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Valori

Lavoro e clima: ingredienti chiave per la ricetta della felicità / Work and climate: key ingredients for the recipe for happiness

An excellent example, proposed by Canova himself, summarizing the complexity of a concept like happiness is the World Happiness Report, a United Nations project to empirically define the concept of happiness.

It makes use of the contribution and supervision of great economists such as John Helliwell, macroeconomist of the Vancouver School of Economics; Richard Layard, of the London School of Economics, among the first to deal with happiness; Jeffrey Sachs, one of the most respected sustainability experts.

Related Links:
Valori - Lavoro e clima: ingredienti chiave per la ricetta della felicità / Work and climate: key ingredients for the recipe for happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 10/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Why life in the UK feels better than ever

Since the referendum, self-reported British subjective wellbeing has stagnated, finds a study led by Georgios Kavetsos of Queen Mary University of London. Pro-Europeans are predictably upset, but even anti-Europeans saw an early rise in wellbeing melt away, perhaps because Brexit hasn't been delivered. Even so, British contentment remains about the highest ever measured. As usual, nostalgia is misplaced.

Related Links:
Financial Times - Why life in the UK feels better than ever

The Effect of the Brexit Referendum Result on Subjective Well-being

CEP Wellbeing

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 09/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

How is Brexit affecting FDI into Britain?

Brexit affects domestic firms, too. In January Barclays bank received legal approval to move €190bn ($213bn) of assets to Dublin, fearing no-deal. The London School of Economics recently found the Brexit vote had caused a 12% rise in investment by British firms in the rest of the eu. That capital might otherwise have been used at home. fdi remains strong, but it would be stronger minus Brexit. And Britain has not even left yet.

Related Links:
The Economist - How is Brexit affecting FDI into Britain?

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 09/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Amplifying Islamophobic hate crime: UK media in the wake of terror attacks

Ria Ivandic, Tom Kirchmaier and Stephen Machin study the empirical connections between local anti-Muslim hate crimes and international jihadi terror attacks. They find that local Muslim populations face a media-magnified likelihood of hate crime victimization in the days following such incidents.

Related Links:
LSE British Politics and Policy blog - Amplifying Islamophobic hate crime: UK media in the wake of terror attacks

Jihadi Attacks, Media and Local Hate Crime

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Ria Ivandic webpage

Tom Kirchmaier webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 09/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

What Works Wellbeing blog

Are the Olympic Games worth hosting?

This week's blog is from Christian Krekel, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics. In this blog, Christian outlines the wellbeing benefits of hosting the 2012 London Olympics.

Related Links:
What Works Wellbeing blog - Are the Olympic Games worth hosting?

The Host with the Most? The Effects of the Olympic Games on Happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 08/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Millennials are some of the worst hit by social mobility decline in the UK

Young people are now less likely to 'do better' than their parents. Lower wage growth is a key factor, write Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman.

This blog post is based on 'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Millennials are some of the worst hit by social mobility decline in the UK

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 08/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post Blogs

Trump's latest scam: Defining poverty out of existence; The administration doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt.

What makes this idea particularly absurd is that studies repeatedly find that lower-income households experience greater inflation than higher - earning ones. (Researcher Xavier Jaravel dubbed this "inflation inequality" in a 2017 paper.) One reason: Companies are catering to the top tier of earners, upping competition and reducing prices for many of the products the affluent are likely to use. For example, decreases in the price of organic groceries acted to reduce the overall increase in the price of food as calculated by the government. But fewer low-income households purchase organic food, since it costs more.

Related Links:
Washington Post Blogs - Trump's latest scam: Defining poverty out of existence; The administration doesn't deserve the benefit of the doubt.

CEP Labour Markets

Xavier Jaravel webpage



News Posted: 08/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

Metropolis Magazine

How the “Happiness Industry” Is Changing Architecture

SM: Happiness has become a metric - "a set of values," as you say - with transnational currency. It now enjoys the imprimatur of political science and sociological research. When did that happen?

FG: The exhibition has a precise chronological moment - the ten years between 2008 and 2018. It is true that this weird entity of "happiness," as we are defining it, was happening in the early '90s. That is the moment it began to be marketed in a new way, as a set of positive emotions to be used as an asset. Will Davies's book The Happiness Industry describes the story very well. In 2008 you have the economic crisis. You have figures like Richard Layard, considered one of the main figures in the U.K. behind the World Happiness Reports. Then there was the Stiglitz Commission's report, which suggested a political strategy to go beyond GDP. At the same time you have the release of the first iPhone, which makes data collection very easy but also allows us to track our own lives. These are just a few points, but the exhibition reads this moment very critically.

The World Happiness Report 2019, produced by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Editors John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard, Jeffrey Sachs.

Related Links:
Metropolis Magazine - How the “Happiness Industry” Is Changing Architecture

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 07/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation AU

Bill Shorten's promise of a living wage is both realistic and necessary. But it's not enough

Exbibit C: Inequality is increasing, a point recently acknowledged by the Productivity Commission. At the top it seems to be driven more by the seeking of favours than by productivity, a point persuasively argued by Gigi Foster and Paul Frijters.

Related Links:
The Conversation AU - Bill Shorten's promise of a living wage is both realistic and necessary. But it's not enough

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage



News Posted: 07/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

CITY AM

Small businesses to be given artificial intelligence boost

Dr Anna Valero, innovation fellow at the London School of Economics, said the results of the funding would inform local and national governments to improve access to technology.

Related Links:
CITY AM - Small businesses to be given artificial intelligence boost

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 06/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

Farmers Weekly

Agricultural workers at risk from minimum wage violations

Workers in the agricultural sector are among the most vulnerable to being paid below the minimum wage and HMRC needs to be more proactive in punishing non-compliant businesses, a leading employment expert has warned.

Sir David Metcalf, emeritus professor of industrial relations at the London School of Economics, said a more proactive response was necessary to hunt down businesses that were actively breaking the law, as most investigations were currently prompted by employee complaints.

United Kingdom Labour Market Enforcement Strategy 2018/19, Director of Labour Market Enforcement David Metcalf, May 2018.

Related Links:
Farmers Weekly - Agricultural workers at risk from minimum wage violations

CEP Labour Markets

David Metcalf webpage



News Posted: 03/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

American Economic Review

What drives differences in management?


Related Links:
American Economic Review - What drives differences in management?

What Drives Differences in Management?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 01/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

Quarterly Journal of Economics

Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation


Related Links:
Quarterly Journal of Economics - Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation

Lost Einsteins: who becomes an inventor in America?

Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

John Van reenen webpage

Xavier Jaravel webpage



News Posted: 01/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

Journal of Urban Economics

Relocation of public sector workers: Evaluating a place-based policy


Related Links:
Journal of Urban Economics - Relocation of public sector workers: Evaluating a place-based policy

Relocation of Public Sector Workers: Evaluating a Place-based Policy

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Giulia Faggio webpage



News Posted: 01/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Quarterly Journal of Economics

Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation


Related Links:
The Quarterly Journal of Economics - Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Xavier Jaravel webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 01/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Quarterly Journal of Economics

The Unequal Gains from Product Innovations: Evidence from the U.S. Retail Sector


Related Links:
The Quarterly Journal of Economics - The Unequal Gains from Product Innovations: Evidence from the U.S. Retail Sector

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Xavier Jaravel webpage



News Posted: 01/05/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Pay no council tax until you sell; Property Peers are calling for radical reforms to property taxation to help older homeowners, reports Carol Lewis

... in property. Professor Christian Hilber, professor of economic geography ...

Related Links:
The Times - Pay no council tax until you sell; Property Peers are calling for radical reforms to property taxation to help older homeowners, reports Carol Lewis

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 27/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

The US Doesn't Need More Superstar Companies

Economists David Autor, David Dorn, Lawrence Katz, Christina Patterson and John Van Reenen, who wrote one of the first papers to bring attention to the phenomenon of rising concentration, also endorse a story of so-called superstar companies. They point out that the companies that have been establishing dominance tend to use less labor to generate revenue, suggesting that they're winning because they're more productive.

Related Links:
Bloomberg - The US Doesn't Need More Superstar Companies

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Business Standard

Are superstar companies killing competition and taking over the US economy?


Related Links:
Business Standard - Are superstar companies killing competition and taking over the US economy?

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

TES (Online)

Exclusive: Manual skills in decline, study shows

Snippet: ...ionally at the heart of most vocational courses, a major piece of research exclusively shared with Tes shows. The report by Andy Dickerson and Damon Morris, at the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics, published today, sa...

Related Links:
TES (Online) - Exclusive: Manual skills in decline, study shows

The Changing Demand for Skills in the UK

CEP CVER



News Posted: 26/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

CVER blog

The Changing Demand for Skills in the UK

In this latest blog post, Andy Dickerson and Damon Morris changes in skill utilisation and returns to skills over time in the UK.

Related Links:
CVER blog - The Changing Demand for Skills in the UK

The Changing Demand for Skills in the UK

CEP CVER



News Posted: 26/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme Blog

Financial innovation in mortgage products spurred the rapid increase in credit and house price growth during the last housing boom

In a new CEP Discussion Paper, "Affordability, Financial Innovation and the Start of the Housing Boom" my coauthors and I study the relationship between the start of the housing boom and the use of non-traditional mortgages.

Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme Blog - Financial innovation in mortgage products spurred the rapid increase in credit and house price growth during the last housing boom

Affordability, Financial Innovation and the Start of the Housing Boom

Lindsay Relihan webpage



News Posted: 26/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

CVER blog

Family Matters: how early disadvantage impacts employment outcomes of young people

Dr Stefan Speckesser, Dr Matthew Bursnall and Jamie Moore share the findings of a new report.

Related Links:
CVER blog - Family Matters: how early disadvantage impacts employment outcomes of young people

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 25/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Poorer children 'twice as likely to be out of work in later life'

Dr Stefan Speckesser from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, which conducted the analysis, said the study showed that some local areas were more successfully tackling the negative effects of disadvantage, which are unrelated to education success, on young people’s school-to-work transitions. "From this point of view, the analysis of large data offers a great potential to see where local actors can achieve better outcomes and to learn from good practice," he said.

Related Links:
Guardian - Poorer children 'twice as likely to be out of work in later life'

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Change UK offers a clean sheet to tackle injustices that have plagued our society for too long


Related Links:
The Times - Change UK offers a clean sheet to tackle injustices that have plagued our society for too long

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Metro

Business Briefing: Youths from poor homes more likely to be jobless


Related Links:
Metro - Business Briefing: Youths from poor homes more likely to be jobless

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

'Youth Jobs Gap' Means Poorer Children More Likely To Be Out Of Work Than Richer Peers


Related Links:
Huffington Post - 'Youth Jobs Gap' Means Poorer Children More Likely To Be Out Of Work Than Richer Peers

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Times Education Supplement

Disadvantaged students left behind in 'youth jobs gap'


Related Links:
Times Education Supplement - Disadvantaged students left behind in 'youth jobs gap'

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Independent

'Youth Jobs Gap' Means Poorer Children More Likely To Be Out Of Work Than Richer Peers


Related Links:
Independent - 'Youth Jobs Gap' Means Poorer Children More Likely To Be Out Of Work Than Richer Peers

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Shropshire Star

Study reveals youth jobs gap between rich and poor


Related Links:
Shropshire Star - Study reveals youth jobs gap between rich and poor

A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education

CEP CVER



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Poorer children 'twice as likely to be out of work in later life'

Disadvantaged children who qualify for free school meals are twice as likely to be out of work in later life than their better-off peers, and even when they get good qualifications at school the employment gap remains, according to research.[...]

Dr Stefan Speckesser from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, which conducted the analysis, said the study showed that some local areas were more successfully tackling the negative effects of disadvantage, which are unrelated to education success, on young people’s school-to-work transitions. “From this point of view, the analysis of large data offers a great potential to see where local actors can achieve better outcomes and to learn from good practice,” he said.


