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News and Press

News Archive 2005

The New York Times

Recalculating what money can't buy

According to the economist Richard Layard, author of "Happiness: Lessons From a New Science", humans cling to the notion that happiness and money are linked. One quotation in Professor Layard's book is credited to Woody Allen: "Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Professor Layard points out that the research on this topic suggests that we would all be a lot happier if we understood the true effect of money on our psyches.

This article appeared in the New York Times on December 31, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard's staff biography page

News Posted: 31/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

Eastern Daily Press

Educational opportunity is declining in modern Britain

Peter Lampl, a successful businessman, has returned to Britain and established the Sutton Trust, which provides educational help to children from less privileged backgrounds. Research from the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the LSE, commissioned by the trust found that social mobility in the UK is lower than in other Western countries and is falling. This is because access to good education is based on wealth, in contrast to the grammar school system where it was based on brains.

This article appeared in the Eastern Daily Press on December 20, 2005
No link to article available.

Related Publications

Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002 Paper No' CEEDP0026

Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage

News Posted: 20/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

EU misses chance for change with farm subsidies

..."The CAP has several negative effects,"' the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance said in an analysis."

This article appeared in Bloomberg News online on December 20, 2005
Link to article
It appeared again in the New Zealand Herald on December 22, 2005
Link to article

CEP Policy Analysis Fighting over Peanuts? The European Union Budget by Henry Overman.

News Posted: 20/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

Washington Times

The EU in Hong Kong

Andrew Charlton, LSE, comments on the World Trade Organisation meeting in Hong Kong.

This article appeared in the Washington Times on December 17, 2005
Link to article

Further Reading
CEP Policy Analysis, The Doha Round: Freer and Fairer Trade? by Andrew Charlton, a Research Officer with the CEP Globalisation Programme.

News Posted: 17/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

Business Day, South Africa

Only sacrifice and compromise can prevent a Hong Kong flop

Comments from former World Bank chief economist Joseph Stiglitz and Andrew Charlton of LSE on the liberalisation of European agriculture and the World Trade Organisation talks in Hong Kong.

This article appeared online in Business Day (South Africa) on December 14, 2005
Link to article

Further Reading
CEP Policy Analysis, The Doha Round: Freer and Fairer Trade? by Andrew Charlton, a Research Officer with the CEP Globalisation Programme.

News Posted: 14/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

The Doha round is missing the point on helping poor countries

Joseph Stiglitz and Andrew Charlton comment on the economic implications of the Doha trade talks on the world’s poor countries. Joseph Stiglitz is a Nobel Prize winner in economics in 2001. His new book, Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development, co-authored with Andrew Charlton of CEP, is published this month by Oxford University Press.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on December 13, 2005

Related Reading

CEP Policy Analysis, 'The Doha Round: Freer and Fairer Trade?'

News Posted: 13/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

Scotland on Sunday

Class divide: now it's even harder for poor to get on

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, that compared children born in the 1950s and the 1970s and found that greater educational opportunities disproportionately benefited those from better-off backgrounds.

This article appeared in Scotland on Sunday on 11 December, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications

Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002 Paper No' CEEDP0026

Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage

News Posted: 11/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

The poor are being robbed in Labour's class war

A recent LSE study showed that the UK was the most socially immobile of eight similar advanced western countries, the others being Canada, Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and the U.S. The main reason cited was disparity in educational opportunity, and the increasing link between family income and educational achievement.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on December 8, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. CEE Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002

News Posted: 08/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Walking the happy talk

Richard Layard's research into 'wellbeing' and his book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science discussed as having an important influence on placing mental health at the centre of government concerns.

This article appeared in The Guardian on November 30, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: lessons from a new science

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage

The CEP Wellbeing Programme

News Posted: 30/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Physical attraction of science runs low

Dr Sandra McNally of the Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, comments on the current trend in UK schools where pupils are becoming less attracted to science-related subjects.

This article appeared in The Guardian, 28 November, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas, written with Stephen Machin, Costas Meghir et al. Report and Summary.



News Posted: 28/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Longer lives should be celebrated

Richard Layard favours discouraging growth in material possessions, because he believes happiness depends more on comparisons with others than on absolute attainment.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on November 25, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage

News Posted: 25/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Copper bottom

Dr Linda Yueh quoted regarding the credibility of China as a trading partner.

This article appeared in The Observer on 20 November, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh's staff biography page.

Further Information

News Posted: 20/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

Entorno

Un laboratorio contra el fracaso escolar

A group of international experts offer opinions as to what policies may help towards solving problems of education in Spain. Steve Machin of CEP speaking about the UK Literacy and Numeracy schemes.

This article appeared in the Entorno on November 19, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Large benefits, low costs by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 9/1, Spring 2004.

The Literacy Hour by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally CEE Discussion Paper No.43 published December 2004



News Posted: 19/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

Business Recorder

Will a bigger salary make you happier?

Professor Richard Layard author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, cites research which implies that despite extensive economic growth since 1950, in the United States, people are not happier than they were before the 1950s. And this same theory holds true in other wealthy, developed nations such as Japan and the UK.

This article appeared in the Business Recorder on 15 November, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, published by Penguin books.

News Posted: 15/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Why UK plc offers little resistance to the embrace of foreign suitors

The UK welcomes foreign-run companies and foreign investment. John Van Reenen, says multinationals pay higher wages and are more productive.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on November 2, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage

The Productivity and Innovation Research Programme at CEP.

News Posted: 02/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek

Why bad managers do matter

Bad bosses get a lot of abuse from workers but not much attention from economists. Now, however, a new study by McKinsey & Co. and the Centre for Economic Performance in London says the quality of corporate management accounts for at least 20 percent of the difference between a highly productive national economy and a sluggish one.

This article appeared in Newsweek (U.S. edition) on October 31, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
The joint McKinsey Group/CEP Report, Management Practices across Firms and Nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen was published in June 2005.

Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen published the article Management practices; the impact on company performance in the Summer 2005 issue of CentrePiece Magazine.

Related Links
The Productivity and Innovation research programme at CEP.

News Posted: 31/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Is everyone a winner?

The Department for Work and Pensions has demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy may be effective in stopping people leaving work because of mental illness and in getting people back to work. Richard Layard quoted as saying that there are more people on incapacity benefit with a mental health problem than there are unemployed, and that 90 per cent of those do not have a severe mental illness.

This article appeared in The Times Online on October 29, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard is Director of the CEP Wellbeing Programme.

Richard Layard's webpage.

News Posted: 29/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

UK's output lags in retail and financial services

Studies have put a large part of America's strong productivity performance down to an IT-driven surge in efficiency in retailing. A study by the Centre for Economic Performance suggested that 80 per cent of the performance gap was down to the effectiveness with which IT was used.

This article appeared in The Times on 25 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Joint CEP/ONS Report It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - IT investment effects for US and other firms by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.

Further management practices across firms and nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen.

Related Links
The Productivity and Innovation research programme at CEP.

News Posted: 25/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

EU set for clash on 'Anglo-Saxon' versus 'social' welfare models

Before the summit of the European Union at Hampton Court, the journalist Nicholas Timmins poses the question 'Does much of mainland Europe need to break up its "social model" welfare state in favour of an "Anglo-Saxon" model along UK and US lines? Richard Layard replies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 21 October, 2005
Link to article



News Posted: 21/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

French Institute

Gross National Happiness (Training one's mind and monitoring society's happiness)

18 October at 6.30 pm

Richard Layard, economist, professor at the London School of Economics, member of the House of Lords and author (Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Penguin, 2005) and Matthieu Ricard, former molecular biologist, Buddhist monk, interpreter for H.H. the Dalai-Lama, photographer and author (Le plaidoyer pour le bonheur, Nil editions, 2003, Happiness, a guide to developing life’s most important skill, Little Brown, New-York, forthcoming May 2006) will debate on how to train our minds in order to develop in ourselves conditions that generate happiness and how we could monitor the development of happiness in our countries as closely as we monitor the development of income. The basic aim should be the sense of an overall purpose wider than oneself.

Matthieu Ricard and Richard Layard will sign their books after the conference.

Price: £20/£10 (students): advance booking: 020 7073 1350 With the generous support of the French Institute.

The French Institute
17 Queensberry Place
London SW7 2JR
Location: Cinema


See also http://www.institut-francais.org.uk

All the profits will be devoted entirely to humanitarian projects in Nepal and in Tibet.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP

News Posted: 18/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

UK tax system turns off investors, report says

Last month, the World Economic Forum said the UK has slid in a global league table of competitiveness, while a CEP Report (produced with the McKinsey Group) found that British managers came fourth in a survey of 730 manufacturers in the UK, US, France and Germany.

This article appeared in The Independent on 17 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Management practices across firms and nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen. This report, published in September 2005, was co-produced with McKinsey and Company.

Management practices: the impact on company performance in CentrePiece Vol.10, Issue 2, Summer 2005.

Related Links
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme at CEP.

News Posted: 17/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Retailers must adapt to evolving markets

US retailers show a much sharper improvement in 'total factor productivity'. In the UK, retailers have had a more modest improvement. Recent research by John Van Reenen, Raffaella Sadun and Nick Bloom of CEP suggests that UK managements need to use IT as effectively as their US counterparts.

This article appeared in The Times on 17 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanation of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates' , report published with the ONS.

Related Links
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme at CEP.

