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News for Wellbeing

Press coverage involving Wellbeing staff or research is listed below.

Project Syndicate

The moral urgency of mental health

PRINCETON – If we can prevent great suffering at no cost to ourselves, we ought to do so. That principle is widely accepted and difficult to dispute. Yet Western governments are neglecting an opportunity to reduce the great misery caused by mental illness, even though the net cost would be nil. The evidence for this claim comes from recent research by a team of economists at the London School of Economics. The team, directed by Richard Layard, drew on data from four major developed countries (Australia, Britain, Germany, and the United States) in which people were asked to indicate, on a 0-10 scale, how satisfied they were with their life.  Associated Article: 'Origins of Happiness: Evidence and Policy Implications', Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward, Vox article published December 2016.


Related Links:
Project Syndicate - The moral urgency of mental health

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 15/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

News One Place

Child-induced fatigue costs economy dear, says new study

Parents with young children are ‘substantially’ less productive than their colleagues, due to a lack of sleep As every parent of a newborn knows, sleep is a foreign country, a place that they happily visited a long time ago but fear they may now never experience again. The constant disruption to sleep patterns posed by a screaming baby can play havoc with relationships, waistlines and sanity, but it’s also having a deleterious effect on the nation’s finances. Until now. In the first study of its kind, Joan Costa-i-Font and Sarah Flèche, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science , have found that baby-induced fatigue is significantly undermining economic performance. Their work is to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s annual conference in April.


Related Links:
News One Place - Child-induced fatigue costs economy dear, says new study

Economics of a good night's sleep

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage


News Posted: 14/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Work, joblessness and what they mean for our happiness

Work-life balance, job variety, autonomy and learning new things make us happier at work; blue-collar workers are less happy than others, write Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and George Ward.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Work, joblessness and what they mean for our happiness

Happiness at work

Happiness at Work

CEP Wellbeing

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 13/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

What Works Wellbeing blog

If you want to know how happy we are, ask often

Today we publish a new discussion series paper, that sets out the views of Paul Dolan, Laura Kudrna and Stefano Testoni on the importance of ‘in the moment’ wellbeing and measurement for understanding – and acting on- wellbeing evidence.

Researchers Paul Dolan, Laura Kudrna and Stefano Testoni argue, in their paper Definitions and Measures of Subjective Wellbeing, that to capture what really matters to people, we need to switch from measuring overall life satisfaction, to how we feel in the moment.

Related links

Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=dolan


Related Links:
What Works Wellbeing blog - If you want to know how happy we are, ask often

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Arabs Today

UAE has developed world’s first ‘Happiness Policy Manual’

Ohoud bint Khalfan Al Roumi, Minister of State for Happiness and Wellbeing, has affirmed that the UAE’s ‘Happiness Policy Manual’, developed by the National Programme for Happiness and Positivity, is the first instrument of its kind in the world, describing it as a benchmark for government entities to align their policies and ensure they prioritise people’s happiness….The National Programme for Happiness and Positivity organised a workshop for 100 federal policymakers to introduce the Happiness Policy Manual. The workshop included a discussion by Paul Dolan, Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, LSE, during which he presented a number of approaches to centre government policies around happiness, illustrating them with examples of success stories that underline the role of behavioural shifts on public satisfaction.


Related Links:
Arabs Today - UAE has developed world’s first ‘Happiness Policy Manual’

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 08/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Would you choose to be happy?

People prefer happiness to income, children, career and education, but being healthy trumps it all, writes Paul Dolan.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Would you choose to be happy?

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 07/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Toquoc.vn (Vietnam)

Translation by the translator Tiet Hung Thai open the door to the world

Tứ Thiện Thái is known as the translator of classic works in the world

Happiness - Lessons from a New Science (By Richard Layard):  The concept of happiness in the past is very voluminous, where the author not only gives definitions of happiness, but also provides empirical evidence to prove his point. The authors of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill argue that the goal of society should be "to bring the greatest happiness to most people." However, this theory was also criticized by libertarians.


Related Links:
Toquoc.vn (Vietnam) - Translation by the translator Tiet Hung Thai open the door to the world

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 06/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Caba.org.uk

Happiness depends on mental health, not money, say economists

According to the Origins of Happiness report, eliminating mental health issues such as depression and anxiety would increase happiness by 20%, whereas eliminating poverty would increase happiness by only 5%. In other words, tackling mental health problems would be 4 times more effective at increasing happiness than reducing poverty. And the best part, say the researchers behind the report is that reducing mental illness doesn't have to cost a penny. Led by top economist Lord Richard Layard, the team of experts at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance investigated the best ways of achieving happiness, reducing misery and promoting wellbeing.

Associated article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
Caba.org.uk - Happiness depends on mental health, not money, say economists

CEP Wellbeing CEP Labour Markets

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 02/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Medicalonline.hu (Hungary)

Gyógyszerek helyett lelki segítség kellene/Instead of medicines, it should be spiritual help

In Great Britain they have chosen a different path. According to Richard Layard's Health Economist Program, with an estimated 12 million jobs, a system has been developed that provides effective and rapid interventions for depressed, anxious patients in order to return to the world of work as soon as possible. For a year, beyond this circle, it is almost certain that psychological illness can be diagnosed.


Related Links:
Medicalonline.hu (Hungary) - Gyógyszerek helyett lelki segítség kellene/Instead of medicines, it should be spiritual help

The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 30/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Nordbayern.de (Gemany)

Forscher erklärt: So werden Sie endlich richtig glücklich/Researcher explains: This is how you finally become really happy

It was a book that sparked him in 2005, "which absolutely fascinated me," titled "The Happy Company" by British economist and author Sir Richard Layard. Especially a caricature in it gave him something to think about. You can see two dogs. One says to the other: "I have everything: plenty of food and your own hut with garden, but somehow I'm still not happy."

Related publications

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005. 2nd Edition 2011.

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/54928/happiness/


Related Links:
Nordbayern.de (Gemany) - Forscher erklärt: So werden Sie endlich richtig glücklich/Researcher explains: This is how you finally become really happy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 28/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

Happiness policy manual for UAE entities

Dubai: The UAE Government has launched a Happiness Policy Manual for government establishments to prioritise people’s happiness, it was announced on Saturday. … The national programme recently organised a workshop for around 100 federal policymakers to introduce the manual. The workshop included a discussion by Paul Dolan, Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, during which he presented a number of approaches to centre government policies around happiness, illustrating them with examples of success stories that underline the role of behavioural shifts on public happiness.


Related Links:
Gulf News - Happiness policy manual for UAE entities

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 28/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Why global leaders should pay attention to people’s happiness

Recent research by London School of Economics academic George Ward shows that how people feel about their lives influences how they vote in elections. He believes that subjective measures of well-being are better predictors of elections than how people feel about the economy.

 


Related Links:
Huffington Post - Why global leaders should pay attention to people’s happiness

Is Happiness a Predictor of Election Results?

CEP Wellbeing

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 20/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

MercatorNet

His standards or hers? How men and women define success

"Money is not the only thing affecting people’s happiness; it's not remotely the whole story," said British economist Baron Richard Layard in 2014. "People must understand that they would do well to preserve their human relationships; they should give them a higher priority than how much they earn.”4 As I point out in The Village Effect, this is more commonly a female perspective than a male-typical one.5

See also:

Tuesday 10 October

Institute for Family Studies – IFS

His standards or hers? How men and women define success

Editor’s Note: The following essay is based on a contribution to European Parliament member, Teresa Giménez Barbat's project Euromind, and to the related event “Gifted Women, Fragile Men,” which was held at the EU parliament buildings on March 28, 2017.

"Money is not the only thing affecting people’s happiness; it's not remotely the whole story," said British economist Baron Richard Layard in 2014. "People must understand that they would do well to preserve their human relationships; they should give them a higher priority than how much they earn.”4

https://ifstudies.org/blog/his-standards-or-hers-how-men-and-women-define-success

 

Related article

4. . Blackhurst, Chris. Richard Layard: "Money is not the only thing affecting people's happiness." The Independent, July 13, 2014.

 

Related links

Happiness and Public Policy research webpage


Related Links:
MercatorNet - His standards or hers? How men and women define success

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 17/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post (India)

These 7 numbers show how global poverty remains a huge problem

If policymakers focused on tackling mental illness instead of only focusing on eliminating poverty, global misery levels could decrease by 20 percent, according to a London School of Economics study. Reducing poverty is therefore not the only key to happiness.

Also in:

Monday 16 October

Huffington Post

These 7 numbers show how global poverty remains a huge problem

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/global-poverty-by-the-numbers_us_59e4d77ee4b04d1d5183787b?section=us_theworldpost

 

Related article

‘Origins of Happiness: Evidence and Policy Implications’, Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward. Article published by Vox online on 12 December 2016

http://voxeu.org/article/origins-happiness

 


Related Links:
Huffington Post (India) - These 7 numbers show how global poverty remains a huge problem

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 17/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP recent awards

Sara Evans-Lacko, PSSRU

Awarded an European Research Council Proof of Concept Grant for the NCore project, which aims to develop a mobile app which facilitates access to mental health services and treatments for young people with mental health problems; and to assess its feasibility, acceptability and potential clinical and costeffectiveness. If successful, the app would: (1) increase access to mental health care by providing links to relevant existing services; (2) increase access to relevant evidence-based mobile health interventions and to address barriers to care and (3) allow individuals to review services they have used and provide feedback which can be accessed by other app users. 


Related Links:
CEP recent awards - Sara Evans-Lacko, PSSRU

CEP Wellbeing

Sara Evans-lacko webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP on Twitter

CEP’s Prof Richard Layard at launch of BEIS’s ‘Time to Change’ on World Mental Health Day 2017.

Tweet by Alastair Campbell:

Alastair Campbell‏Verified account @campbellclaret Oct 10

Follow Follow @campbellclaret

Launching @beisgovuk as @TimetoChange employer with Perm Sec Alex Chisholm (the other tall one) #WMHD2017pic.twitter.com/vUA12S1Wud

1:32 PM - 10 Oct 2017

  • 10 Retweets
  • 31 Likes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Related Links:
CEP on Twitter - CEP’s Prof Richard Layard at launch of BEIS’s ‘Time to Change’ on World Mental Health Day 2017.

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mercola.com

Moods are contagious: good and bad

Perhaps you'd prefer to be the happy person that others gravitate to. In that case, in the video above London School of Economics (LSE) economist Lord Richard Layard, founder of Action for Happiness, a movement of people committed to building a happier and more caring society, suggests not tying your inner purpose to becoming richer and instead focus on achieving happiness and well-being.


Related Links:
Mercola.com - Moods are contagious: good and bad

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Hrmasia

The working blues

The UK Centre for Mental Health calculated that presenteeism from mental ill health alone costs the UK economy £15.1 billion (S$26.5 billion) per annum, while absenteeism costs £8.4 billion (S$14.4 billion). The impact is also being felt in the Asia-Pacific region, perhaps more so. Researchers from the London School of Economics have found workplace depression could have “wide and devastating” consequences for thousands of organisations in the region. Their survey of 8,000 employees from eight countries, including China, Japan, and South Korea, found that the collective annual cost for workplace depression in those countries was more than US$246 billion. … “Interventions which support employees with depression need to be developed, adapted, implemented and evaluated across all countries to mitigate the high costs of workplace depression,” lead researcher Dr. Sarah Evans-Lacko [sic] said.

Related publications

‘Global patterns of workplace productivity for people with depression: absenteeism and presenteeism costs across eight diverse countries’, Sara Evans-Lacko and Martin Knapp, Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Volume 51, Issue 11, November 2016

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00127-016-1278-4

DOI:  10.1007/s00127-016-1278-4


Related Links:
Hrmasia - The working blues

CEP Wellbeing

Sara Evans-lacko webpage

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

John Menadue – Pearls and Irritations

Paul Frijters. EU plans for VAT taxation are doomed to fail. Again.

Article by Paul Frijters

Taxation is the potential downfall of the EU as an institution. The reason is that within the EU, several member states are making money from the tax evasion in other member states, a situation akin to having a wife slowly murdering her husband with poison. Unless this stops, a divorce becomes inevitable.


Related Links:
John Menadue – Pearls and Irritations - Paul Frijters. EU plans for VAT taxation are doomed to fail. Again.

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage


News Posted: 11/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

MOJEH online

The pursuit of happiness

Another landmark study by researchers at the London School of Economics attributed most human misery to failed relationships and physical and mental illness rather than measurable problems like poverty. These findings pose a problem because, in the Western world, our levels of contentment are often closely linked to our spending habits.

Related article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
MOJEH online - The pursuit of happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 11/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

IZA World of Labor

The economics of mental health

Article by Richard Layard

With modern psychological therapy, mentally ill people can become more productive and more satisfied with life.


Related Links:
IZA World of Labor - The economics of mental health

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 11/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

VRT.be (Belgium)

Nobel Prize winner Economy: "I'm going to try to spend my prize money as irrationally as possible"

Behavior Economist and Nobel Prize Winner Economics Richard H. Thaler is best in joking when a journalist asks him from Stockholm what he will do with the prize. A jovial man also confirms his Belgian colleague Jan-Emmanuel De Neve.

“"He is a genius and jovial man who has done much to transform behavioral economics into practice.” - Jan-Emmanuel De Neve


Related Links:
VRT.be (Belgium) - Nobel Prize winner Economy: "I'm going to try to spend my prize money as irrationally as possible"

CEP Wellbeing

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage


News Posted: 09/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Lonely Planet

Mapping the world with data; this new book offers a fresh perspective on planet Earth

Book includes ‘The map of the world’s happiness’. Photo by New Views. Data source: Helliwell, John F., Richard Layard, and Jeffrey Sachs, eds. 2015. World Happiness Report 2015. New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

Related publications

World Happiness Report 2015, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs (Eds), The Earth Institute Columbia University, April 2015

http://worldhappiness.report/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/04/WHR15_Sep15.pdf

ISBN: 978-0-9968513-2-9

 


Related Links:
Lonely Planet - Mapping the world with data; this new book offers a fresh perspective on planet Earth

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 09/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Inquirer.net

Raise happiness; lessen impunity

Raise happiness. “Towards a better society” was the theme of the well-attended 2017 conference of the International Society for Quality of Life Studies (ISQOLS) at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, on Sept. 27-30. It had 5 invited plenary lectures and some 300 presentations, in as many as 6 simultaneous sessions, of scholarly research on quality of life (QOL) and its relevance for policymaking. … In his lecture, Prof. Lord Richard Layard, author of “Happiness—Lessons from a New Science” (2005), maintained that a society should be judged by its people’s satisfaction with life as a whole. Subjective, or self-reported, experience is an objective phenomenon; it correlates with electrical activity in relevant areas of the brain.

Related publications

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005. 2nd Edition 2011

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1080/14733140600986227/abstract

DOI: 10.1080/14733140600986227

 


Related Links:
Inquirer.net - Raise happiness; lessen impunity

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 07/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gestión (Spain)

Positive leadership: These are the pillars of happiness at work

In March 2017 the "World Happiness Report" was published, which includes a chapter on happiness at work. In it, Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, invites us to think about the level of productivity a country would have if people were happy. Therefore, it suggests designing spaces full of happiness for all. Given this worldwide interest in the subject, the first big question to ask is: What is happiness?

Related publications

The World Happiness Report 2017, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

http://worldhappiness.report/ed/2017/


Related Links:
Gestión (Spain) - Positive leadership: These are the pillars of happiness at work

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 03/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Reformatorisch Dagblad (Netherlands)

Zet niet in op baanzekerheid, maar op werkzekerheid/Do not focus on job security, but on job security

There is a lot of literature that describes the link between happiness and work. For example, Richard Layard, co-founder of the Annual World Happiness Report, said in 2011 that having paid work in place three is in a top seven of factors that form the foundation of our happiness. It's not crazy: a job, whether it's a boss or as a boss, gives satisfaction. You make an income, give structure to the day and fall among the people. As Secretary of State Wiebes wrote in a letter in 2014, "Not all jobs are equally fun, and some of us need a boost on Monday morning, but a life with work has more shine and more satisfaction."

Related publications

The World Happiness Report 2017, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

http://worldhappiness.report/ed/2017/

Past World Happiness Reports webpage:  http://worldhappiness.report/download/


Related Links:
Reformatorisch Dagblad (Netherlands) - Zet niet in op baanzekerheid, maar op werkzekerheid/Do not focus on job security, but on job security

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 30/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Delo (Slovenia)

Boštjan J. Turk: Money and Mental Health

Lord Richard Layard, who informed the public about research at this school, said that the average person has not become happier in the past twenty years, although in this period average per capita income has more than doubled. The London School of Economics found that the vast majority of human (spiritual) misery can be attributed entirely to other factors than poverty - especially demolished human relationships and (physical and mental) illnesses. The fact that in developed countries every third to fourth citizen is on antidepressants and drugs, it is not only worrying but alarming!

Related publications

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (2005) Richard Layard, Penguin Books

 

 


Related Links:
Delo (Slovenia) - Boštjan J. Turk: Money and Mental Health

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 28/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Expert panel: People from small, socially cohesive countries are happier

Opinion is divided on whether the breakup of large, diverse countries can increase national wellbeing, write Tony Beatton, Paul Frijters and Nattavudh (Nick) Powdthavee  Among the world’s rich countries, those that are smaller and more socially cohesive tend to have happier populations on average. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. But opinion is divided among the experts on whether the break-up of large, diverse countries into smaller, less diverse ones can be expected to increase national wellbeing. One researcher comments that Catalonia might be an interesting experiment if it were to gain independence.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Expert panel: People from small, socially cohesive countries are happier

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 28/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Forbes (Mexico)

Lo que debes saber sobre liderazgo positive/What you should know about positive leadership

The World Happiness Report indicates that bosses have a major effect on the happiness of team members

In March 2017 the "World Happiness Report" was published, which includes a chapter on happiness at work. In it, Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, invites us to think about the level of productivity a country would have if people were happy. Therefore, it suggests designing spaces full of happiness for all. Given this worldwide interest in the subject, the first big question to ask is: What is happiness?

Related publications

The World Happiness Report 2017, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

http://worldhappiness.report/ed/2017/


Related Links:
Forbes (Mexico) - Lo que debes saber sobre liderazgo positive/What you should know about positive leadership

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 25/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Viva Nicaragua canal 13

Científicos afirman que los 23 años de edad son los más felices/Scientists say 23-year-olds are the happiest

If you thought that childhood is the best stage of life, you are wrong, because, according to a study by Center For Economic Performance, the ages in which the human being experiences happiness at its best is 23 and 69 years respectively.


Related Links:
Viva Nicaragua canal 13 - Científicos afirman que los 23 años de edad son los más felices/Scientists say 23-year-olds are the happiest

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 23/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Brainerd Dispatch

Wealth enhancement column: happy retirement

While aging was once thought of as a negative thing, a study by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that, on average, people's happiness peaks at ages 23 and 69. At 69, nearly 70 percent of Americans are also retired.


Related Links:
Brainerd Dispatch - Wealth enhancement column: happy retirement

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 23/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

World Economic Forum

8 ways to unlock the power of a community

What is the key to happiness? This is a question that people have been asking for thousands of years. But this question need not be an esoteric and philosophical one. Studies at Harvard University, the London School of Economics, and other research have consistently identified the root of happiness: having rich social bonds and meaningful relationships. Being a part of strong communities is a powerful way for people to build those relationships in a faster, more scalable way. Membership in a community comes with an immediate level of social connection that can be developed further over time and can help people to expedite the formation of meaningful relationships.

Associated article

Vox Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications  Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward.


Related Links:
World Economic Forum - 8 ways to unlock the power of a community

CEP Wellbeing

George Ward webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Applying ancient solutions to modern problems

Indeed, a recent study by Richard Layard at the London School of Economics suggests that emotional wellbeing in childhood is more important to an adult’s satisfaction levels than academic success or wealth.


Related Links:
Irish Times - Applying ancient solutions to modern problems

The Key Determinants of Happiness and Misery

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 12/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE News

What’s the secret to happiness?

In the September episode of the #LSEIQ podcast we ask, ‘What’s the secret to happiness?’. Western societies have been getting steadily richer for several decades, but social scientists have shown that we are no happier for it. In fact we now have more depression, more alcoholism and more crime. Why does happiness elude so many of us and what can we do about it? Helping to tackle the question are Paul Dolan, Professor of Behavioural Studies at LSE, Professor Lord Richard Layard of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, and Liz Zeidler, founder and chief executive of the Happy City Initiative.


Related Links:
LSE News - What’s the secret to happiness?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 09/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSEIQ podcast

Epsiode 6 | What’s the secret to happiness?

In this episode, Joanna Bale investigates human happiness: why it eludes so many of us and what we can do about it. She talks to LSE’s Paul Dolan and Richard Layard, and Liz Zeidler of the Happy City Initiative.

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
LSEIQ podcast - Epsiode 6 | What’s the secret to happiness?

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 05/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Mail

Mental health problems cost SA’s economy billions per year

In a 2016 study of eight countries spanning diverse cultures and gross domestic product (GDP) ranges, Dr Sara Evans-Lacko and Prof Martin Knapp from the London School of Economics and Political Science reported that depression was collectively costing the nations of Brazil, Canada, China, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, South Africa and the US more than $246-billion a year.


Related Links:
Financial Mail - Mental health problems cost SA’s economy billions per year

CEP Wellbeing

Sara Evans-lacko webpage

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 31/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

A unique experiment to treat mental illness

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.


Related Links:
Gulf News - A unique experiment to treat mental illness

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 30/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Novara Media

Tory Promises to Improve Mental Healthcare Ignore the Reality of Living With Mental Illness

There is a wealth of evidence to suggest that proactive rather than reactive mental healthcare and treatment is in the interest of the NHS as well as individuals. A report by The Centre for Economic Performance shows that providing better treatments for mental illness could cut NHS expenditure on physical illnesses. A third of the patients treated for physical illnesses suffer from concurrent mental health problems, which raise the costs of physical healthcare by at least 45%. The report provides evidence of a significant saving resulting from the treatment of pulmonary disease, angina, and arthritis in conjunction with psychological therapy, that offset the money invested. But the government have so far failed to put research into practice.

 


Related Links:
Novara Media - Tory Promises to Improve Mental Healthcare Ignore the Reality of Living With Mental Illness

How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 30/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Edinburg Review

Higher minimum wages will give high tech a boost

But unlike many researchers, who maintain a laser-like focus on the question of whether minimum wage cuts jobs in the short term, Neumark has examined the policy from many angles. A recent paper of his, along with Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics, looks at how automation responds to minimum-wage increases. This is a timely research paper, because many people are worried about automation making human workers obsolete. It’s pretty obvious that higher minimum wages give employers an incentive to replace humans with machines. For example, fast-food servers can be partially replaced with automated kiosks. Japan already has plenty of these, and they work very well — you order your food from a menu, get a ticket and pick it up at a counter.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
The Edinburg Review - Higher minimum wages will give high tech a boost

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 23/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Country Living

Matter-of-fact chart shows why we shouldn't worry about growing old

A timeline, created by Business Insider, reveals the areas we excel in at specific ages of our life, including skills, achievements and wellbeing. The chart shows that there is a lot of contentment in later life, with the age of 69 being a time when we feel most life satisfaction, and at 82 most psychological wellbeing. The age of 74 is best for feeling happy about your body.


Related Links:
Country Living - Matter-of-fact chart shows why we shouldn't worry about growing old

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 23/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Aprendemas.com (Spain)

En busca de la felicidad: cursos gratuitos y claves para ser feliz /In search of happiness: free courses and keys to be happy

However, a recent study carried out at the London School of Economics shows that levels of happiness in a person's life follow a U-shaped pattern. This means that between the ages of 20 and 70, The maximum peaks of happiness in the life of any person would correspond with the 23 and the 69 years of age, concretely. Business Insider collated the data mainly based on scientific studies, including from the London School of Economics and MIT, and informal surveys - though the chart cannot conclusively represent the population as a whole.


Related Links:
Aprendemas.com (Spain) - En busca de la felicidad: cursos gratuitos y claves para ser feliz /In search of happiness: free courses and keys to be happy

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 23/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

US News

Study: Happiness is a U and Middle Age is Depressing

A new study suggests midlife "psychological low" points are a global phenomenon

Why people consistently report being near their most unhappy around the same age – across countries, incomes and demographics – has generated much debate. Hannes Schwandt, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Zurich, theorized back in 2013 that "the U-shape is caused by unmet expectations that are felt painfully in midlife."


Related Links:
US News - Study: Happiness is a U and Middle Age is Depressing

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 22/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

HR Dive

Minimum-wage boosts only encourage more bots, researchers say

Two economists said they've found new evidence that minimum-wage hikes force employers to automate low-skilled workers' jobs, reports CNBC. According to David Neumark of UC Irvine and Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics, the low-skilled workers hit hardest by unemployment are young, old, black and female. The research defined low-skilled workers as those with a high school education or less.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017. Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
HR Dive - Minimum-wage boosts only encourage more bots, researchers say

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 21/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde (France)

Le toast à l’avocat, un en-cas qui pourrait coûter cher / Avocado toast, a snack that could be expensive

"The phenomenon is linked to social phenomena often neglected when analyzing food behaviors," notes Clément Bellet, post-doctoral student at the London School of Economics. (Etc ...) "

(Access to the entire article is protected).
 


Related Links:
Le Monde (France) - Le toast à l’avocat, un en-cas qui pourrait coûter cher / Avocado toast, a snack that could be expensive

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage


News Posted: 18/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

MarketWatch

Raising the minimum wage leads workers in these industries to be replaced by robots

A sharp minimum wage increase in the U.S. will most severely impact low-skilled workers, according to an analysis of U.S. Census Bureau “Current Population Survey” data from 1980 to 2015 by economists Grace Lordan from the London School of Economics and David Neumark from the University of California at Irvine. “The findings imply that groups often ignored in the minimum wage literature are in fact quite vulnerable to employment changes and job loss because of automation following a minimum wage increase,” the paper — distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass. — concluded.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
MarketWatch - Raising the minimum wage leads workers in these industries to be replaced by robots

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 17/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo!Finance

Here's new evidence minimum wage hikes result in workers being replaced by robots

There is new evidence that raising the minimum wage pushes business owners to replace low-skilled workers with automation. And it shows that old, young, female and black low-skilled workers face the highest levels of unemployment after a minimum-wage increase. Economists Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of UC Irvine studied 35 years of government census data for their working paper, which was released in August, titled "People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs."


Related Links:
Yahoo!Finance - Here's new evidence minimum wage hikes result in workers being replaced by robots

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 17/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

CNBC online

Here's new evidence minimum-wage hikes result in workers being replaced by robots

There is new evidence that raising the minimum wage pushes business owners to replace low-skilled workers with automation. And it shows that old, young, female and black low-skilled workers face the highest levels of unemployment after a minimum-wage increase.

Economists Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of UC Irvine studied 35 years of government census data for their working paper, which was released in August, titled "People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs."

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017. Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
CNBC online - Here's new evidence minimum-wage hikes result in workers being replaced by robots

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 17/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Econotimes

Government study warns minimum wage hike leads to automation job loss

The main people behind the study are London School of Economics’ Grace Lordan and University of California, Irvine’s David Neumark. Their conclusion is that “low-skilled” workers are at risk of losing their livelihood with a wage increase simply because their jobs could be replaced by automation.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Econotimes - Government study warns minimum wage hike leads to automation job loss

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

24/7 Wall St

Report says mandated wage hikes accelerate introduction of technology in workplace

New research indicates that minimum-wage laws have forced companies to accelerate the introduction of technology in the workplace, hurting American workers in mostly low-skilled jobs. The findings come from a working paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) called “People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs,” by Grace Lordan and David Neumark.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
24/7 Wall St - Report says mandated wage hikes accelerate introduction of technology in workplace

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Developpez.com (France)

Une augmentation du Smic favorise l'automatisation et le chômage dans les métiers automatisables / An increase in the SMIC promotes automation and unemployment in automated trades

In a new study, two economists, Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California at Irvine, analyzed 35 years of census data from the United States. The data cover the period 1980 to 2015. The objective was to study the effect of minimum wage increases on employment in automatable jobs…

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Developpez.com (France) - Une augmentation du Smic favorise l'automatisation et le chômage dans les métiers automatisables / An increase in the SMIC promotes automation and unemployment in automated trades

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Manchester University Policy Blog

Is having any job at all better for your health and wellbeing than being unemployed?

Snippet.. There seems to be a common consensus that anything is better than being unemployed – even working in a job that does not pay well and in which you have little control over your working conditions, such as the hours that you work. Economists such as Lord Richard Layard have emphasised the need to get people out of unemployed states as “(almost) any job is better than no job”.


Related Links:
Manchester University Policy Blog - Is having any job at all better for your health and wellbeing than being unemployed?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Futurism

Study Shows That Minimum Wage Hikes Put More Jobs at Risk of Automation

The desire for a higher wage is pretty self explanatory. However, the impact a minimum wage increase could have on society is not so clear.

In an effort to shed light on this subject, researchers at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) conducted a study, and they’ve concluded that a minimum wage hike might not necessarily lead to happier workers. In fact, it could lead to fewer workers as such an increase has historically resulted in the loss of more jobs to automation.

For this study, authors Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California, Irvine looked at minimum wage changes in the United States from 1980 to 2015. They realized that these changes affected the number of so-called “low-skill” or minimum wage jobs — such as packing boxes or using sewing machines — in various industries in the country.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Futurism - Study Shows That Minimum Wage Hikes Put More Jobs at Risk of Automation

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News online

How low can you go? Economists game out U.S. unemployment bounds

Grandma got replaced by a robot

Old, lower-skilled manufacturing employees lose jobs to robots amid minimum wage increases, new research from the University of California at Irvine’s David Neumark and London School of Economics’ Grace Lordan shows. It’s a well-told story that sudden wage hikes spur job loss, and the innovation here is that the authors dig into just where those cuts happen. A $1 increase in the minimum wage decreases the share of low-skilled automate-able jobs by 0.43 percentage point, the authors find, but in manufacturing that jumps to 0.99 percentage point, and the share of older workers declines most sharply (women and black workers also post big drops).

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Bloomberg News online - How low can you go? Economists game out U.S. unemployment bounds

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

MIT Technology Review

Increasing Minimum Wage puts more jobs at risk of automation

When the minimum wage goes up, the robots come for people's jobs. That's the upshot of a paper published today on the National Bureau of Economic Research's website (abstract, full PDF paywalled), which analyzed how changes to the minimum wage from 1980 to 2015 affected low-skill jobs in various sectors of the U.S. economy. … Interestingly, a study of Seattle's new law, released in June, suggested that cuts to working hours meant people were actually losing as much as $125 a month. The new analysis, by Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark at the University of California, Irvine, suggests that there's a similar negative effect among people who work minimum-wage jobs that machines can do. The researchers found that across all industries they measured, raising minimum wage by $1 equates to a decline in "automatable" jobs—things like packing boxes or operating a sewing machine—of 0.43 percent.


Related Links:
MIT Technology Review - Increasing Minimum Wage puts more jobs at risk of automation

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Economics21

Robots gain from higher minimum wage

A new working paper by Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California at Irvine finds that increasing the minimum wage lowers the share of jobs susceptible to automation held by low-skill workers. A $1 increase in the minimum wage lowers this share by 0.43 percentage points.  Increases also adversely affect the workers' likelihood of being employed and hours worked.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Economics21 - Robots gain from higher minimum wage

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Washington Examiner

New study finds minimum wage hikes lead to job automation

States that raise their minimum wages may put low-skill workers at risk of having their jobs automated, according to a new academic paper published Monday. The study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research finds that higher minimum wages are likely to lower employment in manufacturing jobs that can be performed by robots, and hit older, black, and female workers particularly hard. The paper, which has not yet gone through the peer review process, was written by Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California at Irvine, one of the pre-eminent academic analysts of the minimum wage.

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
Washington Examiner - New study finds minimum wage hikes lead to job automation

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

theregister.co.uk

Raising minimum wage will raise something else: An army of robots taking away folks' jobs

In People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs, Grace Lordan, associate professor in health economics at the London School of Economics, and David Neumark, professor of economics at the University of California, Irvine, show that raising the minimum wage may have unintended consequences.

Also in

E21

Robots Gain from Higher Minimum Wage

A new working paper by Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California at Irvine finds that increasing the minimum wage lowers the share of jobs susceptible to automation held by low-skill workers. A $1 increase in the minimum wage lowers this share by 0.43 percentage points.  Increases also adversely affect the workers' likelihood of being employed and hours worked.

https://economics21.org/html/robots-gain-higher-minimum-wage-2510.html

 

Washington Examiner

New study finds minimum wage hikes lead to job automation

The paper, which has not yet gone through the peer review process, was written by Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics and David Neumark of the University of California at Irvine, one of the pre-eminent academic analysts of the minimum wage.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/new-study-finds-minimum-wage-hikes-lead-to-job-automation/article/2631432

Related publications

People Versus Machines: The Impact of Minimum Wages on Automatable Jobs

Published August 2017

Available on the NBER website


Related Links:
theregister.co.uk - Raising minimum wage will raise something else: An army of robots taking away folks' jobs

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 14/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Perspectiva.com

Wealth or wellbeing?

According to a study by the London School of Economics (LSE), with the participation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, most human misery is not due to economic factors, but to failed relationships and physical and mental illness . … According to Richard Layard, one of those responsible for the study, "the evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness and misery are social relationships and mental and physical health." In his view, this demands a new role for the state, but not in the sense of "wealth creation", but in the sense of "welfare creation."