Related Links:
The Guardian - Poorer children 'twice as likely to be out of work in later life'

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Change UK offers a clean sheet to tackle injustices that have plagued our society for too long

by Heidi Allen MP, interim leader of Change UK

"I’ve had early sight of research released today that magnifies how the most disadvantaged young people in our country are held back because of recurring factors including where they were born and their parents’ income. The charity Impetus has had sight of years’ worth of Department for Education data which shows there is a lingering “opportunity gap” between children growing up on free school meals and their better-off peers.

Its analysis shows that young people who are eligible for free school meals in year 11 are twice as likely to end up out of work, full-time education or training than their wealthier peers. What’s more, there is an “employment gap” between the most disadvantaged and those who are not, at every qualification level right up to A level."

 


Related Links:
The Times - Change UK offers a clean sheet to tackle injustices that have plagued our society for too long

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills



News Posted: 24/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

VOX.eu

Employee wellbeing, productivity, and firm performance: Evidence from 1.8 million employees

A growing number of companies place a high priority on the wellbeing of their workers, assuming that happier workers will lead to improved productivity. This column examines this link based on a meta-analysis of independent studies accumulated by Gallup, covering the wellbeing and productivity of nearly 2 million employees and the performance of over 80,000 business units, originating from 230 independent organisations across 49 industries in 73 countries. The results suggest a strong positive correlation between employee wellbeing, productivity, and firm performance.

Krekel, C, G Ward and J-E De Neve (2018), "Work and wellbeing: a global perspective", in J Sachs (ed.), Global Happiness Policy Report.

Related Links:
VOX.eu - Employee wellbeing, productivity, and firm performance: Evidence from 1.8 million employees

Employee Wellbeing, Productivity and Firm Performance

CEP Wellbeing

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Christian Krekel webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 21/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

The cost of discrimination against senior Jewish managers in Nazi Germany

Less efficiency and lower profitability for firms carry lessons for Britain and the US, write Kilian Huber, Volker Lindenthal and Fabian Waldinger.
Talented individuals are often excluded from leadership positions if they belong to a group that faces discrimination. Such discrimination is, of course, extremely hurtful and unfair to the individuals. But is it also costly in a more general sense?

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - The cost of discrimination against senior Jewish managers in Nazi Germany

Measuring the economic costs of discrimination: insights from Nazi Germany

Discrimination, Managers, and Firm Performance: Evidence from “Aryanizations” in Nazi Germany

CEP Labour Markets

Kilian Huber webpage



News Posted: 16/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

How to Survive a Recession and Thrive Afterward

A company's performance during and after a recession depends not just on the decisions it makes but also on who makes them. In a 2017 study, Raffaella Sadun (of Harvard Business School), Philippe Aghion (of College de France), Nicholas Bloom and Brian Lucking (of Stanford), and John Van Reenen (of MIT) examined how organizational structure affects a company's ability to navigate downturns. On the one hand, "the need to make tough decisions may favor centralized firms," the researchers write, because they have a better picture of the organization as a whole and their incentives are typically more closely aligned with company performance. On the other hand, decentralized firms may be better positioned to weather macro shocks "because the value of local information increases."

Related Links:
Harvard Business Review - How to Survive a Recession and Thrive Afterward

Turbulence, Firm Decentralization and Growth in Bad Times

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

Philippe Aghion webpage

Raffaella Sadun webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 16/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Finance.co.uk

GENERATION GAP: Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

Doing better financially than your parents is an important marker of success, and for much of the last half century, real earnings growth in the UK was strong enough that most young people achieved this milestone. But new research by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman shows that plummeting earnings since the Great Recession has meant that fewer young adults now are earning more than their fathers.

Related Links:
Finance.co.uk - GENERATION GAP: Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 15/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Can going to therapy become as straightforward as going to the gym?

A decade ago, one in six people had depression or chronic anxiety, but only a quarter of them were receiving treatment - mostly drugs. The government's then happiness tsar, the economist Richard Layard, suggested that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was as effective as drugs and was preferred by most patients. Layard's plan to scale up CBT for people with depression and anxiety was ditched by David Cameron's 2010 government, but the problem remains. The government has estimated that about half of days taken off work in 2017/18 were due to stress, depression or anxiety.

Related Links:
The Guardian - Can going to therapy become as straightforward as going to the gym?

Improving Access to Psychological Therapy: Initial Evaluation of the Two Demonstration Sites

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 15/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Phys.org

Parental influence on educational attainment much greater than previously thought, new research finds

Dr. Federico Rossi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Warwick University and Dr. Marta De Philippis of the Bank of Italy's Department of Economics and Statistics investigated the school performance of second-generation immigrants - children born and schooled in their parents' adopted country - taking account of known influences such as parental income, education level and occupational status.

Related Links:
Phys.org - Parental influence on educational attainment much greater than previously thought, new research finds

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Marta De philippis webpage



News Posted: 15/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Dawn

Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out

Researchers at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance found that the "subjective well-being," or happiness, of Britons has declined since the 2016 referendum regardless of a person's position on Brexit. The researchers believe this is because those in favour of remaining in the EU are upset with the outcome, and those who want to leave are unhappy with how politicians are handling the process.

Related Links:
Dawn - Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out

The Effect of the Brexit Referendum Result on Subjective Well-being

CEP Wellbeing

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 15/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Caixan online / The blog of the Shannon Economic Academic Circle

Do we need industrial policies? Evidence from regional funding programs

Original information: Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry G. Overman, John Van Reenen. Some Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy. American Economic Review, 2019, 109(1): 48-85. Governments around the world provide large amounts of subsidies to private companies, requiring companies to keep jobs, reduce unemployment, and increase productivity, especially in areas with poor geographical conditions. However, there are very few quantitative assessments of these policies, as these projects may only fund activities that the company would have carried out anyway, and the measurement estimates are unrecognizable.

Related Links:
Caixan online / The blog of the Shannon Economic Academic Circle - Do we need industrial policies? Evidence from regional funding programs

Some Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Chiara Criscuolo webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Henry Overman webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 14/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Eurasia Review

AI Technology And Gender Inequality – Analysis

There is growing concern that human jobs are being replaced by the rapid technological progress of artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, and automation (Acemoglu and Restrepo 2017, Brynjolfsson and McAfee 2014, Ford 2015). It is often emphasised that whereas mechanisation has so far replaced blue-collar jobs, recent AI technology, which plays a similar role to the human brain, is mainly replacing white-collar jobs (Dauth et al. 2017, Graetz and Michaels 2018). In fact, pattern recognition based on deep learning plays an important role in companies that collect big data, including image, speech, and texts. AI consulting services are already in use.

Related Links:
Eurasia Review - AI Technology And Gender Inequality – Analysis

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 14/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times of Israel

‘Brexhaustion’: Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out


Related Links:
The Times of Israel - ‘Brexhaustion’: Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out

The Effect of the Brexit Referendum Result on Subjective Well-being

CEP Wellbeing

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 13/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

ABC News

Brexhaustion: Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out


Related Links:
ABC News - Brexhaustion: Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out

The Effect of the Brexit Referendum Result on Subjective Well-being

CEP Wellbeing

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 13/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

GENERATION GAP

Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

Doing better financially than your parents is an important marker of success, and for much of the last half century, real earnings growth in the UK was strong enough that most young people achieved this milestone. But new research by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman shows that plummeting earnings since the Great Recession has meant that fewer young adults now are earning more than their fathers.

Related Links:
GENERATION GAP - Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 12/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Young people are doing WORSE than their parents: Just a THIRD of 30-year-olds are earning more than their dads

Jo Blanden, co-author of the study, said: 'Research and political debate have focused on relative social mobility - that is, whether those with higher incomes are likely to have children who are also relatively well-off'.

Related Links:
Daily Mail - Young people are doing WORSE than their parents: Just a THIRD of 30-year-olds are earning more than their dads

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 12/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Abbotsford News (Newspaper)

Brexhaustion: Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out


Related Links:
The Effect of the Brexit Referendum Result on Subjective Well-being

CEP Wellbeing

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 12/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

NIHCM Foundation

Announcing the Winners of the 25th Annual Research Award


Related Links:
NIHCM Foundation - Announcing the Winners of the 25th Annual Research Award

The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured

CEP Growth

Zack Cooper webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 11/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Toronto Star Online

Schools struggle with phone bans: ‘These devices continue to cause major problems’

A widely cited 2015 paper from the London School of Economics and Political Science found "student performance in high stake exams significantly increases" if mobile phones are banned.

Related Links:
Toronto Star Online - Schools struggle with phone bans: ‘These devices continue to cause major problems’

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 10/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

DIAL podcast

Jo Blanden: How well are youngsters getting on compared with mum and dad?

In Episode 4 of the DIAL Podcast, Dr Jo Blanden from the University of Surrey talks about her research using the British Household Panel Survey and Understanding Society to look at home ownership and earnings for younger people and how the picture compares with that of their parents.

Related Links:
DIAL podcast - Jo Blanden: How well are youngsters getting on compared with mum and dad?

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jo Blanden webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 09/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

The value of having a view to a canal

House prices indicate the value of canals as an environmental resource to local residents in England and Wales, write Stephen Gibbons, Cong Peng and Cheng Keat Tang.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - The value of having a view to a canal

Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Canals Using House Prices

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Steve Gibbons webpage

Cong Peng webpage



News Posted: 09/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

DAILY POST

Less cheese, fish, veg, but more carbs - how a worse case Brexit could hit your weekly shop

...roposed extensions to the official date for leaving Europe, the deadline is creeping closer.In this article, we take a look at how Brexit could impact your weekly shop. Less cheese (Image: Sunday Mirror) A report by the London School of Economics (LSE) found that the...

'The impact of Brexit on the UK dairy sector', Jan Bakker and Nikhil Datta, LSE Consulting Report for Arla Foods

Related Links:
DAILY POST - Less cheese, fish, veg, but more carbs - how a worse case Brexit could hit your weekly shop

CEP Trade

Jan Bakker webpage

Nikhil Datta webpage



News Posted: 08/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

ITIF

The Case Against Taxing Robots

Robots are already driving productivity. Investment in robots contributed to 10 percent of GDP growth per capita in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries from 1993 to 2016.5 There is also a 0.42 percent correlation between a country's wage-adjusted manufacturing robot adoption and growth in productivity between 2010 and 2017.6 Graetz and Michaels found that robot densification increased annual growth of GDP and labor productivity between 1993 and 2007 by about 0.37 and 0.36 percentage points respectively across 17 countries studied, representing 10 percent of total GDP growth - this compared with the 0.35 percentage point estimated total contribution of steam technology to British annual labor productivity growth between 1850 and 1910.

Related Links:
ITIF - The Case Against Taxing Robots

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 08/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Log24

Czy roboty zabiora nam prace? / Will robots take our work?

Robots increase productivity when used for tasks that perform more efficiently and at a higher and more stable level of quality than people. In a research focused on robotics for the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels concluded that the density of robot utilization increased in 1993-2007 the annual GDP growth and labor productivity by about 0.37 and 0 respectively, 36 percentage points. The above result concerns 17 countries surveyed, representing 10 percent. total global GDP growth. In turn, looking to the future, the McKinsey Global Institute predicts that only automation will allow global GDP growth of 2.8 percent. annually in the next 50 years.

Related Links:
Log24 - Czy roboty zabiora nam prace? / Will robots take our work?

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 05/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Der Spiegel

Bringt eine Zollunion die Lösung? / Will a customs union bring the solution?

"How unequal power relations can be, is shown by the example of Turkey, whose customs union with the EU has hitherto been limited to industrial products. If the EU lowers the industrial tariffs for a particular trading partner, then Turkey must do likewise. In return, it does not automatically get better access to the market of this country. The market access agreements are 'deeply asymmetrical', according to Holger Breinlich, an economist at Surrey University."

Related Links:
Der Spiegel - Bringt eine Zollunion die Lösung? / Will a customs union bring the solution?