News Posted: 17/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The L.A. Times

Who says money can't buy happiness? People who have something to look forward to -- like a better life -- are more satisfied than those without hope in poor nations

Johan Norberg is a fellow at the Swedish think tank, Timbro. In an article printed in The Los Angeles Times on 16 October, 2005 he argues against some of the conclusions propounded in Richard Layard's book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science.
No direct link.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Details available online.

Related Links
The Wellbeing Research Programme at CEP.

News Posted: 16/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times Educational Supplement

Foster to Question Quality of Managers

Professor Richard Layard was a speaker at the TES Learning and Skills Symposium that was held on Wednesday 12 October 2005. He spoke on the future and importance of Apprenticeships as part of a government inquiry into further education.

This article appeared in The Times Educational Supplement on 14 October, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
A full report following the TES Symposium has been published and is available to download. See Vision 2010 Symposium

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage

CEP Skills for All research programme.

News Posted: 14/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Register online

US firms get more for their IT bucks

A CEP study, led by John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance suggests that investment in IT combined with how a business is organised can increase productivity dramatically. The study was carried out with the Office of National Statistics.

This article appeared in the The Register Online on 14 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.

Related Links
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme at CEP.

News Posted: 14/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

IT Week.com

IT's Business Value Endorsed

Technology investment has a subtantial, quantifiable impact on business productivity according to Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in a report published with the Office of National Statistics (ONS).

This article appeared on the IT Week website
Link to article

Related Publication
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates

News Posted: 12/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Richard Layard: Head start to happiness

Huw Richards interviews Richard Layard, who says the economy will benefit if money is spent on mental health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 11 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Links The Wellbeing Research Programme

News Posted: 11/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

It's the way you do it

Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen of CEP suggest that the greater use of information technology by US subsidiaries and a higher return from their IT investment attribute to the difference in output of US-owned plants in Britain and British-owned ones: output per hour in US-owned plants was almost 40 per cent higher than in British-owned plants.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 10 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publication
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates

Related Links
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme

Also mentioned in EGovMonitor.com, PublicTechnology.net, Tenders Direct, FinFacts Business News, What PC, El Pais, and Silicon.com



News Posted: 10/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

IT Week.com

US firms make better use of IT

US firms are 40 per cent more productive than those in the UK largely owing to the better use of IT, according to the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE.

This article appeared on IT Week online on 6 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates

News Posted: 06/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

Press Release

Information technology boosts UK productivity - but US-owned firms do I.T. better

John Van Reenen together with Nick Bloom and Raffaella Sadun publish a joint investigation with the Office for National Statistics (ONS), sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). The research paper titled It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do I.T.: testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates indicates that investment in new information and communications technologies (ICT) improves the productivity of UK businesses.
Link to article



News Posted: 06/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

It's good to see that the old class structure is alive and flourishing

Reference to LSE research that shows that a working-class child was far more likely to get on if he was born in the 1950s rather than the 1970s. Nick Cohen comments (following on from Hands off the NHS).

This article appeared in the Observer on 2 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002, Paper No' CEEDP0026
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling


News Posted: 02/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Technology kicks away the career ladder

Today's aspiring CEOs are finding it much harder to work their way up from the bottom than the generation before - poor children born in the 1970s were 30% less likely to improve their position in society than those born in the 1950s, according to research by Jo Blanden, Paul Greggand Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times Online on October 3, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002, Paper No' CEEDP0026
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling


News Posted: 02/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Classic comedy sketch on lack of social mobility has the last laugh

Reference to research by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE into social mobility.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 30 September, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Social mobility in Britain: low and falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Spring 2005
Intergenerational mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Report produced for the Sutton Trust.
Changes in intergenerational mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. CEE Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

News Posted: 30/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Fears about job destruction proved to be unfounded

In a study on the impact of the national minimum wage, the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE concluded that 'there is no evidence of significant job losses for the workers most affected by the minimum wage and there have been no obvious knock-on effects on the wages of better-paid workers'.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 30 September, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
The article in the FT draws on the CEP published Election Analysis 'The National Minimum Wage: the evidence of its impact on jobs and inequality' by Mirko Draka, spring 2005.

Related Publications
The employment effects of the October 2003 increase in the National Minimum Wage
Richard Dickens and Mirko Draca, June 2005
Paper No. CEPDP0693

Has the National Minimum Wage reduced UK wage inequality?
Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, June 2002
Paper No. CEPDP0533

News Posted: 30/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The World Economic Forum

Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006



Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006: Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Michael E. Porter, Klaus Schwab and Augusto Lopez-Claros produced by The World Economic Forum was published on 28 September 2005. The study is produced in collaboration with a distinguished group of international scholars, and a global network of over 100 leading national research institutes and business organisations. It presents individual detailed assessments of 117 developed and emerging economies. It also showcases the latest thinking and research on issues of immediate relevance for business leaders and policy-makers. This year's Global Competitiveness Report includes a chapter by Professor Richard Layard titled 'Full Employment for Europe'. (Contents.)

A full description and purchase details are available on the Palgrave Macmillan website.

Related Links
Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP.

Related publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. The revised version of this book was published on 20 January 2005 by Oxford University Press.

News Posted: 28/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

IZA - Institute for the Study of Labor

IZA Prize in Labor Economics 2005 goes to Dale Mortensen and Christopher Pissarides

IZA Prize in Labor Economics 2005

Christopher Pissarides, Macro Programme Director at CEP awarded the IZA Prize in Labor Economics.

Christopher Pissarides Together with Dale T. Mortensen (Northwestern University) were honoured for their contributions to the analysis of markets with search and matching friction.
Link to article



News Posted: 28/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Legacy of '68

Reference to research by Eric Maurin, of Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques and Sandra McNally, LSE, that shows France's short-lived 'revolution' of May 1968. very positive effects for affected students and is of contemporary relevance given the current debate about widening access to higher education.

This article appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education September 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Vive la Révolution! Long term returns of 1968 to the angry students , Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper 49, June 2005

Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, 'Children of the revolution', CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 23/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Work: Question of the week: Once pay and conditions, now cheap PCs ... what's the point of trade unions?

Like pensions, the issue that most excites their general secretaries these days, unions seemed a good idea 30 years ago, but now appear close to worthless. If trade unionism is still a movement, its direction is down.

"In 1980, workers in a union earned, on average, 10% more than those who weren't members," says Professor David Medcalf, of the London School of Economics, but now unions have lost much of their collective bargaining power, that extra bulge in pay packets is no longer there.

This article appeared The Guardian on September 17, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 17/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Work: It's good to talk

For most, counselling is a second career - but it's not a quick fix, finds Matt Keating. According to Richard Layard, LSEand Downing Street adviser, the NHS needs an extra 10,000 therapists. He believes that talking treatments are as important as prescription drugs to help the 3 million people suffering from depression in the UK.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 17, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 17/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

People Management

Highway to Hell?

The gathering of the TUC in Brighton saw the trade union movement at a watershed. David Metcalf and Brendan Barber, general secretary of the TUC debate the future of trade unions - resurgence or perdition?

This article appeared in People Management on 15 September, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Trade Unions: Resurgence or Demise? Sue Fernie and David Metcalf, Editors. Published by Routledge, July 2005

Related Links
CentrePiece Vol 10, Issue 2 webpage



News Posted: 15/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Time to pay attention to management succession

Reference to research conducted jointly by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance and McKinsey, looking at 730 manufacturing companies in France, Germany, the UK and the US, shows just how broadly management practices vary.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on September 15, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy,Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen:Management Practices across Firms and Nations

Related Links
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy,Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen:Management practices; the impact on company performance CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 15/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

"We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Full text: David Davis at the IPPR

The Tory leadership hopeful stakes his claim to being a 'compassionate conservative' including his concern over social mobility in Britain

With reference to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517



News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Teachers pay money no mind

Research carried out by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance finds that "only a small minority" of classroom teachers are likely to respond to performance-related pay.

This article appeared in the Times Online on September 13, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
David Marsden and Richard Belfield, Performance Pay for Teachers: Linking Individual and Organisational-Level Targets, CEP Discussion Paper No 703, August 2005

Related Links
David Marsden and Richard Belfield, Performance pay for teachers, CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 13/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

Agence France Presse

British unions, lacking power, eye merger

Faced with falling memberships and waning influence on the political stage, three of Britain's biggest trade unions are contemplating a merger that could see almost 2.6 million workers under one roof. Such a merger would lead to the birth of a union whose membership would rival that of the German union Verdi. A recent report by LSE, entitled Trades Union, Resurgence or Demise?, suggests that membership has dropped also owing to unions' structure and management -- a point backed up by TUC General Secretary Brendan Barber

This article appeared Agence France Presse on September 13, 2005
No Link

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 13/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Securing a future for the unions is not bound up in mergers

Letter by Prof Gregor Gall, University of Hertfordshire, highlighting the study by LSE on unions.