Associated article

Vox Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications  Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward.


Related Links:
Perspectiva.com - Wealth or wellbeing?

CEP Wellbeing

George Ward webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 13/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

David Stevenson goes into EPIC meltdown after he's cruelly dumped from Make Or Break

Snippet: ... Behavioural expert Paul Dolan tried to remain positive as he told the camera: "They've broken up but they've got an escape plan and they can find someone better."


Related Links:
Mirror - David Stevenson goes into EPIC meltdown after he's cruelly dumped from Make Or Break

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 10/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

Who are Make or Break's Stephen and Abbi? The Vegas party boy who wants to shake off his playboy image for his loyal girlfriend

Snippet: ... What was going through your mind when Paul (Paul Dolan – Happiness expert and Professor of Behavioural Science) told you what would be happening? 


Related Links:
Mirror - Who are Make or Break's Stephen and Abbi? The Vegas party boy who wants to shake off his playboy image for his loyal girlfriend

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

OK!

Make Or Break: David Stevenson reveals the heartbreaking reason behind his quest for love as Beth Matkin relationship spirals

Snippet: ... Things went from bad to worse in Tuesday night's episode of Make Or Break as David broke down in tears once again after finding out some home truths during a task with behavioural expert Paul Dolan.


Related Links:
OK! - Make Or Break: David Stevenson reveals the heartbreaking reason behind his quest for love as Beth Matkin relationship spirals

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 09/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror

Make Or Break's David Stevenson breaks down in tears AGAIN after hearing shocking truths about girlfriend Beth

Snippet: ... As part of a challenge, behavioural expert Paul Dolan read out a series of shocking confessions and the contestants had to guess who they related to.


Related Links:
Mirror - Make Or Break's David Stevenson breaks down in tears AGAIN after hearing shocking truths about girlfriend Beth

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 08/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Higher Education Policy Institute

Measuring teaching intensity: the authors respond to the critics

In research just published in the journal Fiscal Studies, we examine teaching at UK universities in more detail than any study since the 1963 Robbins Report. We compared the teaching of Economics, History and Physics across 67 universities. We also made a historical comparison with 1963, using data drawn from the appendices to the Robbins Report prepared by Richard Layard and Claus Moser.


Related Links:
Higher Education Policy Institute - Measuring teaching intensity: the authors respond to the critics

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Make or Break? is nasty TV with Love Island cast-offs laid on for sadistic voyeurs - review

The host presiding over this bedlam is someone called Paul Dolan, billed as a “behavioural scientist”, one of those odd job descriptions like horse whisperer and cat burglar. 


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Make or Break? is nasty TV with Love Island cast-offs laid on for sadistic voyeurs - review

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Time

14 Ways to Squeeze More Joy Out of Every Day

Gold, natural gas and your attention: they’re all scarce resources. Allocate wisely so you can max out time for pleasure, recommends Paul Dolan in his book Happiness by Design. “Every tweet, text or email distracts us from the good experiences and people in our lives,” he says. 


Related Links:
Time - 14 Ways to Squeeze More Joy Out of Every Day

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Metro

Love Island with more tears

Snippet: ... New Channel 5 show Make or Break puts couples through various tests - their first being to choose someone from another couple to share a bedroom with. Paul Dolan, a professor of behavioural science at the LSE who leads the show, explains…


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 07/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Citizens Voice online

England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense. “We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,” Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
The Citizens Voice online - England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 06/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Sun

The New Love Island?

Snippet: ... "I felt like I was sold the dream, but entered a nightmare^” And you may also recognise a familiar voice on the show, as it’s narrated by MasterChef’s voiceover artist India Fisher. Leading the activities of Channel 5’s new ‘Love Island’ is London School of Economics’ Professor Paul Dolan.


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 05/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Move over Love Island… Here are 10 reasons why Make or Break? is our new obsession

Snippet: ... Leading the activities is London School of Economics’ Professor of Behavioural Science Paul Dolan. He’s previously appeared on other TV shows, including Lose Weight For Love and This Morning.


Related Links:
The Sun - Move over Love Island… Here are 10 reasons why Make or Break? is our new obsession

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

Expert panel: unemployment hurts the wellbeing of men more than that of women

Researchers are divided on whether bad jobs are worse for wellbeing than unemployment, write Tony Beatton, Paul Frijters and Nattavudh (Nick) Powdthavee

Given a generally stronger social norm for men to be working in paid employment than for women, unemployment is typically worse for the wellbeing of men than women. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. But the experts are divided on whether unemployment is better for an individual’s happiness than being employed in a bad job.

Link to press release:

Monday 31 July 2017

WORK AND UNEMPLOYMENT: Evidence of the impact on the wellbeing of men and women

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/_new2014/news/releases/2017_07_31_i151.pdf


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - Expert panel: unemployment hurts the wellbeing of men more than that of women

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

UOL.com

Inglaterra oferece terapia gratuita para tratar depressão e ansiedade /England offers free therapy to treat depression and anxiety

… David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that offering therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense..


Related Links:
UOL.com - Inglaterra oferece terapia gratuita para tratar depressão e ansiedade /England offers free therapy to treat depression and anxiety

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 03/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Bulletin

England’s mental health experiment: free talk therapy

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.

“We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,” Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
The Bulletin - England’s mental health experiment: free talk therapy

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Psychological Therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 03/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harper's Bazaar (Spain)

La felicidad no depende del dinero sino del amor/ Happiness does not depend on money but on love

A survey of 200,000 people at the London School of Economics in the United Kingdom revealed that personal satisfaction is more about finding love, even having more impact than increasing salary.

Associated article

Vox Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications  Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
Harper's Bazaar (Spain) - La felicidad no depende del dinero sino del amor/ Happiness does not depend on money but on love

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 02/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Only health more important than happiness

Snippet: ... MORE should be done to promote health and well-being rather than worrying excessively about wages and careers, Prof Paul Dolan, a specialist in behavioural science at the London School of Economics, has said.

[No link]


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Zdravie.Pravda (Slovakia)

Bezplatná terapia cez telefón. Britský experiment funguje/ Free phone therapy. The British experiment works

The British health experiment began in 2008. In the first wave, 35 clinics were created with a total of thousands of workers, but the system was immediately overwhelmed by huge floods of interest. Now a project with a much higher budget is working, and the UK government's goal is to cover the entire territory of the United Kingdom.

Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, however, says that the project can earn itself, thanks to the greater work performance of cured people. "If someone has a broken leg, he will get immediate help. But if it has a broken soul, it's not so much, "he said. The Czech Republic is also planning to transfer mental health care from hospitals to special centers and home environments.

Also in

El Periodico de Mexico

Un experimento mental único: psicoterapia gratuita / A unique mental experiment: free psychotherapy

….David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, came to the conclusion that offering therapy to people like Oliver was most logical in economic terms.

http://elperiodicodemexico.com/nota.php?id=863158


Related Links:
Zdravie.Pravda (Slovakia) - Bezplatná terapia cez telefón. Britský experiment funguje/ Free phone therapy. The British experiment works

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Clarin.com

Depression and anxiety, in the sights of an ambitious English project

In 2005, David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, came to the conclusion that it made economic sense to provide therapeutic treatment to people like Oliver. "We argued that, just in terms of job loss, the program would pay for itself," said Dr. Layard in his London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Clarin.com - Depression and anxiety, in the sights of an ambitious English project

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 30/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Columbus Despatch

Burgeoning talk-therapy program free for all in England

LONDON — England is in the midst of a unique national experiment, the world’s most ambitious effort to treat depression, anxiety and other common mental illnesses.

…In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.

″We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,″ Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.

Also in

Siglo.21 (Guatemala)

La paz y la felicidad… ¿se puede? / Peace and happiness ... can you?

Economist Richard Layard of the London School of Economics said that although in recent decades we have doubled our economic levels, many surveys show that we are no happier than our predecessors, although we now have more means to know what provides happiness to the people. And he pointed out that it is not necessarily money that provides greater happiness; And that family-founded in marriage, the one of always, since creation-constantly appears as an element that increases happiness. http://s21.gt/2017/07/29/la-paz-la-felicidad-se-puede/

 

Clarin Sociedad (Argentina)
Depresión y ansiedad, en la mira de un ambicioso proyecto inglés /Depression and anxiety, in the sights of an ambitious English project

In 2005, David Clark, a professor of psychology at the University of Oxford, and economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, came to the conclusion that it made economic sense to provide therapeutic treatment to people like Oliver. "We argued that, just in terms of job loss, the program would pay for itself," said Dr. Layard in his London School of Economics. https://www.clarin.com/sociedad/depresion-ansiedad-mira-ambicioso-proyecto-ingles_0_ByqqnY5LZ.html


Related Links:
The Columbus Despatch - Burgeoning talk-therapy program free for all in England

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 30/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

Dr Max talks depression and BBC's Panorama programme

A horrifying study by the London School of Economics a few years ago showed that while mental illness accounts for nearly half of all ill health in the under-65s, only 25 per cent of those in need of treatment get it.

Related publications

‘The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders’, The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2006

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/research/mentalhealth/DEPRESSION_REPORT_LAYARD.pdf


Related Links:
Mail online - Dr Max talks depression and BBC's Panorama programme

How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 29/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

In 2005 David Clark, a professor of psychology at Oxford University, and the economist Richard Layard, a member of the House of Lords, concluded that providing therapy to people like Oliver made economic sense.

“We made the case that, just on lost work alone, the program would pay for itself,” Dr. Layard said in an interview in his office at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
New York Times - England's mental health experiment: free talk therapy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 24/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Watan ( Algeria)

Il ne faut pas rester au niveau sécuritaire pour trouver des solutions / We must not stay at the security level to find solutions

The topics covered this year are varied: "The social foundations of world happiness"; "Growth and happiness in China"; "Waiting for happiness in Africa"; "The key determinants of happiness and misery"; "Happiness at work"; "Restoring American happiness". The report is written by the authors Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, John F. Helliwell, Haifang Huang, Richard Layard, Jeffrey Sachs and Shun Wang. The China team is led by Richard A.Easterlin and the African team consists of Valerie Møller, Habib Tiliouine and two other members.

 

Related publications

World Happiness Report Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.


Related Links:
El Watan ( Algeria) - Il ne faut pas rester au niveau sécuritaire pour trouver des solutions / We must not stay at the security level to find solutions

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk

Economic Affairs Committee publishes its report on Brexit and the Labour Market

Professor Alan Manning, Chair of the Migration Advisory Committee and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics and Lord Layard member of the Economic Affairs Committee…

Related publications

1st Report - Brexit and the Labour Market


Related Links:
Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk - Economic Affairs Committee publishes its report on Brexit and the Labour Market

CEP Community CEP Wellbeing

Alan Manning webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Contrepoints

Les pays où il fail bon vivre sont

The same report by academics (John F. Helliwell, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and Vancouver School of Economics Richard Layard, Director, London School of Economics, Jeffrey D. Sachs, Columbia University) offers also a ranking of countries in terms of the happiness at work.

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
Contrepoints - Les pays où il fail bon vivre sont

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 12/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

el Vocero (Puerto Rico)

¿Riqueza o bienestar?/Wealth or wellbeing?

According to Richard Layard, one of the study's leaders, "evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness and misery are social relationships and mental and physical health." In his view, this calls for a new role for the state, but not in the sense of "wealth creation," but in the "creation of welfare."

 

Associated article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
el Vocero (Puerto Rico) - ¿Riqueza o bienestar?/Wealth or wellbeing?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

David Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 10/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

dS De Standaard (The Netherlands)

Zwitserland is hset beste land ter wereld

In particular, Switzerland takes the first place on the list that the World Economic Forum (a Swiss setting) on the global competitiveness, and also on the list of most innovative countries by the French business school Insead. On another ranking of competitiveness, that of the also Swiss business school IMD, the Alpine country second. The list of human development of the UN is good for a third place, and on the list of most fortunate countries of the professors Jeffrey Sachs and Richard Layard pick up the Swiss a fourth place.

 

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
dS De Standaard (The Netherlands) - Zwitserland is hset beste land ter wereld

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 10/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Romper

How to talk to someone about going to therapy and getting them the help they need

Mental health issues are often stigmatized, or even considered "made up illnesses." But according to a report by The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group at The London School of Economics and Political Science, mental illness is typically more debilitating than most chronic physical conditions. The report indicated that, on average, a person with depression is at least 50 percent more disabled than someone with angina, arthritis, asthma or diabetes.

Related publications

‘How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS’. A report by The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/special/cepsp26.pdf

In brief: Mental illness and the NHS by Richard Layard. Article in CentrePiece 17 (2) Autumn 2012


Related Links:
Romper - How to talk to someone about going to therapy and getting them the help they need

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 08/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

FD.nl (The Netherlands)

Ranglijsten: Nederland handhaaft zich als een na beste land ter wereld (en loopt in op Zwitserland)/ Leaderboards: Netherlands maintains itself as a second-best country in the world (and walks in on Switzerland)

On the fifth list that I use for the rankings of the Netherlands increased rankings again though. Dutch were something happier and are now a position higher, at place 6 of the Happiness index of economists Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs. Only in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Finland are the people still happier.

Related publications

World Happiness report (2017), John Helliwell, Richard Layard & Jeffrey Sachs.

http://worldhappiness.report/


Related Links:
FD.nl (The Netherlands) - Ranglijsten: Nederland handhaaft zich als een na beste land ter wereld (en loopt in op Zwitserland)/ Leaderboards: Netherlands maintains itself as a second-best country in the world (and walks in on Switzerland)

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 07/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC - capital

The many upsides of a happy workforce

There are many benefits to putting happiness at the centre of business and policy decisions, says economist Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, a professor at the University of Oxford’s Said Business School. He points to a 2014 study, which suggests that raising people’s happiness makes them more productive by between 7% and 12%.

Related publications: Does work make you happy?  Evidence from the World Happiness Report’, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and George Ward, Harvard Business Review, March 20, 2017

 

 


Related Links:
BBC - capital - The many upsides of a happy workforce

CEP Wellbeing

Jan-Emmanuel De neve webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Nacion

¿Riqueza o bienestar?/ Wealth or well-being?

According to a study by the London School of Economics (LSE), with the participation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, most human misery is not due to economic factors, but to failed relationships and physical and mental illness ..

According to Richard Layard, one of those responsible for the study, "the evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness and misery are social relationships and mental and physical health." In his view, this demands a new role for the state, but not in the sense of "wealth creation", but in the sense of "welfare creation".                      

Related publications

World Happiness report Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017).

2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

http://worldhappiness.report/

 


Related Links:
La Nacion - ¿Riqueza o bienestar?/ Wealth or well-being?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 06/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek (Online)

Big houses in the U.S. are back (and there's a growing housing bubble)

Construction of McMansions has also increased but people who have smaller homes near where McMansions are built are much, much unhappier with their homes, according to a paper published in the spring by researcher Clement Bellet at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance. As more McMansions are built, their presence pushes other Americans to build bigger and go further into debt.

Related publications

Superstar houses and the American mortgage frenzy, Clement Bellet. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017


Related Links:
Newsweek (Online) - Big houses in the U.S. are back (and there's a growing housing bubble)

The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage


News Posted: 05/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! News

Big Houses in the U.S. Are Back (And There's a Growing Housing Bubble)

Construction of McMansions has also increased but people who have smaller homes near where McMansions are built are much, much unhappier with their homes, according to a paper published in the spring by researcher Clement Bellet at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance.

 

 

Related publications

Centrepiece magazine ”Home ownership and social mobility” Volume 22, issue 2, Summer 2017. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/CentrePiece_22_2.pdf

 

“Superstar houses and the American mortgage frenzy” Clement Bellet , Centre Piece Summer 2017. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp498.pdf


Related Links:
Yahoo! News - Big Houses in the U.S. Are Back (And There's a Growing Housing Bubble)

The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage


News Posted: 04/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

The Observer view on a crisis in mental health

The human condition today is ever more complex in an era of the internet, social media and the focus on status, appearance and material success. However, more is required as an antidote than early intervention, self-help and medication alone. As Richard Layard rightly argues in Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, a boost to serotonin and dopamine, both associated with mental wellbeing, is also provided by public policy that is judged on how it increases human happiness and reduces misery.

Related publications

Happiness Lessons from a New Science (Second Edition) Richard Layard, Penguin, 2011.


Related Links:
The Observer - The Observer view on a crisis in mental health

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Reader's Digest

You'll be happiest during these two years of your life, according to science

According to new research, we’re happiest at two points in our lives—not just one. Researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science asked 23,000 German volunteers aged 17 to 85 to rate their life satisfaction. Participants predicted how happy they would feel in five years, and then, after five years’ time, reported back on how they actually felt.


Related Links:
Reader's Digest - You'll be happiest during these two years of your life, according to science

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 29/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Glamour (Spain)

La ciencia revela las 2 edades a las que somos más felices/Science reveals the two ages when we are happiest

There are many theories about the ages and the optimization of one or several vital aspects: there is an age for the body, another for the mind and, according to a new study, there is not one, but two ages for happiness: And it is the 23 and the 69.  According to a study conducted by the London School of Economics and Social science to more than 23,000 participants between 17 and 85 years were asked how happy they expected to be after 5 years and, after 5 years, were asked for their current degree of happiness.


Related Links:
Glamour (Spain) - La ciencia revela las 2 edades a las que somos más felices/Science reveals the two ages when we are happiest

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage


News Posted: 27/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE The education blog

Judith Shapiro and Steve Pischke on recommended summer reads

As has become the tradition for our last post of the academic year, we’re featuring summer reading recommendations from special people at LSE. This year, two winners of the LSESU Teaching Excellence Awards shared their picks with us.

Steve Pischke, Professor of Economics and Research Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, Winner of LSESU Teaching Excellence Award for Research Guidance and Support

I am not sure my recent reading is all that good fare for the summer; in fact, it seems more appropriate for London’s November days. The last book I read was Walter Scheidel’s The Great Leveller, a history of inequality from the beginning of humanity to the present day. The author argues that inequality has always been increasing with the exception of periods of extreme violence: mass mobilisation warfare, bloody revolutions (the French one was too tame!), state collapse, and pandemics like the Black Death in the Middle Ages. For me this is the most provocative—and depressing—piece on inequality I have seen in a very long time, and this is a literature I follow as part of my day job. The descriptive account of what happened is most intriguing. Scheidel is weaker when he wants to be analytical and his writing does not rival the best.


Related Links:
LSE The education blog - Judith Shapiro and Steve Pischke on recommended summer reads

CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage


News Posted: 26/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Hindu Online

Walk with purpose

Snippet: ... you lose those extra kilos or keep you at your optimum weight. Avoid turning it into a social exercise though, rather than one that is concentrated on the cardiovascular activity you set out for it to be! A study by the London School of Economics reported that people...


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

What research tells us about the avocado toast controversy


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - What research tells us about the avocado toast controversy

CEP Wellbeing

Clement Bellet webpage


News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Impact of lower-rated journals on economists' judgements of publication lists

Article by Nattavudh Powdthavee, Yohanes E. Riyanto and Jack L. Knetsch

Economists are judged on both the number of times they publish and where they publish. Yet very little is known about the impact on reputation of including lower-rated journals in an author’s list of publications. This column presents evidence that including these publications has a negative impact on judgements of the author’s contribution by other economists. To the extent that such judgements may influence research and publication strategies, the findings imply negative implications for social welfare.


Related Links:
Vox - Impact of lower-rated journals on economists' judgements of publication lists

CEP Wellbeing

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 18/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

TES (online)

The UK's first university centre for improving mental health in schools

Earlier this month, Lord Layard, director of the wellbeing programme at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance, called for all schools to employ a senior teacher in charge of mental health.


Related Links:
TES (online) - The UK's first university centre for improving mental health in schools

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 16/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

TES

Every school should have a therapist, says happiness expert

Lord Layard also wants government to assess how much value schools add to pupils’ happiness

Every school should have an on-site therapist, according to one of the country’s leading economists and wellbeing experts. Lord Layard, director of the wellbeing programme at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance, has also called for all schools to employ a senior teacher in charge of mental health. He wants child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs) to provide therapeutic services in schools. “Extra money for child mental health should be devoted to building a school-based wing of Camhs,” he said.


Related Links:
TES - Every school should have a therapist, says happiness expert

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 11/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

YouTube

Game of Mates – Interview with Paul Frijters

Game of Mates: How favours bleed the nation, is a new book by Dr Cameron K. Murray and Professor Paul Frijters that exposes the inner workings of Australia's economic elite.
In this video, Paul Frijters is interviewed about exactly how this great Game is hidden behind the 'economic scenes' in Australian life.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gSMYQkVfHw&feature=youtu.be

 

Related publications

Game Of Mates: How favours bleed the nation by Cameron Murray (Author), Paul Frijters (Author), Publicious Pty Limited, April 5, 2017

ISBN:  0648061108; 9780648061106

 


Related Links:
YouTube - Game of Mates – Interview with Paul Frijters

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage


News Posted: 09/04/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Sleep deprivation, even when moderate, hurts employment

Article by Joan Costa-i-font and Sara Flèche

Sleep is often overlooked in economic models despite its obvious restorative effects on human health alongside its influence on brain plasticity and feelings of well-being. Sleep exerts an influence on emotional well-being and restful perceptions, and sleep deprivation more generally, even when moderate, is found to be detrimental to employment behaviours. The number of hours the average person sleeps has declined over the past century, and we still ignore its effects on economic activity and economic performance.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Sleep deprivation, even when moderate, hurts employment

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage


News Posted: 06/04/2017      [Back to the Top]

Elite Daily (USA) Online

Experts Revealed The One Thing You Need To Truly Be Happy

Related publications

http://worldhappiness.report/

Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network. ISBN 978-0-9968513-5-0

 

Related links

Richard Layard webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=970

Wellbeing Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/wellbeing/default.asp


Related Links:
Elite Daily (USA) Online - Experts Revealed The One Thing You Need To Truly Be Happy

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 20/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Left Foot Forward (Online)

People are happier in more equal societies. Here's the evidence

On World Happiness Day we should be talking about inequality

Richard Layard among others has noted how happiness has stalled in many developed countries, despite considerable improvements in living standards over the last fifty years to so.

Related publications

http://worldhappiness.report/

Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network. ISBN 978-0-9968513-5-0

 

 


Related Links:
Left Foot Forward (Online) - People are happier in more equal societies. Here's the evidence

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 20/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Financial (Georgia) online

Norway takes top spot in 2017 World Happiness Report

The report also highlights the personal factors affecting happiness. As Professor Layard points out, “in rich countries the biggest single cause of misery is mental illness”…

Related publications

http://worldhappiness.report/

Helliwell, J., Layard, R., & Sachs, J. (2017). World Happiness Report 2017, New York: Sustainable Development Solutions Network. ISBN 978-0-9968513-5-0


Related Links:
The Financial (Georgia) online - Norway takes top spot in 2017 World Happiness Report

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 20/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Italia

Perché serve una nuova economia/Why we need a new economics

Labor economists of the United Kingdom, as well as co-author of both Richard Layard that Steven Nickell, we need the introduction of the NAIRU in 1986.

Related publications

Combatting Unemployment IZA Prize in Labor Economics, Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell; Edited by Werner Eichhorst and Klaus F. Zimmermann, OUP, 2011, ISBN 978-0-19-960978-9

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/combatting-unemployment-9780199609789?q=978-0-19-960978-9&lang=en&cc=gb

‘Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market’, Richard Jackman, Richard Layard and Stephen Nickell, OUP, 2005, ISBN: 9780199279173

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/unemployment-9780199279166?cc=gb&lang=en&


Related Links:
Wall Street Italia - Perché serve una nuova economia/Why we need a new economics

CEP Labour Markets CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

W Radio (Spain) online

Vicente Fox cree que 'la gente está perdiendo la confianza en la democracia/ Vicente Fox believes that 'people are losing confidence in democracy'

At the table today the economist Richard Layard, director of the office of the Bhutan gross national happiness, Saamdu Chetri and the spiritual leader also included Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, among others. EFE


Related Links:
W Radio (Spain) online - Vicente Fox cree que 'la gente está perdiendo la confianza en la democracia/ Vicente Fox believes that 'people are losing confidence in democracy'

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Noroeste.com

Special Newsweek: the causes of unhappiness

Youth and young adults are especially vulnerable to mental illness

"We found, persistently and in all countries, that mental health problems are the leading causes of suffering", says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, who, together with his colleague Sarah Flèche, analyzed happiness and satisfaction surveys carried out around the world.

See also

Saturday 11 March

Newsweek en Español

Las causas de la infelicidad

http://nwnoticias.com/#!/noticias/las-causas-de-la-infelicidad

 

Related publications

‘Do more of those in misery suffer from poverty, unemployment or mental illness?’, Sarah Fléche and Richard Layard, KYKLOS International Review for Social Sciences Volume 70, Issue 1, February 2017

DOI: 10.1111/kykl.12129

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/kykl.12129/abstract


Related Links:
Noroeste.com - Special Newsweek: the causes of unhappiness

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 15/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Thanhnien.vn (Vietnam)

British students taught happiness

Professor Richard Layard, the British Government's Adviser in the test program conducted in 26 schools.


Related Links:
Thanhnien.vn (Vietnam) - British students taught happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 14/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Canary

The government has a new way to tackle the childhood mental health crisis

Schools across the country are going to trial lessons on happiness and dealing with mental health issues. Professor Richard Layard, who is a government adviser for a four-year trial of weekly mindfulness classes, says schools shouldn’t obsess about academic achievement. The well-being of pupils also matters.


Related Links:
The Canary - The government has a new way to tackle the childhood mental health crisis

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 13/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Schools to trial happiness lessons for eight-year-olds

Lord Layard, who is a government adviser for a current four-year trial of weekly mindfulness classes in 26 schools, said there was an obsession with measuring only academic achievement.

“The development of the character of children is an incredibly important issue,” said Layard, who is also a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). “If you really want schools to take the wellbeing of their pupils as an important goal, there has to be a way of measuring that.”

Related publications

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
The Guardian - Schools to trial happiness lessons for eight-year-olds

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 12/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Die Bundesregierung

Discussion with Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Third International German Forum

Chancellor Angela Merkel and international experts have discussed ways of improving global health. This is a matter of major importance, she said, and thus one of the priorities of Germany’s G20 Presidency.  Richard Layard speaking at 56:05 minutes.


Related Links:
Die Bundesregierung - Discussion with Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Third International German Forum

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 10/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP on TV/Radio

BBC York

17:20:17

Professor Martin Knapp comments on money for social care in the budget

Also on:

BBC Wiltshire


Related Links:
CEP on TV/Radio - BBC York

CEP Wellbeing

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 09/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

A Tribuna (Brazil)

Pesquisas comprovam: dinheiro não compra felicidade/Polls show: money can't buy happiness

Having good mental health and being in a good relationship makes people happier than doubling income points says study.  The London School of Economics, in the United Kingdom, interviewed 200,000 people in Australia, United Kingdom, Germany and United States on the factors that most influence your sense of well-being. And having a partner positively led this list. "The evidence shows that the things that matter most to happiness are our relationships and our physical and mental health," says the study's co-author Richard Layard, an economist who initiated a few years ago a movement to create a happier and compassionate society, called action for Happiness.

 

Related publications

Associated article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
A Tribuna (Brazil) - Pesquisas comprovam: dinheiro não compra felicidade/Polls show: money can't buy happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC London 94.9 (Radio)

CEP on TV/Radio

19:00:01

Snippet: ...Martin Knapp discusses the Chancellor’s plans to put an extra £2 billion towards England’s social care systems.

Click to open

Also on BBC Radio 4, BBC Foyle, BBC Radio Ulster, BBC Radio Nottingham, BBC Lancashire


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Mirror

Health is our wealth

If I asked what makes you happy what would you say? I think many of us would answer money. But according to a study by researchers at the London School of Economics, much of the world’s unhappiness stems from failed relationships.

[No link available.]

Related articles

Vox – 12 December 2016

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Jornada Aguascalientes (Spain)

El reto de la desigualdad / Opciones y decisiones/ The challenge of inequality / choices and decisions

The UN in this regard, ruled: "the year 2015 is a milestone for mankind by the adoption, in September, of sustainable development goals (SDGS), to help guide the world community towards a more inclusive and sustainable global development. It is very likely that the concepts of happiness and well-being will help to guide progress towards sustainable development"(John Helliwell, Richard Layard, and Jeffrey Sachs. Happiness 2015 World report. Overview).

Related publications

The ‘World Happiness Report 2015’, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs (Eds.), April 2015

http://worldhappiness.report/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/04/WHR15_Sep15.pdf


Related Links:
La Jornada Aguascalientes (Spain) - El reto de la desigualdad / Opciones y decisiones/ The challenge of inequality / choices and decisions

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 04/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Entorno inteligente

MÉXICO: ?El dinero no da felicidad, sobre todo si es poco??/ Mexico:? The money does not give happiness, especially if it's bit?

Almost eight out of 10 people think that the money spoiled people. This is supported by one of the gurus of happiness research, Richard Layard. In his book Happiness.

Related publications

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science 2nd Edition, Richard Layard, Penguin, 7 April 2011

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/54928/happiness/


Related Links:
Entorno inteligente - MÉXICO: ?El dinero no da felicidad, sobre todo si es poco??/ Mexico:? The money does not give happiness, especially if it's bit?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

i Newspaper

Why does nobody want to host the Olympics anymore?

The Olympics shouldn’t be sold as bringing any wider benefits at all – but, instead as a very expensive party. Hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 cost about £150 per UK tax payer – but it did make Londoners happier. Londoners were happier during the summer of 2012 than those of 2011 and 2013, a study by the Centre for Economic Performance found. But in times of austerity, the happiness argument is a hard sell. That is especially true when the benefits are concentrated in the glitziest city – normally the capital. In the 2012 Olympics, citizens in poorer parts of the country effectively subsidised the happiness of Londoners.


Related Links:
i Newspaper - Why does nobody want to host the Olympics anymore?

The Host with the Most? The Effects of the Olympic Games on Happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage

Georgios Kavetsos webpage


News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE academic mentioned in Parliament

Building more homes

During the debate on 'Building more homes' in the Economic Affairs Committee, Lord Layard mentioned LSE:

"Professor Cheshire at the London School of Economics has suggested a levy on the final value of a completed development, combining that with the change in presumption that I referred to earlier. There are many areas in which these ideas can be explored. The committee took no view on these issues but it made a clear recommendation that the Government should examine these proposals."

 

Related links

Paul Cheshire CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=cheshire

Richard Layard webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/staff/person.asp?id=970

 


Related Links:
LSE academic mentioned in Parliament - Building more homes

CEP Urban and Spatial Programme CEP Wellbeing

Paul Cheshire webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek online

Study: Mental Illness Causes More Misery Than Anything Else

“We keep on finding in every country that the mental health problems are the biggest causes of misery,” says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, who along with colleague Sarah Flèche analyzed happiness and satisfaction surveys from around the world. In a paper published in January in the journal Kyklos, Flèche and Layard found that the correlation between mental illness and misery was strong even when poverty and unemployment were controlled for.

Related publications

‘Do more of those in misery suffer from poverty, unemployment or mental illness?’, Sarah Fléche and Richard Layard, Kyklos (International Review for Social Sciences), 70(1), February 2017

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/kykl.12129/epdf


Related Links:
Newsweek online - Study: Mental Illness Causes More Misery Than Anything Else

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

O2 (Poland)

So many minutes of sleep loses his mother when she wakes up her baby

The study is based on data about the life of 14 thousand. the British families. Was collected from the birth of a child in the family up to the 25 years of his life. Applications have developed Joan Costa-and-Font and Sarah Flèche from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.


Related Links:
O2 (Poland) - So many minutes of sleep loses his mother when she wakes up her baby

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage


News Posted: 28/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Health: Child-induced fatigue costs economy dear, says study

In the first study of its kind, Joan Costa-i-Font and Sarah Flèche, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science, have found that baby-induced fatigue is significantly undermining economic performance. Their work is to be presented at the Royal Economic Society’s annual conference in April.


Related Links:
The Observer - Health: Child-induced fatigue costs economy dear, says study

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage


News Posted: 25/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Snippet: ... Martin Knapp

Martin Knapp is director of health and social care at the London school of economics and an economist specialising in health and social care.


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Snippet: ... Martin Knapp

CEP Wellbeing

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 24/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Financiero

El Dinero no da felicidan, sobre todo si es poco

Almost eight out of 10 people think that money spoils people. This is supported by one of the gurus of the research of happiness, Richard Layard.

Related publications

Happiness:  Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005.  2nd edition: 2011; ISBN 0713997699

https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/54928/happiness/9780241952795/


Related Links:
El Financiero - El Dinero no da felicidan, sobre todo si es poco

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 21/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Turkish World Television

TRT [around minute 9:30]

The show was on www.trtworld.com/live at these times on Friday 17 February  (GMT): 1630/ 2030/ 0130/ 0730/ 1230

Insight: Seasonal affective disorder and the business of happiness – Part I

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSoOvT_zdxk

Insight: Seasonal affective disorder and the business of happiness – Part II

Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, affects people around the world. So-called SAD lights have been developed to help combat the condition. And how effective are books that train you to be happy? The World Wellbeing Panel got mentioned in both and advertised in the second of these interview clips.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZWERkTvilc


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage


News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP Impact

CEP article on Top Downloaded of the Economic Journal

Congratulations to Richard Layard, Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, who authored What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-course Model of Well-being. The article, which features in volume 124 of the Economic Journal (EJ), has recently been listed on the Top Downloaded page of the EJ website. Since its publication in 2014, the article has received 11,796 downloads, and in 2016 it was the most downloaded article in the journal for that year.

