economic Performance, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva examine the impact of parental choice on schools.

This article appeared in the Northamptonshire Evening Telegraph on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. In CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.056, Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, January 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - UK

Faith schools get competitive

Faith schools which operate their own admissions get better results when they have competition, research suggests. An institute at the London School of Economics has published a study of school choice, using a sample of 200,000 pupils in England. The research from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, carried out by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, examines the impact of parental choice on schools, using a sample of 2,400 schools in south-east England.

This article appeared in the BBC News - UK
Link to article

Related Publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. Published in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.056, Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, January 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Life Style Extra - UK

Small carbon tax could double environment budget

In his study published in his Centre's journal CentrePiece, Dr Ralf Martin, of the Centre for Economic Performance, shows how a small carbon tax on US car owners could double world public spending on research into tackling global warming.

This article appeared in Life Style Extra - UK on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies by Ralf Martin. CEP Policy Analysis published in 2006.

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Australia Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) TV

Asia Pacific focus

Linda Yueh was interviewed on China and Asia's economic growth prospects.

This interview was broadcast on Australia Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) TV on March 13, 2007
[No link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Chemistry and Industry

EU closing transatlantic innovation gap

A recent report says that the EU is closing the innovation gap with the US and Japan. But experts are sceptical about the data used in the report and say that the EU continues to be hampered by a lack of early venture capital and a lacklustre performance in securing patents. Chiara Criscuolo also has doubts about some of the figures used.

This article appeared in Chemistry and Industry Issue 5 on March 12, 2007
Link to issue

Related Links
Chiara Criscuolo is a British Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Chiara Criscuolo webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 12/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta

A demographic puzzle

As the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church puts it, the family sustains work if it provides the serene background of leisure and education that an unstressed, confident workforce needs. Studies on the ‘economics of happiness’, such as the recent one by Professor Layard, of the London School of Economics, support the general idea.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta on March 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 08/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

School admissions: the race for a place

Places at some oversubscribed schools can be allocated by lottery, also known as random selection. Dr Anna Vignoles, Co-Director of the Centre for the Economics of Education at CEP, says it breaks the link between where a pupil lives and a school. ‘It is likely to lead to less social segregation and some reduction in the prices of houses around good schools.’

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 6, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Anna Vignoles is a Co-Director (Institute of Education branch) of the Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Details
Education & Skills Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Computer Weekly

Productivity - why can't the UK keep up?

John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance discusses reasons why the UK cannot keep up with the US in productivity?

This article appeared in Computer Weekly on March 6, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Work life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Tobias Kretschmer webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World TV

World News Tonight

Linda Yueh was interviewed for BBC World News television on the agenda of China’s National People’s Congress (NPC) meeting.

BBC World News Television.
[No direct link to story.]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Research Programme webpage

Further press
March 5, 2007
Australian Broadcasting Corporation Radio National
Breakfast show
Australian radio broadcast an interview with Linda Yueh on the agenda of China’s National People’s Congress (NPC) meeting.
Listen to ‘China’s economic outlook’

News Posted: 05/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

The Governor of the Zimbabwean Reserve Bank has warned that President Mugabe's government is unable to provide adequate food supplies or maintain services in the country. Linda Yueh, Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, spoke on the programme about the economic position of Zimbabwe.

Linda Yueh was interviewed on The Today Programme on 2 March, 2007
Listen again (08.54am).

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Who said we were rational beings?

Article refers to research into Happiness, by LSE Emeritus Professor Richard Layard.

This article appeared in the THES on 2 March, 2007
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Buy online from Amazon

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 02/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Online Recruitment

IrishJobs.ie - benefits of mobile/flexible working will emerge in practice

IrishJobs.ie today pledged its support for Work Life Balance Day 2007 on 1 March. The recent Work-Life Balance survey by The London School of Economics, concluded that well managed firms do not work ‘harder’ but ‘smarter’.

This article appeared in Online Recruitment on 1st March, 2007
Link to article.