This article appeared The Financial Times on September 13, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 13/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

British productivity still lagging behind output of American and French workers

Dr Nick Bloom, of the Centre of Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said that while data on productivity was unreliable, most of it suggested that productivity growth in Britain seemed to be picking up at last.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 13, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy,Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen:Management Practices across Firms and Nations

Related Links
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy,Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen:Management practices; the impact on company performance CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 13/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Patients suffering depression 'need therapy more than pills'

Lord Layard, professor at LSE, who wrote the Downing Street strategy paper, Mental Health: Britain's Biggest Social Problem?, said there was a "mass of suffering" with half of all those with clinical depression receiving no help.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on September 12, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications:

The Sun September 13, 2005
Britain's got the blues
Britain is suffering a national epidemic of depression, a Downing Street adviser said yesterday. Lord Richard Layard, LSE, claimed 10,000 extra therapists are needed to combat the problem.
Link to article

Guardian September 12, 2005
Call for action on depression epidemic
Plans for a national network of 250 psychological treatment centres to provide talking therapy for 1 million people a year are being considered by ministers to tackle a national epidemic of depression and anxiety. A framework for making behavioural therapy freely available under the NHS will be set out today by Lord Richard Layard, LSE and Downing Street adviser.
Link to article

India Monitor September 12, 2005
Call for action on depression epidemic
A framework for making behavioural therapy freely available under the NHS will be set out today by Lord Richard Layard, LSE and a Downing Street adviser who has convinced the prime minister that mental illness has become Britain's biggest social problem.
Link to article

Related links
For further information on Happiness see the Wellbeing research programme.

'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' is published by Allen Lane.

News Posted: 12/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Unhappiness 'is Britain's worst social problem'

In a lecture to be delivered to the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health today, Lord Layard, former professor of economics at LSE, will say mental illness causes more suffering than poverty and unemployment.

This article appeared in The Independent on September 12, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
For further information on Happiness see the Wellbeing research programme.

'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' is published by Allen Lane.

News Posted: 12/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

On Line Opinion, Australia

Time for mothers to raise their children, not their status

Much has been written in recent times on the phenomenon of "social comparison" or what is more commonly described as "keeping up with the Joneses". As London School of Economics professor emeritus Lord Richard Layard discusses in his new book, Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, as a society, we have become increasingly caught up in a status race, in which we constantly compare ourselves with others and try to keep up. (Layard: 2005) This is problematic because the status race is a "zero-sum game" - that is, there is only so much status to go around. If someone does "better", someone else must do worse. Accordingly, despite having all our material wants and needs satisfied, as a society we are not as happy as previous generations.

This article appeared in On Line Opinion on September 12, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
For further information on Happiness see the Wellbeing research programme.

'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' is published by Allen Lane.

News Posted: 12/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

Agence France Presse

Britain's unions to bring waning influence to bear on Blair

Britain's trade unions begin their annual gathering next week in the presence of Prime Minister Tony Blair, but only too aware that their influence, even on a Labour Party leader, is a far cry from that of the past. "With around 12 percent of privately employed workers as members, the future for private sector unionisation looks bleak," noted David Metcalf and Sue Fernie from LSE, in a recent report on unions.

This article appeared on Agence France Presse on September 09, 2005
No Link

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 09/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Plan to form super-union no threat to us, says TUC chief

According to David Metcalf, Professor of Industrial Relations at the London School of Economics, said: "There will be one union for the public sector and one for the private sector . . . why do you need the TUC?"

This article appeared in The Times on September 09, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 09/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

David Brent-Style Managers 'Have widened UK Productivity Gap With US'

British managers came a distant fourth in a survey of 730 manufacturers in the UK, US, France and Germany. It is further evidence that poor management practices made famous by TV's anti-hero, David Brent, are costing the UK billions of pounds in lost growth.

The report from the Centre for Economic Performance found that much of of one-fifth gap in productivity levels between the UK and US could be explained by inferior management.

This article appeared in The Independent on September 08, 2005
Link to article.(subscription needed)

Related Publications
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy,Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen:Management Practices across Firms and Nations

Related Links
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy,Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen:Management practices; the impact on company performance CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 08/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

TUC boss in 'superunion' warning

Brendan Barber has warned the leaders of three key UK unions not to turn their backs on the TUC if they amalgamate into a 'superunion'. The TUC general secretary was speaking as a report from LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance was published suggesting only 12 per cent of privately employed workers are union members and total union membership had fallen by five million since 1979.

This article appeared on BBC News Online on September 08, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

News Posted: 08/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Shrinking movement warned it must adapt or decline

A report by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE shows the creation of large super unions will not reverse the long-term decline in union membership or ease their financial problems unless they alter their strategies to suit the demands of a much- changed labour market. David Metcalf, professor of industrial relations at LSE, says that unions’ ability to negotiate higher wages for their members, one of the main drivers for recruitment, has dwindled as their bargaining position has weakened.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on September 08, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Book: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? Edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf (Routledge July 2005)

Article: Trade Unions Resurgence or Demise? CentrePiece, Summer 2005

Related Links
Channel 4 News United unions September 07, 2005

News Posted: 08/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

Liverpool Daily Post

Should poorer pupils be sent to private schools?

According to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust, of eight advanced countries Britain's social mobility is the lowest and mobility in Britain has actually declined in recent decades, in part because advances in education have disproportionately benefited the affluent.

This article appeared in the Liverpool Daily Post on August 30, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517



News Posted: 30/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Sits vac: Teacher, carer, thatcher,Jeeves ...

Barbara Oaff looks at the best UK careers for a new start. The Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, verifies earlier studies that point to a lack of economists, statisticians and mathematicians. After gaining a suitable degree, graduates can go on to work in any number of sectors, from pharmaceuticals to farming to fashion. Starting salaries go from £15,000 to £28,000.

This article appeared in The Observer on August 28, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
''What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK'' edited by Steve Machin and Anna Vignoles

Related Links
CEP's Education and Skills programme

News Posted: 28/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Twilight of the brotherhood

The steady spread of human resource management can help to explain why the British union movement is in such a crisis. Reference to research by David Metcalf, LSE, published earlier this year, which shows that unionised workplaces are no more likely to shut than non-unionised ones, as well as being no less productive. However, it appears that in unionised workplaces, employment grows 3 per cent slower, or declines 3 per cent faster, than in non-unionised organisations.

This article appeared in the Personnel Today on August 24, 2005
No Link

Related Publications
The book 'Trade Unions: Resurgence or Perdition?' edited by Sue Fernie and David Metcalf is soon to be published by Routledge. See Chapter 5: British Unions: Resurgence or Perdition? An Economic Analysis by David Metcalf.

Related Links
The Future of Unions programme

News Posted: 24/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

Business Standard, India

Pedagogues and Peddlers

Comments from Tobias Kretschmer, lecturer of strategy and economics with Interdisciplinary Institute of Management at LSE, on the interaction between academics and managers.

Dr Tobias Kretschmer is an associate of the productivity and innovation programme at CEP.

This article appeared in Business Standard, India on August 24, 2005
Link to article.

Related Links
Tobias Kretschmer's webpage

News Posted: 24/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Demand for NHS 'therapy network'

It is estimated that about one in four of us experience mental illness in our lifetimes. Lord Layard, a Labour peer and director of the centre for economic performance at LSE, says the therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and should work from a network of dedicated psychological centres across the country.

This article appeared on BBC News Online on August 22, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 22/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

Access All Areas

The growing performance gap between state and private schools is creating an educational apartheid, says Sir Peter Lampl. The best independent schools must be opened up to all children likely to benefit. Reference to research by LSE, which we also funded, social mobility in Britain has actually declined in recent decades, and of eight advanced countries Britain's mobility is the lowest.

This article appeared in The Sunday Telegraph, on August 21, 2005
No Link

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America



News Posted: 21/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC

From Our Own Correspondent: Stark reality of the American dream

Humphrey Hawksley writes:

'I had come to Seattle because of a recent survey by the Centre for Economic Performance in London, on how easy or difficult it was to get rich in different parts of the world - or if not rich, at least move out of poverty.

'"If you are born into poverty in the US," said one of its authors [Jo Blanden], "you are actually more likely to remain in poverty than in other countries in Europe, the Nordic countries, even Canada, which you would think would not be that different." '

This article appeared on the BBC, From Our Own Correspondent, on August 18, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America



News Posted: 18/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

We need a dramatic solution

The National Union of Students has warned the government to improve the education system so more people stay on after the age of 16. Reference to research from LSE, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, have found that British children from disadvantaged backgrounds have less chance of moving up the social ladder today than they did 20 years ago.

This article appeared on BBC News Online on August 18, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America



News Posted: 18/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Herald

Why streaming in schools helps pupils achieve more

But what exactly has the comprehensive system achieved? Earlier this year a study into social mobility carried out by the London School of Economics discovered that children born in 1970 were less likely to break free of their family background and fulfil their potential than children born in 1958.

The Sutton Trust, an educational charity which commissioned the LSE research, believes this decline in social mobility is partly due to the phasing out of grammar schools.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin

This article appeared in the The Herald Online on August 18, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America



News Posted: 18/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Universities need to do more to rescue academic economists from their ivory towers

Is it true that academic economists in the UK remain in their ivory towers? Admittedly, many of them can be reluctant to appear in the media, compared with their American counterparts. But they are not absent from public life. Economists are increasingly powerful in policy circles - and maybe even more so than in the United States.

Article by Romesh Vaitilingam head of public affairs at CEP and Editor of CentrePiece.

Reference to the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England and former LSE professor.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 15, 2005
Link to article.

News Posted: 15/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Top jobs

Letter by Romesh Vaitilingam, LSE, on how Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE is 'deeply involved in the design and evaluation of government policies, including on education, taxation and the labour market.'

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 12, 2005 -
Link to article.

- And was in response to an article in The Guardian by Heather Long titled 'What Price Academic Economists?'
Link to article.