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage



News Posted: 04/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

As the Phoenicians sailed across the Mediterranean, they spread mice and growth

One of the first major trade expansions in human history provides early evidence that trade promotes growth, write Jan David Bakker, Stephan Maurer, Jorn-Steffen Pischke and Ferdinand Rauch.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - As the Phoenicians sailed across the Mediterranean, they spread mice and growth

Trade and growth in the Iron Age

Of Mice and Merchants: Trade and Growth in the Iron Age

CEP Wellbeing CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade CEP Growth

Jan Bakker webpage

Stephan Maurer webpage

Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage

Ferdinand Rauch webpage



News Posted: 04/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Afterposten

Britene er fortsatt i EU. Men brexit har alt hatt store omkostninger / The British are still in the EU. But brexit has all had great costs

The value of the British pound is ten percent lower than in 2016. A study by the Center for Economic Performance estimated that increased inflation had cost an average household an estimated weekly wage all the first year after the referendum.

Related Links:
Afterposten - Britene er fortsatt i EU. Men brexit har alt hatt store omkostninger / The British are still in the EU. But brexit has all had great costs

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

CEP Trade



News Posted: 04/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

TES (Online)

Vocational Stem courses beat degrees on pay

Snippet: ...es at non-Russell Group universities, new research shows. Researchers at the National Institute for Economic and Social Research (NIESR) affiliated with the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) - part of the London School of Economics - found that by the ...

CVER Research Paper. A comparison of earnings related to higher level vocational/technical and academic education. Hector Espinoza and Stefan Speckesser , April 2019. Paper No' CVERDP019

Related Links:
TES (Online) - Vocational Stem courses beat degrees on pay

CEP CVER



News Posted: 03/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme Blog (formerly SERC)

Valuing the environmental benefits of canals using house prices

Our recent research investigates the value of this resource to local residents in England and Wales, using house prices. Analysis of house prices is a well-established method within urban and environmental economics for establishing the value of amenities - such as good schools, transport, low crime or low pollution. This value is expressed as the monetary value of other types of consumption that people have to sacrifice in order to pay more for housing close to a desirable amenity (or away from an undesirable one).

Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme Blog (formerly SERC) - Valuing the environmental benefits of canals using house prices

Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Canals Using House Prices

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Steve Gibbons webpage

Cong Peng webpage



News Posted: 02/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Brexit blog

Voting for Brexit has already made the UK poorer

How has voting to leave the EU affected the UK's economy? The difficulty in answering this question is that we do not know what would have happened to the economy if Remain had won. Consequently, researchers look for ways to estimate what would have happened. For example, how would the UK's economic output have changed since June 2016 if there had been a Remain vote? Comparing observed outcomes to what would have happened then gives an estimate of the Brexit effect. There now is evidence that voting for Brexit has already made the UK poorer, argues Thomas Sampson (LSE).
Related Links:
LSE Brexit blog - Voting for Brexit has already made the UK poorer

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 02/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Minimum wage marks 20 years without negative impact on jobs

In the mid 1990s, a UK employer could advertise an opening for a security guard on an hourly wage of just £2 - with a requirement to bring their own dog.

Twenty years on from the introduction of a national minimum wage, such miserly job offers - noted in a paper by the labour market economist Alan Manning - are a thing of the past.

Related Links:
Financial Times - Minimum wage marks 20 years without negative impact on jobs

The Elusive Employment Effect of the Minimum Wage

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC World News (TV)

World Business Report

Snippet: ...according to a study by the London School of Economics British companies have delivered almost 11 billion dollars worth of new investment away from Britain through the EU since the Brexit vote so UK firms hiked investment in the EU by about 12% since June 2016 as a direct result of the vote this is according to London school of economics LSE at the study also found that new investment from the EU to Britain has fallen the fallen by 11% since the referendum has fallen to the tune of around 4 and a half billion dollars...

Related Links:
BBC World News (TV) - World Business Report

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Tribune de Genève

Les Britanniques, fatigués et traumatisés par le Brexit /The British, tired and traumatized by Brexit

And the mood of the British is deeply affected. "The level of post-referendum satisfaction has deteriorated significantly in the UK compared to other EU countries," Georgios Kavetsos, a professor of behavioral science at London's Queen Mary University, said in an academic article.

Related Links:
Tribune de Genève - Les Britanniques, fatigués et traumatisés par le Brexit /The British, tired and traumatized by Brexit

The Effect of the Brexit Referendum Result on Subjective Well-being

CEP Wellbeing

Georgios Kavetsos webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

City A.M. (Print)

THE COST OF TAKING BACK CONTROL

Snippet: ...A fall in the pound increases the costs of UK imports, and in the year after the vote consumer prices rose rapidly. Analysis from 2017 by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance estimated that the Brexit vote increased consumer price inflation by 1.7 percentage points in the year following the referendum.

... More recently, and looking at flows in the opposite direction, work published in February by the Centre for Economic Performance showed that the Leave vote has led to a 12 per cent increase in new investment projects by British firms in the EU, but has not affected UK investment outside of the EU.

Related Links:
Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC World News (TV)

Business Briefing

Snippet: ... so what does the investment picture look like in the UK since the referendum in June 20 16th government figures show that last year business investment fell slightly by 0.4% to around 247 billion dollars according to a study by the London School of Economics British companies had diverted almost 11 billion dollars worth of new investment away from Britain to the EU since the Brexit vote UK firms have increased investment in the EU by some 12% since June 2016 as a direct result of the vote according to the LSE the study also found that new investment from the EU to Britain has gone down by 11% since the referendum to the tune of around for half a billion dollars we have spent a Crawley with this is co-founder and general partner at first minute he's with us in...

Related Links:
BBC World News (TV) - Business Briefing

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

El Diario de Madryn

Crear universidades impacta directamente en el crecimiento económico de la región / Creating universities directly impacts the economic growth of the region

Snippet: Creating universities directly impacts the economic growth of the region

Snippet: According to a study conducted by researchers at the London School of Economics in England and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the increase in the number of universities is positively associated with the growth of the pro ...

Related Links:
El Diario de Madryn - Crear universidades impacta directamente en el crecimiento económico de la región / Creating universities directly impacts the economic growth of the region

How universities boost economic growth

The Economic Impact of Universities: Evidence from Across the Globe

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

LBC

Shelagh Fogarty 1 – 4PM

Snippet: ...know that element happens to be one OK that's enough Fabio 10 M&S group protection to keep control all leading Britain's conversation LBC with was speaking to Dr Thomas Sampson associate Professor of economics at the LSE London school of economics and focus on what that customs union vote if it is successful in the Commons today might mean in real terms and what the threat or not according.. (4/1/2019 1:35:03 PM)

CEP BREXIT Analysis
Related Links:
LBC - Shelagh Fogarty 1 – 4PM

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 01/04/2019      [Back to the Top]

Finans

Bekæmpelsen af hvidvask er brudt sammen - sådan fikser vi systemet / The fight against money laundering has broken down - how we fix the system

We should shift the entire responsibility for money laundering with the respective financial authorities and invest much more in IT technology, writes CBS professor and expert in money laundering, Tom Kirchmaier.

Related Links:
Finans - Bekæmpelsen af hvidvask er brudt sammen - sådan fikser vi systemet / The fight against money laundering has broken down - how we fix the system

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Tom Kirchmaier webpage



News Posted: 31/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Investors Chronicle (Magazine)

The dark side of the jobs miracle

Secondly, workers are not being displaced by new technology. Business investment has fallen since 2016. There are countless reasons for this, many of them longstanding structural ones. One, which might have become more intense recently, is uncertainty about Brexit. Stanford University's Nick Bloom and colleagues estimate that this has depressed capital spending since 2016.
[Subscription only]

Related Links:
CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage



News Posted: 29/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Axios

Gutenberg's legacy and populism

Johannes Gutenberg died in 1468, a little over a decade after inventing movable type. But he had already set in motion a gold rush-like frenzy of European entrepreneurs who flung open print shops to cash in on his technological earthquake.

Why it matters: We may be seeing the echoes of Gutenberg's printing fever in the political and social tumult all around us, Jeremiah Dittmar, the lead author of new research published by the London School of Economics, tells Axios.

Related Links:
Axios - Gutenberg's legacy and populism

Europe's transformation after Gutenberg: the impact of new media and competition

New Media and Competition: Printing and Europe's Transformation after Gutenberg

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Jeremiah Dittmar webpage



News Posted: 28/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde

Quand une star scientifique meurt, d'autres idées fleurissent /When a scientific star dies, other ideas flourish

In 2010, along with two other colleagues at MIT and the University of California at San Diego, he had already observed that the productivity of former star coworkers decreased by 5% to 8% after such a fatal event. "Since then, many have taken this idea of the shock of death," said Xavier Jaravel, professor of economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, which showed in 2017 that the co-inventors of a deceased are less productive and that the revenues from their patents fall after a disappearance.

Related Links:
Le Monde - Quand une star scientifique meurt, d'autres idées fleurissent /When a scientific star dies, other ideas flourish

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Xavier Jaravel webpage



News Posted: 27/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Improving resilience to devastating floods

From Dr Guy Michaels, London School of Economics, UK Joseph Cotterill, in "Aid groups battle to reach cyclone survivors" (March 21), describes the terrible devastation that recent floods have wreaked in Mozambique and neighbouring countries…

Related Links:
Financial Times - Improving resilience to devastating floods

Flooded Cities

Flooded Cities

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Guy Michaels webpage

Ferdinand Rauch webpage



News Posted: 27/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

In These Times Online

Why You Shouldn’t Listen to Self-Serving Optimists Like Hans Rosling and Steven Pinker

Most strikingly, Rosling must have worked hard to ignore the data on mental health, given that the global leading cause of ill health today is depression. According to new estimates by Sarah Fleche and Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, mental disorders explain even more misery than poverty and physical ill health, as reflected in life satisfaction surveys.

Related Links:
In These Times Online - Why You Shouldn’t Listen to Self-Serving Optimists Like Hans Rosling and Steven Pinker

Misery and mental health

Do More of those in Misery Suffer From Poverty, Unemployment or Mental Illness?

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flčche webpage

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 27/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Emirates Business

Low interest rates might be what is hurting growth

Meanwhile, a very interesting new paper by economists Philippe Aghion, Antonin Bergeaud, Gilbert Cette, Remy Lecat and Helene Maghin looks at the relationship between credit constraints and productivity at the level of industrial sectors and individual companies, using French data. They find a U-shaped relationship at the sectoral level - at first, more lending is correlated with rising productivity, but as credit becomes very loose, productivity tends to fall. Unproductive companies with easy access to credit tend not to exit the market - a clear mechanism by which low rates might create zombies.

Related Links:
Emirates Business - Low interest rates might be what is hurting growth

The Inverted-U Relationship between Credit Access and Productivity Growth

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 27/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Elizabeth Warren's $700 billion plan to get women off mommy track and boost their careers

And a review of studies by a Boston College economist Christina Olivetti and British colleague Barbara Petrongolo showed that nearly all developed nations have some form of subsidized early-childhood education. The U.S. spends only 0.4 percent of gross domestic product on early-childhood education, while Sweden spends four times that much and France, the United Kingdom and Finland spend three times the U.S. number or nearly so.

Related Links:
CNBC - Elizabeth Warren's $700 billion plan to get women off mommy track and boost their careers

The Economic Consequences of Family Policies: Lessons from a Century of Legislation in High-Income Countries

CEP Labour Markets

Barbara Petrongolo webpage



News Posted: 27/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The LightHouse

A disorderly divorce: why a reversal of Brexit could be the best outcome

...13, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

Related Links:
The LightHouse - A disorderly divorce: why a reversal of Brexit could be the best outcome

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 27/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Innovaspain

Robots en América Latina: ¿cuántos son, dónde están y cuánto tributan? / Robots in Latin America: how many are they, where are they and how much are they taxed?

However, the phenomenon that has promoted the economic viability of new technology around the world has been the reduction of prices. According to Graetz and Michaels [5], the price of industrial robots has been reduced by half between 1990 and 2005 in the six largest developed economies. If the improvements in the quality of the robots are taken into account, the prices adjusted for quality in 2005 are 20 of the 1990 prices.

Related Links:
Innovaspain - Robots en América Latina: ¿cuántos son, dónde están y cuánto tributan? / Robots in Latin America: how many are they, where are they and how much are they taxed?