Related publications

‘What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-course Model of Well-being’, Richard Layard, Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, The Economic Journal, Vol 124, Feature Issue, November 2014

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ecoj.12170/epdf


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Quartz

Economists quantified what sleep deprivation does to mothers' pay and productivity

When Joan Costa-Font became a father, the health economist noticed a dramatic drop in his productivity. “And I am the man,” he said, acknowledging that the effect was clearly worse on his wife.

He and Sarah Flèche, a labor economist, decided to quantify the productivity drop. The novel way they chose to do it was to look at how children disrupt mothers’ sleep, and how that disruption in turn affects mothers’ labor force productivity, including hours worked and income earned.


Related Links:
Quartz - Economists quantified what sleep deprivation does to mothers' pay and productivity

Parental Sleep and Employment: Evidence from a British Cohort Study

CEP Wellbeing

Sarah Flèche webpage


News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Miami Herald online

World leaders, researchers, economists slated to speak at World Happiness Summit

Miami will be the site of the first global gathering of governmental leaders, economists, academics and researchers for the World Happiness Summit next month, the summit announced.

The H20 is one of four tracks being organized by the inaugural World Happiness Summit. Confirmed participants for the governmental track include former President of Mexico, Vicente Fox; spiritual leader and peace negotiator Sri Sri Ravi Shankar; World Happiness Report co-author Sir Richard Layard, founder of the Wellbeing Center at the London School of Economics; Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness Center Director Dr. Saamdu Chetri; Harvard happiness researcher and author Tal Ben-Shahar; Smart Dubai’s Director General Dr. Aisha Bin Bishr; and dignitaries from more than 40 countries.


Related Links:
Miami Herald online - World leaders, researchers, economists slated to speak at World Happiness Summit

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 16/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

NaturalNews.com

Dutch families are raising the world's happiest kids, according to new study

Childhood has a tremendous influence on a person’s entire life. A study from the London School of Economics exploring what makes people happy found that a person’s emotional health as a child was the strongest determinant of their mental well-being as they got older, which is why parents need to take a proactive role in their children’s life and ensure their physical and emotional needs are being met.

Related articles

Vox – 12 December 2016

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
NaturalNews.com - Dutch families are raising the world's happiest kids, according to new study

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 15/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Rochdale Observer

Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

A dedicated tax is the only way that we can be sure the government is reflecting public wishes, argues Richard Layard, emeritus professor at the London School of Economics. He points out that Britain currently spends less on health as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) than other countries at the same income level - and that nearly half of Britons say they are willing to pay for a better service and almost none want it cut. “If, as in Germany, there were a dedicated source of funding for the healthcare sector, it would be much easier for public demand to be translated into action,” he writes.


Related Links:
Rochdale Observer - Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 09/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Taxing Times: Brits should pay a dedicated NHS tax to fund the ailing health service, expert says

Britain currently spends less on health as a share of national income than other equivalent countries, according to economist Professor Richard Layard

BRITS should pay a dedicated tax to fund the ailing NHS, a leading expert says.  Professor Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics, claims it is the only way to ensure the government reflects public wishes.


Related Links:
The Sun - Taxing Times: Brits should pay a dedicated NHS tax to fund the ailing health service, expert says

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 09/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

theBMJ

Head to Head: Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

A dedicated tax is the only way that we can be sure the government is reflecting public wishes, says Richard Layard, but John Appleby argues it would not protect funding from economic uncertainty

Yes—Richard Layard

Taxpayers finance the National Health Service. But how much are they willing to pay for it? No one has any idea. The service is financed from general taxation and there is thus no real way in which the public can express its wish for a better (or worse) funded service. If instead there were a specific funding stream dedicated to health, there could be a real public debate about how much people were willing to pay. And this debate would be particularly intense at the time of general elections, ensuring that our healthcare system in some way reflected the wishes of the population.


Related Links:
theBMJ - Head to Head: Is it time for a dedicated tax to fund the NHS?

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 08/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Workers are happier with less hierarchy

The World Wellbeing Panel agrees that every effort should be made to reduce middle management, write Nick Powdthavee and Paul Frijters.

Workers’ satisfaction with their job is, on average, higher in a flatter organisation than in a hierarchical organisation. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world on the impact of different organisational structures on workers’ wellbeing.

The World Wellbeing Panel on wellbeing and organisational structures is available here. The experts, their affiliations and their responses to the survey are here.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review - Workers are happier with less hierarchy

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 30/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Critical Mental Health Nurses' Network blog

The Layard Report

In December 2016 an electronic version of a new report became available, prior to its imminent publication in book form, by the London School of Economics. Dubbed ‘The Layard Report’ after key author Richard Layard, the actual title is The Origins of Happiness: How new science can transform our priorities. A title like that is about the boldest that could be imagined; one expects a treatise that brings together the biggest questions of philosophy from the past and present and the disciplines of psychology and psychiatry, and all kinds of intriguing demographic research. This is, after all, a 200 page document, packed full with diagrams, graphs and illustrations. In essence, the report makes one central claim: That the government is wrong to focus on lifting people out of poverty. Instead, happiness would be more efficiently created by a focus on the treatment of depression and anxiety.

 

Related Articles

Vox – 12 December 2016

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications, Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward

 

 


Related Links:
Critical Mental Health Nurses' Network blog - The Layard Report

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 23/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mail Online

Dr Max the Mind Doctor: Why anorexia has no respect for age

A horrifying study done by the London School of Economics a few years ago showed that while mental illness accounts for nearly half of all ill-health in the under-65s, only a quarter of people in need of treatment get it.


Related Links:
Mail Online - Dr Max the Mind Doctor: Why anorexia has no respect for age

Tackling Depression and Anxiety Disorders

The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 21/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

SDPNoticias

Salud y amigos la formula de la felicidad segun la ciencia

Health and friends: the formula of happiness according to science

According to researcher Lord Richard Layard, people have not increased their levels of happiness in the past 50 years, while the average income has increased in countries that make up the research. This is because humans are more connected emotionally to your health and relationships, than money.

 

Related articles

The big factors affecting life satisfaction are all non-economic’, Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward, LSE Business Review blog, 12 December 2016


Related Links:
SDPNoticias - Salud y amigos la formula de la felicidad segun la ciencia

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 12/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Financiero

Cuando los ricos tambien lloran

When the rich also cry

Richard Layard in his book "Happiness", says that the standard of life is similar to the alcohol or to the drugs. Once is has some experience in that sense, is necessary follow ascending, if is you want to hold it satisfaction, as if outside a Vice.


Related Links:
El Financiero - Cuando los ricos tambien lloran

Mental Health: the Choice of Therapy for All

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 11/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffpost Politics

What makes people happy? Education policymakers must prioritise emotional health

As highlighted by LSE researchers, UK education policymakers have focused much of their attention on improving academic achievement over the last half century, in the hope that this will result in higher levels of life satisfaction amongst the population. But with this focus on high academic achievement, have we lost sight of why we want our children to get good grades?

Related Articles

Vox – 12 December 2016

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications, Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward


Related Links:
Huffpost Politics - What makes people happy? Education policymakers must prioritise emotional health

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage


News Posted: 11/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Morning Star

Modern childhood a vital class issue for the left

A nasty mix of neoliberalism and the Tories’ austerity policies are having appalling effects on our children’s health and welfare

And so we come to the present day, with a 10-year anniversary press letter appearing in the Guardian on Boxing Day, co-organised with Dr Sharie Coombes and signed by a host of cultural luminaries — including Rowan Williams, the NUT’s Kevin Courtney, (Sirs) Jonathon Porritt, Anthony Seldon and Richard Bowlby; writer Philip Pullman; psychologists Oliver James, Susie Orbach and Sue Gerhardt; educationalists Robin Alexander, Penelope Leach, Sir Christopher Ball, Guy Claxton and Sir Tim Brighouse and a host of eminent professors — including Baroness Susan Greenfield, Lord Richard Layard, Andrew Samuels and Sami Timimi. If all these eminent people, with stellar professional and academic reputations to protect, are prepared to sign a public letter as outspoken as ours about children’s wellbeing, then something surely is rotten to the core in neoliberal Britain and we must urgently do something about it.

 

Related article

Guardian

Letter: Screen-based lifestyle harms children’s health

A decade ago our first multiple-signatory “toxic childhood” press letter described how children’s health and wellbeing were being undermined by the decline of outdoor play, increasingly screen-based lifestyles, a hyper-competitive schooling system and the unremitting commercialisation of childhood.

Despite widespread public concern, subsequent policymaking has been half-hearted, short-termist and disjointedly ineffective. The above factors continue to affect children adversely, with “school and cool” displacing active, self-directed play at an ever-earlier age. Physical health problems like obesity continue to escalate, and mental health problems among children and young people are approaching crisis levels. As well as the intense distress caused to families, there are obviously longer-term social and economic consequences for society as a whole.


Related Links:
Morning Star - Modern childhood a vital class issue for the left

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 10/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Minyanville

Health is more important than wealth

The old folk saying "If you've got your health you've got your wealth" is finding new proponents from a recent study done by the London College of Economics, under the direction of Lord Richard Layard. Layard, who holds advanced degrees in medical science, economics, philosophy, and psychology, is quoted as saying "Research shows more clearly than ever that there is a direct correlation between a person's physical and emotional health and their happiness and satisfaction with life."


Related Links:
Minyanville - Health is more important than wealth

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 10/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

iTECH POST

Millennials' happiness is tied to having close friends at work

A compilation of surveys show that millennial's happiness is closely tied to having close friends at work. Good working relationships seem to make people more productive and satisfied with life. …

In another study by Lord Richard Layard, it showed that people on average have reported feeling the same level of happiness in 50 years despite average income more than doubling, The Guardian says.

 

Related articles

The big factors affecting life satisfaction are all non-economic’, Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward, LSE Business Review blog, 12 December 2016


Related Links:
iTECH POST - Millennials' happiness is tied to having close friends at work

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

Richard Layard webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 10/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

The cost of taking mental health seriously

After decades languishing as one of the most underfunded medical problems, mental illness began to receive some of the attention it deserved under Tony Blair’s government. In 2006, a London School of Economics study led by Professor Richard Layard provided the inspiration for an expansion of psychotherapy services.


Related Links:
Financial Times - The cost of taking mental health seriously

Tackling Depression and Anxiety Disorders

The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 09/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

11 green New Year's resolutions that put the planet first

According to a study from the London School of Economics, brisk walking is a better deterrent against obesity than any other form of exercise.

Men and women who walk briskly for more than 30 minutes a day were found to have lower BMIs and smaller waists than everyone else involved in the study.


Related Links:
Daily Telegraph - 11 green New Year's resolutions that put the planet first

CEP Wellbeing

Grace Lordan webpage


News Posted: 03/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Live Trading News

Feel good, strive to make this world a happier place

In terms of emotional well-being, “there is no further progress beyond an annual income of $75,000,” researchers wrote, concluding that “high income buys life satisfaction but not happiness.”

There is also evidence suggesting that the “mid-life crisis,” a period of unhappiness that hits many people in their 40’s, may be real. Research from 500-K people revealed a distinct U-shaped curve to their happiness levels. …

This is one reason why strong social ties are indicative of one’s happiness; mental illness, especially depression and chronic anxiety, is “the biggest single cause of misery in advanced countries,” according to LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).  One of CEP’s priorities is to overhaul public policy to increasingly aim at increasing wellbeing and personal happiness, especially since only 33% of people struggling with mental illness receive treatment, such as cognitive behavioral therapy.

Mr. Layard is the founder of Action for Happiness, a movement of people committed to building a happier and more caring society.


Related Links:
Live Trading News - Feel good, strive to make this world a happier place

Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Hannes Schwandt webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 30/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Happiness study ‘lets austerity off the hook', psychologists claim

LSE study led by Labour peer found that failed relationships and physical and mental illness were bigger causes of misery than poverty

Clinical psychologists have raised the alarm over a controversial piece of research led by a Labour peer, with one saying it “lets austerity off the hook” as a cause of mental health problems.

The London School of Economics study led by Lord Richard Layard, published in early December, found that failed relationships and physical and mental illness were bigger causes of misery than poverty.  The study, headlined the “Origins of happiness”, made the claim that eliminating depression and anxiety would reduce misery by 20%, while eliminating poverty would only reduce it by 5%.

 

 

Associated article

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward

 


Related Links:
Guardian - Happiness study ‘lets austerity off the hook', psychologists claim

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 26/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Experts call for official guidelines on child screen use

Educationalists, psychologists and authors also call for a minister for children to try to address ‘toxic’ nature of childhood

“Without concerted action, our children’s physical and mental health will continue to deteriorate, with long-term results for UK society that are frankly unthinkable.”

Among the signatories is Sue Palmer, the author of the 2006 book Toxic Childhood, which tapped into parental angst about raising children in the modern world; the psychologist and educational consultant Dr Richard House; the professor of education Dr Robin Alexander; the wellbeing programme director at the London School of Economics’ centre for economic performance, Richard Layard; the former London schools commissioner Sir Tim Brighouse, the psychologist and author Steve Biddulph and a former government mental health champion Natasha Devon.


Related Links:
Guardian - Experts call for official guidelines on child screen use

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 25/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE USA Politics and Policy blog

More public holidays would boost national wellbeing

A a survey of leading wellbeing researchers from around the world finds that more public holidays would be better for everyone, writes Paul Frijters.

The World Wellbeing Panel on wellbeing and public holidays is available here.

The experts, their affiliations and their responses to the Christmas edition of the survey are here.

 


Related Links:
LSE USA Politics and Policy blog - More public holidays would boost national wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage


News Posted: 24/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Walton Sun (Florida, USA)

Happiness may help fight poverty

Too often in our business we focus primarily on finances. Of course, that is what financial professionals do, but we could be neglecting an important, maybe more important, piece of the pie. The recent London School of Economics report "Origins of Happiness" found that more human misery was related to failed personal relationships along with mental illness than financial problems. Tackling mental health issues may be the best way to fight poverty. Richard Layard, an advisor to Prime Ministers Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, led the study, which analyzed data from four countries including the United States. Layard believes money spent on mental health would pay for itself by generating income from increased employment and reduced healthcare costs. Over several decades, Layard has made the argument social and psychological factors are more important than income levels when it comes to life satisfaction. Layard notes that having a partner is as right for you as being unemployed is bad for you.

Associated article: Vox Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications  Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward

 


Related Links:
The Walton Sun (Florida, USA) - Happiness may help fight poverty

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 22/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

More public holidays would boost national wellbeing

This is the consensus finding of a survey of leading wellbeing researchers from around the world, writes Paul Frijters.

Related articles:  World Wellbeing Panel Survey: ‘Wellbeing and Public Holidays’, December 2016

World Wellbeing Panel webpage.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - More public holidays would boost national wellbeing

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Frijters webpage


News Posted: 22/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Emotions blog

New podcast: the politics of wellbeing with Richard Layard and William Davies

Here’s the second episode of our podcast, with Jules Evans interviewing Richard Layard,  former government ‘happiness tsar’ and the creator of the NHS talking therapies service; and Wiliam Davies, author of The Happiness Industry. You can listen to the previous episode, an interview with author Geoff Dyer about peak experiences, here. And you can now subscribe to our podcast on iTunes here.


Related Links:
Emotions blog - New podcast: the politics of wellbeing with Richard Layard and William Davies

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 19/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Northamptonshire Telegraph

Doubling someone's salary has minimal impact on happiness

While increasing salary had a minimal effect on people’s wellbeing, unemployment reduces the happiness of each unemployed person by about 0.7 points on average.


Related Links:
Northamptonshire Telegraph - Doubling someone's salary has minimal impact on happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 19/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

University Herald

Science-backed proof that money can't buy happiness

What makes humans happy? What makes you happy? Is it the material and tangible things? Or is it experiences or people? Happiness can be measured and defined in so many ways but according to a study by a team of researchers in London School of Economics, a person’s happiness is based on their personal relationships as well as their physical and mental health.


Related Links:
University Herald - Science-backed proof that money can't buy happiness

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 16/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

The big factors affecting life satisfaction are all non-economic

What distinguishes ‘Les Misérables’ from the rest is neither poverty nor unemployment, but mental illness, write Andrew Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh (Nick) Powdthavee and George Ward. In 1961, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) organised a conference on human capital that propelled education into the centre of policymaking worldwide. This month, the OECD and the London School of Economics (LSE) are holding a conference on subjective wellbeing that they hope will usher in another revolution – where policymaking at last aims at what really matters, the happiness of the people.


Related Links:
LSE Business Review blog - The big factors affecting life satisfaction are all non-economic

CEP Wellbeing

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Richard Layard webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 12/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

Understanding the key determinants of people’s life satisfaction will suggest policies for how best to reduce misery and promote wellbeing. This column discusses evidence from survey data on Australia, Britain, Germany, and the US which indicate that the things that matter most are people’s social relationships and their mental and physical health; and that the best predictor of an adult’s life satisfaction is their emotional health as a child. The authors call for a new focus for public policy: not ‘wealth creation’ but ‘wellbeing creation’.


Related Links:
Vox - Origins of happiness: Evidence and policy implications

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 12/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Mental health and relationships 'key to happiness'

Good mental health and having a partner make people happier than doubling their income, a new study has found. The research by the London School of Economics looked at responses from 200,000 people on how different factors impacted their wellbeing. Suffering from depression or anxiety hit individuals hardest, whilst being in a relationship saw the biggest increase in their happiness. The study's co-author said the findings demanded "a new role from the state".


Related Links:
BBC News - Mental health and relationships 'key to happiness'

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage

Andrew Clark webpage

Sarah Flèche webpage

Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

George Ward webpage


News Posted: 12/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

IP Belgium

La pub magazine a bonne press

Consume magazine content increases the well-being of 6%

Professor Paul Dolan of the London School of Economics and Political Science, a world authority on Positive Psychology and happiness, largely inspired this study. The five factors that lead to well-being according to Dolan have been translated into times media for this study: investment of time, reward, information, sharing and connection.


Related Links:
IP Belgium - La pub magazine a bonne press

CEP Wellbeing

Paul Dolan webpage


News Posted: 05/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

El Esquiu

Lecturas para Macri/Readings for Macri

The book flies over aspects featured of the cases of Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Iceland, countries that are located well above in rankings that measure development, welfare or happiness. The report on 2016 world happiness by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs under the auspices of the United Nations, Denmark ranks first, Iceland third, Norway fourth and Sweden tenth.

 

This article was published online by El Esquiu (Spain) on November 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications

World Happiness Report 2016, Volume 1, J. Helliwell, R. Layard and J. Sachs (Eds), March 2016

 


Related Links:
El Esquiu - Lecturas para Macri/Readings for Macri

CEP Wellbeing

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 17/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Press

Emotional scars of bullying take a lifetime to heal

...to those who weren't bullied. And authors of the study by the London School of Economics and Political Science... (No link)

The article was published online by The Press on November 15, 2016

[No link available.]

 

Related publications

Childhood bullying victimization is associated with use of mental health services over five decades: a longitudinal nationally representative cohort study’, S. Evans-Lacko, R. Takizawa, No. Brimblecombe, D. King, M. Knapp, B. Maugham and L. Arsenault, Psychological Medicine, first view, Kenneth S. Kendler and Robin M. Murray (Eds), November 2016

 


Related Links:
CEP Wellbeing

Sara Evans-lacko webpage

Martin Knapp webpage


News Posted: 15/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Evening programme

Martin Knapp is here. Professor of social policy at .. depression, anxiety, bullies themselves never seem to be affected. Professor thank you very much we’ve had a lot of emails on this…

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on November 14, 2016
Link to the interview here

Related publication

Childhood bullying victimization is associated with use of mental health services over five decades: a longitudinal nationally representative cohort study, S. Evans-Lacko, R. Takizawa, No. Brimblecombe, D. King, M. Knapp, B. Maugham and L. Arsenault, Psychological Medicine, first view, Kenneth S. Kendler and Robin M. Murray (Eds), November 2016


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - Evening programme

CEP Wellbeing CEP Urban and Spatial Programme

Martin Knapp webpage

Sara Evans-lacko webpage


News Posted: 14/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Halo Noviny

Velká destrukce

Navíc si mezi sebou přestáváme důvěřovat. Z dat, která v roce 2010 uveřejnil britský ekonom Richard Layard, se ukazuje, že ještě v šedesátých letech 20. století se v USA 60 procent dospělých domnívalo, že může důvěřovat svým nejbližším – tedy rodině. Toto číslo pokleslo na třicet procent v roce 2010. Jedná se o varující signál, že něco není v pořádku..
Additionally, between them we cease to trust. From the data, which in 2010 published a British economist Richard Layard, shows that even in the sixties of the 20th century in the United States 60 percent of adults thought they could trust their closest - a family. That number dropped to thirty percent in 2010. This is a warning signal that something is wrong.

This article appeared in Halo Noviny on 25 October 2016

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

Money Week online

How we can profit from winning the battle against ageing

Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia affect huge numbers of people - a third of all over-80s have some form of dementia, estimates the US CDC. This has two key effects. Firstly, Alzheimer's is a major killer in its own right - the CDC says it is the fifth-biggest killer of over-65s in America. Secondly, even where it is not directly responsible for death, dementia has a devastating impact on the quality of life for sufferers and their carers, and it also drives up care costs sharply. A 2014 report by the London School of Economics and King's College London put the total cost of dementia to the UK at £26.3bn a year.

This article was published online by Money Week on September 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Dementia UK (2nd Edition), Martin Knapp et al, Alzheimer's Society, November 2014

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Why astute CEOs must pay attention to employee mental health issues

Article mentions the 'Wellbeing At Work Event' to be held in London on October 19.
Geoff McDonald is among the speakers at the Wellbeing at Work Event in London on 19 October 2016, a conference for HR professionals, business leaders and consultants.
The event aims to provide a forum for businesses to hear, meet and discuss wellbeing initiatives with leading experts and practitioners. The event will include a programme of influential speakers, debating panels, workshops and networking sessions where delegates can ask questions, exchange ideas and share experiences on a subject that has the potential to change the world of work. Speakers include: Brian Heyworth, global co-head, Financial Institutions Group, HSBC; Morna Dason-Barber, HR director (EMEA), BSI; Lawrence Mitchell, global marketing director and corporate wellbeing programme creator, RBI; Professor Lord Richard Layard, wellbeing director, London School of Economics; Poorna Bell, executive editor and global lifestyle head, The Huffington Post; Sandra Winters, head of wellbeing and corporate responsibility, NHS England; and Louise Aston, wellbeing campaign director, Business in the Community

This article appeared in Personnel Today on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Republic

The age of the never-ending performance review: Justin Fox

There’s also a pretty good chance that these new performance-management practices will have the desired effect, at some companies at least. For the past decade, Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom and a rotating crew of co-authors (most consistently MIT’s John van Reenen) have been documenting that the management best practices developed at high-performing companies and consulting firms and taught at business schools really do make companies more productive and profitable – and that HR practices that effectively identify and reward the most-productive workers are a big part of what separates successful companies from the rest.

This article appeared in the Daily Republic on 28 August 2016 Link to article

Related publications
Management Practices Across Firms and Countries, Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practices: the impact on company performance, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 2, Summer 2005

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway)

Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway)

Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway)

Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Ask Men

We Get Happier As We Get Older, Study Finds

A recent study from the London School of Economics and Political Science suggested that the ages of 23 and 69 are the best in terms of life satisfaction.

This article appeared in Ask Men on 26 August 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing Hannes Schwandt, July 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1229

Related Links
Hannes Schwandt webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 26/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

ToVima Magazine (Greece)

The Essence of Happiness

Returning to the interim UN report for happiness, you can find an interesting proposal in many respects. Found in Chapter 3, which shall be signed by the head of the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, Richard Layard.

This article was published online by ToVima Magazine (Greece) on August 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2016 Update, John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs (Eds), March 2016

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

ESRC Blog

The 'photo-finish effect': when third place winners are happier than second

Laura Kudrna, a London School of Economics scholarship PhD candidate, researches the effects of achievement on happiness, particularly focusing on examples of when greater success - be it financial, academic, romantic, or athletic - do not translate into greater wellbeing for individuals or societies. The study, carried out at the ESRC-funded Centre for Economic Performance, recently attracted national headlines. Here Laura gives us a more detailed overview.

Many of us have goals to be 'better' in some way. But does being better mean that we will be happier? One of the most prominent examples of when greater success does not necessarily bring greater happiness is in the Olympics.

This article was published online in the ESRC blog on August 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Without My medal on My Mind: Counterfactual Thinking and Other Determinants of Athlete Emotions, Paul Dolan, Chloe Foy, Georgios Kavetsos and Laura Kudrna, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1436, June 2016

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Georgios Kavetsos webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

PropertyWire

Researcher blames government not rich foreign buyers for UK housing crisis

Decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land and turn them into something like gold or artworks is to blame for the current housing crisis in the UK rather than foreign buyers, according to a new analysis. The problem is not foreign speculators buying luxury flats as an investment in London which then lie empty but that for more than 30 years not enough homes have been built, says Paul Cheshire, Professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by PropertyWire on August 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Express

Gross National Happiness Index: Here's how to focus on the right issues

Data to calculate Gross National Happiness (GNH) includes asking respondents to measure their perceived quality of life on a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 representing the worst and 10 the best possible outcome. The latest report written by three eminent international experts, Jeffrey Sachs, Richard Layard and John Helliwell, was published in March 2016.

This article was published online by the Financial Express on August 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
World Happiness Report Update 2016, Edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, March 2016

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 06/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog

Reflections on the employer support for higher level skills report

Article by John Denham
For the past 20 years and longer, Ministers of all parties have wanted to see more employers support employees and apprentices to gain higher levels skills and higher education. With strong bi-partisan support in a relatively non-ideological area of policy it seems odd that employer supported higher skills have not become a more important part of the skills and education system. In a recent short project for the Institute of Public Affairs I wanted to examine why public policy had apparently failed. I have an interest: I was Secretary of State at the Department for Innovation and Skills from 2007 to 2009 and, more recently, had proposed radical reforms to higher education finance that depended heavily on the expansion of employer supported degrees.

This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog on August 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
In full: Employer Support for Higher Level Skills Report
CVER website


News Posted: 03/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Courier-Tribune

I've been thrown a U-shaped curve

My best year is supposed to be now. Sixty-nine years old, to be exact. According to the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the two happiest years of life are 23 and 69. In between, we're in despair but things gradually get better as we approach 70. It's a U-shaped graph, with happiness at both ends and the depths of despair in the middle. ''One theory is that the U-shape is driven by unmet aspirations which are painfully felt in midlife but beneficially abandoned later in life,'' Princeton researcher Hannes Schwandt, who led the study, told the London Daily Mail.

This article was published by The Courier-Tribune (North Carolina) on August 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing, Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013

Related links
Hannes Schwandt webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Brexit Beckons: Thinking ahead by leading economists

The June 2016 Brexit referendum saw British voters reject membership of the European Union. Now that a decision has been made, it is time to look forward and find the best solutions for the future of both the UK and the EU. This VoxEU eBook regroups the views of more than a dozen leading economists and specialists on a broad range of issues, from various perspectives.

Trade policy and the City

5. The UK's new trade priorities
Angus Armstrong

6. UK-EU relations after Brexit: What is best for the UK economy?
Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson

This article was published by Vox on 1 August 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
Vox on August 1, 2016
A new eBook: Brexit beckons
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 2016
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.
Brexit and Wage Inequality, Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, CEP Brexit Blog, July 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

Brian Bell webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Stephen Machin webpage
Barbara Petrongolo webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Spiked online

Cameron's legacy? The reign of soft paternalism

... Indeed, the ideological common ground of the political class has perhaps been nowhere more apparent than in the transformation of wellbeing or happiness from being a free individua'ls pursuit into the object of government policy. So committed were New Labour to making people happy that they appointed a so-called happiness tsar, academic Richard Layard, who urged us to 'change our inner attitudes as much as our outward circumstances'. Likewise, Cameron, from the moment he was elected Tory leader in 2005, repeatedly stated 'that there's more to life than money', and that government should focus 'not just on GDP but on GWB - general wellbeing'. In office, Cameron continued to focus on wellbeing, even promoting a 'happiness index' - to measure just how happy we are.

This article was published by Spiked online on July 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
Richard Layard 'Happiness is back', Prospect March 2005, issues 108

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chapelboro.com

Catch criminals with Pokemon go

Silver is Better than Bronze
Obviously, an Olympian wants to go for the gold. But, if you don't win the gold, you will probably be happier to win the bronze instead of a silver medal. That's according to the Centre for Economic Performance.

This was published online by Chapelboro.com on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Without My medal on My Mind: Counterfactual Thinking and Other Determinants of Athlete Emotions, Paul Dolan, Chloe Foy, Georgios Kavetsos and Laura Kudrna, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1436, June 2016

Related links
Georgios Kavetsos webpage
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

Experts from the London School of economics have been looking at the 2012 team

Discussion re London School of economics study looking at satisfaction rates of athletes winning gold, silver and bronze

This programme was broadcast on Sky News on 18 July 2016. Link

Related publications
Without My medal on My Mind: Counterfactual Thinking and Other Determinants of Athlete Emotions, Paul Dolan, Chloe Foy, Georgios Kavetsos and Laura Kudrna, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1436, June 2016

Related links
Georgios Kavetsos webpage
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Leeds

Discussion of LSE study re medallists satisfaction

Discussion of LSE study of Olympians, showing bronze medallists are happier with their result than silver medallists

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Leeds on 18 July 2016. Link

Related publications
Without My medal on My Mind: Counterfactual Thinking and Other Determinants of Athlete Emotions, Paul Dolan, Chloe Foy, Georgios Kavetsos and Laura Kudrna, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1436, June 2016

Related links
Georgios Kavetsos webpage
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Mail Online

Why silver is worse than bronze: Study shows Olympians who come second are more upset than those just happy to get on the podium

Olympians who won the silver medal are less happy than their counterparts who achieved bronze according to the results of a new study of the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Researchers behind the study argue that bronze medallist are happy to have secured a spot on the podium while silver medallists are lamenting about how they could have won gold. However, how happy the medallists are is also influenced by how close their results were compared to the other medal winners. The results of the study was published in June this year as part of a paper from the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article was published by the Mail Online on July 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Without My medal on My Mind: Counterfactual Thinking and Other Determinants of Athlete Emotions, Paul Dolan, Chloe Foy, Georgios Kavetsos and Laura Kudrna, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1436, June 2016

Related links
Georgios Kavetsos webpage
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Why finishing as runner up may be the worst place of all

British athletes heading for the Rio Olympics next month will be dreaming of winning a gold medal. But those who cannot bag the top spot may find they are happier with a bronze than coming second. For those who do end up with silver, it might have been better for their mental state if they had been soundly beaten - sometimes, it seems, it is better to lose by a lot than a little. New research suggests that athletes' perception of their achievements is dependent on what they think might have been. A team at the Centre for Economic Performance, based at the London School of Economics, examined the perceived happiness levels of Team Great Britain medallists at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

This article was published by The Guardian on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Without My medal on My Mind: Counterfactual Thinking and Other Determinants of Athlete Emotions, Paul Dolan, Chloe Foy, Georgios Kavetsos and Laura Kudrna, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1436, June 2016

Related links
Georgios Kavetsos webpage
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Tim Harford - The Undercover Economist blog

Did economists fail us over Brexit?

You may have heard the jokes about economists equivocating and squabbling. Ronald Reagan had the best one, about an edition of Trivial Pursuit designed for economists: ''There are 100 questions, 3,000 answers.''

John Van Reenen, the outgoing director of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, doesn't think the profession should be too down on itself. ''I'm proud of what we did'', he says, and had economists engaged more ''in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference.'' Van Reenen has a point; there is a limit to how much experts can achieve by simply presenting the facts.

This article was published online via Tim Harford - The Undercover Economist blog on July 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of papers published in the CEP Brexit Analysis Series can be seen herer

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Take the path to healthy weight loss

Another from the London School of Economics found that people who regularly walked briskly for half an hour or more had smaller waists than those who went to the gym or did tougher sports such as jogging and rugby.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 July 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Leader (Sri Lanka)

The good, the bad and the ugly of Brexit

Overall, Brexit is likely to have a negative impact on inward FDI. New empirical analysis by Center for Economic Performance implies that leaving the EU will reduce FDI inflows to the UK by around 22 per cent. Such losses of investment will damage UK productivity and could lower real incomes by 3.4 per cent. This is larger than our estimates of the static income losses from trade, which are 2.6 per cent even under our 'pessimistic scenario' (Dhingra et al, 2016). Case studies of cars and finance also show that Brexit would lower EU-related output of goods and services, and erode the UK's ability to negotiate concessions from regulations on EU related transactions.

This article was published online by The Sunday Leader (Sri Lanka) on July 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.02, March 2016
See Technical Appendix to CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.2 here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagens Industri (Sweden)

Ekonomiprofessor räknar med fortsatt fall

...resultatet av folkomrostningen. Gianluca Benigno, ekonomiprofessor vid London School of Economics, sager att han forst...
...the result of the referendum. Gianluca Benigno, economics professor at the London School of Economics, says that he first...