News Posted: 12/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

FENews.co.uk

Employers recognise skills gap

At the Industry and Government Summit on Skills Shortage, Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at LSE, delivers key-note speech on UK attitudes regarding learning and training. Dr Steedman called for an analysis of European competitor's methodology and investment initiatives to determine if what can be learnt from these educational models.

This article appeared on FENews.co.uk on August 11, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow of the Education and Skills Programme at CEP and headed the Skills for All Programme

News Posted: 11/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Schools for a scandal

Among the most infuriating conundrums in Britain is why comprehensive schools still exist when every argument for them has been undermined.

Sutton Trust study for the London School of Economics, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,proves that comprehensives damage social mobility.

This article appeared in The Times on August 09, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America



News Posted: 09/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

A short walk beats the school run

Reference to a study by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin that has estimated that in Britain, a home near the best school in a catchment area can be worth almost 20 per cent more than a similar property adjacent to what is perceived as the 'worst' school.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on August 07, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Paying for primary schools: supply constraints, school popularity or congestion? Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin, December 2004, Paper No' CEEDP0042

News Posted: 07/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

State of Joy

Reference to lecture at LSE with LSE's Richard Layard and psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud on how happy the state can make people.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on August 06, 2005
Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP

Details of the event The Politics of Happiness with Dr Raj Persaud and Prof. Lord Richard Layard.

News Posted: 06/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Post

Joy . . . or Pain?

To Some Extent, How You Feel for the Rest of Your Life Is Under Your Control.

Despite the constant promotion of products claimed to extend life and prolong vigor, nothing you can buy in a box, bottle or tube has been shown to extend anything other than your credit card balance.

Some research suggests that happy people live longer. Even if you are not naturally optimistic or of a sunny disposition trying to focus on positive things can be beneficial.

British economist Richard Layard, author of 'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science', agrees: Becoming happy and optimistic, he says, is essentially taking control of your emotions instead of letting them control you.

This article appeared in the Washington Post on August 02, 2005
Link to article. [Free, but registration required].

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 02/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

Management Today

The MT Diary: Howard Davies

A nation of David Brents:

The dirty secret of Britain's economic miracle is that our productivity per hour is 20 per cent lower than in France and Germany, and 30 per cent below the US rate. Since we work more hours in a year than the French and Germans, we end up with a similar GDP per head; but the Americans work longer than we do, as well as more effectively, so they are richer, on average.

If we better understood the reasons for these differences and correct our inefficiency we could clock off an hour earlier each day. So the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance has been working with McKinsey to find the answers.

This article appeared in Management Today on August 01, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications: 'Management Practices Across Firms and Nations' by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen

News Posted: 01/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent on Sunday

Spirit the smileometer

Lord Richard Layard, Professor at LSE, and author of Happiness: Lessons From a New Science, states: 'The competition between countries to achieve greater GDP growth is quite undignified, and is what leads to the pressure and anxiety that our children experience at school. Instead, the competition should be about happiness.'

This article appeared in The Independent on Sunday on July 31, 2005
No Link

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 31/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

A dismal scientist with some funny ideas of happiness

Despite this, a book called Happiness claims to deliver "lessons from a new science". It is written by an English economist called Richard Layard, and attempts to provide the recipe for a content society.

In reality there seem few new facts and lots of misguided conclusions. According to Layard, families, friends, health, a successful career and financial security matter the most. Divorce, unemployment, illness, boredom, loneliness and bereavement tend to cause unhappiness. Try telling us something we don't know.

This article appeared in the Sunday Telegraph on July 31, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 31/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Eureka: now we can legislate for happiness

Richard Layard, emeritus professor at LSE, key new Labour adviser, and Lord Layard of Highgate since 2000, wants us to stop fretting about economic growth so much and try to be happier.

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 31, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

News Posted: 31/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Education: Grammars: the regeneration

Are grammar schools set for a Doctor Who-like rebirth? Quite possibly if unions are voting for them, say Deirdre Fernand and Jasper Gerard. Reference to LSE research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin published last month showed that the decline of grammar schools had helped deepen class divisions, effectively kicking the ladder away from bright children. The LSE study found a link between income and educational achievement.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times Online on July 31, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America



News Posted: 31/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Long live grammars

The unacceptable face of British elitism lies in a school system where money matters more than talent. Reference to research by Jo Blanden and colleagues at LSE on Britain becoming 'an aristocracy of wealth'. The LSE found that on average a boy born to a well-to-do family in 1958 earned 17.5 per cent more than a boy born to a family on half the income.

This article appeared in the The Observer on July 31, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage

News Posted: 31/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Information Week

Global shift: China displacing US in engineering and science, paper says

Further evidence that America's dominance in engineering and science is diminishing can be found in a working paper 'Does Globalization Of The Scientific/Engineering Workforce Threaten US Economic Leadership?', by Richard Freeman, senior research fellow at LSE and Harvard University economist.

Richard Freeman is a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Information Week on July 28, 2005
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Freeman's webpage

News Posted: 28/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Press Association

Five new ''people's peers'' recommended for upper house.

Five new non-party political peers were recommended today by the body that sparked controversy when it created the first batch of so called "People's Peers" in the House of Lords. Among them is Adair Turner, the Chairman of the Independent Pensions Commission and a visiting professor at LSE.

Adair Turner is an Associate of the CEP Policy Committee.

This article appeared in the Press Association on July 26, 2005
No Link.

Related Publications
'What's wrong with Europe's economy?' Adair Turner, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

'Demographics, Economics and Social Choice,' Adair Turner in "Challenges for Europe, " edited by Hugh Stephenson, published by Palgrave MacMillan

'Growth, Productivity and Employment.' Adair Turner, December 2000, Paper No' CEPOP14

News Posted: 26/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times Deutschland

The largest adventure of our time

Article by Stefan Collignon, LSE, on how the European Union needs to centralise decisions. But if this process is not democratised, citizens are likely to turn away.

Stefan Collignon is a Research Associate of the Globalisation Programme at CEP

This article appeared in the Financial Times Deutschland on July 26, 2005
No link.

Related Links
Stefan Collignon's webpage

News Posted: 26/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Die Welt

Europäische Studie: Großzügige Eltern machen Italiens Söhne zu Nesthockern

On why 85 per cent of Italian men aged 18-33 live with their parents. With reference to work by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti which put the case that Italian parents wanted to live with their children and a rise in their income made it possible for them to offer their children higher consumption in exchange for their presence at home.

This article appeared in Die Welt
on July 26, 2005.
Link to article.

Related interview on:
Rush Hour, Radio Montecarlo on June 05, 2005. Link to Radio Montecarlo

Related Publications
Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure - Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents? Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, June 2002, Paper No' CEPDP0536

News Posted: 26/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Education Secretary Ruth Kelly and Dr Tessa Stone, director of the Sutton Educational Trust, discuss how children from deprived backgrounds can be prevented from chronic underachievement.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This interview was broadcast on The BBC Radio 4 Today Programme
on July 26, 2005.
Link to Today Programme.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

News Posted: 26/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times Online

Education gap between rich and poor children has grown

Despite millions of pounds of investment in primary schools, there is still an achievement gap between children from rich and poor families. A study published by the LSE showed that children born in 1970 were less likely to break free of their background and fulfil their potential than children born in 1958.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Times Online
on July 25, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

News Posted: 25/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

The wealth creation college

Article that takes a critical view of the Government's Flying Start initiative, designed to increase entrepreneurialship. According to Professor John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, there is no good evidence that initiatives of this kind are effective.

This article appeared in The Sunday Telegraph
on July 24, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links
For further information see John Van Reenen's Web Page

News Posted: 24/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

International Herald Tribune

2 Cents worth: Never too rich or too happy

This article reports research into the state of happiness. Richard Layard, professor of economics at the LSE, said in a 2003 lecture at the school that GDP is an inaccurate measure of happiness.

This article appeared in The International Herald Tribune
on July 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 23/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Science and Theology News

The Daily Dose

Reference to Bloomberg article (see Money Doesn't Buy Happiness -- But Nothing Does) on happiness and money. Richard Layard cited as one of the most forceful advocates of the study of happiness.

This article appeared in the Science and Theology News on July 22, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
For further information on Happiness see the Wellbeing research programme.

News Posted: 22/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times Online

Would-be homebuyers come out of the woodwork

Parents paying more to live near a popular school might be better off opting for private education. Recent research by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin of LSE suggests that schools so popular as to being oversubscribed have an effect on the house prices in the surrounding area, even if their league table performance is not brilliant.

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for primary schools: supply constraints, school popularity or congestion? Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin,  December 2004, Paper No' CEEDP0042

News Posted: 22/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC

BBC London News

Linda Yueh gave an interview on the effects of gas and oil on the UK economy on "BBC London News" on 19 July, 2005 and CNBC Europe, "Morning Exchange," on the imposition of export limits on Chinese textiles on July 20, 2005

No links to interviews.

Related links For further information see the Linda Yueh's webpage.

News Posted: 20/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Money Doesn't Buy Happiness -- But Nothing Does

In a recent paper, Andrew Clark, professor at the PSE Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris, and CEP associate argued that unhappiness is a much more widespread condition than was previously thought. It isn't just the pursuit of material wealth that isn't making us happy. Just about everything seems to make us miserable. This article contrasts Clark's views with those of Richard Layard:

Richard Layard, professor of economics at LSE, has been one of the most forceful advocates of the study of happiness. "GDP is a hopeless measure of welfare," he said in a lecture at the school in 2003. "For since the War, that measure has shot up by leaps and bounds, while the happiness of the population has stagnated."