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 26/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

China Daily (Hong Kong Edition)

Just how happy are people in our city?

I write this column not to discredit the UN report, which is directed by three well known economists, John Helliwell, Richard Layard, and Jeffrey Sachs. As a matter of fact, Table 2.1 in the report suggests there is considerable rigor in their results. The life satisfaction score is found to relate positively and significantly to GDP per capita, social support, and healthy life expectancy at birth.

The World Happiness Report 2019, produced by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Editors John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard, Jeffrey Sachs.

Related Links:
China Daily (Hong Kong Edition) - Just how happy are people in our city?

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 26/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

CNN

Women inventors, long overlooked, are churning out more patents than ever

However, women inventors made up only 12% of all inventors on patents granted in 2016 - the most recent year for which data is available - according to the patent office. That disparity is not a good sign and even hurts the country's economy, says John Van Reenan, who co-authored the 2017 study about inventors. "You can grow to some degree by copying other people, but what really moves the dial is when you can come out with great new ideas and innovation and new technology," he says.

Related Links:
CNN - Women inventors, long overlooked, are churning out more patents than ever

Lost Einsteins: who becomes an inventor in America?

Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

John Van reenen webpage

Xavier Jaravel webpage



News Posted: 26/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo Finance

Low Interest Rates Might Be What's Hurting Growth

Meanwhile, a very interesting new paper by economists Philippe Aghion, Antonin Bergeaud, Gilbert Cette, Remy Lecat and Helene Maghin looks at the relationship between credit constraints and productivity at the level of industrial sectors and individual companies, using French data. They find a U-shaped relationship at the sectoral level - at first, more lending is correlated with rising productivity, but as credit becomes very loose, productivity tends to fall. Unproductive companies with easy access to credit tend not to exit the market - a clear mechanism by which low rates might create zombies.

Related Links:
Yahoo Finance - Low Interest Rates Might Be What's Hurting Growth

The Inverted-U Relationship between Credit Access and Productivity Growth

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 25/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Regulating mobile money: what’s at stake

A new analysis suggests a trajectory and policy recommendations, write Adeline Pelletier, Susanna Khavul and Saul Estrin. In the past decade, mobile payment systems (MPS) have rapidly emerged in many developing economies, addressing several well-known gaps in the provision of financial services. MPS, also known as mobile money, has allowed consumers who are often unbanked or underbanked, to transact and to store money more efficiently, thereby reducing the costs of engaging in undertaking all transactions, including purchasing and selling goods and paying labour...

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Regulating mobile money: what’s at stake

CEP Growth

Saul Estrin webpage



News Posted: 25/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Mundo

Por qué tu celular puede hacer que gastes más cuando compras por internet / Why your cell phone can make you spend more when shopping online

Abi Adams, a specialist in behavioral economics at the Institute of Fiscal Studies (IFS) in London, UK, tells the BBC that new websites and online shopping applications "are changing our relationship with money."

Related Links:
BBC News Mundo - Por qué tu celular puede hacer que gastes más cuando compras por internet / Why your cell phone can make you spend more when shopping online

CEP Labour Markets

Abi Adams webpage



News Posted: 25/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Quint

Low interest rates might be what's hurting growth

Meanwhile, a very interesting new paper by economists Philippe Aghion, Antonin Bergeaud, Gilbert Cette, Remy Lecat and Helene Maghin looks at the relationship between credit constraints and productivity at the level of industrial sectors and individual companies, using French data.

Related Links:
Bloomberg Quint - Low interest rates might be what's hurting growth

The Inverted-U Relationship between Credit Access and Productivity Growth

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 25/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Money Box (11:20)

To what extent does the way we bank affect the way we spend, or don't spend, our money? Guest: Abi Adams, Behavioural Economist at the University of Oxford.

Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Money Box (11:20)

CEP Labour Markets

Abi Adams webpage



News Posted: 24/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Equities.com

Why the road to full employment is lined with food banks

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) last week published employment figures for the three months to January which showed that more than 90% of new jobs were full-time. "That doesn’t mean they are high-quality jobs," says Machin. "Many people say they would like to work more hours if they were available, strongly suggesting underemployment. Also, many solo self-employed and those on zero-hours contracts say they are doing the job because it was the only one they could get, not because it offered more flexibility."

Related Links:
Equities.com - Why the road to full employment is lined with food banks

Care homes: effects of the National Living Wage

Changing the Structure of Minimum Wages: Firm Adjustment and Wage Spillovers

CEP Labour Markets

Giulia Giupponi webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 23/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Why the road to full employment has ended up being lined with food banks

Steve Machin, head of the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, says more people of pensionable age are staying in the workforce: "The rise in labour force participation of older people is very striking for women, and most likely links to the values of state pensions being eroded."

Related Links:
The Observer - Why the road to full employment has ended up being lined with food banks

Care homes: effects of the National Living Wage

Changing the Structure of Minimum Wages: Firm Adjustment and Wage Spillovers

CEP Labour Markets

Giulia Giupponi webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 23/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

BRITISH SMILES Britain is getting happier despite two years of Brexit gloom, study reveals

Researcher Prof Richard Layard, from the London School of Economics, said: "If governments want to stay in power they should take the happiness of the people more seriously than economic measures."

Related Links:
The Sun - BRITISH SMILES Britain is getting happier despite two years of Brexit gloom, study reveals

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 22/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

National Post

The happiness movement: How cities around the world are pursuing joy by fostering social change

The lesson for cities? If you want to solve poverty and marginalization, the smartest approach is to get the experts - the poor and marginalized - to help with solutions. But more broadly, as happiness economist Jan-Emmanuel De Neve argues, the best way to boost societal happiness is to focus on the needs of the least happy. People are happier in societies where wellbeing is spread more equally.

Related Links:
National Post - The happiness movement: How cities around the world are pursuing joy by fostering social change

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 22/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Conversable Economist

What Did Gutenberg's Printing Press Actually Change?

In a similar spirit, I of course know that the introduction of a printing press with moveable type by to Europe in 1439 by Johannes Gutenberg is often called one of the most important inventions in world history. However, I'm grateful that Jeremiah Dittmar and Skipper Seabold have been checking it out. They have written "Gutenberg's moving type propelled Europe towards the scientific revolution," for the LSE Business Review (March 19, 2019). It's a nice accessible version of the main findings from their research paper, "New Media and Competition: Printing and Europe's Transformation after Gutenberg" (Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 1600 January 2019).

Related Links:
Conversable Economist - What Did Gutenberg's Printing Press Actually Change?

Europe's transformation after Gutenberg: the impact of new media and competition

New Media and Competition: Printing and Europe's Transformation after Gutenberg

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Jeremiah Dittmar webpage



News Posted: 22/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

UK economy since the Brexit vote: slower GDP growth, lower productivity, and a weaker pound

Evidence of the UK's economic performance since the EU Referendum is clear: GDP growth has slowed down, productivity has suffered, the pound has depreciated and purchasing power has gone down, and investments have declined. In this blog, Josh De Lyon and Swati Dhingra (LSE Centre for Economic Performance) argue that the impact of the Brexit vote on the health of the economy can now be evaluated with greater accuracy than previously.

BREXIT Papers & Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - UK economy since the Brexit vote: slower GDP growth, lower productivity, and a weaker pound

CEP Trade

Josh De lyon webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 21/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Inverse

A World Happiness Report Creator Explains Why the US Can't Crack the Top 10

"We were standing at his desk in his office when I broached the idea of a global happiness report, and I would attribute the idea to Thinley’s leadership and the compelling scientific findings of Professors Helliwell and Layard and others," Sachs says. "I was and am inspired by Bhutan’s insight into Gross National Happiness and in the former PM Thinley’s leadership in explaining its importance." The World Happiness Report 2019, produced by the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Editors John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard, Jeffrey Sachs.
Related Links:
Inverse - A World Happiness Report Creator Explains Why the US Can't Crack the Top 10

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 21/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

scotsman.com

Brexit chaos fails to depress as UK rated as the 15th happiest country

Snippet: ...ince 1975.Average earnings increased by 3.4 per cent in the year to January, down by 0.1 per cent on the previous month but still outpacing inflation.However, one of the report’s authors, Professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, and co-founder of U...

Related Links:
scotsman.com - Brexit chaos fails to depress as UK rated as the 15th happiest country

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 21/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Britons find reasons to be cheerful in a glummer world

Snippet: ...core of 2.85 was South Sudan. The Central African Republic and Afghanistan were just above it. The annual happiness report was commissioned by the United Nations in 2012 and co-founded by Lord Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics. It measures happine...

Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 21/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Britons find reasons to be cheerful in a glummer world

Across the world people's evaluations of their happiness dropped to levels that were last seen after the financial crisis of 2008-09, having briefly risen in its aftermath but then fallen steadily. Levels of happiness in Britain rose slightly between 2016, when the Brexit referendum was held, and last year, as optimism among Leavers trumped gloom among Remainers. The country moved up the happiness index from 19th last year to 15th, with a score of 7.05 out of ten.

Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, associate professor at Oxford University's Said Business School and associate editor of the report, said: "In the UK we have seen a slight, marginal uptick from year to year."

Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 21/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

PM (5:49:59 PM)

Snippet: ...e happy than the Germans French Italians just above the Irish last talks one of the world's big happiness experts economist Professor Richard Layard pregnant programme director of the centre for economic performance the London school of economics is one of the author...

Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

La Vaguardia

Llega la ‘happycracia’ o la obligación de ser feliz / There comes the 'happycracy' or the obligation to be happy

The UN instituted in 2012 the International Day of Happiness. Even a stream of economists flourishes like Richard Layard who have proposed to replace a parameter as questioned as GDP by happiness indices. Indexes that Finland leads, and in which Spain is ranked 36 below Saudi Arabia. David Cameron, after announcing in 2007 the biggest cuts in the history of his country, decided that it was time to adopt happiness as an index: the British should not think only of putting money in their pockets, but in what makes them happier.

Related Links:
La Vaguardia - Llega la ‘happycracia’ o la obligación de ser feliz / There comes the 'happycracy' or the obligation to be happy

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Vita.it

È la Finlandia il Paese più felice del mondo /Finland is the happiest country in the world


Related Links:
Vita.it - È la Finlandia il Paese più felice del mondo /Finland is the happiest country in the world

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

World's happiest country's revealed - and UK is actually CLIMBING the table

Professor Richard Layard, from the London School of Economics, one of the authors of the World Happiness Report and co-founder of UK charity Action For Happiness, said: "If governments want to stay in power they should take the happiness of the people more seriously than economic measures."
"It's essential that our leaders look beyond narrow financial measures and focus on the wider set of factors that really affect the well-being of the nation, and especially mental health."

Related Links:
Mirror - World's happiest country's revealed - and UK is actually CLIMBING the table

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Time Magazine

Finland Tops Global Happiness Index for Second Straight Year – Here’s Why


Related Links:
Time Magazine - Finland Tops Global Happiness Index for Second Straight Year – Here’s Why

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

World Happiness Report 2019

Chapter 3, Happiness and Voting Behavior by George Ward

The idea that policymakers should aim for something beyond GDP is far from new, but it has regained prominence in recent years. A growing contingent of governments and international organisations are beginning to focus their attention on the subjective well-being (SWB) - or "happiness" - of citizens. [1] Some governments now produce national well-being statistics, while many others also go further and use SWB data and research to inform their policymaking decisions. Yet, despite this nascent change in the way many governments are going about the way they formulate and evaluate public...

Related Links:
World Happiness Report 2019 - Chapter 3, Happiness and Voting Behavior by George Ward

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

World Happiness Report 2019

Chapter 6, Big Data and Wellbeing by Clément Bellet and Paul Frijters

This chapter provides a general review and discussion of the debate surrounding Big Data and wellbeing. We ask four main questions: Is Big Data very new or very old? How well can we now predict individual and aggregate wellbeing with Big Data, and to what extent do novel measurement tools complement survey-based measures? Is Big Data responsible for the rising interest in wellbeing or a threat to it? What are the economic and societal consequences of Big Data, and is there a point to government regulation of ownership, access, and consent?