Also in
ElectricNews - For the record
Online recruitment firm IrishJobs.ie used Thursday's Work Life Balance Day 2007 to advise that changes in work practice would require a "change in culture". Results from a recent survey by the London School of Economics showed that well managed firms worked 'smarter', rather then 'harder'. "The IrishJobs.ie Childcare Survey revealed a call for choice and options in the area of childcare choice and quality of life are inextricably linked," said Valerie Sorohan, marketing manager at IrishJobs. Link to article.

One Stop Click - IT infrastructure investment 'good for productivity'
A new study has backed investment in IT infrastructure as an effective way of improving overall company productivity. ’There is a lot of evidence that IT spending does increase productivity. But the main message is that it is not just IT alone. It is about spending smarter and making changes to the rest of the business,’ said John Van Reenen LSE Link to article.

Related Publications
Global Information Technology Report 2005-2006 published by the World Economic Forum. http://www.weforum.org/en/initiatives/gcp/Global%20Information%20Technology%20Report/GlobalInformationTechnology(See chapter 2.2: 'Information Technology and Productivity, or 'It Ain’t What You Do, It’s the Way that You Do I.T.' by John Van Reenen and Raffaella Sadun, pp.55-60.)

‘It Ain’t What You Do, It’s the Way that You Do I.T. – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen http://www.statistics.gov.uk/articles/nojournal/sadun_bvr25.pdf

‘Work Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity’ by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen http://cep.lse.ac.uk/management/worklifebalance_research.pdf

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Raffaella Sadun's webpage
Nick Bloom's webpage
Tobias Kretschmer's webpage
Productivity and Innovation research group webpage


News Posted: 01/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC

BBC News 24

Linda Yueh was interviewed on BBC News 24 to discuss Tesco's foray into China.

Related Links
Linda Yueh's webpage

News Posted: 26/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Wellbeing is not about the individual - it's about relationships

While starting from urgent and appropriate concerns, both Oliver James and Richard Layard, cited by Madeleine Bunting as key players in the "politics of wellbeing", risk promoting the very individualism they identify as being the cause of 'social recession'.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related publication
The Depression Report by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

For a full list of articles in the Politics of Wellbeing debate click here



News Posted: 22/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Donations to clarity

In an article about the debate on the politics of wellbeing at the House of Commons, CEP's Richard Layard mentioned as one of the participants in the debate.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage



News Posted: 22/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Money or your life

It has always been the guiding light of progressive politicians: that there is more to life than money; that there is such a thing as society. Richard Layard’s recent book, Happiness: Lessons from a New Science and Oliver James’ Affluenza, are important reminders that the efficiency of our economy is not the dictator of our policies.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 21, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

La Tribune

Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
[No direct link to article available.]

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
Details

‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
Details

Related link
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage
Richard Jackman webpage

News Posted: 20/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Wanted: an Erich Fromm party

…don’t look either to short-term fixes like the cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) advocated by Richard Layard. Instead, turn to the work of Erich Fromm…

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 20, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related Publications
The Depression Report by Richard Layard


Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage



News Posted: 20/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The nasty country

The most influential advocate of happiness being a proper subject for government in recent years has been the economist Richard Layard with his book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 19, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage



News Posted: 19/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Ireland 'News Talk' Radio

The Wide Angle

Linda Yueh took part in a panel discussion from 11am discussing the growth of the Chinese economy
Listen again (subscription only).

Related Links
Linda Yueh's webpage
Globalisation Programme Website

News Posted: 18/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

CNN

World Business Tonight

Linda Yueh appears in a package on CNN, ‘World Business Tonight’ discussing Chinese investment in the City of London

No Link

News Posted: 16/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

New Zealand Herald - Auckland

Simon Caulkin: Gravy train must hit the buffers

All these are proven contributors to job satisfaction and productivity; and, as Richard Layard and other economists are beginning to show…

This article appeared in the New Zealand Herald on 16 February, 2007
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 16/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

It's a mad world

Richard Layard's Happiness Forum meetings and his research into 'wellbeing' featured in the column by Oliver James.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report by Richard Layard
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