This article appeared in Bloomberg.com on July 20, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
For further information on Happiness see the Wellbeing research programme.

'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' is published by Allen Lane.

News Posted: 20/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Sharp end of the LSE

Another exchange overheard at the Skills Summit. David Blunkett...is introduced to Dr Hilary Steedman, of the London School of Economics, just before they both go on stage to speak."Are you the responsible end of the LSE?" he asks impertinently. "You'd better wait and see what I have to say," comes the reply.

This article appeared in The Guardian on July 19, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow of the Education and Skills Programme at CEP

News Posted: 19/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times Online

Doctors' surgeries to offer jobs help

According to a paper by Richard Layard of the London School of Economics fort the Downing Street strategy unit, more people receive incapacity benefits due to mental problems than unemployment benefits, and the cost of benefits for the mentally ill adds up to about £10 billion per year.

This article appeared in The Times Online on July 17, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP

News Posted: 17/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

BA Fellows

The British Academy has elected LSE's Anthony Venables as a fellow. Professor Venables is Director of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in The Times Higher Education Supplement on July 15, 2005.
No link.

Related links
Tony Venables Research Site

News Posted: 15/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

G8: a jaded formula in a high-octane world?

When G8 leaders meet in Scotland this week, the star is arguably Chinese President Hu Jintao, an outsider whose booming Communist-run country is transforming the world economic order. Linda Yueh, LSE, comments on the rising influence of China in the G8.

This article appeared in Reuters on July 05, 2005.
Link to article

News Posted: 05/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

CEP Special Event

The Politics of Happiness

Should happiness be at the centre of government policy? Does having more really do anything for our well-being? Can legislation raise national contentment?
Date:Tuesday 5 July 2005
Time:6:30 pm
Venue:Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE  - See Map
Speakers:Professor Lord Layard and Dr Raj Persaud

A debate at the London School of Economics between one of Britain's leading economists, Lord Layard, and one of the country's foremost psychiatrist, Dr Raj Persaud.

Related Links
See the CEP Special Events pages for further details

News Posted: 05/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio World Service

Europe Today

Augustin De Coulon spoke on immigration discussing migrant workers in Europe. How do they benefit the economy and what does the future look like?

This broadcast took place on June 30, 2005.
Link to broadcast

Related Publications
Immigrants at Retirement: Stay/Return or 'Va-et-Vient'
Francois-Charles Wolff, Augustin de Coulon, May 2005
Paper No' CEPDP0691

Self-Selection and the Performance of Return Migrants: the Source Country Perspective.
Matloob Piracha, Augustin de Coulon, July 2003
Paper No' CEPDP0576


News Posted: 30/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

I.O.L.

New Study Highlights Trend of 'Mamma's Boys'

News article discussing 'Why Do Most Italian Young Men Live with their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure' by Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti

This article appeared in the South African I.O.L Online on 28 June, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Paper No' CEPRDP05116, June 2005

Previously published as CEP Discussion Paper No 536 in June 2002


News Posted: 28/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

The 60-second business book

Succint, "Pass Notes" style look at Richard Layard's book Happiness - Lessons from a new science

This article appeared in The Times
on June 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links:
The Happiness research programme website.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 23/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

Cordis News

Outsourcing can be good for Europe, finds report

The EU drive to stop outsourcing and encourage companies to locate their research laboratories in Europe could be counterproductive, according to a new UK report. According to researchers from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, outsourcing research and development activities to overseas locations can boost innovation and productivity.

This article appeared in Cordis News
on June 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Boffins in the USA: the boost to UK productivity'in CentrePiece Spring 2005



News Posted: 23/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

A Good Week

An article which refers to research by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen of the CEP plus Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin of McKinsey & Company which suggests that US firms are on average the world's best managed while the UK's are the worst.

This article appeared in The Times
on June 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Management Practices Across Firms and Nations' by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen

News Posted: 23/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

LSE Research Laboratory

Research Lab Workshop Day

This year, the annual Research Lab Workshop Day will take place on Wednesday, June 22nd, and will be followed by a Summer Party.

This will be a good opportunity for everyone to hear a variety of short paper sessions throughout the day and to find out about the work going on in other research centres and programmes in the Lab. There will be plenary and parallel sessions.

The programme is now available, with papers (in Adobe PDF format) ready to download, where available.

See The Research Lab Workshop page for further details.

News Posted: 22/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Mugging the middle classes

Reference to research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin that reveals that the ending of educational selection has actually reduced opportunities for the poor and widened the class gulf. The LSE report shows conclusively that the 11-plus was an "escape route" and removing it has undermined social mobility.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail
on June 21, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Social Mobility in Britain: low and falling'in CentrePiece Spring 2005

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

News Posted: 21/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Wheels come off the onion economy

Professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics says France needs to reform its labour market to encourage the unemployed back to work as quickly as possible with a carrot-and-stick approach, rather than paying them a lot to do nothing for a long time.

This article appeared in The Guardian
on June 20, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market' by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman.

'Tackling Unemployment: Europe’s successes and failures' in CentrePiece Spring 2005



News Posted: 20/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

CentrePiece

Poor children ''now less likely to fulfil their potential''

Social mobility in Britain has fallen over recent decades to levels well below those of Canada, Germany and the Nordic countries, according to research published today by LSE. "Children born to poor families are now less likely to break free of their background and fulfil their potential than they were in the past," according to Jo Blanden, LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

The economists concluded that the strong relationship between family income and educational attainment was a key to understanding Britain's low levels of social mobility.

Countries with high levels of inequality tend to have higher rates of inflation, according to research by Chris Crowe published by the CEP today.

Related Publications:
'Social Mobility in Britain: low and falling'in CentrePiece Spring 2005

'More inequality means higher inflation 'in CentrePiece Spring 2005



News Posted: 20/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Warning on EU drive to locate R&D labs in Europe

The drive by European Union policymakers to persuade companies to locate their research laboratories in Europe could be counterproductive, according to new research. Outsourcing R&D to overseas locations can boost innovation and productivity. John Van Reenen, director of LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said the economy received a big boost from the US-based research laboratories of British companies during the 1990s.

This article appeared in The Financial Times
on June 20, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Boffins in the USA: the boost to UK productivity'in CentrePiece Spring 2005



News Posted: 20/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme



News Posted: 19/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

CEP Special Event

Management Practices across Firms & Nations

New research from the Centre for Economic Performance (LSE) and McKinsey & Company uses an innovative new approach to survey management practices in more than 700 manufacturing firms in France, Germany, the UK and the United States. The research finds that:

Management practices across countries
US firms are on average the best managed, with the Germans second, the French third and the UK worst.

US multinational subsidiaries based in the UK, France and Germany are also better managed than either domestic firms or other non-US multinational subsidiaries.

Superior US management performance seems to be driven by more product market competition, higher levels of worker and management skills, and lower levels of labour regulation.

The differences in management practices between the UK and the United States can explain 10-15 per cent of the productivity gap between the two countries.

Countries have distinct management 'cultures' - with Germans firms excelling at shopfloor management and US firms excelling at people management.

Management practices across firms
There is a huge spread of management practices across firms in every country. Some UK firms use world-class management practices while others are among the worst in the whole sample.

Well-managed firms do perform significantly better, with higher levels of productivity, profitability, growth rates and market values.

Competition appears to be a primary driver of good management practices. It seems to act by driving badly managed firms out of the market, but it does not appear to make managers work harder.

A firm's age also seems to matter with very old firms having the lowest average scores for quality of management practices, particularly those in uncompetitive industries where competition does not weed out underperformers.

Related Links:
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen Management Practices across Firms & Nations


News Posted: 15/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

FinFacts, Ireland

How Western manufacturers can better compete with China, India and low cost countries

Government intervention to protect manufacturers against competition might not be the remedy for Western economies losing industries and jobs to China, India and other low-cost countries. Corporate performance in manufacturing is strongly linked to the quality of management techniques - and competitive intensity is needed to stimulate the spread of best practice, according to new research from McKinsey and the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE.

This article appeared on FinFacts, Ireland June 12, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links:
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen Management Practices across Firms & Nations


News Posted: 12/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

A Question of Management

Why do so many badly run companies survive?

If economists are to explain company performance in terms of management practices, these must somehow be quantified. But how do you measure the "quality" of the layout of a shop floor, communication with workers or incentives for employees? An intriguing new study by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, of the London School of Economics, and Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and Tom Rippin, all consultants at McKinsey, attempts to do just that, and goes on to examine why badly run firms survive.

This article appeared in The Economist, June 09, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links:
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen Management Practices across Firms & Nations


News Posted: 09/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Globalist

Richard Freeman

Profile of Richard Freeman, director of labour studies at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and senior research fellow in Labour Markets at LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, and visiting professor at LSE.

This article appeared on The Globalist June 06, 2005. Link to article.

News Posted: 06/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

International Herald Tribune

Vote taken in stride outside Continent

Professor Richard Layard, economist from LSE, has recently published a book in which he examines the effects of government tax, employment and other policies on the personal happiness of ordinary people.