This article was published online by Dagens Industri (Sweden) on June 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related Links
Gianluca Benigno webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily News Egypt

LuxLeaks, law and justice all part of tax scandal trial in Luxembourg

The LuxLeaks papers clearly illustrate that Luxembourg’s most important export product is tax avoidance. That is why French economics researcher Gabriel Zucman says that Luxembourg is “the center of European tax evasion.” Zucman, who has lectured at the London School of Economics since 2014, describes the grand duchy as an “economic colony of the international financial industry.”

This article appeared in Daily News Egypt on 28 June 2016. Link to article

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Katadata (Indonesia)

Inggris Tinggalkan Uni Eropa, Pasar Keuangan Dunia Guncang

The decision left the United Kingdom society of the European Union does indeed have fueled new uncertainty. ''Businessmen reluctant to take new decisions or affect investments, because of the uncertainty for the future,'' said the Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, John Van Reenen, as reported by the New York Times, Friday (24/6).

This article was published online by Katadata News (Indonesia) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

UK areas with stagnant wages are most anti-EU

A feeling of anger and frustration with the European Union is strongest in areas of Britain that have seen wages stagnate in recent years, according to research commissioned by the Financial Times. Two leading labour market economists, Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, found a statistically significant link between wage growth, or the lack of it, and the proportion of the vote secured by the anti-EU UK Independence Party in the 2015 general election.

This article was published by the Financial Times on June 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brian Bell and Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE United States Politics and Policy blog (USAPP)

How some people can maximize their happiness even though they are not actively pursuing it

Article by Marc Fleurbaey and Hannes Schwandt
One of people's most important goals tends to be the pursuit of happiness. In a new survey which measures people's subjective well-being (another way of thinking about happiness), the authors find that 90 percent of people are seeking to maximize their subjective well-being, though they are willing to sacrifice some of this in the short term to benefit their families and for their long-term well-being, They also find that the actual subjective well-being of those who are working to maximize it is lower than those who are not, something that they attribute to both disadvantage of opportunity and sacrificing of well-being in the short term to help others and themselves in the future.

This article was published online by the LSE United States Politics and Policy (USAPP) blog on June 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Do People Seek to Maximize Their Subjective Well-Being?, Marc Fleurbaey and Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1391, November 2015

Related links
Hannes Schwandt webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Consultancy.uk

Charles-Edouard Bouée reflects on the impact of a Brexit

And while some experts argue that FDI is high in the UK due to a favourable business environment, others, such as the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, suggest that ''being fully in the single market'' is what ''makes the UK an attractive export platform for multinationals as they do not face the potentially large costs from tariff and non-tariff barriers when exporting to the rest of the EU.''

This article was published online by Consultancy.uk on June 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Week

The EU isn't snookering Britain. Britain is hoodwinking the EU

Britain never joined the euro currency union, freeing it of all sorts of complicated policy commitments that the rest of the EU is obliged to abide by. But despite staying on the pound, Britain still has full access to Europe's ''single market''. Essentially, this single market allows all EU member countries to move goods, services, capital, and people between each other without barrier, tax, or tariff. ''That single market is about half a billion people,'' [John] Van Reenen said. It's an open question just how much benefit national economies derive from being able to participate in this sort of free trade. But they clearly derive some benefit. And Van Reenen's group thinks it's a lot.

This article was published online by The Week on June 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the final assessment, John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, June 2016

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Reader's Digest

5 Scientific Reasons to Feel Optimistic on a Rainy Day

Your perception of the weather is what brings about negative feelings, the study authors suspect. “If it is sunny every day you get used to it and the sunshine doesn’t make you any happier,” Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics, said to the Telegraph

This article appeared in Reader's Digest on 6 June 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Professor Richard Layard interview

Professor Richard Layard discusses importance of parenting classes on child rearing, resilience and avoidance of self-absorption as the key to life satisfaction and happiness

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 6 June 2016. Link

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Nature versus nurture in obesity: New evidence from adoptee data

Article by Joan Costa-i-Font, Mireia Jofre-Bonet, Julian Le Grand 02 June 2016
Obesity, particularly in children, is a major health concern in many developed economies, where it presents a costly risk to health services. Any policy response must take into account the inter-generational transmission of overweightness and obesity to children. This column uses evidence from the Health Survey of England to assess the extent to which nature and nurture factors play a role in the overweightness of children. It finds that any effective policy action must tackle parental overweightness to lower rates of overweightness in children.

This article was published by Vox on June 2, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Vertical Transmission of Overweight: Evidence From English Adoptees, Joan Costa Font, Mireia Jofre-Bonet and Julian Le Grand, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1324, January 2015

Related Links
Joan Costa Font is an Alumni of the Wellbeing Programme.


News Posted: 02/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Welingelichte Kringen (Holland)

Waarom zoveel mensen kinderen willen, terwijl ze er helemaal niet gelukkig van worden

Why do so many people want children while they themselves are not happy at all in spirit?
Also, we have a selective memory. When we look back on our experiences, we remember the highlights, such as the first smile of a child, says economist Nattavudh Powdthavee of the London School of Economics - a phenomenon known as anchoring. By this form of self deception we often overestimate how lucky we were of children or of other things we ever had.

This article was published online by Welingelichte Kringen on June 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
Think having children will make you happy?, Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Psychologist, Vol.22, April 2009.

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Nick Powdthavee CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The science of resilience

Michael Pluess and Richard Layard interviewed about resilience and mental health.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4 on May 31, 2016
Link to interview here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Michael Pluess webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' programme

Exams and the mental health of children. A community approach to suicide prevention

As every summer, exams are in the news. We look at whether the pressure to do well in exams is having an effect on children's mental health. We speak to experts from Education, Psychology and Economics who are now working together to address the wider issue of the effect of Britain's current education system on our children's wellbeing.

CEPs Richard Layard interviewed on the BBC Radio 4 programme 'All in the Mind' on May 24, 2016
Link to broadcast here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Sajid Javid: Brexit warnings are 'not a conspiracy' - it will cost 500,000 UK jobs

Responding to Hilton’s article, Javid said: “Steve is entitled to his view … the central issue here is that economically, we are far better off being part of this single market … Now you have the Bank of England, the IMF [International Monetary Fund], the OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development], the London School of Economics, the OBR [Office for Budget Responsibility], the IFS [Institute for Fiscal Studies], every one of our allies, every one of our trading partners and that is not a conspiracy, that’s a consensus about what would happen if we left the EU.”

This article appeared in City AM on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Liberation technology: mobile phones and political mobilisation in Africa

Article by Marco Manacorda and Andrea Tesei
Digital technologies have been widely used for political activism in recent years, including during the Arab Spring, the Occupy Wall Street movement, and the Indignados movement in Spain. This column reports research showing that the growing use of mobile phones in Africa leads to more political protests during recessions and periods of national crisis. The mobilising potential of digital technologies is more pronounced in autocratic countries and those where the raditional media are under state control, suggesting that this technology may play a key role in fostering political freedom.

This article was published online by Vox on May 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Liberation Technology: Mobile Phones and Political Mobilization in Africa, Marco Manacorda and Andrea Tesei, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1419, March 2016

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC 1

Lose Weight for Love

Behavioural specialist Paul Dolan features on documentary following couples locked in a cycle of overeating

This programme was broadcast on BBC 1 on 18 May 2016. Link

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Herald Scotland

Chancellor George Osborne warns on Brexit conspiracy theories as Ed Balls and Sir Vince Cable join EU debate

"They join a line of observers that range from the OECD to the London School of Economics to the eight former US treasury secretaries to the president of the United States of America, to the prime minister of Japan, to the leaders of Australia and New Zealand," said the Chancellor. "Indeed every member of the G20, every one of our major trading partners and every major international financial institution has been unequivocal that leaving the EU would come at an economic cost."

This article appeared in the Herald Scotland on 16 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications

See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

CEP State of Working Britain blog

SWOB 10: EU-turn if you want to. Brexit and immigration

State of Working Britain blog, article posted by Jonathan Wadsworth
Immigration has for some years been the uppermost worry among the issues thought to be facing Britain in many opinion polls so it - or rather people's perceptions of its extent and its effects - is almost certainly one of the key issues that will influence the upcoming vote on whether to stay or remain in the EU. A new report from the CEP looks into this. Workers have had a rough ride in recent times. Real (inflation adjusted) wages fell by around 10% in the years after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing austerity. Such a sustained fall in pay is unprecedented in British post-war history.

This article was posted online in the CEP State of Working Britain blog on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
The State of Working Britain blog webpage


News Posted: 11/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Bangor Daily News

Wealth and the Thorny Issues of Envy and Guilt

This envy is the root of the paradox of happiness uncovered by scholars like economist Richard Layard. It is a puzzle to understand how in the post-World War II era citizens of Western nations could experience growing real consumption and no change in happiness.

This article appeared in Bangor Daily News on 8 May 2016. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Yorkshire Post

Obama's arrival in UK brings a boost for the Remain campaign

US PRESIDENT Barack Obama is expected to give a major boost to the Remain campaign tomorrow by backing David Cameron's call for Britain to stay in the European Union.
Earlier this week the Treasury published analysis suggesting Britain's departure from the European Union would cost households on average £4,300 a year. ... The Treasury forecast suggests Britain's GDP would be cut by 6.2 per cent but economists at the LSEs Centre for Economic Performance put the figure at between 6.3 and 9.5 per cent. Swati Dhingra, from the LSE, said: "The Treasury Report looks at the realistic options the UK will face after Brexit - and the cost of each. It takes a conservative approach to the potential costs."

This article was published online by The Yorkshire Post on April 21, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Free Lunch: Sizing up Little England

This is well illustrated by the excellent Brexit study from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, which we reported last month.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Free Lunch: Sizing up Little England

This is well illustrated by the excellent Brexit study from the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, which we reported last month.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

UK Economy: Nuts and bolts of Treasury's view of Brexit

The Treasury will publish details of its long-term economic assessment of EU membership on Britain's economy and prosperity on Monday, but the approach the Treasury has taken is clear from a George Osborne article in the Times. ... The Treasury's work is similar to the dynamic model of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the most complete academic analysis of Brexit to date.

This article was published by The Financial Times on April 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Benefits Canada

How would Brexit impact the financial industry?

Whether Britain loses access to the single market depends on the terms of any exit. Under the optimistic scenario, Britain would join the European Economic Area as non-member countries like Norway and Switzerland have done, says Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. Membership in that area provides full single-market access. Under the pessimistic scenario, Britain wouldn't join the European Economic Area. ''Then there would be bilateral negotiations between Britain and the EU over what kind of access Britain has,'' says Sampson.

This article was published online by Benefits Canada on April 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Eurasia Review

Regulation To Blame For England's Surging House Prices – Analysis, By Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

New causal evidence on the impact of supply constraints on house prices shows land use regulation to be a major culprit of England’s current housing affordability crisis. Absent regulation, house prices would be lower by over a third and considerably less volatile. Young households are the obvious losers, yet macroeconomic stability is also impaired and productivity may suffer from constrained labour supply to the thriving cities where demand is highest.

This article appeared on Eurasia Review on 11 April 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror

Why a brisk walk beats other exercise if you want to keep your body healthy

And doing it for five days a week is more effective than any other form of exercise for shedding the pounds, a study by researchers at the London School of Economics concluded

This article appeared in the Daily Mirror on 10 April 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Science Daily

Overall sense of satisfaction shrinks when inequality widens

Co-authors of "Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World" are Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, associate professor in economics and strategy at the Said Business School, Oxford University, and Nattavudh Powdthavee, principal research fellow with the Wellbeing Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared on Science Daily on 6 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World Richard V. Burkhauser, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Nattavudh Powdthavee, January 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1400

Related Links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage

News Posted: 06/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Newswise

Overall Sense of Satisfaction Shrinks When Inequality Widens

Co-authors of “Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World” are Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, associate professor in economics and strategy at the Said Business School, Oxford University, and Nattavudh Powdthavee, principal research fellow with the Wellbeing Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared on Newswise on 6 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World Richard V. Burkhauser, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Nattavudh Powdthavee, January 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1400

Related Links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
News Posted: 06/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Why Does Happiness Inequality Matter?

“Inequality of well-being provides a better measure of the distribution of welfare than is provided by income and wealth,” assert the World Happiness Report authors, who hail from the University of British Columbia, the London School of Economics, and the Earth Institute.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 6 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
World Happiness Report Update 2016 Edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Science Daily

Overall sense of satisfaction shrinks when inequality widens

Cornell's Richard Burkhauser has co-authored (with Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nattavudh Powdthavee of CEP) a research paper that contends a person's satisfaction drops as the percentage of overall income held by the very rich in a country rises. However, the authors say, this drop is minimal as long as the average person's income is also rising.

This article was published online by Science Daily on April 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World', Richard V. Burkhauser, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nattavudh Powdthavee, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1400, January 2016

Related links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 06/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Excellent News: US Unemployment Rate Rises

To walk back into a bit of theory here about the labour market. This is from my old Professor, Richard Layard. He was teaching this to undergraduates in the 1980s so it’s hardly a new finding in the slightest. “The rationale for welfare-to-work is simple. If you pay people to be inactive, there will be more inactivity. So you should pay them instead for being active – for either working or training to improve their employability….

This article appeared in Forbes on 2 April 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider Singapore

A former McKinsey partner shares 7 techniques that will energize you when you're feeling burnt out at work

As Webb notes, “using a huge cache of British data, London School of Economics professor Nattavudh Powdthavee found that meaningful personal interactions with others had as much impact on well-being as an extra $142,000 of income a year.”

This article appeared in Business Insider Singapore on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

Minimum wage raised, critics downplay effect

The new increased amount compares with an 8.50 euro minimum wage rate in Germany and almost 9.70 euros in France. In Britain, where unemployment is relatively low at around 5%, large wage inequalities persist and London School of Economics professor Alan Manning described the NLW as “more symbolic” than anything else. “It’s significant but I don’t think one should exaggerate its significance,” he said.

This article appeared in The Gulf Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Also in:
The Gulf Today
Jamaica Observer

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

Minimum wage raised, critics downplay effect

The new increased amount compares with an 8.50 euro minimum wage rate in Germany and almost 9.70 euros in France. In Britain, where unemployment is relatively low at around 5%, large wage inequalities persist and London School of Economics professor Alan Manning described the NLW as “more symbolic” than anything else. “It’s significant but I don’t think one should exaggerate its significance,” he said.

This article appeared in The Gulf Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Also in:
The Gulf Today
Jamaica Observer

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

The GDP-Higher Ed link

Expansion of higher education systems around the world is likely to continue, according to a study that found a strong correlation between opening universities and significantly increased economic growth. An analysis of data on 14,870 higher education institutions in 78 countries over six decades, presented at the annual conference of the Royal Economic Society, reveals that doubling the number of universities in a region results in a 4.7 percent increase in gross domestic product per capita in that region within five years, on average. John Van Reenen, professor of economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Anna Valero, a research economist at LSE's Center for Economic Performance, found that opening universities had a positive impact not only in the ''home'' region but also in neighboring areas.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on March 31, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
Growth multiplier: how university expansion increases national income, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, March 24, 2016

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

The GDP-Higher Ed link

Expansion of higher education systems around the world is likely to continue, according to a study that found a strong correlation between opening universities and significantly increased economic growth. An analysis of data on 14,870 higher education institutions in 78 countries over six decades, presented at the annual conference of the Royal Economic Society, reveals that doubling the number of universities in a region results in a 4.7 percent increase in gross domestic product per capita in that region within five years, on average. John Van Reenen, professor of economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Anna Valero, a research economist at LSE's Center for Economic Performance, found that opening universities had a positive impact not only in the ''home'' region but also in neighboring areas.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on March 31, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
Growth multiplier: how university expansion increases national income, Anna Valero and John Van Reenen, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, March 24, 2016

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Cornell Chronicle

Top-heavy dispersal of wealth linked to lower life evaluations

A research paper by Richard Burkhauser, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nattavudh Powdthavee contends that a person's satisfaction drops as the percentage of overall income held by the very rich in a country rises. However, the authors say, this drop is minimal as long as the average person's income is also rising.

This article was published by the Cornell Chronicle on March 31, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World', Richard V. Burkhauser, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nattavudh Powdthavee, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1400, January 2016

Related links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

moneyexpert

CBI: EU exit could cost £100bn and 1m jobs

The Centre for Economic Performance at LSE released a report last week that also states that British living standards and trade will be damaged if an ''out'' vote wins the referendum. In their research, the body states that the best case scenario would still see household incomes hit by around £850 per year. The organisation went on to say that this figure could rise to as much as £6,400 per household if trade and productivity are more severely impacted; this represents a fall not seen since the peak of the financial crisis in 2008-09.

This article was published online by moneyexpert on March 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, March 2016.
Download the accompanying Technical Paper here
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

moneyexpert

CBI: EU exit could cost £100bn and 1m jobs

The Centre for Economic Performance at LSE released a report last week that also states that British living standards and trade will be damaged if an ''out'' vote wins the referendum. In their research, the body states that the best case scenario would still see household incomes hit by around £850 per year. The organisation went on to say that this figure could rise to as much as £6,400 per household if trade and productivity are more severely impacted; this represents a fall not seen since the peak of the financial crisis in 2008-09.

This article was published online by moneyexpert on March 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, March 2016.
Download the accompanying Technical Paper here
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

EU Referendum - Reality check: would Brexit cost every household £850?

The UK leaving the European Union would knock £850 off the average UK household's income, according to a report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics. And that's its conclusion taking an ''optimistic'' view. The pessimistic conclusion from the report is £1,700 per household.

This article was published online by BBC News on March 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, March 2016
Download the accompanying Technical Paper here
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

MBN - Market Business News

Danes happiest on Earth Britons a bit miserable Americans in between

The Danes are the happiest people on Earth, followed by the Swiss, while Britons are comparatively miserable among the rich nations, but happier than the French and Italians. The only European countries happier than the Americans are the small northern ones. The World Happiness Report 2016 Update ranks 156 nations by their levels of happiness. The latest update was released today in Rome in advance of the United Nations International Day of Happiness, 20th March.

This article was published online by Market Business News (MBN) on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
World Happiness Report Update 2016. Edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN)

CEP Special Reports

The SDSN is pleased to present the 2016 World Happiness Report in two volumes - the 2016 Update and the Special Rome Edition, including an update on national rankings and new analyses. A key focus this year is on the inequality of happiness within and among countries around the world. The Report argues that inequality of well-being provides a broader measure of equality than is provided by measures of inequality in the distribution of income and wealth.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Budget 2016: highly questionable whether the academisation of all schools is good policy

All schools will become academies, announced George Osborne in his 2016 Budget speech. But the impact of such mass rollout on students' performance is uncertain, explain Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin.

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Academies 2: the New Batch', Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
'The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education', Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2 Autumn 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Times

We should ban smartphones from schools

Last year a London School of Economics study found that banning phones from school boosts exam results and benefits low-achieving and low-income pupils the most.

This article was published by The Times on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Abilities Magazine (online)

Better than the gym

Not exactly, but researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science did find that walkers tend to be thinner than gym-goers. In an analysis of 50,000 people over the age of 13, those who did at least 30 minutes of brisk walking per day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than people who did high intensity workouts.

This article was published online by Abilities Magazine on March 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Reuters - Video

Brexit fact check: Who's telling the truth?

With both campaigns heating up ahead of June's referendum on EU membership, Reuters Jacob Greaves has spoken to a leading economist - CEP's Thomas Sampson - about the truth behind some political claims.

This video is available to view on Reuters Video (UK). The video was posted on March 10, 2016.
Link to filmed interview here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage
CEP Brexit 2016 Series webpage


News Posted: 10/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Nouse

Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Nouse

Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Nouse

Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

U.S. News and World Report

Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

If the UK leaves the EU, any path it chooses would carry economic costs

Article by Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson
All scenarios embody very different visions of the country's future place in the world, write Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. To make an informed decision on the merits of leaving the European Union (EU), UK voters need to know more about what the government would do following Brexit. Just as the parties put forward policy manifestos in the run-up to an election, they should publish their plans for a post-Brexit world before the referendum.

This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Transport infrastructure: Life in the slow lane

Sometimes there is no option but to build big. On many London Underground lines—which already run as many as 30 trains an hour—it is hard to make incremental improvements; the only sensible way to create new capacity is to build a new line, as the government is doing now with Crossrail, an east-to-west London link. Still, it has mostly ignored the recommendations of the Eddington review, says John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, instead focusing its energy on larger, shinier projects.

This article appeared in the Economist on 5 March 2016. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Active Age

Can brisk walking help one lose weight?

But how much of a difference can brisk walking make in comparison to other forms of exercise? Using measurements based on body mass index (BMI) - ratio of height to weight, researcher Dr. Grace Lordan a specialist in health economics at the London School of Economics says the difference can be almost twice as great (1.8 units for walking and 1 unit for gym exercising).

This article was published online by The Active Age on March 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

As the rich get richer everyone else gets less happy

Article by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nick Powdthavee
Despite growing concern over the economic and social implications of the increasing concentration of wealth among a wealthy elite, we continue to know very little about how the growing gap in wealth and income of the top 1% influences the wellbeing of the other 99%. Together with Richard Burkhauser at Cornell University, we decided to find out. We wanted to estimate how the rising income of the 1% relates to average life satisfaction, even where household income and a country's GDP remain constant. We started our research by asking if income inequality at the very top really matters to the life satisfaction of the average person in a country - the results show that there is a correlation between the two.

This article was published by The Guardian on February 16, 2016
Link to article here

See Also
February 18, 2016
LSE Business Review
As the richest get richer, everyone else gets less happy, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nick Powdthavee.

Related publications
'Top Incomes and Human Well-Being Around the World', Richard V. Burkhauser, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nattavudh Powdthavee, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1400, January 2016

Related links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Forget about a mental health revolution without new cash

One mental health success has been the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies talking therapy programme, evidence based, tightly costed and until now ringfenced. By getting nearly 5% of its patients back to work, it pays for itself. But those savings to the DWP don’t flow back to mental health. The sheer dogged determination of the economist and campaigner Professor Richard Layard has forced this through, says Charlesworth.

This article appeared in The Guardian on 16 February 2016. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

The key to beating a midlife crisis? Don't worry about being happy

Professor Paul Dolan, a specialist in behavioural science at LSE, says there is currently too much emphasis placed upon traditional self-improvement methods, such as weight loss and career ambition, and too little on simple pleasures. "Don't pay attention to how happy things make you," Dolan told The Observer. "Instead, find things which make you feel good, and do more of them. A long-term sustainable impact on your life can be achieved, but not by sitting about thinking if only I was slimmer, fitter, richer, then I would be happier. It's not going to happen, so you'll still be miserable."

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on 8 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Why the little things in life are the key to happiness: Doing more of what gives you pleasure is the simple solution to a mid-life crisis

Professor Paul Dolan, the man behind the study, says his subjects were asked how satisfied they were with their lives rather than how happy they felt. And now he says the way to beat the blues is to embrace the small pleasures of life.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 8 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Banish those midlife blues – the secret to happiness starts with one small step

Paul Dolan, author of the bestselling Happiness By Design and professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, said patterns can be broken by taking care to enjoy the little things in life. “I think too much is being made of the U-shape dip [that happens in the 40s and 50s],” he said. “It’s all about actually changing what you do to do more of the things we like – listen to music, go outdoors, meet friends and new people. If everybody did that every day we’d be a lot happier.”

This article appeared in The Observer on 7 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

There is no science to being happy, however we try to measure it

Then, in 2005, Lord Richard Layard of the London School of Economics published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, and inaugurated a new era of state-backed emotional inquiry.

This article appeared in the Independent on 6 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Catholic

How to achieve happiness

The economist Richard Layard wrote a book called Happiness (Penguin, 2005) and points out that happiness has not increased since the 1950s, despite the fact that, in real terms, average salaries have more than doubled, we have more cars, bigger houses, a shorter working week, more holidays and better health.

This article appeared in Irish Catholic on 4 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Prof Paul Dolan interview

....on happiness is Paul Dolan is professor of behavioural science the London school of economics and author of happiness by design alone had...

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 5 Live on 2 February 2016 Link

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Stylist

'It's not about how to get things done, It's about how to get the right things done': how to regain control of time when life gets busy

“The trouble is, as you get richer, you attach more value to your time, so it feels scarcer,” says Paul Dolan, professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, and the author of Happiness By Design: Finding Pleasure And Purpose In Everyday Life. “This attitude heaps the pressure on that small window of time to perform.”

This article appeared in the Stylist on 2 February 2016 Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

City A.M.

How to make a success of your failed New Year resolutions, by Paul Dolan

Despite big ambitions to change behaviour through determination alone, HSBC’s research showed that 60 per cent of people blamed a lack of willpower for failing to achieve their resolutions. Indeed, there is significant evidence to suggest that contextual cues play one of the most important roles in changing our behaviour. So design power is more effective than willpower.

This article appeared in City A.M. on 1 February 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 01/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

On Wall Street Online

HSBC Combines Data and Behavioral Analysis for New App

HSBC is aiming for the former with its new financial management app, called Nudge. Released last week, the app is being trialed with just 500 customers in the U.K., as the bank is being extra careful to work out any kinks before rolling the app out to its wider customer base, said HSBC spokeswoman Jenna Brown. The app uses "nudge theory" to encourage customers to make small, regular financial decisions that will result in a change to long-term spending habits.

This article appeared in On Wall Street Online on 1 February 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 01/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Golf Punk

Golf is good for you

Shocking new research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) has found that regular walking is more effective at keeping weight down than vigorous activities such as going to the gym.

This article appeared in Golf Punk on 28 January 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Golf Club Management (Online)

Regular golf is the best way to keep your weight down, according to new research

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) has found that regular walking is more effective at keeping weight down than vigorous activities such as going to the gym. The walking needs to be brisk and the research applies to men over the age of 50 and women of all ages.

This article appeared in Golf Club Management (Online) on 28 January 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Golf Club Management (Online)

Regular golf is the best way to keep your weight down, according to new research

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) has found that regular walking is more effective at keeping weight down than vigorous activities such as going to the gym. The walking needs to be brisk and the research applies to men over the age of 50 and women of all ages.

This article appeared in Golf Club Management (Online) on 28 January 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

El Candelero Tecnológico

¿Nuevos retos para 2016? Microsoft puede ayudarte a lograrlos

Como afirma el doctor Paul Dolan, experto en Ciencia del Comportamiento de la London School of Economics, “cuando nos fijamos propósitos, debemos partir de qué va a hacernos felices más que en qué deberíamos hacer.

This article appeared in El Candelero Tecnológico on 25 January 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 25/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

PR Week

Showcase: Sir David Attenborough promotes clean energy at COP21

Last June a clutch of British grandees including former UK chief scientist Sir David King and professor Richard Layard of the LSE launched the Global Apollo Program (GAP).

This article appeared in PR Week on 20 January 2016. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

News Journal online (Delaware, USA)

$450M Powerball: sixth-largest jackpot in US history

Wednesday nights’ Powerball drawing is worth approximately $450 million. That’s the sixth-largest lottery jackpot in U.S. history, according to the Multi-State Lottery Association, which runs Powerball in 44 states. … That kind of money can change a person’s life in more than just the expected ways. A study done in 2014 by two professors at British universities found that people who had come into a windfall after winning a large lottery frequently changed the way they vote and became more conservative. “We find that the larger is their lottery win, the greater is that person’s subsequent tendency, after controlling for other influences, to switch their political views from left to right,” according to the study, done by Nattavudh Powdthavee, of the London School of Economics, and Andrew Oswald, of the University of Warwick.

This article appeared on News Journal Online (Delaware, USA) link to article

Related publications
Does Money Make People Right-Wing and Inegalitarian? A Longitudinal Study of Lottery Winners Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew J. Osald, February 2014

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Phil Williams show

Guy Michaels discusses his study of the economic impact of floods and likelihood of people moving from flooding areas.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 5 Live on January 5, 2016
Link to interview here
(43 mins in)

Related publications
'Flooded Cities', Adriana Kocornik-Mina, Thomas K.J. McDermott, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1398, December 2015

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Linking work and health: the What Works Centre for Wellbeing

Cross-cutting capabilities: This project is being led by Professor Lord Richard Layard of the London School of Economics and will assess and develop methods of understanding how policy and practice can affect wellbeing. It will look at the effect of different factors on wellbeing, analyse the impact of wellbeing on other outcomes and develop a framework for cost effectiveness analysis with wellbeing as the measure of benefit. It will also carry out a “life course” analysis, looking at how important early life is to wellbeing in later years.

This article appeared on Personnel Today on 5 January 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Leicester Mercury

When walking briskly beats a gym workout

... gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Leicester Mercury on January 4, 2016
(no link available)

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Top Treasury civil servant Sir Nick Macpherson to step down in April

The Treasury's top civil servant, Sir Nicholas Macpherson, is set to stand down in April, having led the Government department for over a decade. George Osborne, the Chancellor, said he would ''miss'' Sir Nicholas, 56, who he described as one of the ''outstanding public servants of his generation''. ... The Eton and Balliol college, Oxford educated civil servant has held various public sector roles since 1985, after starting a career as an economist at the Confederation of British Industry and Peat Marwick Consulting, which was absorbed by KPMG. Sir Nicholas is a visiting professor at King's College London, and chairs the Policy Committee of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He said that it had been ''a privilege to lead the Treasury through an extraordinary period''.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on January 4, 2016
Link to article here

See also
Accountancy Age
Macpherson to leave Treasury after 10 years in Permanent Secretary role

Related links
Centre for Economic Performance Policy Committee info.
News Posted: 04/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Bangor Daily News

Will You Be Happy in the New Year?

By the end of the 20th Century, some economists were beginning to question the logical problems that this had led economics to and started talking about happiness again. Prominent among these was Richard Layard of the London School of Economics. Layard’s 2005 book, Happiness: Lessons from a New Science is an important resource for new thinking about happiness.

This article appeared in the Bangor Daily News on 2 January 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Western Mail (Cardiff)

These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

News

Dr Joan Costa Font commenting on the Catalan elections.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on December 21, 2015
Link to programme here
Also broadcast on 6 other BBC outlets

See also
NPR/National Public Radio
Link
Also broadcast on 9 other stations

Related links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health Management.org

Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Saga Magazine

Ten good reasons to go for a winter walk

2. It's better for you than the gym
Well, that's the conclusion of researchers from the London School of Economics, who claim regular brisk walking is the best exercise for maintaining a healthy weight. Having analysed data from the annual Health Survey for England, researchers found that adults who regularly walk briskly for more than 30 minutes tend to have a lower body mass index and smaller waist than those who take part in sports or exercise at the gym. The results were particularly pronounced in the over-50s.

This article appeared in Saga Magazine on 21 December 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Center for American Progress

Helping firms by helping employees? Work-life balance in America

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, Daniela Scur and John Van Reenen
There is a long history of debate within business, policy, and economic literature regarding whether firms can improve their performance by treating their employees well. One view is that policies to improve employees' work-life balance - such as working from home, part-time working, child care support, and generous maternity leave - are both expensive and often counterproductive for firms. For example, the U.S. internet firm Yahoo famously banned working from home in February 2013, stating in its leaked e-mail that ''Speed and quality are often sacrificed when working at home.'' In this view, improved employee work-life balance will come at the expense of substantially lower profits for most firms. An alternative view is that improving employees' work-life balance may simultaneously raise firms' profits. For example, the U.S. airline JetBlue allows its call-center employees to work flexible hours from home in order to attract highly skilled employees, such as college educated women with young children, so that JetBlue can offer superior customer service.

This article was published by the Center for American Progress on December 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Helping firms by helping employees? Work-life balance in America, Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, Daniela Scur and John Van Reenen, Center for American Progress, December 2015

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Daniela Scur webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage


News Posted: 18/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph

Five simple habits that will make you feel happier

Happiness expert Prof Paul Dolan, a professor at the London School of Economics, recently outlined five tips for feeling more content.

This article was published online by the Telegraph on December 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Minnesota Star Tribune

Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds

While many studies have shown that Medicare gets a good deal in Rochester, Duluth and Minneapolis, new work from four economists suggests that private insurers in those cities pay noticeably more for care.

This article was published online by the Minnesota Star Tribune on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

See also
Thursday 16 December
Duluth News Tribune
Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds
Bloomberg Business
Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds
Scitechdaily
Hospital price study reveals 'mind-boggling' variation across USA
Pharmacy Choice
Hospital price study reveals 'mind-boggling' variation across USA
HealthCanal
Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for privately insured
Carnegie Mellon University
Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for privately insured

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Minnesota Star Tribune

Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds

While many studies have shown that Medicare gets a good deal in Rochester, Duluth and Minneapolis, new work from four economists suggests that private insurers in those cities pay noticeably more for care.

This article was published online by the Minnesota Star Tribune on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

See also
Thursday 16 December
Duluth News Tribune
Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds
Bloomberg Business
Health care in Minnesota not always a bargain, study finds
Scitechdaily
Hospital price study reveals 'mind-boggling' variation across USA
Pharmacy Choice
Hospital price study reveals 'mind-boggling' variation across USA
HealthCanal
Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for privately insured
Carnegie Mellon University
Researchers find hospital prices vary significantly for privately insured

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais (Spain)

La digitalización y la robotización no aparecen en el PIB

Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (2014) teachers at the University of Uppsala (Sweden) and the LSE, have written a study called 'Robots at Work' that has examined the effects of the use of robots in 14 manufacturing sectors, services and even agriculture and concludes that robots increase the productivity of labour without effecting so much wages.