News Posted: 16/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Socialist Worker

Downwardly mobile

A Report from the Centre for Economic Performance for the Sutton Trust published in 2005 is cited in this article in the Socialist Worker (Issue 2037, 10th February). The article says that it is harder for disadvantaged people to progress in society now than it was when the present Prime Minister came to office.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker online on February 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Gravy train of big business must hit the buffers

Sustainability is not just about green issues - without their social and economic equivalents, environmental initiatives are just greenwash. It's also about being fair, secure, in control of the job, and, unfashionable as it is, relatively equal. All these are proven contributors to job satisfaction and thence to productivity; and, as Richard Layard and other economists are beginning to show, to overall happiness and welfare, which are the point of economic activity.

This article appeared in The Observer on February 4, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

Political happiness

Despite a sharp rise in material wealth over the past 40 years the average level of reported happiness has remained static. The factoid is most often wielded by the political left in its battle against excessive materialism, inequality and competition which, it believes, are at the root of the “status anxiety” that makes us less happy than we should be. In Britain, for example, one of the key figures in the happiness debate is Richard Layard, the LSE economics professor and Labour peer, who advocates higher taxes on the rich to mitigate status anxiety.

This article appeared on the joint Washington Post.com/Newsweek online website on February 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Momentous modelling

Nick Bloom's research into the effects on the economy of the unknown - of 'shocks' - the Economics Focus in this week's issue of The Economist.

This article appeared in The Economist on February 2, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Esitmationa nd a 9/11 Simulation by Nick Bloom. Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Seven steps to having a happier life

Richard Layard reports in his book Happiness: Lessons from a new Science that (American) people's level of happiness has not increased at all despite a tripling of the average disposable income since the late 1950s.

This article appeared in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel - Milwaukee, WI, USA on February 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

A lost opportunity

A golden decade has transformed the economy less than it should have done. Mention of a study by John Van Reenen and Nick Bloom of the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE with McKinsey, that concluded that British managers are partly at fault.

This article appeared in The Economist on February 1, 2007
Link to article (Subscription necessary).

Related Publications
Management Practices Across Firms and Nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen, December 2004.
Management Practices: the Impact on Company Performance by Nick Bloom. Published in CentrePiece Vol.10, Issue 2, Summer 2005.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

News-Medical.net

Money cannot buy you happiness

"For example, as Professor Richard Layard of the LSE emphasises, improving health, particularly mental health, would be an effective way of making people ...
This artical featured in News-Medical.net on 29 January, 2007. Link to article

Related Links
The Depression Report Click to download
Richard Layard's webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Main Wire

Experts doubt BOE Blanchflower claims pay to be restrained

Academic economists say the current pay round is a good test case of how the UK labour market will respond to a sharp rise in inflation, and said that predicting the outcome is tricky. ‘Inflation has been really subdued for quite some time,’ said LSE Professor Alan Manning. Manning says that, thanks to the sharp pick-up in December inflation, experts will soon be finding out what the response will be of the modern UK labour market to sharply rising prices. (Source: Lexis Nexis News.

This article appeared in The Main Wire on January 29, 2007
No link to article available.

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

Successful business needs more than family

Recent evidence from McKinsey & Company and the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics concludes that family businesses managed by the eldest son fare significantly poorer on measurements like productivity, market share, sales growth and market valuation compared to those run by outside executives.

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK's Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries' by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

How, under Labour, a working-class baby now has 'far less chance' of getting ahead in society

James Kirkup, Political Editor of The Scotsman queries the Labour Government's claim that "This is not just a Britain of social mobility for some, it is a Britain where opportunity is open to all" citing the joint Sutton Trust and Centre for Economic Performance Report by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Scotsman on January 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Sutton Trust and CEP Report, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent - Sunday Review

Happy Now?

As a nation we are more affluent than ever. Yet, we only seem to be getting gloomier…William Leith takes a personal journey to the heart of our collective darkness.
Richard Layard’s book Happiness and comments on depression cited extensively.