Related Links:
World Happiness Report 2019 - Chapter 6, Big Data and Wellbeing by Clément Bellet and Paul Frijters

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

World Happiness Report 2019

Editors John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs

The World Happiness Report is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness that ranks 156 countries by how happy their citizens perceive themselves to be. This year's World Happiness Report focuses on happiness and the community: how happiness has evolved over the past dozen years, with a focus on the technologies, social norms, conflicts and government policies that have driven those changes.

Related Links:
World Happiness Report 2019 - Editors John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage

Paul Frijters webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Independent

The UK will have very little control over trade tariffs in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

Despite calls to 'take back control' the economic reality is that tariffs will be determined by the 'bound rates' that the UK already has in place under the WTO and, ultimately, no tariff regime will make up for loss of access to the EU market.

BREXIT Papers & Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
Independent - The UK will have very little control over trade tariffs in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

CEP Trade

Josh De lyon webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 20/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE US Centre

Trump is learning the wrong lessons from Ronald Reagan – innovation policy is better than protectionism

Donald Trump has cited the example of one of his US presidential predecessors, Ronald Reagan, in support of his protectionist policies. But as research by Ufuk Akcigit, Sina Ates and Giammario Impullitti shows, it was the Reagan administration's innovation policy - not a retreat from globalisation - that promoted long-run growth in the US economy.

Related Links:
LSE US Centre - Trump is learning the wrong lessons from Ronald Reagan – innovation policy is better than protectionism

When innovation policy trumped protectionism: the Reagan years

Innovation and Trade Policy in a Globalized World

CEP Trade

Giammario Impullitti webpage



News Posted: 19/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Unassuming Economist

Paul Cheshire on Urban Economics

In this interview, Paul Cheshire shares his over 50 years of experience on urban economics. He talks about why "land is making a comeback", reasons for the dramatic turnaround in the value of land, the "key tools in the urban policy box", and more. Cheshire is Emeritus Professor of Economic Geography at the London School of Economics.

Related Links:
The Unassuming Economist - Paul Cheshire on Urban Economics

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 18/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST

Cities are the Most Welfare Enhancing Human Innovation In History


Related Links:
CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST - Cities are the Most Welfare Enhancing Human Innovation In History

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Paul Cheshire webpage



News Posted: 18/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Bank of England policymaker warns of risk to UK jobs market

Jonathan Haskel worried by falling business investment driven by uncertainty.

Related Links:
Financial Times - Bank of England policymaker warns of risk to UK jobs market

CEP Growth

Jonathan Haskel webpage



News Posted: 14/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review (Blog)

Gutenberg’s moving type propelled Europe towards the scientific revolution

Book prices fell, the salaries of university professors rose, and revolutionary religious ideas spread, write Jeremiah Dittmar and Skipper Seabold.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review (Blog) - Gutenberg’s moving type propelled Europe towards the scientific revolution

Europe's transformation after Gutenberg: the impact of new media and competition

New Media and Competition: Printing and Europe's Transformation after Gutenberg

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Jeremiah Dittmar webpage



News Posted: 14/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Politics is failing on Brexit but economics has been on the money

A few days before the vote, three of the UK's most reputable economic institutions - the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics - wrote a short joint statement under the heading: "Leaving the EU would almost certainly damage our economic prospects".

Why leaving the EU would almost certainly damage our economic prospects.

BREXIT Papers & Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
Financial Times - Politics is failing on Brexit but economics has been on the money

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 14/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

India election 2019: The next manufacturing superpower?

"It's important to remember that China started with a much more broad-based and educated workforce when it embarked on its economic transition," says Swati Dhingra, from the London School of Economics.
"India has seen mostly jobless growth in manufacturing even during boom periods - or at least a lack of secure employment arising from it," she adds.

Related Links:
BBC News - India election 2019: The next manufacturing superpower?

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 13/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

New Statesman America

Even if MPs pass Theresa May’s deal, the UK’s Brexit nightmare won’t end

If, in spite of all this, the government manages to negotiate a trade agreement with the EU, what will be the economic and political consequences for the UK? Will it all be worthwhile in the end? A good guide to the economics is a collaborative study between the Centre of Economic Performance and The UK in a Changing Europe, which is both authoritative and representative of similar work.

BREXIT Papers & Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
New Statesman America - Even if MPs pass Theresa May’s deal, the UK’s Brexit nightmare won’t end

The Economic Consequences of the Brexit Deal

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The HuffPost Canada

Cell Phones In Classrooms Are So Distracting, U.S. Teacher Shows In Viral Experiment

Bans on mobile phones significantly increases student performance in high-stakes exams, according to a 2015 London School of Economics and Political Science paper.

Related Links:
The HuffPost Canada - Cell Phones In Classrooms Are So Distracting, U.S. Teacher Shows In Viral Experiment

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 12/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

London Free Press

TVDSB welcomes proposed cellphone ban in Ontario classrooms

...which are designed to create positive learning environments." They note that many school boards have policies that allow students to bring their own devices into the classroom for educational purposes. A 2015 London School of Economics and Political Sciences...

Related Links:
London Free Press - TVDSB welcomes proposed cellphone ban in Ontario classrooms

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 12/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Vice

Doug Ford is Banning Cell Phones in Schools

The Toronto District School Board dropped its ban in 2011, and last summer, it also lifted its ban on Snapchat, Instagram and Netflix. A 2015 London School of Economics study found that ...

Related Links:
Vice - Doug Ford is Banning Cell Phones in Schools

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 12/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

BOE’s Haskel Warns Brexit Deal May Not End Economic Uncertainty

Bank of England policy maker Jonathan Haskel warned that the UK may not see a material pickup in investment growth even if the government secures an exit deal with the European Union this month.

Haskel, in his first speech since joining the Monetary Policy Committee last September, also said Brexit is to blame for a majority of the UK's recent substandard investment performance.


Related Links:
Bloomberg - BOE’s Haskel Warns Brexit Deal May Not End Economic Uncertainty

CEP Growth

Jonathan Haskel webpage



News Posted: 11/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Pervasive uncertainty - Your weekly briefing on the UK economy

What we're reading Political Quarterly is continuing its excellent series on Britain and Brexit. This week Swati Dhingra examined what a post-Brexit trade policy could look like while Duncan Weldon asked if Brexit really represents a shift in the fundamental model of British capitalism.

BREXIT Papers & Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
Financial Times - Pervasive uncertainty - Your weekly briefing on the UK economy

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 10/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

Elizabeth Warren wants to turn the internet into a literal sewer (service): Commentary

Arguably, it is also simply getting harder to innovate. As economists Nick Bloom, Chad Jones, John Van Reenen and Michael Webb argue, ....

Related Links:
CNBC - Elizabeth Warren wants to turn the internet into a literal sewer (service): Commentary

Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 10/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Truth on the Market (Blog)

Elizabeth Warren wants to turn the internet into a literal sewer (service)

Arguably, it is also simply getting harder to innovate. As economists Nick Bloom, Chad Jones, John Van Reenen and Michael Webb argue, ....

Related Links:
Truth on the Market (Blog) - Elizabeth Warren wants to turn the internet into a literal sewer (service)

Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

iNews

How are British housebuilders making such juicy profits amid a housing crisis?

But according to a forthcoming paper from Felipe Carozzi, Christian Hilber and Xiaolun Yu of the London School of Economics, the clearest impact of Help to Buy has been to raise house prices, potentially by as much as 5 per cent.

Related Links:
iNews - How are British housebuilders making such juicy profits amid a housing crisis?

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Felipe Carozzi webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Enact policies to boost emotional health


Related Links:
Financial Times - Enact policies to boost emotional health

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 09/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Economist (Online)

Why British housebuilders are making such juicy profits

Snippet: ...home buyers. It was supposed to increase home-ownership rates among the young. Economists dispute whether it actually has. But according to a forthcoming paper from Felipe Carozzi, Christian Hilber and Xiaolun Yu of the London School of Economics, the clearest impact...

Related Links:
The Economist (Online) - Why British housebuilders are making such juicy profits

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Felipe Carozzi webpage

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 07/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Scotland

Broadcast

Carmen Villa comments on the economics of crime in relation to police numbers and knife crime

Outlet: BBC Radio Scotland, BBC Radio Manchester, BBC Radio 5 Live and over 15 other local BBC Radio Stations

Crime Research Programme

Related Links:
BBC Radio Scotland - Broadcast

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Carmen Villa - llera webpage



News Posted: 07/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC2 (Broadcast)

Newsnight (19.20)

Ben Chu, Economics Editor of BBC Newsnight, showed a graph on FDI outflows from the UK (actual vs. expected) on BBC2 Newsnight on 07 March 2019. This graph is taken from CEP Brexit Analysis No. 13, Figure 2. 19:20min

Related Links:
BBC2 (Broadcast) - Newsnight (19.20)

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 07/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Broadcast

Carmen Villa comments on the economics of crime in relation to police numbers and knife crime.

Related Links:
BBC Radio 5 Live - Broadcast

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Carmen Villa - llera webpage



News Posted: 06/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Unherd

Do police numbers really affect knife crime?

But Prof Will Jennings, a political scientist at the University of Southampton, and Prof Tom Kirchmaier, who lectures on crime and policing at the LSE, both tell me that the increase in knife crime is probably real. What they don't say is that falling police numbers are necessarily the major factor behind it.

Crime Research Programme

Related Links:
Unherd - Do police numbers really affect knife crime?

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Tom Kirchmaier webpage



News Posted: 06/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Centre for Vocational Research (Blog)

Devolution at any cost?

This new report, undertaken jointly by the Centre for Vocational Education Research and the What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth provides a real life example of how these questions play out in practice by looking at the impact of devolution of the Apprenticeships Grants for Employers (AGE) to the local level through City Deals.

Centre for Vocation Education Research (CVER) Website

What Works Centre for Local Economic Growth Website

Related Links:
Centre for Vocational Research (Blog) - Devolution at any cost?

CEP CVER



News Posted: 06/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

Research: Better-Managed Companies Pay Employees More Equally

By Nicholas Bloom Scott Ohlmacher Cristina Tello-Trillo Melanie Wallskog
For 2010 and 2015, the U.S. Census Bureau fielded the Management and Organizational Practices Survey (MOPS) in partnership with a research team of subject matter experts, including one of us (Nick), as well as Erik Brynjolfsson and John Van Reenen.

Related Links:
Harvard Business Review - Research: Better-Managed Companies Pay Employees More Equally

The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms

What Drives Differences in Management?

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 06/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Political Quarterly

Brexit and the Future of Trade

The United Kingdom is one of the most open economies in the world. Its exports and imports were over ÂŁ600 billion (30 per cent of UK GDP) each last year. It is 'extremely open' from an investment perspective, both its outward and inward foreign direct investment (FDI) stocks, equivalent to 55 per cent and 46 per cent of GDP in 2015, are higher than the UK share in OECD GDP. Given their importance for the economy and the dependence on EU policy in these areas, international trade and investment are the biggest areas of economic policy that the UK will need to decide on as it prepares to exit the European Union.

Related Links:
The Political Quarterly - Brexit and the Future of Trade

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 05/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

USNews.com

A Boom in High-Rises Alters London's Skyline

But Christian Hilber, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, says even if those empty apartments were occupied, they wouldn't help mitigate the affordable housing crisis.

Related Links:
USNews.com - A Boom in High-Rises Alters London's Skyline

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Christian Hilber webpage



News Posted: 05/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

VideoVox

Technological Revolutions Must be Matched by Policies

Phlippe Aghion (College of France, LSE, and CEPR) discusses work on merged datasets from the UK - one detailing occupation & wages, the other looking at R&D and investment.


Related Links:
VideoVox - Technological Revolutions Must be Matched by Policies

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 04/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Radio 4

@BBCPM

Economists believe "firms are more productive if they're in larger cities" says Henry Overman, a Professor of Economic Geography at the LSE.