No link

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 06/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

academics.de

Konsequenzen fur Unternehmen aus der Einfuhrung des Bachelors

Die Einführung des sechssemestrigen Bachelors als Regelabschluß könnte erhebliche Umwälzungen im deutschen Ausbildungs- und Wirtschaftssystem zur Folge haben. Diese Schlußfolgerung legt jedenfalls eine deutsch-britische Studie nahe.

This article appeared in the academics.de on June 01, 2005
Link to article.

News Posted: 01/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Well-paid career is no longer simply a matter of course

Research by Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles, LSE, concludes that increased education supply has not resulted in falling wage differentials between more- and less-educated people.

With reference to the book "What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK" , edited by Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles, published by Princeton University Press. The book launch on Wednesday 8th June 2005.

This article appeared in The Financial Times May 31, 2005.
Link to article

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education

News Posted: 31/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times Educational Supplement

Esteem will drive the merits of vocation

Despite the disappointment of the educational world with the previous Government's response to Tomlinson, in the vocational field there is an important job to do.

Hilary Steedman and John West on how esteem for vocational courses has to be earned, not just conferred.

This article appeared on The Times Educational Supplement May 27, 2005.
Link to article.

News Posted: 27/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Press Association

Public school is still key for legal high-fliers

The legal profession is still dominated by people who went to public school, according to a report published today. Education charity the Sutton Trust said the situation had not significantly improved in the last 15 years. Research by LSE published last month showed that social mobility has declined in Britain over the last 30 years and Britain, together with the US, has the lowest mobility of the eight industrial countries surveyed.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Press Association
on May 24, 2005.
No Link

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

News Posted: 24/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Labour has unleashed the dogs of class war

Recent research from LSE demonstrates that the annihilation of the grammar schools severely reduced the opportunities for the poorest in society to work their way up. As a result, Britain now has lower social mobility than comparable western countries.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Scotsman
on May 24, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

News Posted: 24/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Relax, there is no need to be gloomy about jobs

According to a research by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, the labour market might be starting to slow down after over a decade of prosperity. A rise in unemployment would have devastating consequences, especially after such a long phase of sustained growth, as pointed out by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman in their latest book 'Unemployment' (Oxford University Press).

This article appeared in The Sunday Times
on May 22, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell, and Richard Jackman.

News Posted: 22/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Let''s work to make Britain sane

As stated in a paper by LSE Professor Richard Layard for a seminar at No. 10, 16 per cent of adults of working age have a mental illness.

If the state wants to cut the huge numbers on incapacity benefit it must first change our stressful working culture.

This article appeared in The Observer
on May 22, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard: Happiness

News Posted: 22/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

Associated Press/Forbes.Com

IBM Shares Fall on Job Cut Announcement

International Business Machines Corp. said Thursday it will be cutting jobs in Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy and France as part of a restructuring that will slash between 10,000 and 13,000 positions, mostly in Europe.

Linda Yueh, a former lawyer and an economics fellow at the London School of Economics, said the job cuts in Europe will be more involved because of the required negotiations.

"In Europe, people have rights to continue working - in other words, they are more protected and they can't be fired without a just cause," she said.

This article appeared in Forbes.Com May 10, 2005
Link to article

News Posted: 10/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

New York Review of Books

A Mind of His Own

In this illuminating review of 'John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics' by Richard Parker, review author Jeff Madrick cites Richard Layard's new book, 'Happiness' as an example of expanding psychological research within economics which demonstrates higher GDP does not yield more happiness - a view central to Galbraith's 'The Affluent Society.'

This article appeared in The New York Review of Books May 05, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Happiness - Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard

John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics by Richard Parker

News Posted: 05/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Challenge of 'Hidden Unemployed'

Inactivity is one of the biggest problems the Welsh economy faces, yet it has not become a major issue in this general election campaign.

Giulia Faggio of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE comments.

This article appeared in BBC News Online
on May 03, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Giulia Faggio and Stephen Nickell, Inactivity Among Prime Age Men in the UK, CEP Discussion Paper No' 673, February 2005.

News Posted: 03/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Western Mail

Education, education, education - what rubbish!

"According to research by the London School of Economics, Britain and the United States have the worst social inequality in a sample of eight rich nations."

Letter published in The Western Mail, with reference to Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This Letter appeared in The Western Mail May 02, 2005.
Link to letter.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

News Posted: 02/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Is increased choice any good?

The issue of choice is now at the centre of the political debate, with Labour and Conservatives both proclaiming their commitment to increasing choice in health and education.

Professor Steve Machin of the London School of Economics warns that there is relatively little evidence that competition improves performance in state education.

This article appeared in BBC News Online May 02, 2005.
Link to article.

News Posted: 02/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

CNN

Giant aspires to superpower status

While the United States still sets the pace for global markets, there is a growing awareness that, as China's economy expands rapidly, the balance of power is shifting in its direction.

Dr Linda Yueh of the London School of Economics (LSE), says the rising influence of the Chinese economy is causing a fundamental rethink of the implications for the world, and for China's neighbours.

This article appeared on CNN April 29, 2005.
Link to article

Related Links
CNN Eye on China

News Posted: 29/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

''Bachelor senkt Qualifikationsniveau''; Vergleichende Studie über verkürzten Hochschulabschluß in Großbritannien und Deutschland

Ein Vergleich mit Großbritannien zeigt, daß die Einführung des Bachelorabschlusses das Qualifikationsniveau der Hochschulabsolventen verringert. Gemeinsam mit der "London School of Economics" hat die Fachhochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft in Berlin 90 Unternehmen in Großbritannien und Deutschland befragt. Darunter waren Banken, Handel, Automobilindustrie und Softwareentwicklung. Grundlage der Befragungen war ein strukturierter Fragebogen - für den Vergleich der Hochschulbildung wurden die Informatikstudiengänge gewählt.

With reference to 'The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison' by Jim Foreman, Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner, June 2003

This article appeared in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung April 25, 2005.
No direct link to article

Related Links
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Online Paper

Related Publications
The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison, CEP DP 0575

News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Boston Business Journal

MIT's Daron Acemoglu wins 2005 Clark medal

Professor Daron Acemoglu of the Department of Economics, MIT has received the prestigious John Bates Clark Medal, awarded every two years to an American economist under the age of 40 for making a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge.

Professor Acemoglu gained his PhD from The London School of Economics and was associate member of the CEP.

This article appeared in The Boston Business Journal April 25, 2005.
Link to article.

News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

LoWER Publications

Low-Wage Employment in Europe: Perspectives for Improvement - edited by I. Marx and W. Salverda

Employment in Europe is rising, but not fast enough. Yet, it would appear that there remains an enormous potential for job growth. Europe is known to have a massive employment deficit relative to the United States. It is often said that this is because economic activiy in the United states is more geared towards labourintensive services than in Europe. Americans are thought to buy far more financial and personal care services, as well as more domestic support and gardening. but is this perception entirely correct? How far is the greater service orientation of the US economy really a source of its higher employment rate? And would such service jobs be desirable jobs? Many service workers in the United States are said to be "working poor". The concern in much of Europe is that the opening up of low-paid service jobs could undermine Europe's social model, as well as do little to enhance social inclusion and gender equality.

Includes "Measuring Labour Market Performance on Jobs and Pay at the Individual and Household Level" by Paul Gregg and Jonathan Wadsworth.

Related links
AIAS Publications

News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Has Labour brought us German efficiency?

Gordon Brown has made raising Britain's productivity a central aim of Labour's economic policy since 1997, following a long tradition of chancellors who have fretted that the average British worker seems less productive than his or her foreign counterpart. Britain has a problem. The average German works two months less a year than us, but produces nearly as much, according to a new report out today from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

"There has been some improvement ... and this has been going on for some time," says CEP head John van Reenen. He says during the late 1990s Britain even managed to keep up with the US. But the gap with the US remains large.

This article appeared in The Guardian, April 25 2005
Link to article



News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

Sutton Trust News Release

Social Mobility In Britain Lower Than Other Advanced Countries and Declining

In a study sponsored by the Sutton Trust, researchers from Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics have compared the life chances of British children with those in other advanced countries, and the results are disturbing.

They have found that social mobility in Britain - the way in which someone's adult outcomes are related to their circumstances as a child - is lower than in Canada, Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. And while the gap in opportunities between the rich and poor is similar in Britain and the US, in the US it is at least static, while in Britain it is getting wider.

See the full news release
on April 25, 2005.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

Related articles appeared in:

The Times
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Demise of grammar schools leaves poor facing uphill battle

The Daily Telegraph
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Poorest pay for failures of state schools

The Guardian
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: UK low in social mobility league, says charity

The Independent
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Britain the land of least opportunity

The Daily Mail
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: End of grammar schools has helped widen class divisions

The Sun
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Rich/poor gap gets wider

The Financial Times
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article:University expansion fails to help the poor, says study

Belfast Telegraph
on April 25,2005.
Education class gap 'is growing'
No Link

Lidove noviny
on April 25,2005
Land of opportunity
No Link Coverage on TV & Radio: Channel 4 News
on April 24, 2005.
Link to special report: Life Changes

The Today Programme, BBC Radio 4
on April 25, 2005.
Link to The Today Programme Website



News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Immigration 'boosts the UK economy'

The Conservatives' election attack over immigration was further undermined yesterday by an independent study arguing that immigration is beneficial to the UK economy. The study, by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, was critical of all the main parties for pledging to curb the free movement of labour into Britain.