This article appeared in the Independent on January 21, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard. Buy online from Amazon
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. Download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage



News Posted: 21/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

New Quest in British politics: public happiness

"There has been no upward trend in happiness despite the fact that we are richer, healthier and have longer holidays." says Richard Layard, an economist and advisor to the British government on happiness. "That is the challenge to government policy and to our own lifestyle."

This article appeared in Gulf News on January 19, 2007
Link to article.

Further press mentions of Richard Layard – no available links

Monday January 15, 2007
Politiken
Lykkekurven stikger ikke med flere penge…og Labour-politiker Richard Layard opfordret til, at…

Thursday January 18, 2007
Leeuwarder Courant
Economie en Geluk
…de Britse econoom Richard Layard dat een grotere…

Friday January 19, 2007
El Pais
Felicidad e ingresos, GUILLERMO DE LA DEHESA…
…ingles (hoy lord) richard Layard, que ha publicado…

News Posted: 19/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

What's a smile worth?

The Government wants to cut welfare costs by improving people’s mental health, but academics have questions about the proposed ways and means…. Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance suggests a sweeping overhaul to improve access to psychological therapy services but the proposals are creating divisions among academics with an interest in mental health.

This article appeared in the THES on January 19, 2007

No direct link to article Download pdf.

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard. Buy online from Amazon
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. Download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage



News Posted: 19/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo News USA

National Stock Exchange Names Andrew B. Bernard and Dennis C. Cuneo to Board of Directors

Lists affiliations of Andrew B. Bernard – including that he is a Research Associate of CEP.

This article appeared in Yahoo News USA on January 17, 2007
Link to article.
Original press release from the National Stock Exchange Inc

Related Links
Andrew B. Bernard is an Associate of the Globalisation research programme at CEP.
Globalisation research programme webpage
For a list of CEP Discussion Papers Andrew Bernard has co-authored go to: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/author.asp?author=bernard

News Posted: 17/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

CBS News - NYC

UK's New Hot Button Issue: Happiness

Richard Layard, quoted as an economist and advisor to the British government on happiness.

This article appeared on CBS News online on January 17, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard. Buy online from Amazon

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage



News Posted: 17/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Christian Science Monitor

New quest in British politics

… after decades in which Western nations have gotten richer but not necessarily happier, a new performance indicator….is beginning to emerge. Some simply call it happiness….

This article appeared in the Christian Science Monitor on Janury 17, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard. Buy online from Amazon
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. Download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage

News Posted: 17/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

A war on depression makes economic sense

With 1m people drawing incapacity benefits due to mental illness, Richard Layard urges government to see the long-term economic benefits of investing now in psychotherapy services for those people trying to cope with the affliction

This article appeared in the Financial Times on January 8, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard: Download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage  The Mental Health Policy Group webpage The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Statesman, Ghana

Moving up the social ladder is never easy

Article refers to LSE research that has shown that early cognitive development, measured in children as young as 22 months, predicts final qualifications about 25 years later.

This article appeared in the Statesman on January 8, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Pre-school Educational Inequality? British Children in the 1970 Cohort Leon Feinstein, September 1998 Paper No' CEPDP0404

Related Links
Leon Feinstein is an Associate of the Education and Skills research programme at CEP. He is also the Director of the Centre for Research on the Wider Benefits of Learning, Institute of Education, London. VIew webpage

News Posted: 08/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Buddy, can you spare a billion?

These days, millionaires are 10 a penny, especially in Britain. So how much do you really need to be properly, and filthily, rich? Lord Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, says: ‘Most people feel 10 per cent more money would make a huge difference. They are mostly wrong. They would just adjust their expenditure up again, and go back to where they were before.’

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on January 7, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Buy it online

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage


News Posted: 07/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Here's looking at you

A article looking at various case studies of people with problems such as debt, overweight or suffering from depression. Refers to research by the LSE which found only one in four people who suffer from depression or chronic anxiety receive treatment.