What Works Well Centre for Economic Growth

Related Links:
Radio 4 - @BBCPM

CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Henry Overman webpage



News Posted: 04/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Business Day (SA)

UNDERCOVER ECONOMIST - Happiness is easy to venerate but much harder to generate

Just as with GDP, it is only when we move to the specifics that gross national happiness becomes useful. Richard Layard, a leading happiness researcher, argues mental illness is a leading cause of misery, and it can be treated very cost-effectively. That seems useful enough. What is not useful is the sense that measuring GDP is the problem, and measuring gross national happiness the solution. Few societies have really focused on either. We should be happy about that.

Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 04/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Economic Report of the President Together with The Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers

CEP research featured in Chapter 7, “Adapting to Technological Change with Artificial Intelligence while Mitigating Cyber Threats”

These conclusions are consistent with not only theoretical models of economics featuring AI in general equilibrium (Aghion, Jones, and Jones 2017) but also with evidence on how the introduction of robots raised labor productivity across 17 countries between 1993 and 2007 (Graetz and Michaels 2018).

Review of Economics and Statistics, Volume 100 | Issue 5 | December 2018 p.753-768.

Related Links:
Economic Report of the President Together with The Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisers - CEP research featured in Chapter 7, “Adapting to Technological Change with Artificial Intelligence while Mitigating Cyber Threats”

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 01/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Happiness is easy to venerate but much harder to generate


Related Links:
Financial Times - Happiness is easy to venerate but much harder to generate

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 01/03/2019      [Back to the Top]

Alternatives Économiques

La pub ne fait pas le bonheur CLAIMS Advertising does not make happiness

From Thorstein Veblen to Richard Layard, to Richard Easterlin and others, several economists have spent the last century trying to ... [paywall]

Happiness: Lessons from a new science, Richard Layard, Penguin 2011 ISBN: 9780241952795

Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 27/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

Working parents are an endangered species. That’s why Democrats are talking child care.

Research indicates that universal child care might encourage people to have children. Spending on Research indicates that universal child care might encourage people to have children. Spending on early-childhood programs tends to be related to an increase in fertility and a decrease in the gender wage gap, economists Claudia Olivetti (Boston College) and Barbara Petrongolo (Queen Mary University of London) found in a 2017 Journal of Economic Perspectives analysis.

Related Links:
Washington Post - Working parents are an endangered species. That’s why Democrats are talking child care.

The Economic Consequences of Family Policies: Lessons from a Century of Legislation in High-Income Countries

CEP Labour Markets

Barbara Petrongolo webpage



News Posted: 26/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post Blogs

Working parents are an endangered species. That's why Democrats are talking child care.

Research indicates that universal child care might encourage people to have children. Spending on early-childhood programs tends to be related to an increase in fertility and a decrease in the gender wage gap, economists Claudia Olivetti (Boston College) and Barbara Petrongolo (Queen Mary University of London) found in a 2017 Journal of Economic Perspectives analysis. [paywall]

Related Links:
The Economic Consequences of Family Policies: Lessons from a Century of Legislation in High-Income Countries

CEP Labour Markets

Barbara Petrongolo webpage



News Posted: 26/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The New Statesman

We need a political party that is tough on the causes of Brexit. The Independent Group isn’t

Economists like David Blanchflower, John Van Reenen and I set out just how bad UK economic performance had been over the previous five years, but once again expertise was ignored. As far as the media were concerned, reducing the deficit had become the most important priority for the economy, and that was how they judged politicians. You will not find that in any textbook either, but the media had either sold or been sold a narrative and they didn't want to know any different.

Related Links:
The New Statesman - We need a political party that is tough on the causes of Brexit. The Independent Group isn’t

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 26/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Economic and Political Weekly

Robot Apocalypse: How Will Automation Affect India’s Manufacturing Industry

Graetz, Georg and Guy Michaels (2017): "Robots at Work," Discussion Paper 1335, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Related Links:
Economic and Political Weekly - Robot Apocalypse: How Will Automation Affect India’s Manufacturing Industry

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 23/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

Despite Tight Job Market, Labor Force's Income Is Squeezed

"One of the features of these very big firms is that they've got high profits but they have low labor shares," said John Van Reenen, an economics ... [paywall]

Related Links:
The Wall Street Journal - Despite Tight Job Market, Labor Force's Income Is Squeezed

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 23/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

VOXEU

The economic effects of density: A synthesis

Most countries pursue policies that implicitly or explicitly aim at promoting 'compact urban form', but so far these policies have not been well-grounded in evidence. This column summarises the state of knowledge on the economic effects of density on various economic outcomes. It concludes that densification policies may lead to aggregate welfare gains, but there may be regressive distributional consequences.

SERC/Urban and Spatial Programme Discussion Paper
The Economic Effects of Density: A Synthesis. Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt and Elisabetta Pietrostefani. January 2017. Paper No' SERCDP0210

Related Links:
VOXEU - The economic effects of density: A synthesis

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage



News Posted: 22/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Fortune

In Brexit, Could Ireland Wear the Crown?

"Moving companies to Dublin does not turn Dublin into London," says Swati Dhingra, an economist at the London School of Economics. "The dispersal—to Paris, Munich, wherever—means that nobody will inherit the conglomerate force that London had. You might get a bigger slice of pie, but the pie itself is getting smaller. There are no winners here. London is diminishing, but nowhere is becoming the next London."

Related Links:
Fortune - In Brexit, Could Ireland Wear the Crown?

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

fDiIntelligence

UK inward FDI lowest since 2010

UK companies have increased their investments into the EU by $10.73bn due to Brexit uncertainty diverting investment from the domestic market, says a recent study from the London School of Economics' (LSE) Centre for Economic Performance.

Related Links:
fDiIntelligence - UK inward FDI lowest since 2010

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Minimum wage rises may prompt firms to switch to zero-hours jobs

A recent paper by economists from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance suggests the introduction of the National Living Wage in April 2016 had such an impact. The paper examined closely the effects on the social care sector, which at 15pc had the highest proportion of ZHC workers of any single industry. The sector's dependence on council funding also meant the opportunity to pass on cost increases through to higher consumer prices was very limited for these businesses... [paywall]

Related Links:
Care homes: effects of the National Living Wage

Changing the Structure of Minimum Wages: Firm Adjustment and Wage Spillovers

CEP Labour Markets

Giulia Giupponi webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Project Syndicate

The AI Road to Serfdom?

Ignore for a moment, the horrendous costs involved in this wholesale re-direction of human work. The question is which jobs are most at risk in which sectors. According to MIT economist David Autor, automation will substitute for more routinized occupations and complement high-skill, non-routine jobs. Whereas the effects on low-skill jobs will remain relatively unaffected, medium-skill jobs will gradually disappear, while demand for high-skill jobs will rise. "Lovely jobs" at the top and "lousy jobs" at the bottom, as LSE economists Maarten Goos and Alan Manning described it. The frontier of technology stops at what is irreducibly human.

Related Links:
Project Syndicate - The AI Road to Serfdom?

Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Britain

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 21/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM) Foundation

Rising Hospital Prices Are Driving Up Health Care Spending

A new study found that hospital prices paid by private insurers for inpatient and outpatient care grew much more quickly than the prices paid to the physicians who provide care in these settings. For all inpatient care, hospital prices grew by 42 percent compared to 18 percent for physician prices. The same pattern was observed for four specific high-volume hospital-based procedures. This Research Insights summarizes the findings of this study, conducted by NIHCM grantee Zack Cooper and colleagues, and outlines proposed policy solutions.

Cooper Z, Craig S, Gaynor M, Harish NJ, Krumholz HM and Van Reenen J. "Hospital Prices Grew Substantially Faster Than Physician Prices for Hospital-Based Care in 2007-14." Health Affairs, 38(2):184-9, February 2019.

Management Practices and Organisational Structures webpage

Health Service Journal: Cowper's Cut: Tesco, Disneyfication and avoiding the real problems
Lord Prior also reiterated his view that competition in the NHS has proven "deeply damaging" and "failed almost totally". This may come as news to those familiar with the peer-reviewed academic work of Carol Propper, Zack Cooper and John Van Reenen. (The meaningful debate here is probably whether the effectiveness of competition is also cost-effective in both financial and opportunity cost terms.)

Related Links:
The National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM) Foundation - Rising Hospital Prices Are Driving Up Health Care Spending

CEP Growth

Nick Bloom webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 18/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What would a no-deal Brexit mean for trade?

According to the Centre for Economic Performance, a research institute, a no-deal Brexit would lower Britain's trade with the EU by two-fifths over ten years.

BREXIT Papers & Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
The Economist - What would a no-deal Brexit mean for trade?

The Economic Consequences of the Brexit Deal

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Australian

What-if-facebook-never-saw-the-sun

Such things occur outside idle thought experiments. Guy Michaels of the London School of Economics and Ferdinand Rauch, of the University of Oxford studied ... [paywall]

Related Links:
Can cities be trapped in bad locations?

Resetting the Urban Network: 117-2012

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Guy Michaels webpage

Ferdinand Rauch webpage



News Posted: 17/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Brexit: New UK investments in the EU are growing, while new EU investments here fall

The increase in outward investments is entirely driven by the services sector, as Brexit negotiations have prioritised manufacturing - by Holger Breinlich, Elsa Leromain, Dennis Novy and Thomas Sampson.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Brexit: New UK investments in the EU are growing, while new EU investments here fall

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 16/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

So you’re happier at 16 and 70? I’ve been both … and it just gets better

Sir Richard Layard, "happiness tsar" under New Labour, diagnosed us, as a nation, as suffering from lack of trust and excessive concern with status, materialism, envy and winning the rat race.

Happiness: Lessons from a new science, Richard Layard, Penguin 2011 ISBN: 9780241952795

Related Links:
The Guardian - So you’re happier at 16 and 70? I’ve been both … and it just gets better

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 15/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Why politicians should think more deeply about the dignity of work

But recent research by economists Nikhil Datta, Giulia Giupponi and Stephen Machin suggests that undesired zero-hours contracts may have become more prevalent because of minimum wage hikes. [paywall]

Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets

Giulia Giupponi webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Nikhil Datta webpage



News Posted: 15/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Mancunian

Universities advised to ignore migration targets

UK Universities should ignore migration targets set by Westminster, says Alan Manning, the government's lead adviser on migration. Manning, chairman of the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), is also a professor of economics at LSE.

Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) report: EEA migration in the UK: final report

Related Links:
The Mancunian - Universities advised to ignore migration targets

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage

Brian Bell webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Why politicians should think more deeply about the dignity of work

But recent research by economists Nikhil Datta, Giulia Giupponi and Stephen Machin suggests that undesired zero-hours contracts may have become more ... [paywall]

Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets

Nikhil Datta webpage

Giulia Giupponi webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What would happen if Facebook were turned off?

Guy Michaels, of the London School of Economics, and Ferdinand Rauch, of the University of Oxford, studied the fortunes of Roman-era towns in Britain and ... [paywall]

Related Links:
The Economist - What would happen if Facebook were turned off?

Can cities be trapped in bad locations?

Resetting the Urban Network: 117-2012

CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Guy Michaels webpage

Ferdinand Rauch webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education (Online)

The week in higher education

The UK government's lead adviser on migration has claimed that the Home Office's net migration target no longer drives policy. Alan Manning, professor of economics at the London School of Economics and chair of the Migration Advisory Committee... [paywall]

Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) report: EEA migration in the UK: final report

Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage

Brian Bell webpage



News Posted: 14/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation (AUS)

It's unanimous: Economists' poll says we can fix the banks. But that doesn't mean we will

By Gigi Foster, Paul Fritjers

After three years and 35 polls, the Economic Society of Australia has received its first-ever unanimous response to a survey question.

Related Links:
The Conversation (AUS) - It's unanimous: Economists' poll says we can fix the banks. But that doesn't mean we will

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage



News Posted: 13/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

In Parliament

Professor Alan Manning a Witness on the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination Bill

In the first sitting of the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill, Professor Alan Manning joined a witness panel in his role as chair of the Migration Advisory Committee. He took a large number of questions around the salary threshold recommendations made in the report.

The exchange, chaired by Sir David Amess MP (Con), can be read in the transcript.

Read the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) report: EEA migration in the UK: final report.