This article was published online by El Pais (Spain) on December 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais (Spain)

La digitalización y la robotización no aparecen en el PIB

Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (2014) teachers at the University of Uppsala (Sweden) and the LSE, have written a study called 'Robots at Work' that has examined the effects of the use of robots in 14 manufacturing sectors, services and even agriculture and concludes that robots increase the productivity of labour without effecting so much wages.

This article was published online by El Pais (Spain) on December 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! France

Minceur : la marche vigoureuse meilleure que le sport

L'etude est parue dans la revue Risk Analysis a l'initiative de deux specialistes de l'economie de sante, le Dr Grace Lordan (London School of Economics and Political Science, UK) et le Dr Debayan Pakrashi (School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia).

This article was published online by Yahoo! France on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Lincolnshire Echo

Every brisk step counts towards improving your health - so get walking

... your gym membership for some good walking shoes. Research from the London School of Economics and Political Science ...

This article was published by the Lincolnshire Echo on December 10, 2015

Also in
Newcastle Journal

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Irish News

You really can walk your way to better health

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) found that people aged over 50, and women of all ages, who regularly walked briskly for more than 30 minutes at a time, had a lower body mass index (BMI) and smaller waists than those who say they favour other forms of exercise, including gym workouts, cycling and swimming.

This article was published by The Irish News on December 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Independent

Ditch the gym: Why walking the weight off is the way to go this Christmas

Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective — in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases — than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes. “People are also more likely to get walking ‘right’, as compared to gym exercises — it’s easier to know if you’re working to a moderate level with walking than with other exercises,” Dr Lordan adds.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent on 7 December 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 07/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The i

Winter walks to warm the soul

... published last month, walking is better for you than hitting the gym. The London School of Economics found people who...

This article was published online by The i on December 5, 2015
(no link available)

Also in:
The Northern Echo (Darlington)
The Independent

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The i

Winter walks to warm the soul

... published last month, walking is better for you than hitting the gym. The London School of Economics found people who...

This article was published online by The i on December 5, 2015
(no link available)

Also in:
The Northern Echo (Darlington)
The Independent

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

7 days

Taking the simple steps to a healthier habit

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) states that people over 50, and women of all ages, who regularly walked briskly for more than 30 minutes at a time, had a lower body mass index (BMI) and smaller waistlines than those who say they favour other exercises like gym workouts, cycling and swimming.

This article appeared in 7 days on 5 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Examiner

Skip the gym and start walking to boost your health

Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective – in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases – than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes. “People are also more likely to get walking ’right’, as compared to gym exercises – it’s easier to know if you’re working to a moderate level with walking than with other exercises,” Dr Lordan adds.

This article appeared in the Irish Examiner on 5 December 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Edinburgh Evening News

Keeping fit is a walk in the park

Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective – in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases – than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes. “People are also more likely to get walking ‘right’, as compared to gym exercises – it’s easier to know if you’re working to a moderate level with walking than with other exercises,” Dr Lordan adds.

This article appeared in the Edinburgh Evening News on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mature Times

Tackling the challenges of dementia

Professor Martin Knapp at the London School of Economics and Political Science will lead another study, which will develop a publicly available tool to help meet the future needs of dementia patients and their carers. A model will be developed from this which will enable us to better predict the future costs of dementia.

This article was published by Mature Times on December 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Belfast Telegraph

Want to slim down and feel much healthier? Then try going for a stroll

New research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) found that people over 50, and women of all ages, who regularly walked briskly for more than 30 minutes at a time, had a lower body mass index (BMI) and smaller waists than those who say they favour other forms of exercise, including gym workouts, cycling and swimming. (Men aged under 50 had similar waist sizes whether they walked or went to the gym.)

This article was published by the Belfast Telegraph on December 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Could brisk walks be more effective than running for slimming down?

WANT to slim down and get healthier in the New Year? Forget trendy workouts and pricey gym memberships - according to research, you're better off going for a walk.
So what is it about walking that's so effective? A very big factor is that people who like to walk tend to do it very regularly, so they are more active overall - compared with non-walkers who, while they may say they do other forms of exercise, are possibly doing them far less frequently. Previous studies have also found that walking can be far more effective - in terms of aiding fitness and weight loss, and warding off diseases - than people might think. And, as Dr Grace Lordan, who led the LSE research, notes, people who take up walking tend to stick with it more than other fitness regimes.

This article was published by The Scotsman on December 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Georgia News Day

How many calories can YOU burn walking between New York's subway stations? New map reveals exactly how much energy you can work off on your daily commute

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by Georgia News Day on December 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How many calories can YOU burn by walking between subway stations?

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by the MailOnline on November 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How many calories can YOU burn by walking between subway stations?

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by the MailOnline on November 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

COP21: Gates fund to back development of liquid hydrocarbons

The move was welcomed by a group of British scientists, academics and officials who have been pushing a “global Apollo programme” to boost energy innovation. But they cautioned that to be truly effective, governments had to include two elements in their plan. First, a clear target had to be set to reduce the cost of clean electricity below that of coal, preferably by 2025, and second, it was important to establish a committee that would properly co-ordinate the global research effort and identify successful opportunities.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 30 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Stampa Societa

La crisi di mezza età? Esiste, ma dopo si torna a sorridere

Happiness in life can be traced in the shape of a 'U'. We start with the enthusiasm of 20 years, then you hit the lowest point between 45 and 55, but from sixty things start to look up again. ... The latest confirmation comes from the study of three researchers Nattavudh Powdthavee, Terence Cheng and Andrew Oswald of the Universities of Melbourne and Warwick and the London School of Economics who have collected tens of thousands of questionnaires on the welfare of people between 20 and 70 years in the United Kingdom, Australia and Germany.

This article was published by La Stampa Societa on November 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Well-being: Results from Four Data Sets, Terence C. Cheng, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew J. Oswald, The Economic Journal, October 2015
DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12256

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Childless adults are generally just as happy as parents

And just to be clear, having a kid isn't worse for you than unemployment or losing a spouse, even though that's what the new study found. Nick Powdthavee, a happiness researcher at the London School of Economics and the University of Melbourne, notes that the average change in well-being reported in the paper ''was derived from a raw data that 70 percent of people reported a drop in life satisfaction following having a child''.

This article was published online by Vox on November 26, 2015
Lik to article here

Also in
MSN PH
Childless adults are generally just as happy as parents

Related publications
Think having children will make you happy?, Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Psychologist, Volume 22, April 2009

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Autumn Statement 2015: U-turn on tax credits saves the short term argument, but serious long term questions remain

Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, John Van Reenen, gives his reaction to the Autumn Statement. Whilst the U-turn on tax credits might appear to be the big story in the short term, the longer term plans continue to represent a shrinking of the state on a spectacular scale.

This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on November 26, 2015
Link to response here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Food World News

Depression during midlife crisis: how to find relief when the happiness pattern takes a dip to depression

A study on happiness by researchers Dr Terence Cheng (University of Adelaide), Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee (Centre for Economic Performance, LSE) and Professor Andrew Oswald (Warwick University), verified a U-shaped happiness pattern among its 50,000 men and women subjects from Britain, Germany and Australia. The findings were based on assessments of the participants throughout their lives. This is the first study to monitor the same set of participants for a full cycle assessment, yet it is not the first study to determine the U-shape happiness pattern among individuals from other countries and from different times.

This article was published online by Food World News on November 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Well-being: Results from Four Data Sets, Terence C. Cheng, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew J. Oswald, The Economic Journal, October 2015
DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12256

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Finance and Development magazine

People in Economics: A generous-hearted life

Richard Layard profiled: ''Richard Layard, who believes the basic purpose of economics is the maximization of happiness and well-being''
A day after sharing a stage with the Dalai Lama, London School of Economics (LSE) professor Richard Layard is still buzzing. As director of the Wellbeing Programme at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, Layard focuses on the study of happiness.

This article was published by Finance and Development magazine on November 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

To find the energy to save the earth, shoot for the moon, article by Richard Layard

The world spends $100bn subsidising the private production of renewables using the inadequate technologies that are now available. We can surely spend $15bn on transformational research and development — to be followed, of course, by private sector efforts to apply the results. This should be high on the agenda for the climate change meeting in Paris beginning on November 30.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 17 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

WGCL-TV Online

Study: Daily Walks Beat Gym Workouts For Weight Control

London School of Economics researchers collected data from 1999 to 2012 to evaluate the link between various kinds of physical activity and weight, as reported by CBS News. The study analyzed how often people took 30-minute walks at a fast pace and how often people played sports or worked out at the gym. Researchers also considered heavy housework and manual labor in their analysis.

This article appeared on WGCL-TV Online on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

City Metric

Can better housing policy improve physical health and mental wellbeing too?

To that end, LSE’s Paul Dolan agrees that building on the green belt, to increase housing supply and cut commuting times, is “part of the solution”. His colleague Lord Richard Layard, the director of the wellbeing programme at the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, agrees: “If we allowed building on 10% of the green belt, we could largely solve the housing shortage.”

This article apperaed in City Metric on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Canberra Times

Is this the optimal exercise for staying slim?

Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at how regularly Britons engaged in 30 minutes or more of walking, moderate intensity exercise such as going to the gym, swimming, dancing, running and tennis, as well as heavy housework or heavy outdoor labour like chopping wood. They then compared the waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) data of the people and found that those who regularly walked were leaner.

This article was published by the Canberra Times (Australia) on November 12, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Topnews

Brisk walk helps shed and maintain weight

Researchers from the London School of Economics carried out the study on over 50,000 patients between 1999 and 2012. In the study, the researchers have assessed the activity levels and exercises carried out by the participants.

This article appeared in Topnews on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Paul Dolan interview BBC radio

Paul Dolan discusses happiness and use of social media.

This article appeared on BBC Radio 5 Live on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Stock Journal

Is this the optimal exercise for staying slim?

Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at how regularly Britons engaged in 30 minutes or more of walking, moderate intensity exercise such as going to the gym, swimming, dancing, running and tennis, as well as heavy housework or heavy outdoor labour like chopping wood.

This article appeared in Stock Journal on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Canada

Brisk walking: is it better than vigorous exercise for losing weight?

A new study by the London School of Economics found that people are "more likely to have a lower weight if they regularly engage in high impact walking compared to doing another vigorous activity like going to the gym."

This article appeared in Yahoo Canada on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

msn

Study Finds That Regular Brisk Walking Is More Effective Than Going to the Gym

Researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science have found that walkers tend to be in better shape than their gym-going counterparts. In the study of 50,000 people over the age of 13, people who walked briskly for at least 30 minutes a day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than those who engaged in moderate-intensity activities at the gym. The results were particularly pronounced in women and people over 50.

This article appeared on msn on 11 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 11/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

MoneyTalksNews

Best exercise for weight control may be cheap and easy

The research was led by assistant professor Grace Lordan, who specializes in health economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science, a school of the University of London. She analyzed data on physical activity levels from annual national English surveys from 1999 to 2012, focusing on activities that increase heart rate and cause perspiration, and analyzed data on BMI scores and waist circumference.

This article was published online by MoneyTalksNews on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Economonitor

Nicaragua: a success story in the making

All said, are Nicaraguans happier? According to the World Happiness Report 2015, edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, Nicaraguans are indeed happier now than they were in 2007. Nicaragua ranks first as the country in the world that increased its happiness levels the most from 2007 to 2014.

This article was published online by EconoMonitor on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2015, John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Politics and Policy blog

Because GDP is not enough: five headline indicators for better policymaking

Prioritising wellbeing as a key measure of whether policy is improving human lives would lead to more interventions like the provision of psychological therapy for people with mental health problems, which increased access to at least minimal levels of talking therapies, rather than just medication, for those suffering depression and anxiety disorders. This policy was implemented as a result of efforts by wellbeing expert, Professor Richard Layard, and his engagement with wellbeing evidence.

This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE Politics and Policy blog

Because GDP is not enough: five headline indicators for better policymaking

Prioritising wellbeing as a key measure of whether policy is improving human lives would lead to more interventions like the provision of psychological therapy for people with mental health problems, which increased access to at least minimal levels of talking therapies, rather than just medication, for those suffering depression and anxiety disorders. This policy was implemented as a result of efforts by wellbeing expert, Professor Richard Layard, and his engagement with wellbeing evidence.

This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Nottingham

thing researchers at the London school of economics reckon

... maybe a brisk walk this is the thing researchers at the London School of Economics reckon going freight 30 minute brisk ...

This piece was broadcast by BBC Radio Nottingham on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage


News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times LIVE

Walking the best way to stay trim

Walking officially beats them all, hands (or rather feet) down. Regular walking is the best thing you can do to achieve and maintain a healthy weight, according to a study from the London School of Economics. It concluded that the brisk constitutional is a better deterrent against obesity than any other form of exercise.

This article was published online by Times LIVE on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage


News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

CBS News Online

Does brisk walking beat the gym for weight control?

Good old-fashioned brisk walking on a regular basis may trump gym workouts and other types of exercise when it comes to managing weight. London School of Economics researchers wanted to look at associations between various types of physical activity and weight, so they analyzed data collected from 1999 to 2012 from the country's annual Health Survey of England.

This article was published online by CBS News Online on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage


News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

MSN MY

Study finds that walking could be better than the gym

Could it be time to quit the gym altogether? Not exactly, but researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science did find that walkers tend to be thinner than gym-goers. In an analysis of 50,000 people over the age of 13, those who did at least 30 minutes of brisk walking per day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than people who did high intensity workouts.

This article was published online by MSN MY on November 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage


News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

Is walking really the best way to lose weight fast?

This week scientists at the London School of Economics revealed the results of a study of more than fifty thousand patients in England between 1999 and 2012. The study found that those who took brisk walks as their main form of exercise had lower BMIs than those who did high-intensity workouts. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the study, said: “We think it is because walking is more convenient than the gym, and is easier for people to maintain. This is particularly true for older people because they do not have to be at peak physical fitness to walk.”

This article appeared on BT.com on 9 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 09/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Albawaba Business

World Innovation Summit for Health partner up with World Innovation Summit for Education

WISH has also established the Mental Health and Well-being in Children Forum, chaired by Professor the Lord Richard Layard, Wellbeing Program Director at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE). The Forum explored the role of education in well-being as part of its remit to produce evidence-based reports and provide recommendations for policymakers at the second WISH Summit that took place in February 2015 in Qatar.

This article was published online by Albawaba.com on November 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

WUSA-TV

Sunday Morning

Mention of LSE report which outlined the benefits of regular brisk walking.

Report mentioned on WUSA-TV on November 8, 2015
[No link available]

Also on:
KBMT-TV, 08.11.2015 (18 hours, 45 minutes ago)
This Week With George Stephanopoulos

KTRH-AM, 07.11.2015 (1 day, 19 hours ago)
as safe at the London School of Economics says

New York News 1 - NY1, 08.11.2015 (18 hours, 44 minutes ago)
New York News 1

BBC Radio Devon (Plymouth), 07.11.2015 (1 day, 21 hours ago)
absolutely well and the London school of economics came

CBS News, 08.11.2015 (11:40am)
Milepost: Walking vs. running

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage


News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Nation (Pakistan)

30-minute walk more effective to lose weight

A study by scientists at the London School of Economics, this week, claimed a brisk 30-minute walk each day is a more effective way to lose weight than running or going to the gym. But, how much exercise do personal trainers, whose jobs depend on their getting results, say we need to do to shed pounds? Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics led the research at LSE. Her team compared the measurements of people who performed half-an-hour of fast-paced walking compared to those who did the same amount of heavy housework, manual labour and sports, including rugby.

This article appeared in the Nation (Pakistan) on 8 November 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Woman's Day online

Study finds that regular brisk walking is more effective than going to the gym

Researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science have found that walkers tend to be in better shape than their gym-going counterparts. In the study of 50,000 people over the age of 13, people who walked briskly for at least 30 minutes a day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than those who engaged in moderate-intensity activities at the gym. The results were particularly pronounced in women and people over 50.

This article appeared on Woman's Day Online on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

CBC News (British Columbia)

Brisk walking: is it better than vigorous exercise for losing weight?

Study from the London School of Economics measured the body mass index and waists of participants
A new study by the London School of Economics found that people are "more likely to have a lower weight if they regularly engage in high impact walking compared to doing another vigorous activity like going to the gym."

This article appeared on CBC News (British Columbia) on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times of India

Brisk walking better way to lose weight than gymming

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in regular, brisk walking for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby. The results were particularly true for women, people over 50 and those on low incomes. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the study said, "The results thus provide an argument for a campaign to promote walking."

This article appeared in the Times of India on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times of India

Brisk walking better way to lose weight than gymming

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in regular, brisk walking for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby. The results were particularly true for women, people over 50 and those on low incomes. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the study said, "The results thus provide an argument for a campaign to promote walking."

This article appeared in the Times of India on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

How walking to work changed my life

There are times when you deserve to feel pleased with yourself and last week was one of them. Science, you see, confirmed something that I had worked out a decade and a half ago, namely: regular walking is the best thing you can do to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. According to the study from the London School of Economics, brisk walking is a better deterrent against obesity than any other form of exercise. Forget the gym or five-aside, stuff running, spinning, zumba and squash… Walking officially beats them all, hands ( or trainer’d feet) down.

This article appeared in the Sunday Telegraph on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Nation online

Brisk walk is a great workout

NEW RESEARCH SAYS that regular brisk walking is the best exercise for keeping weight down, according to the UK’s London School of Economics. In the study, Do All Activities “Weigh” Equally? How Different Physical Activities Differ as Predictors of Weight, lead author Dr Grace Lordan of the LSE examined reported physical activity levels from the annual Health Survey for England from 1999 to 2012.

This article appeared in the Daily Nation Online on 7 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 07/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

WISH partners with WISE on education and wellbeing

The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) held a special debate on education and well-being with the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE). The event marked the second collaboration between the two global initiatives of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development (QF). Held at the Qatar National Convention Centre in Doha last week, the session was aimed at ensuring influential outcomes are reached in healthcare and education innovation in Qatar, the region and across the globe. … WISH has also established the Mental Health and Wellbeing in Children Forum, chaired by professor the Lord Richard Layard, director, Wellbeing Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE). The forum explored the role of education in well-being as part of its remit to produce evidence-based reports and provide recommendations for policymakers at the second WISH Summit that took place in February 2015 in Qatar.

This article appeared in Gulf Times on 7 November 2015 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Whoar.co.nz

Walking might beat the gym for weight loss

A study conducted by the Dr Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics found that women of all ages and men over 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes weighed less than those who took part in more vigorous exercise.

This article appeared on Whoar.co.nz on 6 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 06/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Study finds that walking could be better than the gym

Could it be time to quit the gym altogether? Not exactly, but researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science did find that walkers tend to be thinner than gym-goers. In an analysis of 50,000 people over the age of 13, those who did at least 30 minutes of brisk walking per day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower BMIs than people who did high intensity workouts.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 6 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 06/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How much exercise do you REALLY need to do to lose weight? Here, five personal trainers give their expert verdict

A study by scientists at the London School of Economics, this week, claimed a brisk 30-minute walk each day is a more effective way to lose weight than running or going to the gym. But, how much exercise do personal trainers, whose jobs depend on their getting results, say we need to do to shed pounds? Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics led the research at LSE.

This article appeared in the Mail Online on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Israel Herald

Brisk walking a better method for losing weight than going to the gym, study claims

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in "regular, brisk walking" for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Glow Australia

The best exercise strategy for weight loss isn't hitting the gym

Yet new research from the London School of Economics and Political Science suggests there’s an even more efficient option. The study claims that people who walk briskly for longer than 30 minutes every day have lower Body Mass Indexes (BMIs) and smaller waists than those who work out at the gym, run, or go swimming.

This article appeared in The Glow Australia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Voz de Galicia

Lo que Albert Rivera esconde, clave del éxito de Ciudadanos en las generales

Conscientes de qué es lo que realmente preocupa a los españoles, los de Rivera han desplegado todo su encanto en un puñado de medidas orquestadas por el célebre economista Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in La Voz de Galicia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Belfast News Letter

Brisk walk 'better than gym' for weight

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym.

This article appeared in Belfast News Letter on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Record

Brisk and reward

Research from the London School of Economics has revealed you’re more likely to lose weight from a brisk 30-minute daily walk than going to the gym.

This article appeared in the Daily Record on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily News Online

Walking better than gym membership for fitness over 50

''Walking is a lasting habit,'' said the study's author, Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics. '''Going to the gym takes much more time than walking out the door and turning left''.

This article was published by Daily News Online on November 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

NYSE Post

Walking 'more beneficial' to keeping weight down than visiting the gym

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym.

This article apperaed in NYSE Post on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
Dallas Sun
Hometown News Group
Beat 102-103
Counsel and Heal
WKBW-TV - Online
Classic 105
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Unlimited Online

Walking beats gym for weight loss

A study conducted by the Dr Grace Lordan of the London School of Economics found that women of all ages and men over 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes weighed less than those who took part in more vigorous exercise.

This article appeared on Unlimited Online on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
WFTS-TV Online
Sunrise Radio Online
Mummypages
Telepolis.pl
KIT-FM - Online
Eat This, Not That! Online

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

AOL.com

Study says walking could be better than visiting the gym

Researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science analyzed data of 50,000 people who were at least 13 years old and found those who walked briskly 30 minutes a day were more likely to have smaller waistlines and lower body mass indexes than those who did higher-intensity workouts.

This article apperaed on AOL.com on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health, Medical, and Science Updates

Brisk walks better at keeping weight off than going to the gym: new UK study

Research by the London School of Economics discovered people who walked a lot had lower BMIs and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport. Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics who led the research, compared the measurements of people who took part in activities which increased heart rate and caused perspiring.

This article appeared in Health, Medical, and Science Updates on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brisk walking better for losing weight than going to the gym, study claims

A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in “regular, brisk walking” for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby.

This article appeared in the Independent on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

News

Grace Lordan's research on walking being better for weight loss than the gym mentioned.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio 5 Live on 4 November 2015.
Broadcast link here

Also on
News4 today; Kiro 7; BBC Radio Nottingham; BBC Wales(Bangor); BBC Nottingham; BBC Essex; KXNT-AM; FM News 101 KXL; WGMD-FM BBC Radio Scotland (Glasgow); WGMD-F; LBC Radio

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Gloucestershire

News

Grace Lordan's research on walking being better for weight loss than the gym mentioned.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Gloucestshire on 4 November 2015. Link

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sun

WALKS BEATS A GYM

Speedy strollers are about 4½lb lighter and women are almost a dress size smaller than gym-goers, said experts at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Sun on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Metro

Losing weight can be just a walk in the park

Researchers from the London School of Economics and Political Science analysed data about how much people exercise from the annual Health Survey for England between 1999 and 2012.

This article appeared in the Metro on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Brisk walk better than gym for weight control

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym. The effects were particularly strong for women, and both men and women over the age of 50.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror

Forget the gym.. a half-hour walk is better for you

Dr Lordan, of the London School of Economics and Political Science, studied exercise data from the annual Health Survey for England over 13 years.

This article apperaed in the Daily Mirror on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Express

Just 30 minutes of walking a day will keep you slim

Research from the London School of Economics said that people who regularly stride out are more likely to have slimmer waistlines and a lower body mass index than people who do high-intensity workouts.

This article appeared in The Express on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Forget the gym, take a brisk walk to lose weight

A study from the London School of Economics found that people may benefit more from “high-impact” walking than other exercise.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 November 2015. (No link available)

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Half an hour of walking better than gym for losing weight

The benefits of high-impact walking outweigh those from keep fit activities including running, swimming and working out at the gym, according to researchers at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article appeared in The Times on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

This is Local London

Brisk walk 'better than gym' for weight control

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym. The effects were particularly strong for women, and both men and women over the age of 50. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the research, examined data on how much people exercise from the annual Health Survey for England (HSE) from 1999 to 2012.

This article appeared in This is Local London on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
Hastings Observer and News Series
Redditch Advertiser Online
Andover Advertiser
Wiltshire Business - Online
Hillingdon Times - Online

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror (Eire)

Want to lose weight but hate the gym? You'll like these scientists' findings

Study leader Dr Grace Lordan compared exercises that raise the heart rate and causes sweating – such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling, gym workouts, dancing, running, jogging, football, rugby and squash.

This article appeared in the Daily Mirror (Eire) on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mirror (Eire)

Want to lose weight but hate the gym? You'll like these scientists' findings

Study leader Dr Grace Lordan compared exercises that raise the heart rate and causes sweating – such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling, gym workouts, dancing, running, jogging, football, rugby and squash.

This article appeared in the Daily Mirror (Eire) on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

StyleCaster

Skip the Spin Class: Research Shows 'Brisk Walks' Could be the Secret to Weight Loss

Bad news for anyone who spends a significant chunk of cash every month paying off a gym membership or signing up for luxury spin classes: Research by the London School of Economics has discovered that brisk walking is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. We like the sound of this.

This article appeared in Style Caster on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mirror Online

Want to lose weight but hate the gym? We have some VERY good news

Study leader Dr Grace Lordan compared exercises that raise the heart rate and causes sweating – such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling, gym workouts, dancing, running, jogging, football, rugby and squash. And the study found those taking a half hour stroll had lowest body mass index and smaller waists.

This article apperaed in Mirror Online on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times of India

Experiencing an early mid-life job crisis?

According to professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, Paul Dolan, a mix of purpose and pleasure makes one feel truly happy. People can be too goal-focused. They have ticked off making money and career goals, and wonder what next?

This article appeared in Times of India on 2 November 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider (Scotland)

Report: Immigration

''Immediately after the General Election in May this year, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) was commissioned by the Conservative government to examine Tier 2 of the Points-Based System,'' ... The MAC indicated in August that there appeared to be a ''good case'' for increasing it, because eit was calculated in 2009 when lower-skilled jobs were eligible for sponsorship. However, chair of the MAC Professor David Metcalf has said salary levels should not be considered in isolation.

This article was published in the Business Insider (Scotland) magazine in November 2015
Link to magazine here (pp53-54)

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

wyborcza.biz

Szczescie w fawelach, depresja w Glasgow

Wcale nie jest tak, ze im jestesmy bogatsi, tym sie stajemy szczliwsi. Do szczcia rednio wystarcza nam okoto 20 tys. dolarów rocznie. Z lordem Richardem Layardem rozmawia Aleksandra Kaniewska
It is not true that the richer we are, the happier we become. Happiness on average, about 20 thousand. dollars a year is enough. Lord Richard Layard talks to Alexander Kaniewska.

This article appeared in wyborcza.biz on 31 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 31/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Share Radio

The topsy-turvy world of negative interest

Dennis Novy gave a radio interview to Share Radio about negative interest rates and what they mean for the UK economy. ''Is the US headed for negative interest rates? As the Fed announced a mostly positive rate outlook this Wednesday, some are still worried that we could see a negative interest on the horizon. Matt Cox investigates...''

The interview was broadcast by Share Radio on October 29, 2015
Link to broadcast here

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Austerity cuts are causing mental distress and are linked to rise in suicides, health professionals warn

According to the Centre for Economic Performance, mental health services receive just 13 per cent of the total NHS budget, while mental illness is responsible for 23 per cent of the loss of years of healthy life caused by all illness nationwide.

This article appeared in the Independent on 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
How mental health loses out in the NHS The Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

CIPD

We can make you work for less: the psychology of pay

Professor Nick Powdthavee, principal research fellow in the wellbeing research programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, suggests it is no accident that increasing pay around the world is accompanied by rising stress and mental ill-health. “We underestimate the negative things that go hand in hand with high pay, and, while surveys find people saying they would swap money for happiness or ‘good living’, behaviour doesn’t bear that out,” he says.

This article appeared in CIPD in 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Can You Imagine a Mindful Parliament in Britain?

Among them is Lord Richard Layard, Programme Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 28 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Could ‘mindfulness' make Britain happier?

It marks the first time mindfulness has been seriously considered in the context of national public policy - and the firsts don’t stop there: for instance, today, I discover that, to date, almost 200 MPs, Peers and their staff have undergone mindfulness training since January 2013 (after Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster), and listen to Tracey Crouch, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Sport, Tourism and Heritage, tell the room about how mindfulness has helped her cope with her own anxiety and depression

This article appeared in the Scotsman on 28 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
A new priority for mental health, Richard Layard, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, May 2015

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

IQ

Notre cerveau nous trompe lorsque nous parlons à des robots

Pour le découvrir, des scientifiques de la London School of Economics ont conduit une expérience durant laquelle une personne normale devait dire des choses suggérées par un ordinateur

This article appeared in IQ on 26 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El País Online

La educación: la gran asignatura pendiente, article by Luis Garicano

En los últimos treinta años de historia, España ha conseguido mucho. Los logros económicos, la integración en Europa, el desarrollo de una democracia plena son indudables. En algunas áreas importantes, como en sanidad, se ha logrado una verdadera excelencia mundial, a pesar de la falta en muchos casos de recursos.

This article appeared in El Pais Online on 25 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

Recetas contra la desigualdad: renta básica y subir el salario mínimo

Ciudadanos cree que el problema es "un sistema de contratación perverso y un modelo económico que no funciona", ha defendido Luis Garicano, responsable del programa económico del partido de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in El Pais on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial Digital

Albert Rivera encarga a Garicano que rete a Álvaro Nadal y Jordi Sevilla a un debate económico

En el partido han realizado un amplio análisis interno sobre las causas del éxito de Albert Rivera en su enfrentamiento con Pablo Iglesias y parte de responsabilidad la achacan al proyecto económico de Luis Garicano, que ha pasado con creces la prueba. Es percibido como “sólido y solvente”.

This article appeared in El Confidencial Digital on 22 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Rioja

Ciudadanos deja el copago en manos de las autonomías

El encargado de aclarar la propuesta fue Luis Garicano, responsable económico de la formación y mano derecha de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in La Rioja on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial

Golpe en la mesa de Garicano: desautoriza a De la Torre y afirma que no habrá copago

El coordinador del programa económico de Ciudadanos, Luis Garicano, ha respondido al número dos de Albert Rivera en la lista al Congreso por Madrid y encargado de elaborar las propuestas fiscales de la formación, Francisco De la Torre, asegurando que la financiación de las CCAA "debe garantizar la igualdad básica de todos y especialmente cuando se trata del disfrute de servicios básicos como la sanidad y la educación".
The coordinator of the economic program Citizens Luis Garicano, replied to Albert Rivera's number two on the list to Congress by Madrid with instructions to establish the tax proposals of training, Francisco de la Torre, ensuring that the financing of the CCAA "must guarantee the basic equality of all and especially when it comes to the enjoyment of basic services such as health and education

This article appeared on El Confidencial on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

195 MPs, peers and staff attend mindfulness classes

To date, 115 parliamentarians and 80 of their staff have undergone mindfulness training since January 2013, after former Labour MP Chris Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster.

This article appeared on BT.com on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph.co.uk

Dangerous prisoners taught mindfulness and meditation

Almost 200 MPs, peers and their staff have also attended mindfulness classes after Labour MP Chris Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster in January 2013.

This article appeared on Telegraph.co.uk on 21 October 2015. Link to article Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Euro Scientist

From Mindful Nation to Mindful Europe

Inspired by these words, Lord Richard Layard, director of the well-being programme at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, UK, and myself proactively focused on bringing mindfulness forward as a catalyst for change. Three years ago, we invited Mark Williams and Chris Cullen, from the Oxford University Mindfulness Centre, UK, to help us establish mindfulness practice in the British Parliament.

This article appeared in Euro Scientist on 20 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

iMagazine

Lord Richard Layard, article by Richard Layard

There is a shocking fact. Despite our huge increase in affluence, opinion research data for most developed countries show that people in the West have grown no happier In the last 50 years. This should make us rethink everything, including our work-life balance and our attitudes to tax.

This article appeared in iMagazine on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Not all academies are the same – don't assume they will all boost results, article by Stephen Machin, Andrew Eyles and Olmo Silva

Our new research shows that many of the schools that have become academies since the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government came to power are fundamentally different in nature from those that became academies under Labour. Because of this, their conversion is unlikely to generate the same positive results in raising students' attainment.

This article appeared in the Conversation on 14 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
News Posted: 14/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

L'obs Online

Angus Deaton, prix Nobel d'économie: 5000 ?, le salaire du bonheur ? Une théorie à nuancer

Ce que montre un autre spécialiste de l’économie du bonheur, Sir Richard Layard, professeur à la London School of Economics, c'est que ce qui compte surtout c’est de "gagner plus que son voisin". That shows another expert in the economics of happiness, Sir Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, is that what counts above all is to "earn more than his neighbor."

This article appeared on L'obs Online on 13 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

This Is As Good As It Gets Folks: The US Is About At Full Employment

However, there’s also the point that Richard Layard and other European labour economists have been making for a long time now. Long periods of unemployment mean that people become detached from the labour force in a rather more involuntary manner. Skills decay, of course, but employers are also extremely hesitant to employ someone who has been unemployed a long time. Unemployment of more than a year or two can mean complete divorce from the workforce: possibly simply on the grounds that no one will even grant an interview to someone in that position.

This article appeared on Forbes on 9 October 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Australia Plus

'Happiness thinker' Professor Paul Dolan on pleasure, purpose and everyday happiness

He is a professor at London School of Economics, and one of the world's leading thinkers on happiness, or what policy-makers call "subjective wellbeing". Happiness, as defined by Professor Dolan, is "experiences of pleasure and purpose over time".