This article appeared in The Scotsman
on April 21, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Jonathan Wadsworth, Immigration: The Evidence from Economic Research, part of the CEP Election Analysis series



News Posted: 21/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

ESRC Tender

RLAB wins tender to run ESRC Review of International Data Resources and Needs.

The Review of International Data Resources and Needs is a major, new ESRC project, the findings from which will form the basis for a range of potential new initiatives to support and encourage international and comparative research.

The scope of the review is wide ranging, assessing the international data needs of the research community from all disciplines and institutions from academic bodies and government departments to charities and private consultancies.

The 8 month project will focus upon the nature of the resources required to undertake international and comparative research, in terms of the resources currently available, the quality of such resources and their accessibility.

Winning the tender for the review is a significant recognition of the very high level of international data expertise within the RLAB, its excellence in collaborative research and the quality of the joint research centres' overseas contacts.



News Posted: 11/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Happiness? Who needs it?

Happiness, not GDP, still less competitiveness, should be the overriding principle of economic policy, Professor Lord Richard Layard maintains, backing up his proposition with some fascinating statistics from the 'new science'.

Money really can't buy happiness: although Western countries are at least twice as well off as they were 50 years ago, they are no more content.

This article appeared in The Observer April 11, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 10/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Bail-outs just a way of delaying the inevitable

John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economics Performance at LSE, is against the idea of a government helping out a struggling company, like in the case of MG Rover. "Survival is for consumers to decide, not politicians," he says.

This article appeared in The Financial Times April 08, 2005.
Link to article.

News Posted: 08/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The World Tonight

The Economy:
The cabinet has met for the last time before the expected general election as newspaper headlines said average incomes have fallen for the first time under Labour - but what does the statistic actually show?

Richard Layard talks about the economy on The World Tonight.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 4
on March 31, 2005.
Listen to the interview (Real Audio needed).

Related Links
The World Tonight, on the BBC website.



News Posted: 31/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The New Statesman

Britain's rich kids do better than ever

Reference to research by Jo Blanden, LSE, Stephen Machin of University College London and Paul Gregg of Bristol University. They compared children to their parents generation.

This article appeared in New Statesman March 21, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Paper No' CEPDP0517, January 2002

News Posted: 21/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Education investment fails poorest pupils

A new report by the London School of Economics shows that the government has failed to stop young people from Britain's most deprived boroughs from leaving school with no GCSE passes. The report - "Tackling the Poverty of Opportunity: Developing 'RBS Enterprise Works' for The Prince's Trust" - by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Shankar Rajagopalan says millions of pounds worth of government money has failed to stop a new generation of teenagers from the poorest homes leaving school with nothing to show for 11 years of compulsory schooling.

This article appeared in The Independent March 21, 2005.
Link to article.

Also in New Zealand Online.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Download the report from The Prince's Trust website.

News Posted: 21/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Daily Express

Some things money can't buy - do we still know what they are?

Richard Layard of the London School of Economics has written a book entitled: Happiness: Lessons From A New Science, in which he argues that once poverty and discomfort have been eliminated, extra income is much less important than human relationships.

Related Publications Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005

News Posted: 21/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Middle classes fill best state school

According to Sir Peter Lampl, a key government adviser on working-class access to independent and leading state schools, the government is to blame for the failure of a four-year project he devised to get more state school pupils into private schools. He also claims that, according to a study by researchers of the London School of Economics, social mobility has declined significantly over the last 30 years and this trend is set to continue.

This article appeared in The Observer March 20, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Paper No' CEPDP0517, January 2002

News Posted: 20/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Education Quandary

Are we losing sight of what schools are for? The Government tells them to teach children to be nice to each other. Professor Richard Layard, of the LSE, says they should teach children how to be happy. Is this just more mumbo-jumbo?

Reference to the work of Professor Richard Layard, LSE, that despite growing prosperity, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago. He argues that schools have a role in building individual self-advancement at an early age in people.

This article appeared in The Independent - Education section March 17, 2005.
Link to article.

News Posted: 17/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Winners and Losers in the Happiness Stakes

The fascinating new book by Richard Layard, the British economist, argues that we should make happiness, not growth, the object of our economic policies. At first sight, there is not a lot of difference - the countries with the highest productivity are also the happiest. But on closer inspection, there are interesting differences.

This article appeared in The Financial Times March 15 2005.

No Direct Link

News Posted: 15/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Progress Seminars

Social Mobility - are some still more equal than others?

Wednesday 16 March 2005, 6.00pm
Committee Room 8, The House of Commons

Ruth Kelly is among the high profile speakers who will address the Progress seminar 'social mobility - are some still more equal than others?' Mike Dixon from the IPPR, Professor Stephen Machin from the Centre of Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and Barbara Roche MP, will join her in the debate. Parmjit Dhanda MP, vice chair of Progress, will chair the seminar.

Related Links:
The Progress website.

News Posted: 09/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Students of the revolution thriving in France

Eric Maurin, of Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques and Sandra McNally, LSE, investigate the long term effects of 1968 revolutions. Dr McNally and Dr Maurin conclude: "Our study suggests very positive effects of the '1968 events' for affected cohorts and is of contemporary relevance given the current debate in many countries about widening access to higher education."

This article appeared in The Guardian March 09, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Vive la Révolution! Long Term Effects of 1968 to the Angry Students , Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Seminar Paper to be presented on Friday 11 March at the DfES.

For further details see the CEE Seminars page.

News Posted: 09/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Eastern Daily Express

So how happy are we really?

Review of 'Happiness: Lessons From A New Science', the book by LSE Professor Richard Layard in which he argues that, in spite of higher levels of income, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago.

This article appeared in the Eastern Daily Press March 08 2005.

News Posted: 08/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Norfork Eastern Daily Press

So how happy are we really?

Happiness, happiness, the greatest gift that I possess, sang Ken Dodd. And soon you will be able to go and find it. Forget having to go over the rainbow; by 2010 the Government will be able to tell you where the happy places are.

A series of maps of England is to be produced - a so-called happiness index - telling you which areas enjoy the best quality of life, probably based on factors such as employment, marriage, commuting times, environmental quality and stress.

With reference to Richard Layard's new book Happiness: Lessons from a new Science

This article appeared in The Norfork Eastern Daily Press March 08, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 08/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Book Launch

Can We Become Happier?

Wednesday 9th March 2005, 6.30pm
Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

Richard Layard answers tough questions about his new book Happiness: lessons from a new science (Penguin). This offers a vision of a better life, based on the insights of psychology, economics and social philosophy.

Richard Layard was founder-director of the LSE Centre for Economic Performance and intellectual architect of the New Deal for the unemployed.

The event will be chaired by Andrew Marr, the BBC's political editor and author of My Trade: a short history of British journalism.

This event is free and open to all with no ticket required. Entry is on a first come, first serve basis.

Related Links:
The Happiness research programme website.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 08/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Blair''s Green antidote to beating the blues

The Government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is planning to compile a wellbeing index, which includes a number of factors other than income (neighbourhood, mental health, access to green areas etc.) A book recently published by LSE professor Richard Layard argues that we are no happier now than 50 years ago.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 08, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 08/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Richard Layard, talking about his latest book, Happiness: Lessons on a new science.

This interview appeared on The Today Programme March 05, 2005.
Link to programme.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 07/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Life, Labour and the pursuit of happiness

Happiness is all the rage. The year kicked off with a big conference in the United States on the subject, then Professor Richard Layard, LSE, published a book on it and now the government is getting into it. Professor Layard thinks happiness should become the biggest goal for the government. He suggests things such as compulsory parenting classes and lessons in emotional intelligence from the age of five onwards.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 07, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 07/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Denver Post

'Happy' as public policy

"What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?" - Luke 9:25. Or, as Richard Layard puts it in secular, supranational terms in "Happiness: Lessons From a New Science," what good is it if Western societies get richer and richer but their populations become no happier?

Layard, a highly regarded British economist and pioneer in the new field of happiness studies, proves both halves of his equation quite satisfactorily in this engaging if inevitably controversial work. Standards of living in the United States, Britain, Western Europe and Japan have more than doubled in 50 years, bringing us improved health and shorter work weeks and allowing us to accumulate more and more stuff.

This article appeared on The Denver Post March 06, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 06/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Western Daily Press

Make life smiles better instead of just making miserable money

Review of 'Happiness: Lessons From A New Science', the book by LSE Professor Richard Layard in which he argues that, in spite of higher levels of income, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago.

News Posted: 05/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Joy divisions

Review of the book by leading economist Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons on a new science on the relation between increasing wealth and decreasing happiness in the Western World. The article's author interviewed Mr Layard in his LSE office.

This article appeared on The Financial Times March 05, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

News Posted: 05/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Family gap years 'no help to children'

Leaving gaps between children to spare more time for each of them does not result in better educational achievement, the largest study of its kind shows today. The study by the Centre for the Economics of Education says that this is the case whether the first-born is a member of a family of two or 10. Comments from Stephen Machin,director of the Centre.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph, March 01, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Sandra E. Black, Paul J. Devereux and Kjell G. Salvanes, The more the merrier? The effect of family composition on children's outcomes, CEE seminar paper presented 25 February 2005.