Related Links:
In Parliament - Professor Alan Manning a Witness on the Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination Bill

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Harper's Bazaar Online

Why Does It Feel Like Everyone Has More Money Than You?

Ross Levine and Yona Rubenstein, economists at University of California, Berkeley, and The London School of Economics, wrote a paper about the shared traits of entrepreneurs in 2013. Guess what? Most were white men who were highly educated, i.e., from a certain class of privilege.

Related Links:
Harper's Bazaar Online - Why Does It Feel Like Everyone Has More Money Than You?

Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Does it Pay?

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Yona Rubinstein webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Star

Brexit referendum spurs British firms into investing in EU

The referendum result led to a 12 percent increase in foreign direct investment transactions from Britain into the EU between mid-2016 and September 2018, researchers from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance said.

Related Links:
The Daily Star - Brexit referendum spurs British firms into investing in EU

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Brexit and outward investment by UK firms

Media reports suggest that some UK firms have started to move production abroad in anticipation of Brexit. Using data on announcements of new foreign investment transactions, this column reports evidence that the Brexit vote has led to a 12% increase in the number of new investments made by UK firms in EU27 countries. At the same time, new investments in the UK from the EU27 have declined by 11%. The results are consistent with the idea that UK firms are offshoring production to the EU27 because they expect Brexit to increase barriers to trade and migration, making the UK a less attractive place to invest and create jobs.

Related Links:
Vox - Brexit and outward investment by UK firms

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Express (online)

Brexit BETRAYAL: Firms ditch UK to invest £7.7 BILLION in EU claim London experts

Dennis Novy, one of the report's authors, told CNBC: "The economic risk of Brexit is larger on the UK side of the Channel.

Related Links:
Express (online) - Brexit BETRAYAL: Firms ditch UK to invest £7.7 BILLION in EU claim London experts

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Continental Telegraph

Brexit Is Reducing UK Domestic Investment And Foreign


Related Links:
Continental Telegraph - Brexit Is Reducing UK Domestic Investment And Foreign

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

Brexit is clearly taking its toll on UK economic growth

A study published this morning by the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE dissects how foreign investment has changed behaviour since the referendum. According to the LSE researchers, UK firms appear to have started to shift much of their investment to the EU - evidence of money that might otherwise have been spent on factories and units in the UK going across the Channel.

Related Links:
Sky News - Brexit is clearly taking its toll on UK economic growth

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 12/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Income inequality: firms have been reducing profit-sharing with workers

The fall is more pronounced among companies that enjoy high market power, write Brian Bell, Pawel Bukowski and Stephen Machin.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Income inequality: firms have been reducing profit-sharing with workers

Rent Sharing and Inclusive Growth

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Brian Bell webpage

Pawel Bukowski webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 11/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Brexit Blog

Voting with their money: Brexit and outward investment by UK firms

Are firms moving investment abroad because of Brexit? Holger Breinlich, Elsa Leromain, Dennis Novy and Thomas Sampson (LSE) use a 'doppelganger method' to estimate how foreign direct investment would have evolved without the vote for Brexit. They find a 12% increase in the number of new investments made by UK firms in EU countries, and an 11% fall in new investments made by EU firms in the UK. Moreover, there is no sign of a 'Global Britain' effect that would have seen UK firms investing elsewhere in the world.

Related Links:
LSE Brexit Blog - Voting with their money: Brexit and outward investment by UK firms

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

British firms have diverted $10 billion of investment to the EU due to Brexit, study claims

A study conducted by academics from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) looked into how the vote to leave the EU has affected outward investment by U.K. companies.

Related Links:
CNBC - British firms have diverted $10 billion of investment to the EU due to Brexit, study claims

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

CNBC Europe

Broadcast

Mention of CEP report showing British firms investing outside of the UK because of Brexit.

Related Links:
CNBC Europe - Broadcast

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

Brexit referendum spurs British companies into investing in EU - research

The referendum result led to a 12 percent increase in foreign direct investment transactions from Britain into the EU between mid-2016 and September 2018, researchers from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance said.
Related Links:
Reuters - Brexit referendum spurs British companies into investing in EU - research

Voting with their Money: Brexit and Outward Investment by UK Firms

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 11/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Pro Market (Blog)

Rents and Inclusive Growth: A Decline in Rent Sharing Implies Growing Income Inequalities

A new study looks at the long-run evolution of rent sharing between companies and workers in the UK and finds that rent sharing has significantly decreased between 2001 and 2016, particularly among companies that enjoy monopolistic markups.

Related Links:
Pro Market (Blog) - Rents and Inclusive Growth: A Decline in Rent Sharing Implies Growing Income Inequalities

Rent Sharing and Inclusive Growth

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Brian Bell webpage

Pawel Bukowski webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 08/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit already hitting UK household finances due to higher prices, study shows

The average worker has had to spend more than ÂŁ404, equivalent to more than a week's wages, in the first year after the Brexit vote, according to a report by the Centre for Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE). The findings suggested the average household had to spend £7.74 more per week to afford the same purchases the year after the referendum.

Economics professor Dennis Novy, who contributed to the report, said: "It is clear that the average UK household is already paying the price for voting to leave the EU".

Troeger, Vera E. and Egerton-Warburton, Diana (eds.) (2019), Which way now? Economic policy after a decade of upheaval: A CAGE Policy Report (London: Social Market Foundation)

Related Links:
The Independent - Brexit already hitting UK household finances due to higher prices, study shows

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

CEP Trade

Holger Breinlich webpage

Elsa Leromain webpage

Dennis Novy webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 08/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

How Globalization Saved the World and Damned the West

MGI was putting its finishing touches on the report in early 2016, but held its publication for the Brexit vote in March. "We weren't surprised by the outcome," Manyika told me. "We had been sitting on this research showing widespread resentment toward globalization as a result of people feeling like they were being left behind." In June, MGI published the paper under the title "Poorer Than Their Parents." That same week, the labor economists Brian Bell and Stephen Machin published a separate analysis of the Brexit outcome. The economic statistic most closely aligned with "Leave" votes wasn’t unemployment or income at the local level. It was poor wage growth.

'Brexit Beckons: Thinking ahead by leading economists.' VoxEU eBook , June 2016.

Related Links:
The Atlantic - How Globalization Saved the World and Damned the West

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Brian Bell webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 07/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review (Blog)

The challenge of dealing with ‘double disruption’: Brexit and technology

The UK needs a new era of policy activism with a 'future of good work' focus, write Christopher Pissarides, Anna Thomas and Josh De Lyon.

Related Links:
LSE Business Review (Blog) - The challenge of dealing with ‘double disruption’: Brexit and technology

The Brexit Vote, Inflation and UK Living Standards

The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU: Trade Effects

The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK

CEP Trade

Josh De lyon webpage



News Posted: 06/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

VOX CEPR Policy Portal

Winners, losers and future prospects: The economic geography of transition countries

Klaus Desmet, David Krisztian Nagy, Dzhamilya Nigmatulina, Nathaniel Young

The economic geography of transition economies has changed dramatically over the last quarter century, with large urban areas growing fast and many smaller places facing declining populations. Using a high-resolution spatial growth model, this column projects the transition economies as a whole to perform economically well over the next decades, especially the region’s densest places. Large-scale infrastructure projects such as the Belt and Road Initiative will have a positive impact, but not more so than modest reductions of general trade frictions.

Related Links:
VOX CEPR Policy Portal - Winners, losers and future prospects: The economic geography of transition countries

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Dzahmilya Nigmatulina webpage



News Posted: 04/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed

Snippet: ...ther revolutionary thing called Brexit the EU has always been a unique experiment and shared sovereignty and no-one has ever tried to leave before well apart from Greenland sort of in 1985 Professor Swati Dhingra of the London school of economics I think one of the...

Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Brexit: A Guide for the Perplexed

CEP Trade

Swati Dhingra webpage



News Posted: 04/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Australian

Ball back in Brussels' court on Irish border sticking point

The Centre for Economic Performance estimates that the long-term impact of no deal on Ireland is almost as bad as for the UK. But, locked inside the EU, it cannot subsidise industries or change tariff schedules and its central bank has no power to cut interest rates if growth slows once ties with its biggest trading partner are severed. That goes double when it comes to the border.

Related Links:
The Economic Consequences of the Brexit Deal

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 04/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Health Affairs

Hospital Prices Grew Substantially Faster than physician prices from 2007 to 2014


Related Links:
Health Affairs - Hospital Prices Grew Substantially Faster than physician prices from 2007 to 2014

The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured

CEP Growth

Zack Cooper webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 04/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Health Affairs

Variation in Health Spending Growth For The Privately Insured From 2007 To 2014


Related Links:
Health Affairs - Variation in Health Spending Growth For The Privately Insured From 2007 To 2014

The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured

CEP Growth

Zack Cooper webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 04/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Brexit will go to the brink, because everyone has something to lose

Ireland has a more intractable problem, however. The Centre for Economic Performance estimates that the long-term impact of no deal on Ireland is almost as bad as for the UK. But, locked inside the EU, it cannot subsidise industries or change tariff schedules and its central bank has no power to cut interest rates if growth slows once ties with its biggest trading partner are severed. That goes double when it comes to the border.

Related Links:
The Economic Consequences of the Brexit Deal

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 02/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Ban mobile phone use in schools

Almost all schools are thought to have some controls over mobile phone use. Some ban them outright and others restrict their use in lessons or during playtime. A 2015 study by the London School of Economics found that banning them resulted in test scores rising by more than 6 per cent.

Related Links:
The Times - Ban mobile phone use in schools

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 02/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Quarterly Journal of Economics

The Price Ain’t Right? Hospital prices and health spending on the privately insured


Related Links:
Quarterly Journal of Economics - The Price Ain’t Right? Hospital prices and health spending on the privately insured

The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured

CEP Growth

Zack Cooper webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 01/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Global Business Outlook

Robots and jobs: Evidence from the US

These machines are defined by The International Federation of Robotics as "an automatically controlled, reprogrammable, and multipurpose [machine]" (IFR 2014; see also Graetz and Michaels, 2015).

Related Links:
Global Business Outlook - Robots and jobs: Evidence from the US

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 01/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

Economics of Education Review (Journal)

The Economic Impact of Universities: Evidence from Across the Globe, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen

Volume 68, February 2019, Pages 53-67

The Economic Impact of Universities: Evidence from Across the Globe, Anna Valero, John Van Reenen. NBER Working Paper No. 22501

How universities boost economic growth Anna Valero, John Van Reenen
Related Links:
Economics of Education Review (Journal) - The Economic Impact of Universities: Evidence from Across the Globe, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen

The Economic Impact of Universities: Evidence from Across the Globe

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 01/02/2019      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

The ‘Rotten Equilibrium’ of Republican Politics

There are significant parallels between voting patterns for and against Brexit and the patterns in the 2016 and 2018 elections in this country.
In a separate 2017 paper, "Who Voted For Brexit", Fetzer and two fellow economists at the University of Warwick, Sascha O. Becker and Dennis Novy, found that "in particular, fiscal cuts in the context of the recent UK austerity program are strongly associated with a higher Vote Leave share".

Related Links:
New York Times - The ‘Rotten Equilibrium’ of Republican Politics

Who Voted for Brexit? A Comprehensive District-Level Analysis

CEP Trade

Dennis Novy webpage



News Posted: 30/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Huff Post

The Real Problem Isn't Executive Pay, It's That Everyone Else Is Underpaid

One little-known study could, however, help shed light on where the problem really lies. According to Professors Bell and Van Reenen of the LSE, the real issue is not that CEO pay has been inflated, but that worker pay has simply not kept pace. And not merely by a few percent here or there, but by a whopping 15 times. Every year. With this kind of disparity you can see it doesn't take long for a yawning pay chasm to develop, which then compounds exponentially.
Related Links:
Huff Post - The Real Problem Isn't Executive Pay, It's That Everyone Else Is Underpaid

Firm Performance and Wages: Evidence from Across the Corporate Hierarchy

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Brian Bell webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 29/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

ITPro

The fund will be split between fifteen projects which will all aim to encourage SMBs to adopt the latest technologies

"Lessons from this RCT will provide valuable insight into the most (a) effective and (b) cost-effective means of driving adoption of AI; whether education and convening is sufficient to drive adoption or whether a degree of 'hand-holding' is needed when seeking to drive adoption of perceived cutting edge technologies, said Dr Anna Valero, economist and researcher at LSE.
Related Links:
ITPro - The fund will be split between fifteen projects which will all aim to encourage SMBs to adopt the latest technologies

CEP Growth

Anna Valero webpage



News Posted: 29/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

VOX

Subsidising labour hoarding in recessions: New evidence from Italy’s Cassa Integrazione

By Giulia Giupponi and Camille Landais
Labour hoarding - the practice of retaining excess employees during a negative shock - could potentially help firms avoid re-hiring and training costs when economic conditions improve and act as a form of insurance for workers. This column uses Italian micro data to show how labour hoarding in the form of short-term work programmes can be beneficial despite being ineffective in the long term.