This article appeared in The Observer on January 7, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard: download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 07/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Age

Count your blessings

Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, provides one prominent example of the transformation that some dismal scientists have undergone.

This article appeared in The Age online on January 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman Details
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 07/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Rai 1 TV

Sabato, Domenica and...

Marco Manacorda was interviewed by Rai 1 TV for the programme called ‘Sabato, Domenica &…’ about youths in Italy.

No recording available.
Sabato, Domenica &... webpage.

Related Publications
‘Mamma's Boys? Why Most Young Italian Men Live With their Parents’ by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti in CentrePiece magazine, Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.
‘Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure. Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents?’ by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, CEP Discussion Paper No 536.

Related Links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets research programme webpage

News Posted: 06/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Moving up the social ladder is never easy

Even before formal education starts, parenting has arguably an even more important effect. Researchers at LSE have shown that early cognitive development, measured in children as young as 22 months, predicts final qualifications about 25 years later. The explanation is intuitive: parents set the standards that most children aspire to surpass.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on January 6, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Pre-school Educational Inequality? British Children in the 1970 Cohort Leon Feinstein, September 1998 Paper No' CEPDP0404

Related Links
Leon Feinstein is an Associate of the Education and Skills research programme at CEP. He is also the Director of the Centre for Research on the Wider Benefits of Learning, Institute of Education, London. VIew webpage

News Posted: 06/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance Magazine

School segregation not decreasing

Researchers from the London School of Economics, in their study Are schools drifting apart? published by the DfES on 2 January, found there is still a 30 percentile difference in the average ability of pupils entering the best and worst state secondary schools in England — a gap that has not changed since 1996.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on January 5, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Are Schools Drifting Apart? Intake Stratification in English Secondary Schools by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj
December 2006, Paper No. CEEDP0064 - Link to paper

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons' webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj's webpage
Centre for the Economic Of Education homepage
Education and Skills research programme webpage

News Posted: 05/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

South Wales Echo

Consultant radical vision for capitalism

CHINESE leaders and representatives of some of the world's biggest companies are turning to a St Davids-based consultancy for corporate guidance which fuses idealism and business acumen.
Article refers to Richard Layard’s report on mental health, that ‘identified improving mental health as a priority for Britain’

This article appeared in icWales Online on January 5, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard: download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Spiked

There is no 'paradox of prosperity'

Economic growth does not make people happier, the pursuit of mass affluence is at best futile and is probably responsible for making humanity miserable. Article refers to the Richard Layard’s book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, in which he states ‘There is a paradox at the heart of our lives. Most people want more income and strive for it. Yet as Western societies have got richer, their people have become no happier.’

This article appeared in Spiked Online on January 5, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Buy it online

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The World Tonight

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the programme discussing the reports that the Chinese city of Guangzhou is expected to become the first in the country to reach the economic standard of developed nations.

There is no link to this broadcast
The World Tonight homepage.

Also on
CNBC Europe
Squawk Box
Linda Yueh also featured in broadcast discussing China’s economic outlook.
Squawk Box homepage

Related Links
Linda Yueh's webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage

News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Calcutta Telegraph, India

The secret of India's unhappiness

The constant search for new measurements to assess the quality of life continues. Politicians in the West espouse such efforts as an aid to governance. David Cameron has said that ‘improving society’s sense of well-being is the central political challenge of our time’. Well-being may not be quite the same as happiness, but the concept obviously owes a great deal to the work of another economist and Labour peer, Lord Layard of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Calcutta Telegraph on January 3, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Buy it online

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Times

Seeking the elusive state

Happiness is the buzzword for the New Year….Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, studied stress felt by the unemployed and concluded that stressful unemployment is no longer Britain's No. 1 social problem. More workers are on the dole not because they can't find work, but because they're too depressed and stressed out to work, or look for work.

This article appeared in the Washington Times on January 1, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications:
Happiness - Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard. Buy online from Amazon
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. Download pdf

Related Links:
Richard Layard's webpage

News Posted: 01/01/2007      [Back to the Top]