This article appeared on Australia Plus on 9 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph Online

Can a course teach you to be happy in 8 weeks?

Richard Layard is an economist, an expert on mental health and the author of Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, which argues that we should make happiness, not growth, the object of our economic policies

This article appeared on the Telegraph Online on 9 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Mindfulness an essential ‘parachute' for politicians – former British MP

He introduced the valued form of meditation to fellow Commons politicians, working with Labour peer and economist Prof Richard Layard, who has spoken about its merits at Davos, and with Oxford University’s Prof Mark Williams and Chris Cullen.

This article appeared in the Irish Times on 8 October 2015 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Market Mogul

Which is more important: Happiness or Economic Growth?

One man who has addressed the issue directly is Richard Layard, co-editor of the World Happiness Report, 2012. He outlines in an article how the income only accounts for less than 2% of the measurable determinants of happiness.

This article appeared in Market Mogul on 7 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2015, John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

WXII-TV Online

Opinion: Are we hurting kids at school?

In 2013, more than a hundred teachers, writers and academics -- including Lord Layard, director of the well-being program at the London School of Economics -- wrote to the education secretary to protest Britain's education policies. The quest for school readiness, they asserted, had gotten terribly out of hand, foisting "the tests and targets which dominate primary education" upon 4-year-olds.

This article appeared in WXII-TV Online on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Education: Too much, too soon?

CNN Online

In 2013, more than a hundred teachers, writers and academics -- including Lord Layard, director of the well-being program at the London School of Economics -- wrote to the education secretary to protest Britain's education policies. The quest for school readiness, they asserted, had gotten terribly out of hand, foisting "the tests and targets which dominate primary education" upon 4-year-olds.

This article appeared on CNN Online on 6 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Le Soleil

Sa juste part d'impôt

Le Québec assumerait annuellement des pertes fiscales de quelque 800 millions $, évalue le ministère des Finances en extrapolant les résultats d'une étude réalisée par Gabriel Zucman, qui était en 2014 professeur adjoint à la London School of Economics. Toujours en utilisant la même étude, le ministère estime à 47 milliards $ les capitaux québécois placés dans des paradis fiscaux.
Quebec will assume an annual tax loss of approximately $ 800 million, the Ministry of Finance estimated by extrapolating the results of a study by Gabriel Zucman, which in 2014 was assistant professor at the London School of Economics. Still using the same study, the ministry estimated $ 47 billion Quebec capital invested in tax havens.

Related Links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth webpage
News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Ecologist

Tory Conference: pledge the UK to the Global Apollo Program

The Tories have an opportunity to show real leadership on energy and climate change this week, writes Richard Layard - by making the UK the first country to sign up to a global research effort to replace fossil fuels with renewables as the world's primary power source.

This article appeared in The Ecologist on 5 October 2015 Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Friday Magazine

Happy cafés

Lord Richard Layard, founder of Action for Happiness, a professor at the London School of Economics and international expert on health and well-being, says: ‘We all want to be happy and we want the people we love to be happy.‘ Happiness means feeling good about our lives and wanting to go on feeling that way. Unhappiness means feeling bad and wanting things to change.’ The best society then is one in which there is the least misery and the most happiness, he says. ‘We wanted to spread more happiness in the community and the world.’

This article appeaerd in Friday Magazine on 2 October. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Brand Republic

My Media Week Sue Todd

First is the up and coming Spark event, where, among other things, we will be revealing some new research around the evolving role that premium content experiences play in consumers’ lives. We discuss the role that Paul Dolan, professor of Behavioral Science at the London School of Economics, will play at the event and how the panel and interactive elements will work.

This article appeared in Brand Republic on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The EU should pay cash to areas to compensate them for high immigration, says Labour

Research by the London Schools of Economics and Centre for Economic Performance published earlier this year found that mass immigration to Britain had had no overall negative effect on wages or unemployment. The study found no connection between how much immigration an UK county had seen between 2004 and 2012 and the area’s level of unemployment or changes in wage patterns.

This article appeared in the Independent on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Business

The successes and shortfalls of treating mental illness

London School of Economics Professor Richard Peter Layard, author of Thrive, discusses progress made in treating mental health and the impact of mental illness on the global economy. He speaks on 'Bloomberg Surveillance'.

The interview was broadcast by Bloomberg Business on September 29, 2015
Link to the interview here

Related publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M. Clark, Penguin, July 2014.
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

If Everyone Gets Electricity, Can the Planet Survive?

In the long term, sustainable, reliable supplies of terawatts of energy need to be researched, developed, and scaled. Solar and wind are already playing an exciting and rapidly expanding role in powering the developing world. But countries also need electricity at night when the air is still. A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a “global Apollo program” to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

On the Wight

Medina College bans all use of mobile phones: Here's one parent's view

In the Spring of this year, Medina College headteacher, Richard Williams, asked parents what they thought about introducing a ban on mobile phones in school. He quoted research which shows that banning mobile phones from schools improves GCSE results. Even used outside of lessons there is the pressure of social media, which can bring up cyber-bullying issues.

This article appeared in On the Wight on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

BBC World News

Joan Costa Font comments on the elections in Catalonia

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on 27 September 2015 Link

Also on:
National Public Radio Link

Related Links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article was published online by the Essex Chronicle on September 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Common Ground

I am a conservative, I conserve

Their destruction is done with the aim of cutting taxes and reducing government. Yet many thinkers, such as Lord Richard Layard, professor emeritus at the London School of Economics, argue that taxation is a good thing for creating a state of balance between work and life.

This article appeared in Common Ground on 26 September 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

YLE Alueellinen tv-uutistoiminta Lounais-Suomen uutiset (Turku) - Online

EU och nationalismen

Det finns intressanta paralleller till den här problematiken i en studie gjord av doktor Joan Costa Font och professor Frank Cowell vid London School of Economics. De fann en stark länk mellan en ökning av den europeiska identiteten, en minskning av den nationella stoltheten och förändringar i ekonomiskt beteende. There are interesting parallels to this issue in a study made by doctor Joan Costa Font and professor Frank Cowell at the London School of Economics. They found a strong link between an increase in the European identity, a reduction of national pride and changes in economic behavior.

This article appeared in YLE Alueellinen tv-uutistoiminta Lounais-Suomen uutiset on 24 September 2015 Link to article

Related publications
European Identity and Redistributive Preferences Joan Costa Font and Frank Cowell, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1362, July 2015

Related links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Common ground

I am a conservative, I conserve

Institutions such as railways, medicare, electrical power production and delivery, environmental protection, social services, schools and many other government agencies are being attacked, weakened and even privatized. These aspects of society are useful and helpful and are there for the common good. Their destruction is done with the aim of cutting taxes and reducing government. Yet many thinkers, such as Lord Richard Layard, professor emeritus at the London School of Economics, argue that taxation is a good thing for creating a state of balance between work and life.

This article apperaed on Common Ground on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La provincial.es

La batalla de las balanzas fiscales

In that vein, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics said in an article that "would gain from spreading, as in a divorce, is not what the husband's transfer, because then there are many duplications: need two houses, two cars?" Catalonia and Spain needed two armies, two consular networks?

This article appeared on La Provincial.es on 23 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano link to article
Growth webpage
News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Richard Layard interviewed

Richard Layard emeritus Professor of economics at the LSE interviewed on action for happiness campaign for increased happiness and kindness in the UK.

This interview was broadcast on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Interview

Richard Layard, emeritus Professor of economics at the LSE interviewed on action for happiness campaign for increased happiness and kindness in the UK.

The interview was broadcast by BBC World Service on September 21, 2015
Link to interview here

Also on 1 other outlet

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

EIN News

Interfaith meeting and action for happiness event

In the afternoon, an enthusiastic and friendly audience of more than 2000 awaited His Holiness's arrival at the Lyceum theatre. He was met at the stage door by his old friend Lord Richard Layard, who with Director of Action for Happiness, Mark Williamson, escorted him to the stage. They were received with resounding cheers and applause. Dr Williams explained that a new course of training was being launched today on World Peace Day, called Exploring What Matters. He said that it is ever more important to bring people together to think about their lives and to help them make their lives happier.

This article was published online by EIN News on September 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

EIN News

Interfaith meeting and action for happiness event

In the afternoon, an enthusiastic and friendly audience of more than 2000 awaited His Holiness’s arrival at the Lyceum theatre. He was met at the stage door by his old friend Lord Richard Layard, who with Director of Action for Happiness, Mark Williamson, escorted him to the stage. They were received with resounding cheers and applause. Dr Williams explained that a new course of training was being launched today on World Peace Day, called Exploring What Matters. He said that it is ever more important to bring people together to think about their lives and to help them make their lives happier.

This article appeared on EIN News on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Razon

Colores primaries

Pero, a la hora de la verdad, Sala i Martin se ha negado a debatir públicamente con Luis Garicano, otro peso pesado, catedrático de la London School of Economics. Lo peor ha sido los decepcionantes argumentos que ha expuesto para su negativa, más ad hominem que ad rem, mezclados con expresiones clasistas de desprecio como matones de barrio.
But, when it comes to the truth, Sala i Martin has refused to discuss publicly with Luis Garicano, another heavyweight, Professor at the London School of Economics. The worst has been disappointing arguments that has exposed its refusal, more ad hominem that ad rem, mixed with class expressions of contempt as neighborhood thugs.

This article appeared in La Razson on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Razon

Colores primaries

Pero, a la hora de la verdad, Sala i Martin se ha negado a debatir públicamente con Luis Garicano, otro peso pesado, catedrático de la London School of Economics. Lo peor ha sido los decepcionantes argumentos que ha expuesto para su negativa, más ad hominem que ad rem, mezclados con expresiones clasistas de desprecio como matones de barrio.
But, when it comes to the truth, Sala i Martin has refused to discuss publicly with Luis Garicano, another heavyweight, Professor at the London School of Economics. The worst has been disappointing arguments that has exposed its refusal, more ad hominem that ad rem, mixed with class expressions of contempt as neighborhood thugs.

This article appeared in La Razson on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

9am

Richard Layard interviewed on happiness.

This programme was broadcast on Sky News on 21 September 2015 (no link available).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Richard Layard interviewed on happiness

This programme was broadcast on 21 Setpember 2015 on BBC Radio 4 (no link available)

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Action for Happiness: secular ethics

Article by Richard Layard
Nothing causes more misery than pre-occupation with self. So in a largely secular age, we desperately need a movement to promote positive, ethical living. We have inspirational teachers like the Dalai Lama, but frail humans need regular meetings with like-minded people to uplift and inspire their daily lives. That is how the churches have operated and it is not easy to lead a good life in isolation. Nearly all of us need to meet regularly with others to discuss and affirm our commitment. That is why in 2011 we founded Action for Happiness, with the Dalai Lama as our patron. This may seem a strange name for an ethical movement. But ethics is not about the hair-shirt. It is about principles for living together which lead to happy and fulfilling lives all round. For this, people need to understand what makes themselves happy but above all they need a passionate desire to make others happy - a spirit of unconditional benevolence.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV1 Anglia West

News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Relationship breakdown: family stability is vital for a thriving society

Letter in support of the institution of the family from Professor Richard Layard, London School of Economics and 67 others
SIR – Relationship breakdown currently costs Britain an estimated £47 billion a year, but just £7.5 million of government funding is made available for prevention. There is an increasing demand for support in this area, yet many cannot afford to access support services, even when they are subsidised by charities.

This article appeared in the Telegraph on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Confidencial Colombia

La economia de la felicidad

In the 70's, the New Yorker Richard Easterlin Economist concluded that, once past a certain level of income in the richest nations, happiness not increased as a result of higher revenues. Today we know for scientific research and the findings of the English economist Richard Layard, the rent acts as a powerful factor correlated with happiness, but that is a kind of momentary happiness, which runs out as falls into a vicious cycle of dissatisfaction by wanting to always have something better than 'the of to the side' and because once achieved one higher income soon generated an adaptation to this higher standard of living where the greatest happiness obtained is quickly lost. In response to this human problem, the economy of personal development flourishes. This entails two main lines: services to individuals and services to organizations and institutions.

This article was published online by Confidencial Colombia on September 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Birmingham Post

Could life be better with less technology?

... the wrong person. Expert on happiness, Professor Paul Dolan of the London School of Economics, believes that ...

This article was published by the Birmingham Post on September 16, 2015
[No link available to the article.]

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Global Apollo Programme Press Release

Apollo Programme: Top global scientists and business leaders back Paris clean energy plan

  • David Attenborough, Brian Cox, Paul Polman, Jeffrey Sachs and Arunabha Ghosh all sign letter calling for action by UN climate conference in December

  • The international group of experts and CEOs back a new 'Global Apollo Program' to coordinate and invest in renewable R&D

  • Attenborough releases new video urging world leaders to back Global Apollo Program
  • 27 world-leading scientists, executives, academics and politicians have called on nations to adopt the Global Apollo Program (GAP) by the time of the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris in December.
    A letter published today, signed by David Attenborough, Brian Cox, Paul Polman, Carlo Carraro, Nilesh Jadhav and other respected figures argues that ''A sensible approach to tackling climate change will not only pay for itself but provide economic benefits to the nations of the world''. The GAP plan for internationally coordinated RD&D (research, development and demonstration) into renewable energy technology was proposed in June by a group of top scientists, economists and energy experts including Nicholas Stern, Gus O'Donnell, Richard Layard, David King, Martin Rees, Adair Turner and John Browne. The aspiration of the Program is to make renewable energy cheaper than fossil fuels by increasing government spending on research to at least $15bn a year globally for the next 10 years. Watch this video to learn more about GAP.

    The letter comes at the same time as a video from Sir David Attenborough urges support for the Program. You can watch the video here

    See also
    Letter published on 16th September, 2015
    We the undersigned believe that global warming can be addressed without adding significant economic costs or burdening taxpayers with more debt. A sensible approach to tackling climate change will not only pay for itself but provide economic benefits to the nations of the world. The aspiration of the Global Apollo Program is to make renewable energy cheaper than coal within 10 years. We urge the leading nations of the world to commit to this positive, practical initiative by the Paris climate conference in December. The plan requires leading governments to invest a total of at least $15 billion a year in research, development and demonstration of clean energy. That compares to the $100 billion currently invested in defence R&D globally each year. Public investment now will save governments huge sums in the future. What is more, a coordinated R&D plan can help bring energy bills down for billions of consumers. Renewable energy gets less than 2% of publicly funded R&D. The private sector spends relatively small sums on clean energy research and development. Just as with the Apollo space missions of the 1960s, great scientific minds must now be assembled to find a solution to one of the biggest challenges we face. Please support the Global Apollo Program - the world's 10 year plan for cheaper, cleaner energy.

    Related links
    About the Global Apollo Program
    The Global Apollo Program (GAP) is a 10 year project which aspires to make renewable energy cheaper than fossil fuel. The initial aim is to get leading nations to commit to more publicly funded research and development of renewable technology (with a target of 0.02% of GDP). The report's authors are Sir David King (the UK government's former Chief Scientist), Lord Gus O'Donnell (the former head of the UK civil service), Lord Richard Layard (London School of Economics), Lord Nicholas Stern (author of the ''Stern Review'' of Climate Change), Lord John Browne (ex-CEO of BP), Lord Adair Turner (the former chair of the Financial Services Authority) and Lord Martin Rees (Former President Royal Society).

    See GAP plan here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Reader's Digest online

    5 Reasons to feel optimistic on a rainy day

    Your perception of the weather is what brings about negative feelings, the study authors suspect. “If it is sunny every day you get used to it and the sunshine doesn’t make you any happier,” Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics, said to the Telegraph.

    This article appeared in Readers Digest on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Irish Times

    Information technology and schools

    Sir, – At last the penny is dropping among educationalists that technology in the classroom can be a hindrance to learning. A study by the London School of Economics in 2014 found that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones to school showed a sustained improvement in exam results, compared to schools that allowed students to carry mobile phones. The improvements in education standards, by eliminating the distraction of phones, was most pronounced in disadvantaged schools.

    This article appeared in the Irish Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BlueandGreen Tomorrow

    Apollo-scale clean energy research plan proposed by leading figures: Global Apollo Programme

    We went to the moon. Not because it was easy but because it was hard. In an open letter to the Guardian, leading figures have called today for an ambitious initiative to make clean energy cheaper than coal launching the Global Apollo Programme…. The signatories below choose to save our fragile planet. Join them. … Richard Layard London School of Economics

    This article appeared on Blue and Green Tomorrow on 16 September 2015. Link to article

    See also:
    GreenWiseBusiness.co.uk
    Leading global scientists and business chiefs back Paris clean energy plan Link to article
    Click Green
    Top global scientists and business leaders back Paris clean energy plan Link to article
    Energías renovables - Online
    Panorama - Top global scientists and business leaders support Paris clean energy plan Link to article

    Related publications
    In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Israel Herald

    Britain mulls ban on smartphones, iPads in classrooms

    In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 15 September 2015. Link to article

    Related publications
    In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage


    News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Telegraph

    Smartphones and tablets could face classroom ban

    More than 90 per cent of teenagers have mobile phones, but a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where they were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6 per cent. There is currently no Government policy about mobile phone use in schools.

    This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

    Related links
    Richard Murphy webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Al Jazeera International

    News

    Joan Costa Font interviewed regarding the push for Catalan independence in Spain.

    The interview was broadcast by Al Jazeera International on September 12, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related links
    Joan Costa Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 12/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Jerusalem Post

    After Freud, CBT offers hope

    “I was first here in 1987 and then attended a workshop on social phobia two years later. Israelis in the field are a wonderful group of people,” he said. Clark, one of the world’s leading experts on CBT, was with British labor economist Richard Layard the main driver behind the UK’s Improving Access to Psychological Therapies program. Together with Layard, Clark wrote a popular 373-page book, Thrive: The Power of Psychological Therapy, in 2014 to explain mental illness and what can be done to relieve it. CBT, he wrote, refers to a variety of interventions, depending on which emotional problem is involved. Among the techniques are imagery, distraction, motivational self-talk, relaxation, biofeedback, development of adaptive coping strategies (e.g. minimizing negative or self-defeating thoughts) and changing maladaptive beliefs about pain. People with phobias or obsessive compulsion disorder are exposed to the cause of their problem gradually, and so are gradually liberated from it.

    This article appeared in the Jerusalem Post on 12 September 2015. Link to article

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 12/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Economista online

    Rivera ve 25.400 millones de desfase en los Presupuestos

    Rivera sees 25,400 million gap in the budget approved by the PP for 2016
    Albert Rivera, President and the economic team of the party have denounced the General State budgets drawn up by the people's Party for 2016 to hide a hole of more than 25,400 million. According to the economists Luis Garicano, Francisco de la Torre and Toni Roldan, the accounts for the next year are coloured by a blatant electioneering.

    This article was published online by El Economista on September 10, 2015
    Link to article webpage

    Related links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Growth Programme webpage


    News Posted: 10/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 4

    You and Yours

    Martin Knapp comments on costs of NHS beds and cost of private provision.

    This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 4, Your and Yours show, on September 3, 2015
    Link to programme here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Almeria

    Alemania sufre de amnesia

    ... Tambien lo estudio el historiador Albrecht Ritschl, de la London School of Economices (LSE). En medio de la Guerra Fria, los...
    Germany suffers from amnesia
    Also studied it the historian Albrecht Ritschl, of the London School of Economices (LSE). In the midst of the cold war, the allies spared debt owed by Germany. 'Ritschl showed that debt cancellation was equivalent to up to four times the total of the economic output of the country in 1950 and laid the foundations for rapid post-war economic recovery,' said the London University in a release last year. The equivalence between the situation facing Germany in 1945 and which faces Greece today is not an argument accepted by everyone.

    This article was published online by El Almeria (Spain) on September 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Department of Economic History webpage


    News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Sky News

    Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

    Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity and employment in a variety of countries between 1993 and 2007 to see if the trepidation about the increased use of robots has been well founded. The pair examined data on the use of robots provided by the International Federation of Robotics. They also studied economic performance indicators across 14 industries and 17 countries, including the United States, Australia, South Korea and many European nations. The professors found that ''industrial robots increased both labour productivity and value added''.

    This article was published online by Sky News on September 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
    'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

    Related links
    Georg Graetz webpage
    Guy Michaels webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage


    News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Tendencias21

    Guest Reviews: Ecoomia solidaria

    Solidarity Economy: Conversations with the Dalai Lama about altruism, development and compassion
    The Mind and Life Institute was born in 1987 ... the Professor Emeritus of Economics at the London School of Economics, Lord Richard Layard exposes an interesting paper, 'The economy of Happiness', in which he talks about why happiness levels have remained stagnant, despite unprecedented increases in income and the quality of life of mankind.

    This article was published online by Tendencias21 on August 28, 2015
    Link to article here
    Translation here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 28/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Harvard Business Review

    Companies like Amazon need to run more tests on workplace practices

    Leaders could also test whether specific work conditions or policies affect workers' performance. ... Nick Bloom of Stanford University and his colleagues conducted a randomized experiment on working from home using a NASDAQ-listed Chinese travel agency called CTrip, which has 16,000 employees. Employees who volunteered to work from home were randomly assigned to either work from home or in the office, and their performance was monitored for the next nine months. The results: Working from home led to a 13percent increase in productivity, greater work satisfaction, and lower turnover.

    This article was published online by the Harvard Business Review on August 20, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013
    Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

    Related Links
    Nick Bloom webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

    Article by John Van Reenen
    Unlike most commentators I have actually read Corbyn's ''The Economy in 2020'' as well as the 1983 manifesto. Corbyn's document has several major advantages. First, at 8 pages it is much shorter and second, it does not (yet) commit the UK to leaving the European Union (a very silly idea). Indeed, Corby-nomics strikes many of the right notes. Low productivity is holding down wages and inadequate infrastructure in housing, transport and energy is, in turn, depressing productivity. This resonates with my findings in the LSE Growth Commission.

    This article was published online in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go?, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015

    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015
  • VIEW accompanying video here

  • Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Innovation and Infrastructure, LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute for Government and the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen et al., January 2013
  • VIEW accompanying video here
  • Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    News Posted: 15/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Corbyn and the political economy of nostalgia

    Article by John Van Reenen
    Unlike most commentators I have actually read Corbyn's ''The Economy in 2020'' as well as the 1983 manifesto. Corbyn's document has several major advantages. First, at 8 pages it is much shorter and second, it does not (yet) commit the UK to leaving the European Union (a very silly idea). Indeed, Corby-nomics strikes many of the right notes. Low productivity is holding down wages and inadequate infrastructure in housing, transport and energy is, in turn, depressing productivity. This resonates with my findings in the LSE Growth Commission.

    This article was published online in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go?, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015

    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP Election Analyses 2015, March 2015
  • VIEW accompanying video here

  • Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Innovation and Infrastructure, LSE Growth Commission in partnership with the Institute for Government and the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen et al., January 2013
  • VIEW accompanying video here
  • Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Isabelle Roland webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Anna Valero webpage
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    News Posted: 15/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Agerpres.ro (Romania)

    RECORDURI: Cea mai fericita tara din lume

    Records: the happiest country in the world
    On April 24, 2015, the 2015 Edition of the happiness of the world (World Happiness Report) was published. The work includes a happiness measure, taking into account 158 countries for 2012-2014. ... The report on the world's happiness is coordinated by Professor John Helliwell University of British Colombia, Lord Richard Layard, director of welfare at the London School of Economics, and Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Colombia University, U.S., and Adviser to the UN Secretary-General.

    This article was published online by Agerpres.ro (Romania) on August 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2015', John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Dawn.com

    Life satisfaction

    On average, sexual-minority adults are more likely to be single, tend to have worse health and are less likely to be employed than heterosexuals, say Nattavudh Powdthavee of the London School of Economics and Mark Wooden of the University of Melbourne.

    This article was published online by Dawn.com on August 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'What Can Life Satisfaction Data Tell Us About Discrimination Against Sexual Minorities? A Structural Equation Model for Australia and the United Kingdom', Nattavudh Powdthavee and Mark Wooden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1267, May 2014

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Living Well

    How a cognitive footprint may put the heat on dementia

    It was some considerable interest that I read a contribution in dementia policy, co-authored by one of my previous bosses, Prof Martin Rossor. The other co-author was Prof Martin Knapp from LSE.

    This article was published online by Living Well on August 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    See also:
    Talking Nutrition
    Nutrition missing from the Lancet's cognitive footprint of dementia prevention
    In the leading medical journal The Lancet, Rossor and Martin Knapp frame the challenge in reducing the disease burden of dementia as a ''cognitive footprint''.

    Monday 3 August
    Medical News Today
    Would a 'cognitive footprint' of activities and interventions help meet the global challenge of dementia?
    A novel conceptual framework for tackling the global challenge of dementia has been proposed in an article published in The Lancet. Martin Rossor (Professor of Clinical Neurology, University College London) and Martin Knapp (Professor of Social Policy, London School of Economics) have suggested modelling a ''cognitive footprint'' of activities, interventions and policies.

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 04/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Lindedin.com

    We need clean energy innovation, and lots of it

    Article by Bill Gates
    Last month, during a trip to Europe, I mentioned that I plan to invest $1 billion in clean energy technology over the next five years. This will be a fairly big increase over the investments I am already making, and I am doing it because I believe that the next half-decade will bring many breakthroughs that will help solve climate change. As I argued in this 2010 TED talk, we need to be able to power all sectors of the economy with sources that do not emit any carbon dioxide.

    This article was published online by Linkedin.com on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change

    Article by Richard Layard
    Leading thinkers across the worlds of science, public service and academia have launched a new global programme to combat climate change. Richard Layard outlines their proposal for big public investment in research that will dramatically reduce the costs of clean energy.

    This article was published online by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    New Statesman

    The record-breaking solar plane is grounded – is there still hope for clean energy?

    This autumn sees the launch of the Global Apollo Programme: a green research initiative that wants governments to match, in today's money, the sums spent putting men on the moon. At a time of increasing austerity, requests to increase green spending are unlikely to go down smoothly. ''Dream on'' might be the response of some, but in Solar Impulse there's a reminder that we can re-fashion the Apollo spirit - and its corporate support - for a more connected, caring age. Flying by Yeats's Cloths of Heaven, it reminds us to: ''Tread softly because you tread on my dreams''.

    This article was published by The New Statesman on August 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    In brief... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard, Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
    A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Aitkenage.com

    Scouting teaches morals and more

    In the book A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age by Judy Dunn and Richard Layard, they reference a study which reports only seven percent of adults say children have a stronger sense of moral values than those in the past and 66 percent say they are not as strong. They also report that when asked whether today's children have a stronger sense of community than that of the past, only 5 percent said yes and 69 percent say not as strong.

    This article was published online by Aitkenage.com on August 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age, Richard Layard and Judy Dunn, Penguin (5 Feb 2009) ISBN-10: 0141039434 ISBN-13: 978-0141039435 £9.99
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 02/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE British Politics and Policy blog

    Summer budget: High hopes for the productivity plan - is enough being done?

    Article by Anna Valero
    In the 2015 summer budget, George Osborne at last identified the UK's productivity performance as an important issue that needs to be tackled. Here, Anna Valero reviews some of the measures ahead of further detail on the government's productivity plan due out tomorrow.
    The issue of productivity was left out of the March budget and somewhat ignored during the general election campaign - much to the dismay of economists, for whom weak productivity performance since the financial crisis is the number one problem facing the UK economy. Therefore, Osborne's post-election announcement that dealing with weak productivity would be a priority in this parliament was welcome news.

    This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on July 9, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
    Further info here

    Related CEP video/podcast
    'Productivity and Business'. Interview with Anna Valero.
    Low productivity is probably the greatest challenge facing the UK economy.
    View video here

    Related links
    Anna Valero webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


    News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Gates to double investment in renewable energy projects

    Bill Gates (co-founder of Microsoft) interviewed: ...
    Tens of billions of dollars should therefore be spent by governments on research and development in renewables over coming years, three times current levels, to identify reliable sources of ''zero-carbon'' power that can be exploited at scale, Mr Gates said. ''Because there's so much uncertainty and there are so many different paths, it should be like the Manhattan Project and the Apollo Project in the sense that the government should put in a serious amount of R&D.''

    This article was published in The Financial Times on June 25, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change', David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner
    Download the report from here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Global Apollo Programme webpage
    News Posted: 25/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    A moonshot to save a warming planet

    A report entitled A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change, written by a number of high-profile British scientists and economists, offers a bold answer. It argues that carbon-free energy has to become competitive with fossil fuels. ''Once this happened, the coal, gas and oil would simply stay in the ground.''

    This article was published by the Financial Times on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Cameron wants wage rises to replace benefits

    Iain Duncan Smith, the welfare secretary, has exhorted companies to ''pay their full share'' of workers' remuneration rather than leaving it to the state to prop up incomes through tax credits. Professor Steve Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics said there was no evidence demonstrating that social security payments to low-wage workers enabled companies to pay people less.

    The article was printed by The Financial Times on June 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Real Wages and Living Standards, Stephen Machin, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
    CEP Real Wages Updates research series by David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin webpage

    Related links
    Stephen Machin webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    The secret of happiness (it's not what you think)

    Money, as the song lyric has it, can't buy you love - or happiness. Happiness, as Richard Layard's research shows, depends much more on the quality of our personal relationships than on our income. In many ways, the most important external factor in well-being is whether we feel this closeness.

    This article was published by the Huffington Post on June 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Coventry and Warwickshire

    Shane O'Connor's Breakfast Show

    8.50am: live radio interview
    Dennis Novy interviewed, speaking about Greece and the looming IMF deadline.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC Coventry and Warwickshire on the Shane O'Connor Breakfast Show on June 22, 2015
    Link to broadcast here (about 1 hour 50 mins in)

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    TES News

    ‘Encouraging a growth mindset is not just about boosting academic achievement'

    First Richard Layard, my colleague in the Lords, blogged about why schools should teach character as well as competence. Their research at the LSE, using the British Cohort Study, found that the strongest predictor of a satisfying adult life is a child's emotional health, and least important is academic achievement.

    This article was published online by Times Education Supplement (TES) on June 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 19/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Stern

    Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

    A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
    The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

    This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

    Related links
    Albrecht Ritschl webpage
    Macro Programme webpage


    News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Scientific American

    How to be a better parent

    Further evidence: children in a London School of Economics and Political Science study from 2014 who had two overweight biological parents were 27 percent more likely than other kids to be overweight, yet adopted children of overweight parents were almost as equally more likely to be heavy - 21 percent.

    This article was published by the Scientific American on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Vertical Transmission of Overweight: Evidence From English Adoptees', Joan Costa Font, Mireia Jofre-Bonet and Julian Le Grand, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1324, January 2015

    Related links
    Joan Costa Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Mirror.co.uk

    The 6 everyday habits that cost you money

    Why? It could be because most of us just are wired a certain way. ''Most of what we do simply comes about rather than being thought about'', said Paul Dolan, professor of behavioural science, London School of Economics. ''We act on emotion and impulse, sometimes in ways that improve our wellbeing but other times to our detriment.''

    This article was published online by the Mirror.co.uk (web) on June 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Foreign Policy Magazine

    Embroiled in endless conflict, how is Israel the 11th happiest nation in the world?

    ...its roster of contributors includes John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, and Jeffrey D. Sachs who is, among other things, special advisor to U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Overall, the report is a pretty impressive...

    This article was published by Foreign Policy Magazine on June 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'World Happiness Report 2015', John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Vox

    The case for a Global Apollo Programme to limit climate change

    Article by Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Nicholas Stern, Adair Turner
    If clean energy were cheaper than dirty energy, climate change would halt. Making clean energy cheaper is a problem - like putting a man - on the moon that can be cracked if the effort is properly organised and financed. This column proposes a ten-year 'Global Apollo Programme' to achieve the necessary price reversal.

    This article was published online by Vox on June 8, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 08/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The New India Express

    Indices signal need for people centric plans for a happier and fairer India

    In the freedom to make life choices, too, India performs poorly. There are many inherent inhibitions in this freedom, mainly for women. Richard Layard, director of the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and one of the study's editors, says: ''A positive outlook during the early stages of life is inherently desirable, but it also lays the foundation for greater happiness during adulthood''.

    This article was published by The New India Express on June 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The World Happiness Report 2015, John F. Helliwell, Lord Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs, published by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 05/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Korea Times

    China's jobless growth miracle

    Article by Keyu Jin
    Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang recently cited job creation as vital to his country's ''ultimate goal of stability in growth''. His observation could not be more accurate. In fact, one of the most baffling features of China's economic rise is that, even amid double-digit GDP growth, employment grew at a measly 1.8 percent average annual rate from 1978 to 2004. Households, it seems, have largely missed out on the benefits of economic development in China.

    This article was published by The Korea Times on June 4, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Keyu Jin webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Macro Programme webpage


    News Posted: 04/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Hindu

    India central to green energy plan: U.K. climate change envoy

    India will be a member of a consortium of countries that will implement the Global Apollo Programme - a plan to find ways within the next 10 years of making green energy clean cheaper to produce than energy drawn from coal, gas or oil. This is the only way the internationally accepted limit of 2 degrees centigrade increase in global emperature that will avert a climate crisis can be met. The plan - which seeks to bring the creative spirit that put the first humans on the moon through the Apollo mission to the challenge of reversing climate change - is the brainchild of a group of UK experts drawn from academia, business and government. The group includes Sir David King, UK's climate change envoy and former United Kingdom Chief Scientific Adviser, Lord Nicholas Stern, author of the Stern Report, Lord Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal, Lord Richard Layard, Director of Wellbeing Programme, London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance and Lord John Browne, ex-BP chief.