News Posted: 01/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Radio Free Europe

World: Signs Grow Of Dollar Losing Favor As World''s Reserve Currency

Gianluca Benigno, LSE, states "The euro is an alternative reserve currency that the central banks are considering is becoming more liquid and important"

This article appeared on the Radio Free Europe website, February 24, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Gianluca Benigno and Pierpaolo Benigno, Designing Target Rules for International Monetary Policy Cooperation, Paper No' CEPDP0666, December 2004.

News Posted: 25/02/2005      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement

Wanted: Boffins with business balls

Why does the commercial world turn a blind eye to the demands of academics? Small firms are often too stretched, but there is also the problem of a common language. Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at LSE, who interviewed 90 firms in Britain and Germany to compare information and communication technology skills, says the ways of publishing research are deficient

This article appeared in The Times Educational Supplement, February 18, 2005.
No direct link.

Related Publications
Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner and Jim Foreman, The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison, Paper No' CEPDP0575, June 2003.

News Posted: 24/02/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Why the culture of failure has been hard to break

Assessing Labour's promises for education. Reference to research published in July 2004 by the Institute of Education and LSE on educational opportunity expanding.

This article appeared in The Guardian, February 01, 2005.
Link to article

Related news articles
Class gap widens under Blair
The class divide in UK higher education widened during Tony Blair's first term in office as the children of Middle England reaped the benefits of university expansion, new research reveals. Anna Vignoles of the IoE, who conducted the research with Fernando Galindo-Rueda and Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez of the LSE, said: 'The message is that things are getting better, everybody is more likely to go into higher education, but the gap between rich and poor is widening.'

This article appeared in THES July 2, 2004.
Link to article (subscription needed)

This article appeared in The Times July 2, 2004.
Link to article

This article appeared in BBC News Online July 3, 2004.
Link to article

Related publications
Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Anna Vignoles, The Widening Socio-economic Gap in UK Higher Education in the National Institute Economic Review, No' 190, October 2004

Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Anna Vignoles, Class Ridden or Meritocratic? An Economic Analysis of Recent Changes in Britain, Paper No' CEEDP0032, May 2003



News Posted: 01/02/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live/Radio 4 The Today Programme

Work Foundation Report

David Marsden on Radio 5 Live

David Metcalf on the Today Programme

Press notice regarding 'British Unions, Resurgence or Perdition' by David Metcalf can be viewed at The Work Foundation website.

This is the first in a series of provocations exploring key issues for work in UK in the coming years. A hard copy of the paper is available to photocopy from the Admin team in zones 1 and 2 in CEP.

The interviews took place at the BBC - Radio 5 Live and Radio 4 on January 31, 2005.
No link.

Related Publications
David Metcalf, 'British Unions, Resurgence or Perdition', CEP Working Paper, No' 1347



News Posted: 31/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

LSE News and Views

Richard Layard awarded WW Leontief Medal

The Russian Academy of Science has awarded Professor Richard Layard, emeritus professor of economics and founder of the Centre for Economic Performance, the WW Leontief for contributions to progress in economics.

See the latest edition of the LSE's News and Views

Related Publications
Richard Layard, George Lucas, Investment Prospects In Russia, Paper No' CEPSP04, February 1997, available as hard copy only. Richard Layard, Can Russia Control Inflation?, Paper No' CEPDP0170, September 1993 available as hard copy only.

Richard Layard, Ansgar Richter, How Much Unemployment is Needed for Restructuring?: The Russian Experience, Paper No' CEPDP0238, April 1995 available as hard copy only.

Richard Layard, Ansgar Richter, Who Gains and Who Loses from Russian Credit Expansion, Paper No' CEPDP0200, July 1994 available as hard copy only.

News Posted: 31/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times: Economic Outlook:

Sun shines on UK prospects

Why the 2005 is possibly good to win - new research suggests that, short-term worries aside, Britain is very well placed in economic terms.

Professor Steve Nickell of the London School of Economics and the Bank of England's monetary policy committee, has written a paper with two colleagues for the Economic Journal. Called Explaining the Rise in Unemployment in Europe Since the 1960s, it does what he says in the title.

This article appeared in The Times
on January 23, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Stephen Nickell, Luca Nunziata, Wolfgang Ochel, Glenda Quintini The Beveridge Curve, Unemployment and Wages in the OECD from the 1960s to the 1990s - Preliminary Version, Paper No' CEPDP0502, July 2001



News Posted: 23/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

Sun Herald, Mississippi, US

Unlike tsunamis, some disasters are man-made

Reference to research by Peter Boone, LSE, on the experience of some 100 nations that received long-term foreign aid. He found that it typically benefited political elites - and that it did nothing to alleviate poverty. Because, as he rightly points out, "poverty is not caused by capital shortage."

This article appeared in The Sun Herald
on January 18, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Working Paper No 677, 'The Impact of Foreign Aid on Savings and Growth' by Peter Boone (hard copy available only).

CEP Working Paper No 678, 'Politics and the Effectiveness of Foreign Aid' by Peter Boone. 'Multilateral Aid, Politics and Poverty: Past Failures and Future Challenges', chapter 2 Peter Boone and Jean-Paul Faguet in R. Grant and J. Nijman (eds.). The Global Crisis in Foreign Aid, Syracuse University Press: Syracuse, New York, 1998.

'Foreign Aid and International Crises' published in The Freeman: Ideas on Liberty, December 1996 Link to article



News Posted: 19/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian: Office Hours

The inside track: Welfare benefits

It is a widespread orthodoxy that Europe lags behind the US in job creation because workers in the Eurozone are featherbedded with social welfare benefits. Even German and French trade unions are beginning to accept this belief, introducing longer working weeks to defend jobs. Yet some economists are starting to wonder if the apparently freewheeling US economy might actually be rather less good at job creation than has previously been thought. True, the unemployment rate in the US is half that of Germany's, but fewer jobs are being produced than expected, given the recent economic recovery.

This is according to two prominent US economists, Richard Freeman and William Rodgers, writing in CentrePiece, the magazine for job-market anoraks, produced by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance. Like other economists, Freeman and Rodgers brush aside the US Government's excuse that job growth is weak because productivity is strong. Instead they turn their attention to, among other things, health insurance. In the US, private health insurance is principally an employment perk. This means that not only are the jobless without health cover, but that the most expensive health system in the world is financed almost entirely by employers. The costs of health insurance are a powerful incentive not to take on new workers. They are also a handicap in international competition. The US dollar would have to fall to the value of Monopoly money before US exporters could achieve a level playing field, and nobody is going to allow this to happen. Obviously the US is going to have to rethink its social model. Conversely German and French workers should be slower to concede social benefits and perhaps consider the possibility that the single currency, and its inflexible interest-rate policy, is the cause of sluggish job growth and high unemployment.

This article appeared in The Guardian
on January 17, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Freeman, R and Rodgers, W (2004), 'Jobless recovery: whatever happened to the great American jobs machine?', published in CentrePiece Autumn 2004, in PDF format (272Kb)



News Posted: 17/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Class divisions bar students from university

Fifteen years after John Major promised to turn modern Britain into a 'classless society', research commissioned by an educational charity, the Sutton Trust, from experts at LSE reveals the barriers holding back children who start at the bottom. Comments from Paul Gregg, CEP, one of the authors of the report.

This article appeared in The Observer
on January 16, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, Paper No' CEPDP0517, January 2002



News Posted: 17/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Another revolution in teaching

How do you keep hold of teachers once you've recruited them? With some difficulty, it would seem, as more than 40 per cent of teachers leaving the profession say that nothing could have made them stay, according to a report in CentrePiece (Autumn 2004). Even calculating the level of shortage is not straightforward, the magazine of the Centre for Economic Performance suggests. Demand for teachers has fluctuated considerably over the past 30 years and estimating the need for teachers is further complicated by the fact that teaching is an ageing profession: "Within the next ten years, nearly 50 per cent of the current workforce will have retired," the report authors note.

Current financial administration arrangements for education also make the calculations difficult. Although the Government sets spending limits and determines pay, it does not have control over how many teachers individual education authorities employ.

Despite "golden hellos" of £4,000 for new teachers in shortage subjects, retention in maths, English and modern languages is a problem because career options outside the profession offer better financial rewards. So assessing the flow of newly qualified teachers does not truly indicate the actual level of those available to teach.

The quality of teaching staff is also a concern. Quite aside from debates regarding what kind of qualifications make someone a better teacher, the report suggests that "we need to be concerned about recruiting from the lower end of the ability distribution".

Creating a pay package that would guarantee high-quality teachers remains a problem. The report notes, too, that performance-related pay schemes elsewhere in the world have not been entirely successful and have a limited role in motivating staff.

This article appeared in The Times on January 11, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Arnaud Chevalier and Peter Dolton Teacher shortage: another impending crisis?, CentrePiece, Autumn 2004



News Posted: 11/01/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Can the route to happiness lie in higher taxes?

Is there a link between GDP and happiness? Greater economic growth may not lead to contentment. The happiness derived from chasing possessions such as bigger homes, 4x4 cars and electronic gadgets is so transitory, argues Richard Layard that there should be increased taxation on spending to offset this outcome.

This article appeared in The Scotsman on January 10, 2005.
Link to article

See also:
Link to Financial Times article

In March 2003 Lord Richard Layard, delivered three lectures at LSE on the theme of the pursuit of Happiness. A forthcoming book titled Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard will be published by Penguin Press in the US in February 2005 and in the UK during March 2005.



News Posted: 11/01/2005      [Back to the Top]