Related Links:
VOX - Subsidising labour hoarding in recessions: New evidence from Italy’s Cassa Integrazione

Subsidizing Labor Hoarding in Recessions: The Employment & Welfare Effects of Short Time Work

CEP Labour Markets

Giulia Giupponi webpage



News Posted: 25/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

Why Six Months Seems to Be the Sweet Spot for Paid Parental Leave

Claudia Olivetti at Boston College and

Barbara Petrongolo

at Queen Mary University of London found little evidence that extended leaves had a positive effect on women's employment or earnings - but found that subsidized child care and preschool did. "You want to make it easier for mothers to work, and when you talk about paid leave in isolation, the issue is who is going to take care of the baby after, and how much does it cost?" Ms. Olivetti said.

Related Links:
The Economic Consequences of Family Policies: Lessons from a Century of Legislation in High-Income Countries

CEP Labour Markets

Barbara Petrongolo webpage



News Posted: 25/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Reader's Digest

You’ll Be Happiest During These Two Years of Your Life, According to Science

Snippet: ... of you. Science says so! Think you have already reached your peak in life? You might want to think again. We want to share some good news with you: Your happiest years are still ahead! According to research from the London School of Economics and Political Science ...

Related Links:
Reader's Digest - You’ll Be Happiest During These Two Years of Your Life, According to Science

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing



News Posted: 25/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

The State of Working Britain Blog

Measure for Measure: Has the Government Already Met its Net Immigration Target Without Noticing?

The State of Working Britain blog is edited by Paul Gregg and Jonathan Wadsworth
It may well be that we no longer care about estimating the number of immigrants in the UK (though this is doubtful). Government policy (at the moment) still appears to be based around the notion that getting net immigration down below 100,000 is the thing to do. As such it needs a measure of how well it is doing on this front.

Related Links:
The State of Working Britain Blog - Measure for Measure: Has the Government Already Met its Net Immigration Target Without Noticing?

Immigration and the UK Economy

CEP Labour Markets

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage



News Posted: 24/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Lancashire Telegraph

Burnley MP doubts the case for second Euro-referendum

A special report on Brexit and Pendle published by the London School of Economics this week reveals: "There is a clear consensus that if there was a second referendum held today, Pendle's vote would be the same or even more strongly Leave."

Read the report: "Debating Brexit at a Local Level"

Related Links:
Lancashire Telegraph - Burnley MP doubts the case for second Euro-referendum

CEP Trade

Josh De lyon webpage



News Posted: 21/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Three strategies for left-behind places

The first is a strategy of reversal. This consists of interventions that aim to offset or compensate for the technological and market dynamics that cause cost disadvantages for value creation in left-behind places - place-based investment subsidies, tax credits and the like. This is the most traditional type of industrial policy, and one that is more often marked by failure than success. But they can work: Chiara Criscuolo and her colleagues have examined European investment subsidies for areas that lag behind and found that greater subsidies can increase manufacturing investment and employment — but only by small, existing companies, not the biggest and most productive ones, nor new start-ups.

Related Links:
The Financial Times - Three strategies for left-behind places

Some Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Chiara Criscuolo webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Henry Overman webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 21/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

iPolitics.ca

Brexit chaos belies Quebec sovereigntist promise of painless breakup

Long term is worse. "Our best estimate is that GDP per capita will be 6.3 to 9.5 per cent per year lower than it would be if we were to remain in the EU," wrote John Van Reenen, today an economics professor at MIT. "At the mid-point of this range, this means an eight per cent real pay cut: about four years of 'normal' wage gains wiped out in a deliberate act of economic self-harm."

Related Links:
iPolitics.ca - Brexit chaos belies Quebec sovereigntist promise of painless breakup

CEP Growth

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 18/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

The force of gravity on Britain's trade

But economists at the LSE argue that Mr Minford made no allowance for differences in quality among the manufactured goods being considered (Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, and John Van Reenen.) This is the crux of whether or not the EU can be seen as protectionist in manufactured goods. If goods of the same quality cost more in the EU than outside it, then there is a strong case for calling the bloc a protectionist one. But if prices are higher inside the bloc because they are of a higher quality, and because they are safer and more reliable than those on sale outside, then it is much harder to argue that the EU is protectionist.

Related Links:
The Times - The force of gravity on Britain's trade

‘ECONOMISTS FOR BREXIT’: A critique

CEP Growth CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 18/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times Higher Education Supplement

French university admissions: the crème de la crème?

One irony is that just as France has scrapped admissions lotteries, some in the UK and US are beginning to wonder whether they might be a good idea - albeit in a much more limited form than the pre- system. In a book published last year, Lee Elliot Major, chief executive of the UK social mobility thinktank the Sutton Trust, and Stephen Machin, professor of economics at the London School of Economics, argue that places at oversubscribed universities should be distributed randomly to students with grades above a certain threshold. The hyper-selectivity of "elite" universities favours the middle classes, who are better placed to help their offspring navigate the "baffling" selection processes, the book, Social Mobility and Its argues. A lottery could level the playing field.

Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 17/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Times

The force of gravity on Britain's trade

Claiming that manufacturing is protected in the EU is far more contentious. Mr Minford makes his case by taking an OECD databank of the prices of manufactured products around the world. He adjusts them for transport and distribution costs and concludes that the prices of manufactured products in the EU are 10 per cent above the world price.

But economists at the LSE argue that Mr Minford made no allowance for differences in quality among the manufactured goods being considered (Economists for Brexit: A Critique, by Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, and John Van Reenen).

Related Links:
‘ECONOMISTS FOR BREXIT’: A critique

CEP Trade CEP Growth

Swati Dhingra webpage

Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 17/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Irish Daily Mail

Studies show range of detrimental effects

Snippet: ... A new ESRI study shows smartphone ownership among children has a detrimental impact on their education. And a 2015 study by the Centre of Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that after sch...

Related Links:
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 17/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Plenty of Uber drivers are loving their jobs too

A survey by Stephen Machin and Giulia Giupponi, two researchers at the London School of Economics, involved more than 20,000 self-employed, gig economy and zero-hours respondents. On average, workers on zero-hour contracts worked about 19 hours per week. Very few did more than 40 hours. Again, there was a near-equal split between those who'd like more hours (44 percent) and those satisfied (40 percent). Gig economy workers were similar.

Related Links:
Bloomberg - Plenty of Uber drivers are loving their jobs too

CEP Labour Markets

Giulia Giupponi webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 15/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde

Paul Seabright : « La politique industrielle a la capacité de soutenir l’emploi et l’investissement » / Paul Seabright: "Industrial policy has the capacity to support jobs and investment"

A British study estimated the impact of public subsidies in regions in difficulty. If a gain for the job was found but the big companies, first beneficiaries, do not change their behavior, notes the professor of economy in his column.

Fortunately, a study published a few days ago in the prestigious American Economic Review allows us to estimate the impact of a British program of support for businesses in regions in difficulty ("Some Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy", Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry G. Overman and John Van Reenen, American Economic Review No. 109/1, January 2019).

Related Links:
Le Monde - Paul Seabright : « La politique industrielle a la capacité de soutenir l’emploi et l’investissement » / Paul Seabright: "Industrial policy has the capacity to support jobs and investment"

Some Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy

CEP Growth CEP Trade CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Chiara Criscuolo webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Henry Overman webpage

John Van reenen webpage



News Posted: 14/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Brexit, xenophobia and international students: how to combat 'public paranoia' over immigration

Research by London School of Economics professor Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy at The University of Texas at Austin revealed that by paying higher fees, international students in effect subsidise certain domestic students.

Related Links:
The Conversation - Brexit, xenophobia and international students: how to combat 'public paranoia' over immigration

Paying Out and Crowding Out? The Globalisation of Higher Education

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage

Richard Murphy webpage



News Posted: 09/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Should the world care about Brexit?

Thomas Sampson, a London School of Economics scholar, detects a wider global meaning in Brexit. "The period since world war II has been marked by growing economic and cultural globalisation and, in Europe, increasing political integration under the auspices of the European Union. Brexit marks a departure from this trend... More broadly, Brexit raises questions about the future stability of the EU and the extent to which further globalisation is inevitable."

Brexit papers and Analyses from the CEP.

Related Links:
Financial Times - Should the world care about Brexit?

The Economic Consequences of the Brexit Deal

CEP Trade

Thomas Sampson webpage



News Posted: 08/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Beneath the Surface (blog)

Effects of New Technologies on Labour

Autor and Salomons acknowledge that because they used such a general measure of technological change, they couldn't assess the impact of robotics specifically. They do cite work by Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels that did not find general negative effects of robots on employment or labor share in countries of the European Union. That's important, since many European countries have gone farther than we have in adopting robots.

Related Links:
Beneath the Surface (blog) - Effects of New Technologies on Labour

Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs

Robots at Work

CEP Labour Markets

Georg Graetz webpage

Guy Michaels webpage



News Posted: 04/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

ActuAI (video)

Conférence « Intelligence artificielle et croissance » par Philippe Aghion/ Conference "Artificial Intelligence and Growth" by Philippe Aghion


Related Links:
ActuAI (video) - Conférence « Intelligence artificielle et croissance » par Philippe Aghion/ Conference "Artificial Intelligence and Growth" by Philippe Aghion

CEP Growth

Philippe Aghion webpage



News Posted: 04/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy Blog

David Cameron, David Beckham, and the UK’s social mobility problem

Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin explain how Britain has become less mobile, particularly at the top and bottom of society.

Social Mobility And Its Enemies, Lee Elliot Major & Stephen Machin, Pelican, October 2018.

Related Links:
LSE British Politics and Policy Blog - David Cameron, David Beckham, and the UK’s social mobility problem

CEP Labour Markets

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 04/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

The FT polled 81 economists about prospects for 2019

Swati Dhingra, associate professor, LSE
Slowdown like earlier, low GDP growth relative to other OECD countries. Dampening of investments. Hard to predict numbers here because short-term forecasts are not the most reliable but direction likely to be negative.

Stephen Machin, professor, LSE
Much of the uncertainty has already been factored in, but more recent events and extra uncertainty associated with that may magnify the effects we have already seen: upward pressure on price inflation, firms cutting back on intangibles like worker training and overtime, and associated negative effects on firm productivity.

John Van Reenen, professor, MIT Economics Department and Sloan Management School
It will affect it negatively, especially over investment and hiring (as it is currently doing).

Related Links:
Financial Times - The FT polled 81 economists about prospects for 2019

CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Swati Dhingra webpage

John Van reenen webpage

Stephen Machin webpage



News Posted: 02/01/2019      [Back to the Top]

Süddeutsche Zeitung

Auf der Suche nach dem Glück / In search of happiness

The Briton Richard Layard is a well-known economist. Now he sits in the upper house and is dedicated to the question of what really makes people happy. It is not money, that much is clear.

"The price of happiness: lessons from a new science", by Richard Layard (Ed. Armand Colin, 2007)

Happiness: Lessons from a new science, Richard Layard, Penguin 2011 ISBN: 9780241952795

Related Links:
Süddeutsche Zeitung - Auf der Suche nach dem Glück / In search of happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage



News Posted: 01/01/2019      [Back to the Top]