    This article was published by The Hindu on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Clean Technica

    Global Apollo Programme aims to tackle climate change

    In the deepest chill of the Cold War, then-president of the United States John F. Kennedy announced to the country, and the world, that ''we choose to go to the moon.'' The Apollo Programme placed a man on the moon within the decade, and now, a new Apollo Programme has been launched, but this time its aims are to tackle climate change.

    This article was published online by Clean Technica on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Daily Kos

    'We managed to put a man on the moon. Now we need to put clean energy on Earth.'

    ''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

    This article was published online by the Daily Kos on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Daily Kos

    'We managed to put a man on the moon. Now we need to put clean energy on Earth.'

    ''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

    This article was published online by the Daily Kos on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Information (Denmark)

    Apollo skal inspirere til billig og ren energi

    A number of Britain's leading experts in the field of climate research are focused on achieving the goal of solving the world's most pressing problem: the continued global temperature rise.

    This article was published online by Information (Denmark) on June 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' Report. Details here.
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    New Scientist

    New Apollo programme wants moonshot budget to boost renewables

    ''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

    This article was published by the New Scientist on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Global Apollo programme seeks to make clean energy cheaper than coal

    Lord Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics and member of the Apollo group, said it was barely believable that the world only spent 2% of its R&D money on its ''most pressing problem'' of climate change and clean energy. He said: ''We do not think this problem can be conquered unless we reduce the cost of renewable energy below the cost of dirty energy.''

    This article was published online by the Guardian on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Heart London (Radio)

    News

    Discussion of Paul Dolan's recent comments on what makes people happier.

    This interview was broadcast by Heart London (Radio) on June 2, 2015
    [No link available]

    Also on
    BBC Newcastle
    Swansea Sound
    Magic FM

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Heart London (Radio)

    News

    Discussion of Paul Dolan's recent comments on what makes people happier.

    This interview was broadcast by Heart London (Radio) on June 2, 2015
    [No link available]

    Also on
    BBC Newcastle
    Swansea Sound
    Magic FM

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC World Service

    News

    Interview with Lord Layard regarding launch of the 'Apollo' programme to make renewables cheaper than fossil fuels.

    The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service News on June 2, 2015
    [No link available.]

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    We need a global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change

    Article by Richard Layard
    The target for GAP is to reduce the cost of clean energy and to do it fast.

    This article was published by The Huffington Post on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Leading scientists join campaign to end use of coal within 10 years

    Leading academics, including former government chief scientist Sir David King, past president of the Royal Society Lord Rees, and economists Lord Stern and Lord Layard, in effect said that the world cannot be saved from global warming unless coal - the dirtiest fossil fuel - is put out of business.

    This article was published by The Independent on June 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Richard Layard: ‘Money is not the only thing affecting people's happiness'

    The Chris Blackhurst interview from 13 July 2014
    How could we become a happier nation? One pioneering economist has spent the best part of a decade arguing that we simply must find an answer to this question - gaining the support of David Cameron, who backed the notion of happiness as ''the new GDP''. That economist won't let it drop. He wants to reignite the whole debate and go further still.

    This article was published by The Independent on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage


    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Evening Standard (web)

    Revealed: The five things which can make you immediately happier

    A respected ''happiness expert'' has revealed five simple ways to make yourself feel immediately better. Paul Dolan, a professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, said the answer to feeling happier could be found by following simple steps. Speaking at the Hay Festival, he advised people seeking to be immediately happier

    This article was published online by The Evening Standard on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage


    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Times Live South Africa

    Five things you can do to be happier

    Earning more money, bagging the fabulous job you have always wanted, or travelling the world might seem like keys to happiness. But, according to ''happiness expert'' Paul Dolan, making simple changes is the key to bringing joy and purpose into your life. Dolan, a professor at the London School of Economics, claims that many of the things people believe will make them happy are fleeting and can actually alter their lives for the worse.

    This article was published by Times Live South Africa on June 1, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

    BBC London 94.9FM

    News

    Discussion of Paul Dolan's event at the Hay Festival, and the ways people can feel happier.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC London 94.9FM on May 31, 2015
    [No link available]

    Also on:
    BBC Radio 5 Live
    News

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage


    News Posted: 31/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    De Morgen

    Vijf dingen die je meteen kan doen om gelukkiger te worden

    More money, the job of your life may seem like the keys to a happier life. However it is no less true that happiness is, according to Professor Paul Dolan. Just small changes that bring joy and give meaning to life can provide great happiness. Dolan, who is a professor affiliated with the prestigious London School of Economics and who works as a government adviser, claims that the major changes that people think will make them happy may instead have a negative impact on their lives.

    This article was published by De Morgen on May 31, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 31/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Telegraph

    Prof: joy lies in simple activities

    According to happiness expert Prof Paul Dolan, making simple changes are the key to creating joy. Prof Dolan, of the London School of Economics, has claimed a work promotion may bring more stress, travelling can be lonely and above a £50,000 salary people aren't measurably happier.

    This article was published by The Sunday Telegraph on May 31, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 31/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Mental health momentum mustn't give way to political expediency

    The authoritative How Mental Health Loses Out in the NHS study, published by the LSE in 2012, revealed that for people aged 65 or less, nearly half of all ill health was mental ill health.

    This article was published online by The Conversation UK on May 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    How Mental Health Loses Out in the NHS: Report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012
    In brief: Mental illness and the NHS, Richard Layard. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Mental Health Research webpage
    News Posted: 15/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    What would you pay to be happy?

    Richard Layard, a British social economist and associate of Kahneman, found himself at the top table of Britain's New Labour government when it took power in 1997. The press gave him the title Happiness Tsar, and his 2005 book, Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, remains a hugely influential international bestseller.

    This article was published by The Guardian on May 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    News Posted: 10/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Times

    Rent controls that aren't

    Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
    Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

    This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
    CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

    Related links
    Christian Hilber webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre website

    News Posted: 27/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Telegraph

    Are happy workers more productive?

    As Pret a Manger becomes the latest company to credit happy workers for improved profits, we examine the evidence that suggests smiling employees might keep the tills ringing.
    There is a slight problem with anecdotal evidence from trendy companies and laboratory experiments undertaken at Warwick. Dr Alex Bryson at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research says: ''You have to ask yourself about the believability of the experiment. How did they induce happiness? By showing a comedy clip. Even if you could induce higher wellbeing into individual workers that doesn't necessarily translate into improved profitability.''

    This article was published online by The Telegraph on April 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Alex Bryson webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Alex Bryson CEP publications webpage


    News Posted: 22/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Observer

    What would happen if Britain left the EU?

    One of the main arguments employed by those in favour of remaining in the EU is simply how difficult it would prove to leave. We are deeply integrated with our European allies - economically, militarily and culturally. It's likely that Brexit (and what an ugly neologism it is) would lead to plummeting stock markets and an economic recession, with losses to GDP calculated by the Centre for Economic Performance at up to 9.5% - worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

    This article was published in The Observer on April 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

    Related CEP videos/podcasts
    Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson
    View video here

    Related links
    Swati Dhingra webpage
    Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
    Thomas Sampson webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage


    News Posted: 19/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Time

    The one word key to happiness

    Paul Dolan teaches at the London School of Economics and was a visiting scholar at Princeton where he worked with Nobel-Prize winner Daniel Kahneman. He explains the importance of attention in his book, Happiness by Design: Change What You Do, Not How You Think.

    This article was published by Time on March 31, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 31/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Mail online

    How do YOU think NHS money should be spent? Boob jobs, liver transplants for alcoholics or vital support for dementia patients? New TV show asks the public for their view

    Can the NHS cope with the rapid rise in dementia patients? Ros is one of 670,000 carers, but she needs help - £350 will provide a support nurse
    Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said: 'One of the biggest numbers we should worry about is the number of people who have dementia now in the UK, it is estimated at more than 800,000'.

    This article was published in the Mail online on February 23, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Svenska Dagbladet

    Lättare att få terapi i England

    Allt började med att Oxfordprofessorn i psykologi råkade hamna intill sir Richard Layard, ekonom vid London school of economics och rådgivare åt Labourpartiet. Detta skedde när båda hade blivit invalda i Brittiska akademien för humaniora och socialvetenskap.
    Depression and anxiety make you less productive, more likely to be unemployed, have more physical illnesses and often a shorter life. It is painful for the individual and costly to society. With these findings Oxford psychology professor David Clark and London School of Economics economist Richard Layard were able to convince the British government to start IAPT in 2005. It stands for improving access to psychological therapies.

    This article appeared in Svenska Dagbladet on 23 February 2015 link to article

    Related Publications
    Healthy Young Minds: Transforming The Mental Health Of Children Richard Layard, Ann Hagell, Report of the WISH Mental Health and Wellbeing in Children Forum, February 2015

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Svenska Dagbladet

    Lättare att få terapi i England

    Allt började med att Oxfordprofessorn i psykologi råkade hamna intill sir Richard Layard, ekonom vid London school of economics och rådgivare åt Labourpartiet. Detta skedde när båda hade blivit invalda i Brittiska akademien för humaniora och socialvetenskap.
    Depression and anxiety make you less productive, more likely to be unemployed, have more physical illnesses and often a shorter life. It is painful for the individual and costly to society. With these findings Oxford psychology professor David Clark and London School of Economics economist Richard Layard were able to convince the British government to start IAPT in 2005. It stands for improving access to psychological therapies.

    This article appeared in Svenska Dagbladet on 23 February 2015 link to article

    Related Publications
    Healthy Young Minds: Transforming The Mental Health Of Children Richard Layard, Ann Hagell, Report of the WISH Mental Health and Wellbeing in Children Forum, February 2015

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Svenska Dagbladet

    Lättare att få terapi i England

    Allt började med att Oxfordprofessorn i psykologi råkade hamna intill sir Richard Layard, ekonom vid London school of economics och rådgivare åt Labourpartiet. Detta skedde när båda hade blivit invalda i Brittiska akademien för humaniora och socialvetenskap.
    Depression and anxiety make you less productive, more likely to be unemployed, have more physical illnesses and often a shorter life. It is painful for the individual and costly to society. With these findings Oxford psychology professor David Clark and London School of Economics economist Richard Layard were able to convince the British government to start IAPT in 2005. It stands for improving access to psychological therapies.

    This article appeared in Svenska Dagbladet on 23 February 2015 link to article

    Related Publications
    Healthy Young Minds: Transforming The Mental Health Of Children Richard Layard, Ann Hagell, Report of the WISH Mental Health and Wellbeing in Children Forum, February 2015

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Observer

    Enjoy a two-day festival of ideas and inspiration

    Dolan is professor of behavioural science at LSE and his recent bestselling book Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life aims to provide insights into behavioural science and the relationship between attention and of happiness.

    This article appeared in the Observer on 22 February 2015 link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 22/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Observer

    Giving a voice to UK's dementia sufferers and their loved ones How John's Campaign has helped to build awareness of the illness

    In 1974 there were 350,000 people with dementia in the UK. Last year the number had grown to 816,000, a 74 percent increase. According to Martin Knapp, professor of social policy at the London School of Economics, that growth is likely to quicken as the population ages. He estimates that the total cost to the UK economy is already £26bn a year. It is imperative for quality of life and the health of the public purse that we invest in research: £52m went into dementia research last year compared with £600m spent on cancer research. It is also important to diagnose earlier and make the small gestures that allow those with diagnosis to live well for as long as possible.

    This article was ublished by The Observer on February 15, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 15/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Daily Telegraph

    Love? That's no route to happiness

    Bestselling behavioural scientist Paul Dolan - also known as 'Professor Happy' - busts a few myths about love
    It is the week before Valentine's Day, and in his office at the London School of Economics (LSE), Dolan ''also known as Professor Happy'' is mulling over the reasons why love barely features in his book about happiness.

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on February 14, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness by Design, Paul Dolan published by Penguin on the 28th August 2014
    Details

    Related links
    Related links Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 14/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Herald

    Plymouth parents' lifestyles rather than genes are responsible for children being overweight, new research shows

    PARENTS' lifestyles, rather than their genes, are primarily responsible for their children being overweight, according to new research. Researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance compared the weight of biological and adopted children to that of their parents to determine whether children inherit their weight problems or whether they are the result of the environment they grow up in. Dr Joan Costa Font, associate professor of political economy at LSE, said: ''The good news is that our research shows that we can do something about children's weight problems.''

    This article was published in the Plymouth Herald on February 11, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Vertical transmission of overweight: Evidence from English adoptees', Joan Costa-i-Font, Mireia Jofre-Bonet and Julian Le Grand, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1324, January 2015

    Related links
    Joan Costa Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 11/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    New Scientist

    Secrets of the home: My house made me do it

    Our personalities shape our homes, but it's not one-way traffic: they exert a powerful psychological effect on us too. Take the way it smells. ''If there are clean smells in the house, you are more likely to keep it clean'', says Paul Dolan, a psychologist at the London School of Economics. In one study carried out in 2005, Dutch psychologists found that the aroma from a hidden bucket of citrus-smelling cleaner was enough to make volunteers do a much better job of cleaning up biscuit crumbs - even though they weren't aware of the scent. Although the research was carried out in a lab, Dolan suspects that we are likely to behave in a similar way at home.

    This article was published by the New Scientist on February 7, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 07/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    LSE showcases SERC Impact Case Studies

    Research Impact site launched

    LSE has launched a Research Impact site which showcases how researchers at the School have worked with policymakers and communities around the world, and gathers together Impact Case Studies from the 2014 REF .

    SERC has two case studies placed front and centre on the site. The first looks at how SERC has influenced urban economic policy in the UK, both in central Government and working with cities like Manchester. The second focuses on Paul Cheshire’s research on land use planning , which has highlighted the economic effects of the UK planning system and helped drive national debates on housing, the green belt and town centre first policies.
    News Posted: 06/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    UnMexicali.com

    Las 10 cosas que hacen feliz a un hombre

    Los enumero Nick Powdthavee, economista comportamental de la Universidad de York autor del libro ''La ecuacion de la felicidad''
    The 10 things that make a man happy
    The behavioral economist, Nick Powdthavee, has looked into an equation for happiness. The 10 points are: 1) spending time with friends; 2) to have better health than others; 3) to have a happy partner in life to live with; 4) have a job that you love; 5) solidarity with your community; 6) marriage; 7) living close to where you work; 8) being young and then being old; 9) sex; 10) earning more than others you know.

    This article was published online by UniMexicali.com on February 3, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 03/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Telegraph

    Playing with political fire

    Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics says it is Syriza that has misjudged badly, both by teaming up in coalition with a virulently anti-German party, and by violating Troika terms across the board – halting privatisation, raising the minimum wage to €750 a month, re-hiring 10,000 civil servants, and blocking mortgage foreclosures. “Tsipras is slapping the Germans in the face: it is almost as if he wishes to be thrown out of Europe. I can’t see any political support for Syriza from any government in southern Europe. They are all terrified of their own populist movements,” he says.

    This article appeared in The Telegraph on 2 February 2015 link to article

    Related Links
    Luis Garicano webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    News Posted: 02/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Monitor Mercantil

    Obama quer taxar multis que aplicam em paraísos fiscais

    According to a study by Professor Gabriel Zucman, of the London School of Economics, quoted by MM, on 26 November, at least 8 percent of the world's wealth, or about $7.6 trillion, are in private accounts in tax havens. The value represents 2.1 times the GDP of Germany, $3.6 trillion in 2013. Most of these resources belongs to U.S. multinationals such as General Electric, Microsoft, Pfizer, Google and Apple.

    This article was published online by Monitor Mercantil on February 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The missing wealth of nations: Are Europe and the U.S. net debtors or net creditors?, Gabriel Zucman, Oxford Journals, July 6, 2013

    Related links
    Gabriel Zucman webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    News Posted: 02/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Monitor Mercantil

    Obama quer taxar multis que aplicam em paraísos fiscais

    According to a study by Professor Gabriel Zucman, of the London School of Economics, quoted by MM, on 26 November, at least 8 percent of the world's wealth, or about $7.6 trillion, are in private accounts in tax havens. The value represents 2.1 times the GDP of Germany, $3.6 trillion in 2013. Most of these resources belongs to U.S. multinationals such as General Electric, Microsoft, Pfizer, Google and Apple.

    This article was published online by Monitor Mercantil on February 2, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    The missing wealth of nations: Are Europe and the U.S. net debtors or net creditors?, Gabriel Zucman, Oxford Journals, July 6, 2013

    Related links
    Gabriel Zucman webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    News Posted: 02/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

    L'avenir.net

    La droit au Bonheur sans salaire

    Should we follow the British economist Sir Richard Layard? ''According to him, work contributes to happiness insofar as it contributes to the society and gives some meaning to the life of the worker'', says Cyril Perrier.

    This article was published by L'avenir.net (France) on January 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    News Posted: 29/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Miami Herald

    Become a 'big' and help a 'little'

    We recruit and train mentors and pair them with children who need some additional encouragement and perspective to recognize a more positive future. Our mentors - ''Bigs'' - bring a new sense of opportunity and perspective to a world of possibilities that their mentees - ''Littles'' - didn't realize were available to them. ... New research finds that emotional health in childhood is the key to future happiness. According to the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, ''By far the most important predictor of adult life satisfaction is emotional health, both in childhood and subsequently.''

    This article was published online by the Miami Herald on January 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 29/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Labour's fiscal record was good until world recession

    Letter from Professor Richard Layard
    Sir, John Hutton and Alan Milburn are quite right (''Defend Labour's economic record - the facts are on our side'', Comment, January 28): the fiscal record of the last Labour government was good. Until the world recession of 2008, Labour's fiscal deficit was lower in every year than the deficits of John Major's government. It was the world recession that caused the deficits of 2008 and 2009. In the coming election campaign Conservative candidates will refer daily to ''the deficit that Labour left behind''. Labour needs to respond with its own mantra: ''No, they were deficits caused by the world recession.''

    The letter was published by The Financial Times on January 29, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 29/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    R.It Scienze

    Una formula per la crisi di mezza eta ecco perche arriva a 42 anni/A formula for the mid-life crisis here why gets to 42 years

    According to the latest research in scatenarla crisis is not linked to money or old age but to the collapse of expectations and loss of job Terence c. Cheng, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew j. Oswald of the University of Melbourne, of the London School of Economics, the University of Warwick and the Institute for the study of Labor (Iza) in Bonn, pregiandosi of having ''the first demonstration in various nations of the existence of scientific reasons for believing the nadir or midlife crisis''.

    This article was published online by R.it Scienze on January 26, 2015
    Link to article here

    See also:
    San Francesco Patrono d'Italia
    La crisi di mezza eta arriva a 42 anni, copa della mancan
    Donna Today
    La crisi di mezza eta arriva a 42 anni: ecco perche
    Befan
    La crisi di mezza eta esiste davvero: ecco quando inizia

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 26/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Rtlnieuws.nl

    Wij eisen geluk!/We demand happiness!

    We demand happiness!
    Despite the reservations you can make there, we find that the British are busy with something special. That is why we went to London to investigate where they, four years after Cameron's speech, with measuring well-being and their use for policy. We talked to the economist Richard Layard, with Diane Coyle (who last year wrote ''GDP: a brief but affectionate history of GDP'') and with Charles Seaford of the New Economics Foundation. And we went along to Valerie Fender, head economist of well-being at the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the British CBS. There they should see the beautiful words of Cameron to translate into practical 'management information' for politicians.

    This article was published online by Rtlnieuws.nl on January 25, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    News Posted: 25/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Stumbling and Mumbling

    Not seeing luck

    This is consistent with other experiments by Nick Powdthavee and Yohanes Riyanto, who conclude that ''an average person is often happy to pay for what could only be described as transparently useless advice''.

    This article was published online on the Stumbling and Mumbling blog on January 22, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 22/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Only one in ten education reforms analysed for their impact: OECD

    Only a tenth of education reforms carried out around the world since 2008 have been analysed by governments for the impact they have on children's education. A new report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) think-tank looked at 450 education reforms carried out by its 34 member countries between 2008 and 2014. It found that only one in ten of these reforms were scrutinised for impact.

    Peter Dolton, professor of economics at the University of Sussex, who has recently carried out research on the cost-effectiveness of education systems, said the OECD was ''right to suggest that there needs to be more rigorous evaluation of new education policy initiatives''.

    This article was published online by The Conversation on January 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Educational efficiency: value for money in public spending on schools, Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro Gutierrez and Adam Still. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 3, Winter 2014/15
    The Efficiency Index: Which Education Systems Deliver the Best Value for Money? by Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Adam Still, published by GEMS Education Solutions, September 2014.

    Related links
    Peter Dolton webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    News Posted: 19/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Only one in ten education reforms analysed for their impact: OECD

    Only a tenth of education reforms carried out around the world since 2008 have been analysed by governments for the impact they have on children's education. A new report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) think-tank looked at 450 education reforms carried out by its 34 member countries between 2008 and 2014. It found that only one in ten of these reforms were scrutinised for impact.

    Peter Dolton, professor of economics at the University of Sussex, who has recently carried out research on the cost-effectiveness of education systems, said the OECD was ''right to suggest that there needs to be more rigorous evaluation of new education policy initiatives''.

    This article was published online by The Conversation on January 19, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Educational efficiency: value for money in public spending on schools, Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro Gutierrez and Adam Still. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 3, Winter 2014/15
    The Efficiency Index: Which Education Systems Deliver the Best Value for Money? by Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Adam Still, published by GEMS Education Solutions, September 2014.

    Related links
    Peter Dolton webpage
    Education and Skills Programme webpage
    News Posted: 19/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    RealEconomy

    The right balance: the economics of happiness

    What makes people happy? Measuring human happiness is increasingly becoming a pursuit of economists, who use a range of research tools to gauge and quantify popular contentment at a national level. A common factor is money, but that's far from the whole story, as we find out in this edition of Real Economy. ... In London we meet Baron Richard Layard, a leading labour economist who explains the complexities of measuring happiness.

    This article was published by RealEconomy on January 13, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness Research webpage
    News Posted: 13/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Confidencial

    La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Confidencial

    La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Confidencial

    La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    El Confidencial

    La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

    Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

    This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
    Link here

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    OpEdNews.com

    Two irrepressible egalitarian spirits

    British epidemiologists Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett have changed how the world thinks about economic inequality - and they have a wealth of new insights to share. Wilkinson and Pickett are now completing a new book, due out in 2016, and Too Much editor Sam Pizzigati caught up with the pair at their UK home outside the city of York. The resulting discussion, edited here for publication, explores their Spirit Level experience - and the egalitarian work they see as essential ahead.

    Richard Layard, the author of Happiness, which did very well as a serious nonfiction book, had told us to be prepared, when the book comes out, for your life to be completely chaotic for about two weeks. Well, it's been completely chaotic for five years now. It just hasn't let up.

    This article was published online by OpEdNews.com on January 5, 2015
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
    Details

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness research webpage
    News Posted: 05/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

    Huffington Post

    Managing Our Minds: The Economic Case for Investment in Mental Health

    Lord Richard Layard of the LSE has campaigned heavily for increased expenditure in mental health care, having demonstrated the economic viability of taking such measures. Layard estimates that the costs of providing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to all those who need it would be quickly recovered, and that the longer-term impact on the economy would be wholly positive.

    This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 17 December 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014 Details here


    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 17/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    International New York Times

    Along with art and jewels, the rich now collect passports

    “These programs bring huge benefits to the Russian oligarchs or the various Chinese wanting to benefit from the rule of law, good educations and robust capital markets,” said David Metcalf, chairman of the British government’s Migration Advisory Committee and a professor emeritus at the London School of Economics. “But the fundamental question is, What does everyone else get out of it?”

    This article appeared in the International New York Times on 15 December 2014 link to article

    Also in:
    CNBC
    Latest rich collectible: Passports link to article

    Weekly Voice
    Collecting passports is the new fad for those with the money link to article

    Related links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Labour Markets webpage
    David Metcalf CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 15/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Financial Express Bangladesh

    How's life with rural people?

    Richard Layard in his book 'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' notes that as the Western societies got richer, their people have not become happier.

    This article appeared in the Financial Express on 10 December 2014 link to article

    Related publications Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
    Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
    News Posted: 10/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Mail Online UK

    Wind farms 'have no significant effect' on house prices, claims study

    This research, which was recently published in the journal Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics, is the first peer-reviewed study on the subject. It contradicts research earlier this year by the London School of Economics (LSE) which found that values of homes within 1.2 miles (1.9km) of large wind farms were being slashed by about 11 per cent.

    This article appeared in the Mail Online on 9 December 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Gone with the Wind: Valuing the Visual Impacts of Wind Turbines through House Prices, Stephen Gibbons, SERC Discussion Paper No.159, April 2014
    Gone with the Wind Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    Stephen Gibbons webpage
    SERC website
    News Posted: 09/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Reuters

    Can we live the good life without economic growth?

    The life of the mind encompasses a broad array of human preoccupations: values, creativity, the appreciation of beauty, intellectual curiosity and the struggle to make sense of our lives. Consuming more stuff doesn’t necessarily help us do any of this. Indeed, studies by economists such as Richard Layard suggest that, beyond a certain point, additional income does nothing to promote happiness.

    This article appeared in Reuters on 8 December 2014 link to article

    Also in:
    The New York Times link to article
    Breaking Views link to article

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011 Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
    News Posted: 08/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Financial

    Young people who argue with their fathers are less resilient when faced with unemployment as adults

    Adolescents who have poor relationships with their fathers are more likely to fare worse psychologically if they become unemployed as adults says new research from the Centre for Economic Performance, at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). ... ''We know that unemployment is a massively distressing event that many people do not completely recover from psychologically even after their income has returned to pre-unemployment levels. What we know a lot less about is why some people are more or less affected by unemployment than others,'' Professor Nick Powdthavee, author of the research, said.

    This article was published online by the Financial on December 4, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    What childhood characteristics predict psychological resilience to economic shocks in adulthood?, Nattavudh Powdthavee. Article forthcoming in Journal of Economic Psychology.
    'Resilience to Economic Shocks and the Long Reach of Childhood Bullying', Nattavudh Powdthavee, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1173, October 2012

    Related links
    Nick Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 04/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    MIT News Press Release

    Economist's new book teaches how to conduct cause-and-effect studies on complex social questions

    MIT News announced the publication later this month of Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke.
    Economists' new book teaches how to conduct cause-and-effect studies on complex social questions.

    The release was published online by MIT News on December 1, 2014
    Link to the article here

    Related publications
    Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke, Princeton University Press, December 2014
    Details

    Related links
    Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 01/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Huffington Post

    Emotional health, not academic obsession

    I am glad there is now an academic study by London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance to give credence to my deep personal beliefs. That a child's emotional health is far more important to their satisfaction levels as an adult than other factors. You can read more on Professor Lord Richard Layard's work here.

    This article was published in The Huffington Post (UK edition) blog on November 26, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 26/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    BBC World

    Global With Matthew Amroliwala

    Professor Paul Dolan was interviewed about happiness.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC World on November 25, 2014
    [No link available]

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 25/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Guardian

    Happiness expert Paul Dolan: what makes me happy

    Article by Paul Dolan
    Paul Dolan explains how happiness should be defined and measured in terms of experiences of pleasure and purpose over time.

    This article was published by the Guardian on November 22, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 22/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Workplace Savings and Benefits

    National wellbeing survey vital for employers - ONS

    Everett was supported by Lord Richard Layard and Lord Gus O'Donnell who were also speaking at the launch of the index. Lord O'Donnell said: ''One of the biggest, clearest conclusions from wellbeing analysis is that we should be reallocating wellbeing budgets around the world towards solving mental health problems and away from physical problems. ''Obviously we'd all like more of everything, but as an ex-head of the Treasury I know we're dealing with re-allocations here.'' Lord Layard added that it was interesting that many companies, particularly those in the City where stress levels were high, were having stress reduction courses. ''Some are more cognitive, some are more physical or more mindful based,'' he said. ''But stress reduction courses have been used all over the USA to very good effect - and you can see effects on blood pressure, immune system and so on.''

    This article was published online by Workplace Savings and Benefits on November 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
    Details here
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Gus O'Donnell webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage

    News Posted: 21/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog

    Why the views of middle class citizens help explain increased choice in European healthcare systems

    Article by Joan Costa-i-Font and Valentina Zigante
    Several countries across Europe have attempted to reform their health systems by allowing patients more choice over their healthcare provider. The typical rationale for this strategy is that by creating competition between providers, there will be an increased incentive to improve the efficiency and quality of healthcare. Joan Costa-i-Font and Valentina Zigante assess the underlying factors that have led to European countries adopting this 'choice agenda' in their healthcare systems. They find that one of the key drivers for this type of reform has been the role of middle class citizens in demanding greater choice over health providers.

    This article was published by the LSE's EUROPP (European Politics and Policy) blog on November 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Joan Costa-i-Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 21/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Hindustan Times

    Does living in a democracy make you tall?

    New research linking democracy and wellbeing suggests that men growing up in a democracy are likely to be taller than those who spend the first 20 years of their lives in a communist regime. The link is related to good nutrition, high disposable income and a life free of social and political constraints, according to findings by experts from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). In their study of Czech Republic and Slovakian residents since the dissolution of the communist regime in 1989, political economist Joan Costa-i-Font and colleague Lucia Kossarova found clear height differences between the two regimes.

    This article was published online by the Hindustani Times on November 21, 2014
    Link to article here

    Also in
    MSN Nieuws
    Indian Monitor
    radiosarajevo.ba


    Related publications and videos
    'Anthropometric Dividends of Czechoslovakia's break up' by Dr Joan Costa-i-Font and Dr Lucia Kossarova, is available here
    'Joan Costa-i-Font: The Link between Democracy and Height'. Video link here

    Related links
    Joan Costa-i-Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 21/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    O Globo Online - blog

    Homens ficam mais altos em democracia do que em regime comunista

    Men are taller in a democracy than if grown up in a communist regime
    ''Men who grow up in a democracy tend to be taller than those who have lived their first 20 years of life under a Communist regime.'' The assertion may seem strange to those who read. But this is one of the findings of a survey conducted by political economists at the London School of Economics (LSE), Joan Costa-Font and Lucia Kossarova.

    This article was published by the blog O Globo online on November 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and videos
    'Anthropometric Dividends of Czechoslovakia's break up' by Dr Joan Costa-i-Font and Dr Lucia Kossarova, is available here
    'Joan Costa-i-Font: The Link between Democracy and Height'. Video link here

    Related links
    Joan Costa-i-Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 20/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Psychology Today

    Being happy at work matters for you - and your boss

    Article by Paul Dolan
    Being happy at work is important. Studies suggest that if you're not happy at work, you're less productive, more likely to take days off sick, and a poor problem solver. Still, some people maintain being happy at work isn't important - that happiness is just one possible by-product of a good working environment, and not worth being goal in and it itself. I think, however, this comes from a fundamental misunderstanding of what happiness can mean. In order to discuss whether it's worth being happy at work - or anywhere else - we should first understand what sort of happiness we are talking about.

    This article was published by Psychology Today on November 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 20/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Aftenposten (Norway)

    Gir leger bonus for å stille riktig diagnose

    Give doctors bonuses for asking the right diagnosis
    Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics, Martin Knapp, says such incentive schemes tend to have an effect. He thinks this controversial measure will cause some more attention will be given to dementia-diagnosis for the next six months, and he considers the risk of a possible incorrect overdiagnosing to be small.

    This article was published by Aftenposten (Norway) on November 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 20/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Aftenposten (Norway)

    Gir leger bonus for å stille riktig diagnose

    Give doctors bonuses for asking the right diagnosis
    Professor of Social Policy at the London School of Economics, Martin Knapp, says such incentive schemes tend to have an effect. He thinks this controversial measure will cause some more attention will be given to dementia-diagnosis for the next six months, and he considers the risk of a possible incorrect overdiagnosing to be small.

    This article was published by Aftenposten (Norway) on November 20, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 20/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    LSE Press Release

    Stand tall if you are living in a democracy

    Men growing up in a democracy are likely to be taller than those who spend the first 20 years of their lives in a communist regime. The link between democracy and stature is related to good nutrition, high disposable income and a life free of social and political constraints, according to new findings from the London School of Economics and Political Science. In a study of Czech Republic and Slovakian residents since the dissolution of the communist regime in 1989, LSE political economist Dr Joan Costa-i-Font and colleague Dr Lucia Kossarova found clear height differences between the two regimes.

    This press release was published by the London School of Economics on November 20, 2014
    The release is available to download here

    Related publications and videos
    'Anthropometric Dividends of Czechoslovakia's break up' by Dr Joan Costa-i-Font and Dr Lucia Kossarova, is available here
    'Joan Costa-i-Font: The Link between Democracy and Height'. Video link here

    Related links
    Joan Costa-i-Font webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 20/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    BBC Radio 3

    Free thinking

    Paul Dolan on a panel discussion show about happiness.

    The programme 'Free Thinking' was broadcast by BBC Radio 3 on November 19, 2014
    No link to the broadcast is available.

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 19/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Forget Facebook: One man's quest to see his nearest and dearest in person

    ''Happiness is caused by what we pay attention to'', says [Paul] Dolan, a professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, who devised the questions being used in large surveys on happiness in the UK, as well as being asked to advise multinational companies, charities and governments about how they can improve happiness. ''A large part of how you feel is determined by what you do, what you do is largely motivated by the expected impact on your happiness, and happiness is the feedback you receive about the impact of what you do. You can see how it's all very cyclical. Your happiness is determined by how you allocate your attention.''

    This article was published by The Independent on November 18, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 18/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Atlantic

    The real roots of midlife crisis

    What a growing body of research reveals about the biology of human happiness - and how to navigate the (temporary) slump in middle age Oswald, Terence Cheng, and Nattavudh Powdthavee have found the U-curve in four longitudinal data sets from three countries: an important kind of evidence, because it traces the lived experiences of individuals over time, rather than comparing people of various ages in a statistical snapshot. ...
    The idea that the expectations gap closes with age has recently received some empirical backing, in the form of fascinating findings by Hannes Schwandt, a young economist at Princeton University's Center for Health and Wellbeing. He used a German longitudinal survey, with data from 1991 to 2004, that, unusually, asked people about both their current life satisfaction and their expected satisfaction five years hence. That allowed him to compare expectations with subsequent reality for the same individuals over time.

    This article was published by The Atlantic on November 17, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
    Longitudinal Evidence for a Midlife Nadir in Human Well-being: Results from Four Data Sets, Terence C. Cheng, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Andrew Oswald, mimeo, February 2014

    Related links
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 17/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Telegraph

    How to be happy: expert advice

    Experts including comedian Ruby Wax, author Gretchen Rubin, and LSE professor Paul Dolan tell you how to find happiness in everyday life.
    Paul Dolan provides 5 suggestions for gaining happiness.

    This article was published in The Sunday Telegraph on November 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 16/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Herald Scotland

    We need to plan better for precious years of childhood

    The new understanding that childhood emotional wellbeing is key to a fulfilled adulthood comes from the Wellbeing research programme at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. Its study analysed data from around 9,000 people over 40 years.

    This article was published by the Herald Scotland on November 11, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being', Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1245, October 2013
    What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being, Richard Layard, Andrew Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Economic Journal, Feature Issue, Vol. 124, Issue 580, pp. F720-F738, November 2014

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Andrew Clark webpage
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 11/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Tapei Times online

    Emotional health in childhood is key to adult happiness

    [Richard] Layard and his colleagues at the Wellbeing research program at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance concluded that a child's emotional health is far more important to their satisfaction levels as an adult than other factors, such as if they achieve academic success when young, or wealth when older.

    This article was published by the Taipei Times online on November 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being', Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1245, October 2013
    What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being, Richard Layard, Andrew Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Economic Journal, Feature Issue, Vol. 124, Issue 580, pp. F720-F738, November 2014

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Andrew Clark webpage
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 10/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Gulf Times

    WISH partners with WISE to conduct health study

    The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) has held a special debate on education and wellbeing in partnership with the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) at the Qatar National Convention Centre. ... WISH has also established the Mental Health and Wellbeing in Children and Young People Forum, chaired by Prof the Lord Richard Layard, wellbeing programme director at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. The forum will further explore the role of education in wellbeing as part of its remit to produce evidence-based reports and provide recommendations for policymakers at the second WISH Summit taking place in February 2015 in Qatar.

    This article was published online by Gulf News on November 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 08/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Emotional health in childhood 'is the key to future happiness'

    Richard Layard and his colleagues at the Wellbeing research programme at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance conclude that a child's emotional health is far more important to their satisfaction levels as an adult than other factors, such as if they achieve academic success when young, or wealth when older.

    This article was published by the Guardian on November 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being', Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1245, October 2013
    What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being, Richard Layard, Andrew Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Economic Journal, Feature Issue, Vol. 124, Issue 580, pp. F720-F738, November 2014

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Andrew Clark webpage
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 08/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    British Politics and Policy blog

    The 'investor route' to UK citizenship should be reformed

    Blog article by David Metcalf
    Wealthy foreigners looking for a quick way to get permanent residence in the UK can take the 'investor route'. David Metcalf explains how simple reforms to the system, including visa auctions, would benefit UK residents.

    This blog article was posted online by LSE's British Politics and Policy blog on November 3, 2014
    Link to the article here

    Related publications
    The 'investor route' to UK citizenship, David Metcalf. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014

    Related links
    David Metcalf webpage
    Labour Markets Programme webpage
    News Posted: 03/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Elite Daily

    20 reasons friends are worth more than money - $133,000 to be exact

    In Nattavudh Powdthavee's research paper, ''Putting a Price Tag on Friends, Relatives, and Neighbours'', he discusses the monetary values we can put on social interactions.

    This article was published online by Elite Daily on October 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships, Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008

    Related links
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 30/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Why are recessions so depressing?

    But perhaps we haven't taken the recession nearly seriously enough. That's the conclusion of Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, an economist at University College London and the London School of Economics. De Neve says that the "untold story" of the recession is its psychological cost. In plain language: recessions make us very sad. It might seem obvious that recessions are disheartening experiences. It’s not, for the simple reason that the link between economic growth and happiness is itself not obvious.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 24 October 2014. Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem, George W. Ward, October 2014 Paper No' CEPDP1304

    Related Links
    Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 25/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Patria online

    What life satisfaction do we lose during a recession or gain during a boom

    Similar considerations are linked with the far more important question: does more money give greater satisfaction? Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Michael Norton, professors from the London School of Economics and Harvard University examined data for the past 40 years from more than 150 countries. Specifically, they were about the possible relationship between the mental health and the economic cycle.

    This article was published online by Patria online (Czechoslovakia) on October 19, 2014
    Link to article here


    Related Publications and films
    'Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data', Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem and George W. Ward, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1304,October 2014
    The untold story of the recession: the psychological cost
    The psychological cost of a few years of recession can wipe out the benefits of many years of growth. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve of the Centre for Economic Performance explains his latest research on the effect of the recent recession on people's wellbeing.
    View film here.

    Related Links
    Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 19/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Britain News.Net

    Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

    Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

    This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

    News Posted: 16/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    DiarioLibre.com

    Es la 'crisis de la mediana edad' solo una excusa?

    Is the mid-life crisis just an excuse?
    However, a study published earlier this year found that an average decrease of subjective happiness, or welfare as described by economists in middle age, between 40 and 42 years occurs. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, coauthor of the longitudinal research conducted in three countries, said that this confirms previous studies showing a relationship between age and the use of antidepressants. ...
    Dr. Hannes Schwandt, Princeton University, believes midlife, unlike childhood and old age, has not been investigated. Last year, he published the research focused on the ''unfulfilled expectations''. It was found that young people are optimistic perhaps even ''too optimistic'' - while those in their forties and fifties feel repentance before they feel at peace with themselves in older age. ''Maybe people of middle age can learn from the elderly, who are less regretful and more accepting'' he suggests. ...
    Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness by Design believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure to feel truly happy. In a future article, argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crisis centers on our assessments of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences. In other words, the stories we tell ourselves about what makes us happy, which a prestigious job is good- even depress us our daily experience of this work.

    This article was published online by DiarioLibre.com on October 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
    Happiness by Design: Finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, Paul Dolan, Allen Lane, August 2014, ISBN 9780241003107 Details

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 14/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    DiarioLibre.com

    Es la 'crisis de la mediana edad' solo una excusa?

    Is the mid-life crisis just an excuse?
    However, a study published earlier this year found that an average decrease of subjective happiness, or welfare as described by economists in middle age, between 40 and 42 years occurs. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, coauthor of the longitudinal research conducted in three countries, said that this confirms previous studies showing a relationship between age and the use of antidepressants. ...
    Dr. Hannes Schwandt, Princeton University, believes midlife, unlike childhood and old age, has not been investigated. Last year, he published the research focused on the ''unfulfilled expectations''. It was found that young people are optimistic perhaps even ''too optimistic'' - while those in their forties and fifties feel repentance before they feel at peace with themselves in older age. ''Maybe people of middle age can learn from the elderly, who are less regretful and more accepting'' he suggests. ...
    Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness by Design believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure to feel truly happy. In a future article, argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crisis centers on our assessments of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences. In other words, the stories we tell ourselves about what makes us happy, which a prestigious job is good- even depress us our daily experience of this work.

    This article was published online by DiarioLibre.com on October 14, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
    Happiness by Design: Finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, Paul Dolan, Allen Lane, August 2014, ISBN 9780241003107 Details

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 14/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    hacked by Rizgar halshoy kurdish hacker

    hacked by Rizgar halshoy kurdish hacker

    Vince Cable's in trouble for suggesting we build on golf courses. The business secretary was referring to research by the London School of Economics showing that more of Surrey is devoted to golf than housing.

    This article appeared in the Times on 14 October 2014 link to article

    Related publications
    Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

    Related links
    Paul Cheshire webpage
    Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website
    News Posted: 14/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Clarin

    No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

    Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
    ''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

    This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Clarin

    No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

    Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
    ''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

    This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Veronica Rappoport webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Atlantic

    Why don't boom-times make people happier?

    New research from Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Michael Norton, professors at the London School of Economics and Harvard respectively, looks at four decades of data (collected from more than 150 countries, including one dataset from the Centers for Disease Control and covers 2.5 million U.S. respondents) to investigate the relationship between life satisfaction and the business cycle. What they found was that well-being is two to eight times more sensitive to negative economic times: Psychologically, a recession hurts a lot more than a boom helps.

    This article was published by The Atlantic on October 9, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    The untold story of the recession: the psychological cost
    The psychological cost of a few years of recession can wipe out the benefits of many years of growth. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve of the Centre for Economic Performance explains his latest research on the effect of the recent recession on people's wellbeing.
    View here.

    'Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data', Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem and George W. Ward, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1304, October 2014

    Related links
    Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 09/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Daily Mirror

    It's the biggest disease in Britain, so why is it only now a priority?

    In an article sourced from the Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group, the Health and Social Care Information Centre, the Mental Health Foundation, Young Minds and the Guardian the Mirror explains why mental health needs to be a government priority.

    The article was published in The Daily Mirror on October 9, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Further links
    Recent films: Let's Make Mental Health a Priority
    Treating mental illness is the right thing to do morally but also economically - Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance explains why treating mental illness should be high on the public agenda. The costs of treatment for mental illness are far less than the costs of doing nothing.

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
    News Posted: 09/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    World Economic Forum

    Why busts hurt more than booms help

    Article by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Michael I. Norton
    We find evidence that the life satisfaction of individuals is between two and eight times more sensitive to negative growth as compared to positive economic growth. People do not psychologically benefit from expansions nearly as much as they suffer from recessions. These results suggest that policymakers seeking to raise wellbeing should focus more on preventing busts than inculcating booms. Our results also offer an explanation for why increases in GDP do not always pay off in increases in happiness - the modest happiness gains accrued over years of growth can be wiped out by just a single year of contraction.

    This article was published online by the World Economic Forum on October 9, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications and films
    The untold story of the recession: the psychological cost
    The psychological cost of a few years of recession can wipe out the benefits of many years of growth. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve of the Centre for Economic Performance explains his latest research on the effect of the recent recession on people's wellbeing.
    View here.

    'Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data', Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem and George W. Ward, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1304, October 2014


    Related links
    Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 09/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Le Plus

    Des ados partent faire le djihad en Syrie : comme le suicide, un comportement de fuite

    Some researchers have studied the characteristics of happy people. They identified six factors which only concern the economy (unemployment), the others being: divorce rate, the level of trust between the people, the number of participants in non-religious organizations, the number of believers and the quality of government. (Reference: Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2005).

    This article was published by Le Plus on October 8, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
    Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
    News Posted: 08/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Conversation

    Attention David Cameron: time to stop the scaremongers from strangling TTIP

    Article by Dennis Novy
    If you have been following the TTIP negotiations in the press over the past year, you might have been under the impression that TTIP is a corporate sell-out and nothing but a threat for the average person in the street. There has been a lot of hype and scaremongering, which has not only taken some issues completely out of context but has often hopelessly exaggerated reality. ... The reality is that UK business is in line to do well out of TTIP.

    This article was published online by The Conversation on October 5, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related links
    Dennis Novy webpage
    Globalisation Programme webpage
    Dennis Novy CEP publications webpage
    News Posted: 05/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The McKinsey Quarterly

    Why management matters for productivity

    Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
    While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

    This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
    Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

    Related links
    John Van Reenen webpage
    Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
    Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage
    News Posted: 30/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Huffington Post - The Blog

    So it turns out Londoners aren't all that happy - what can we do about it?

    The ONS' data showed that whilst, on average, Londoners have the highest disposable incomes in the country they are also the most anxious and have the lowest levels of life satisfaction. None of this will come as any surprise to anyone who has read their Spirit Level or the works of economists like Richard Layard or philosophers such as Peter Singer who have argued that money can't buy us happiness. In fact, there appears to exist a ''happiness paradox'': once personal income rises above subsistence level, happiness does not increase. Instead, it is more likely to decrease because a focus on money-making creates harsher social comparisons and ultimately encourages greed and materialism. Far from bringing contentment, such behaviours distract us from those aspects of our lives (friends, family, and communities) that hold their own intrinsic and life-satisfying values. Instead we seek to compare our fortunes with those of our neighbours - keeping up appearances with Hyacinth Bucket next door.

    This article was published online by The Huffington Post - The Blog on September 24, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
    Details here

    Related links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
    News Posted: 24/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Centre for Economic Performance Press Release

    Let's make mental health a national priority: new short film from the Centre for Economic Performance

    In a short online film, Professor Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) explains why treating mental illness should be high on the public agenda, especially as proven psychological therapies effectively cost nothing.

    The film - made by Econ Films - was launched on September 23, 2014
    View here

    Related links
    CEP press release webpage
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Is the midlife crisis just an excuse?

    However, research published earlier this year found an average midlife dip in happiness – or subjective wellbeing as it is described by economists – happened between 40 and 42. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, co-author of the longitudinal research across three countries, says this confirms previous studies that show a hill-shape relationship between age and the use of antidepressants.....
    .....Dr Hannes Schwandt of Princeton University believes midlife, unlike infancy and old age, is under-researched. Last year, he published research focused on “unmet expectations”. It found the young are optimistic – perhaps even “over-optimistic” – while those in their forties and fifties feel regret, before making their peace in older age. “Perhaps people in middle age can learn from the elderly who feel less regret and have adapted,” he suggests....
    .....Paul Dolan, professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, and author of Happiness by Design, believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure in order to feel truly happy. In a forthcoming paper, he argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crises focuses on our evaluations of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing Hannes Schwandt, July 2013, Paper No' CEPDP1229

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing webpage webpage
    News Posted: 18/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    Is the midlife crisis just an excuse?

    However, research published earlier this year found an average midlife dip in happiness – or subjective wellbeing as it is described by economists – happened between 40 and 42. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, co-author of the longitudinal research across three countries, says this confirms previous studies that show a hill-shape relationship between age and the use of antidepressants.....
    .....Dr Hannes Schwandt of Princeton University believes midlife, unlike infancy and old age, is under-researched. Last year, he published research focused on “unmet expectations”. It found the young are optimistic – perhaps even “over-optimistic” – while those in their forties and fifties feel regret, before making their peace in older age. “Perhaps people in middle age can learn from the elderly who feel less regret and have adapted,” he suggests....
    .....Paul Dolan, professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, and author of Happiness by Design, believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure in order to feel truly happy. In a forthcoming paper, he argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crises focuses on our evaluations of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing Hannes Schwandt, July 2013, Paper No' CEPDP1229

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Hannes Schwandt webpage
    Wellbeing webpage webpage
    News Posted: 18/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    In pursuit of happiness

    Financial Times

    As Richard Layard and David Clark explain in their brilliant and important book Thrive, “today one in six of all adults [in the UK, US and continental Europe] suffers from depression or a crippling anxiety disorder”. Such extreme misery, they argue, is much more debilitating than physical diseases such as angina or diabetes, which nonetheless attract many more resources.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 12 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 12/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Times

    UK's ‘happiness tsar' on the importance of mental health

    Just off a hilly street in Highgate, north London, a front path leads to the 1900-era property covered in roses that is home to a man sometimes called the UK government’s “happiness tsar”. Richard Layard, a Labour peer and professor at the London School of Economics, earned the nickname after the 2005 publication of his book, Happiness: A New Science.

    This article appeared in the Financial Times on 12 September 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (Second Edition) Richard Layard 2011

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 12/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    Spiralling costs of dementia 'being unfairly picked up by carers'

    LSE professor of social policy Martin Knapp said many people with dementia and their families are essentially paying out £21,000 a year through the unpaid care provided by carers and covering the costs of social care.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 10 September 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 10/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    British Science Festival

    CEP Session on Economics of Inequality

    On Monday 8 September 2014, CEP hosted the only economics session in the British Science Festival. Presenting their work on the "Economics of Inquality" were John Van Reenen on the 99%; Brian Bell on Top Pay of the 1% and Barbara Petrongolo on Gender. Members of the public listened and discussed the findings with the presenters at the University of Birmingham.

    Link to British Science Festival website

     


    News Posted: 08/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    This man wants to make us really happy

    HAPPINESS BY DESIGN Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life by PAUL DOLAN Allen Lane £20/ebook £11.99 pp235 Paul Dolan, a renowned behavioural scientist, a professor at the London School of Economics and a happiness expert, has a friend who works at a prestigious media company. At a recent lunch the friend spent the entire time talking obsessively about her unhappy working life: her diffi-cult boss, her commute, the tense environment. As lunch ended, she wrapped up by telling Dolan, without a trace of irony: "Of course, I love working there."

    This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 7 September 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 07/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    This man can make you……happy

    His full name is Professor Paul Dolan, and he holds a chair in Behavioural Science at the LSE. He's worked with the Office for National Statistics and the government's Behavioural Insights Team – better known as the 'nudge' unit – and he counts Nassim Nicholas Taleb and the Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman as fans.

    This article appeared in The Independent on 6 September 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 06/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Responding to Climate Change

    Apollo mark two: UK climate envoy champions greentech fund

    With a colleague, the economist Professor Lord Richard Layard, Sir David is working on a scheme to raise money to address this. “It’s called the Global Apollo Programme”, he explained. “We are urging all governments to form a commission to spend 0.02% of their GDP, which should raise US$10-20 billion/yr over 10 years, to fund R&D for low-carbon technology.

    This article appeared in Responding to Climate Change on 2 September 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 02/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Business Green Plus

    Sir David King preps launch of $10bn global clean tech 'Apollo programme'

    Sir David King has expressed hopes that ambitious plans for a global clean energy development programme modelled on the Apollo moon-landing mission could take a major step forward at this month's UN climate change meeting in New York. Speaking at a conference on mainstreaming the green economy hosted by the Green Economy Coalition, the former chief scientist and current Special Representative on Climate Change at the Foreign Office revealed a proposal he developed with economist Richard Layard for a global clean tech research, development and demonstration programme could be adopted at UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's imminent meeting of world leaders.

    This article appeared on Business Green Plus on 2 September 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 02/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Coventry Evening Telegraph

    To Do List

    PAUL DOLAN, a Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, takes a cool, scientific look at how we can organise our lives to put more joy into them in Happiness By Design (Allen Lane, priced £20/ebook £8.03). Happiness, he says Dolan, lies in finding the right mix of pleasure and purpose - the feeling that what we're doing is worthwhile. For him, becoming happier is more to do with making small adjustments to what we do, rather than big changes - chatting to a stranger to liven up a boring queue, setting up out-of-office emails that make us laugh, minimising distractions - can mean more happiness.

    This article appeared in the Coventry Evening Telegraph on August 30, 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 30/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Coventry Evening Telegraph

    To Do List

    PAUL DOLAN, a Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, takes a cool, scientific look at how we can organise our lives to put more joy into them in Happiness By Design (Allen Lane, priced £20/ebook £8.03). Happiness, he says Dolan, lies in finding the right mix of pleasure and purpose - the feeling that what we're doing is worthwhile. For him, becoming happier is more to do with making small adjustments to what we do, rather than big changes - chatting to a stranger to liven up a boring queue, setting up out-of-office emails that make us laugh, minimising distractions - can mean more happiness.

    This article appeared in the Coventry Evening Telegraph on August 30, 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 30/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Coventry Evening Telegraph

    To Do List

    PAUL DOLAN, a Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics, takes a cool, scientific look at how we can organise our lives to put more joy into them in Happiness By Design (Allen Lane, priced £20/ebook £8.03). Happiness, he says Dolan, lies in finding the right mix of pleasure and purpose - the feeling that what we're doing is worthwhile. For him, becoming happier is more to do with making small adjustments to what we do, rather than big changes - chatting to a stranger to liven up a boring queue, setting up out-of-office emails that make us laugh, minimising distractions - can mean more happiness.

    This article appeared in the Coventry Evening Telegraph on August 30, 2014 (no link available)

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 30/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Globe and Mail (Canada)

    Happiness is in the details; Behavioural scientist says it's not just a matter of adopting a sunny outlook, but taking notice of what makes one happy

    Happiness is not simply a matter of adopting a sunny outlook, says Paul Dolan, a renowned happiness expert and professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics and Political Science. It's about paying attention to the things that give you joy. In his new book, Happiness by Design: Change What You Do, Not How You Think, Dolan draws on a wealth of psychology and economics research to shed light on what causes happiness, and what prevents us from being happier. With amusing anecdotes, hard data and a delightful delivery, he explains how to engineer joy into your life by reallocating your attention to pleasurable and meaningful experiences.

    This article appeared in the Globe and Mail on 29 August 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 29/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Review: NON-FICTION: Go on, make that change: Are you stuck in a rut?

    Paul Dolan, an LSE economist and government well-being adviser - a man who knows his way around the Nudge Unit - has written the more businesslike of the two. The "science of happiness", he starts by pointing out, is full of bizarre and contradictory findings. Parents report that parenting makes life much more meaningful, yet seem to experience no more pleasure than non-parents; more money doesn't lead to more happiness, unless you frame the question differently, in which case it does. One problem, he argues, is that psychologists simply try to find out which "inputs" - income, work, marital status, age, religiosity and so on - are correlated with the "output" of happiness.

    This article appeared in the Guardian on 27 August 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 27/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Evening Standard

    Happiness: you can work it out

    A professor of behavioural sciences at LSE, Dolan came from what he describes as a “lower working-class” family in east London to become one of the world’s leading experts in the emerging study of happiness. Daniel Kahneman, the fabled Nobel Prize-winning psychologist, views him as something of a protégé. The Office for National Statistics has employed him to help establish the framework of David Cameron’s national wellbeing survey. He is part of a wave of social scientists whose discoveries at once confound your expectations and provide an appreciable way of acting on that knowledge.

    This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 23 August 2014 link to article

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 26/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Daily Telegraph

    Happiness by Design, review: 'occasionally jargon-heavy'

    Rowan Pelling enjoys a new approach to the old problem of happiness
    I bet politicians hanker for the days when they only had to worry whether the population was fed and plague-free, rather than fretting about their well-being. Now happiness is a matter of national anxiety and Paul Dolan, a professor at the LSE and self-described ''sentimental hedonist'', is at the forefront of the debate. Dolan's new book, Happiness by Design, aims to combine lessons from economics and behavioural science to improve our lot. Chiefly, Dolan wants to refocus our attention: ''What you attend to drives your behaviour and it determines your happiness. Attention is the glue that holds your life together.'' But, he points out, attention is a limited resource, so we tend to squander it on social media, petty worries and unprofitable goals. He wants us to refocus it on objectives and activities that yield ''experiences of pleasure and purpose over time'' (Dolan's definition of happiness).

    This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on August 25, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 25/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Times

    The secret to happiness starts with a D

    ''Lost happiness is lost for ever'' could be a slogan emblazoned on the favourite T-shirt of a pseudo-intellectual teenage poet, or the tag line of a deep-house club night in Dalston, east London. In fact, it's the life maxim of the prestigious behavioural scientist Professor Paul Dolan. Thanks to Dolan, it is a principle that reaches well beyond angsty teenagers: as a London School of Economics (LSE)academic, a former member of the Cabinet Office's ''nudge unit'' and part of the Office for National Statistics wellbeing team, Dolan guides public policy and the government's approach to happiness research. Now - happy news for the individual - Dolan, with his two diamante earrings in his left ear and trendy helping of stubble, has written a book, Happiness by Design, in which he explains why most of us are not as happy as we could be ... and how we can transform ourselves.

    This article was published by the Sunday Times on August 24, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 24/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Finchannel

    Psychology of parenting: Mother's personality measured during pregnancy predicts how well children perform in GCSEs

    Babies born to mothers who hold a stronger belief that their fate is in their own hands and not down to luck tend to perform better in their GCSE exams 16 years later. That is the central finding of research by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) published by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

    This article was published onlinie by Finchannel on August 23, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Economist

    Treating mental illness: Body and soul

    That is in part because many sufferers are ashamed to seek help, but it is also due to funding gaps and disorganisation within the NHS. The result is a system in crisis, says Sue Bailey, a former president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists. This failure is costly. Mental-health problems cause more suffering in Britain than physical illness, poverty or unemployment, according to Richard Layard, an economist and author of a book on happiness.

    This article appeared in The Economist on 23 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 23/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Bristol Post

    Bristol's chance to learn the happiness habit

    The project cites Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies – the latest work by Richard Layard, co-authored with David Clark, professor of psychology at Oxford University. Mr Layard is credited as one of the leading figures who wants the campaign for happiness and wellbeing to be put centre-stage in policy-making.

    This article was published by the Bristol Post on August 22, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 22/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    BBC London

    News - Londoners lose out on 'happy scale'

    Nick Powdthavee comments on happiness in London.

    The interview was broadcast by BBC London News on August 21, 2014
    Link to broadcast here

    Related Links
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 21/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Independent

    David Cameron should do some homework before sounding off about immigration and jobs

    The impact of immigration on the labour market is a serious subject. And there has been some serious academic research on it. Work by Jonathan Wadsworth at the London School of Economics suggests that around 17 per cent of new hires in the economy have been going to people born outside the UK.

    This article appeared in the Independent on 21 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Immigration, the European Union and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, May 2014 Paper No' CEPPA015

    Related Links
    Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
    Labour Markets webpage
    News Posted: 21/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Psychologist

    Call for access to psychological therapies to double

    Two of the key figures behind government reform in mental health care have spoken of the success of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative. Professor Lord Richard Layard, Emeritus Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and clinical psychologist Professor David Clark (University of Oxford), were talking at the LSE to mark the launch of their new book Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies.

    This article was published in The Psychologist Volume 27, Issue 9 September 2014 on August 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 19/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Times

    Tiger moths lift children's exam results before birth

    Tiger mothers predestine their children to do well at school even before they are born, research has suggested. Babies born to highly competitive women who believe that they have the power to shape their children's prospects go on to achieve better GCSE results, academics found. The research, by academics at the London School of Economics, was based on a study that tracks more than 10,000 children born in and around Bristol from 1991. Early in their pregnancy mothers were asked questions such as ''Do you believe things happen no matter what you try to do to stop them?'', and ''Does planning ahead make things turn out better?'' They were then interviewed annually until their children were five. Using their answers, the women were grouped by a psychological measure known as locus of control, which reflects whether people think outcomes are influenced by their own actions. The research plotted the GCSE results of teenagers whose mothers had shown high internal control tendencies in their twelfth week of pregnancy. Francesca Cornaglia, an economist at Queen Mary University, London, said: ''Other things constant, children whose mothers ranked in the top 25 per cent of the internal locus of control scale tended to obtain GCSE scores about 17 per cent higher than children of mothers in the bottom 25 per cent.''

    This article was published in The Times on August 19, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 19/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Psychology Today

    Now, where was I?

    Article by Paul Dolan

    There are two main sources of evidence that technology is creating distracted mindsets amongst us. The first is from neuroscience: Technology physically alters the way our brains work. The brains of heavy Internet users - people who report symptoms of addiction - actually shrink, just as they do in people who are addicted to drugs like heroin. Consider also the medical condition 'digital dementia', which refers to irreversible deficits in brain development and memory loss among children who spend a lot of time on electronic devices.

    This article was published by Psychology Today on August 18, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Links
    Paul Dolan webpage
    Paul Dolan CEP Publications webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    LSE News

    Psychology of parenting: mother's personality measured during pregnancy predicts how well children perform in GCSEs

    Babies born to mothers who hold a stronger belief that their fate is in their own hands and not down to luck tend to perform better in their GCSE exams 16 years later. That is the central finding of new research by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

    This article was published by LSE News online on August 18, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Telegraph

    Children of proactive mothers do better in exams, study finds

    The study, by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), analysed data from more than 10,000 young people and their mothers, who have taken part in the Children of the 90s project. Data included a psychological measure of mothers’ expectations about how much of their own actions influenced their life outcomes, collected during the first trimester of pregnancy, which researchers found strongly predicted how well the children performed in exams aged 16.

    This article appeared in the Telegraph on 18 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee, Nele Warrinnier, August 2014 Paper No' CEPDP1293

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    MSN News

    The Beauty/Happiness Connection

    The usual markers of happiness are colloquially known as the “Big Seven”: wealth (especially compared to those around you), family relationships, career, friends, health, freedom, and personal values, as outlined by London School of Economics professor Richard Layard in Happiness: Lessons from a New Science.

    This article appeared on MSN News on 17 August 2014 link to article

    Also in:
    Soren Dreier link
    The Atlantic link
    The American Conservative link

    Related Publications
    Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (Second Edition) Richard Layard, 2011

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 17/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Daily Mail

    Your fate really is in your hands - or at least, your children's GCSE results are

    Research published by the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) shows that babies born to mothers who are strong believers that their fate is in their hands perform up to 17 per cent better in exams when they grow up. The study, which analysed data from the University of Bristol's Children of the 90s project – a long-term study of the attitudes and behaviour of 10,000 young people, tracked the formation of a key personality trait known as 'locus of control'.

    This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 17 August 2014 link to article

    Also in:
    All Voices link
    Capital Bay link

    Related Publications
    Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee, Nele Warrinnier, August 2014 Paper No' CEPDP1293

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 17/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Mothers who believe they can shape their destinies give children a head start

    Research published by the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) finds that babies born to mothers who hold a strong belief that their fates are in their hands, rather than down to luck, perform significantly better in their GCSEs 16 years later.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on 17 August 2014 link to article

    Also in: Gulf News

    Related Publications
    Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee, Nele Warrinnier, August 2014 Paper No' CEPDP1293

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 17/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Guardian

    Mothers who believe they can shape their destinies give children a head start

    Research published by the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) finds that babies born to mothers who hold a strong belief that their fates are in their hands, rather than down to luck, perform significantly better in their GCSEs 16 years later.

    This article appeared in The Guardian on 17 August 2014 link to article

    Also in: Gulf News

    Related Publications
    Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee, Nele Warrinnier, August 2014 Paper No' CEPDP1293

    Related Links
    Francesca Cornaglia webpage
    Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
    Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
    Nele Warrinner webpage
    Wellbeing webpage

    News Posted: 17/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Globe and Mail (Canada)

    Mental illness: A depressing failure of public policy

    The lost productivity and direct health expenses have an economic cost; in a recent analysis for the Mental Health Commission of Canada, the value was pegged at $50-billion a year. Labour economist Richard Layard argues that such estimates are inherently conservative: Mental illness casts a long shadow, over our jails and emergency departments, with total costs of more than 8 per cent of a country's GDP.

    This article was published by The Globe and Mail (Canada) on August 15, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 15/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    Financial Chronicle

    The weight of weariness

    The economist Richard Layard, after advocating that the goal of public policy should be to maximise happiness, set out to learn what the greatest impediment to happiness was today. His conclusion: depression. Depression causes nearly half of all disability, affects one in six, and explains more current unhappiness than poverty. And (important for public policy) cognitive behavioural therapy has a short-term success rate of 50 per cent.

    This article was published in the Financial Chronicle on August 15, 2014
    Link to article here

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
    Details here

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage

    News Posted: 15/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    The Sunday Business Post (Ireland)

    A call for justice for those with mental illness

    Richard Layard and David M Clark insist that mental illness sufferers who do not receive treatment are the victims of marked injustice. The authors use political, intentionally provocative language to bolster their persuasive claims: they depict the treatment of mental illness as a humanitarian issue where human rights are consistently violated. To demonstrate, Thrive cites the discrepancy between how our health systems care for those with physical as opposed to mental illness: in most cases, physical illness is treated, but mental illness is not. ''Apart perhaps from global warming", they write of mental illness, ''there is no other major problem which is so neglected worldwide." So what can be done? The authors urge a substantial increase in the availability of evidence-based psychological therapies that monitor a patient's progress at each session. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is an example of one of these therapies. Its focus is equipping patients with the skills to manage their negative moods so that patients are less likely to get depressed when problems recur in their lives.

    Related Publications
    Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

    Related Links
    Richard Layard webpage
    David Clark webpage
    Wellbeing Programme webpage
    News Posted: 10/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    New Statesman

    Does the NHS treat mental health as a 'second-class service'?

    As well as the ethical concerns of these cases, such neglect of the mentally ill also has practical implications; a report by the London School of Economics found that the NHS could save over £50m a year by reversing budget cuts to preventative and early intervention therapies.

    This article appeared in the New Statesman on 1 August 2014 link to article

    Related Publications
    Investing in recovery: making the business case for effective interventions for people with schizophrenia and psychosis Knapp, Martin, Andrew, Alison, McDaid, David, Iemmi, Valentina, McCrone, Paul, Park, A-La, Parsonage, Michael, Boardman, Jed and Shepherd, Geoff (2014)

    Related Links
    Martin Knapp webpage
    Wellbeing webpage
    News Posted: 01/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

    LSE News online

    Internet speed closely linked to property values

    Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

    This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
    Link to press release