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News and Press

News for Community

Press coverage involving Community staff or research is listed below.

World Finance

US must tackle growing skills gap

However, not everyone agrees with the rhetoric emerging from the US regarding the failings of its workforce. Alan Manning, Professor of Economics at LSE argues: “The retraining process tends to work best for younger workers, not necessarily for the older demographics of workers.” He agrees that education is hugely important to addressing the skills gap in places like the US and UK, but added that “these are long-standing problems and have always been there”.


Related Links:
World Finance - US must tackle growing skills gap

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 31/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Horticulture Week

Can UK fresh produce come out of Brexit ahead?

NFU Scotland’s Horticulture Committee chairman and Angus Soft Fruits (ASF) grower James Porter last month met UK Migration Advisory Committee chair Professor Alan Manning and Defra secretary Michael Gove to put the sector’s concerns over labour availability post-Brexit. "For a major soft fruit area like Angus, the importance of seasonal workers cannot be underestimated," he says. "There are only 1,400 long-term unemployed in Angus, yet ASF needs a seasonal workforce of 4,000 to pick crops."


Related Links:
Horticulture Week - Can UK fresh produce come out of Brexit ahead?

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation

The inner workings of the Board: Evidence from emerging markets

Article by Ralph de Haas, Daniel Ferreira and Tom Kirchmaier

Our recent paper exploits data collected through an online survey of 130 current and past board directors (De Haas, Ferreira and Kirchmaier, 2017). These non-executive directors were on the boards of companies across 27 emerging markets and were all nominated by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. We use these nominees as entry points to access detailed information about the behaviour and conduct of their boards.


Related Links:
Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation - The inner workings of the Board: Evidence from emerging markets

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 05/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Great Yarmouth Mercury

Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis warns businesses may have to employ fewer staff post-Brexit

Businesses will be forced to employ fewer staff and improve productivity after Brexit, Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis has warned. … Further details on how the government will tackle the problem will be made available next year when the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), which is chaired by Professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics, presents its report to ministers.


Related Links:
Great Yarmouth Mercury - Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis warns businesses may have to employ fewer staff post-Brexit

CEP Community

Paul Cheshire webpage


News Posted: 04/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Chronicle Live

Immigration Minister gives ominous Brexit warning to businesses when it comes to staff

The Government’s Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), chaired by Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, would present a report to Government in September, and this would influence plans for a new immigration system after Brexit, he said.


Related Links:
Chronicle Live - Immigration Minister gives ominous Brexit warning to businesses when it comes to staff

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 04/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Birmingham Mail

Businesses told they may have to learn to get by with fewer staff after Brexit

Immigration Minister Brandon Lewis says it takes 20 workers to build a house in the UK but just four workers overseas

The Government’s Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), chaired by Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, would present a report to Government in September, and this would influence plans for a new immigration system after Brexit, he said.


Related Links:
Birmingham Mail - Businesses told they may have to learn to get by with fewer staff after Brexit

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 03/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Farmers Guardian

Non-EU workers targeted to plug agricultural labour gap

British agriculture has become a less attractive place to work for EU migrants and the industry needs to be able to look outside the EU to source more labour. This was the call from the chairman of NFU Scotland’s Horticulture committee, James Porter, who pushed for the ‘urgent’ introduction of a scheme allowing 20,000 non-EU seasonal workers into the UK each year. … Mr Porter, a soft fruit grower in Carnoustie, Angus, made the call during a meeting with Prof Alan Manning, chairman of the Migration Advisory Committee, a body which focuses on the impact of Brexit on the UK labour market.


Related Links:
Farmers Guardian - Non-EU workers targeted to plug agricultural labour gap

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 29/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Somerset (5:19:24 PM)

Tom Kirchmaier comments on police funding


Related Links:
BBC Somerset (5:19:24 PM) - Tom Kirchmaier comments on police funding

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 19/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Somerset (5:19:24 PM)

Tom Kirchmaier comments on police funding

Click to open


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 19/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Public Affairs News

Student Immigration Figures

The government has commissioned independent advisers on migration (the Migration Advisory Committee) to complete a detailed assessment of the social and economic impact of international students in the UK. The announcement was part of a series of publications that came out at the end of August which will feed into an evidence base on the impact of international students.

The study will: 

- Examine the impact of tuition fees and other spending by foreign students on the national, regional and local economies.

- Consider the impact of their recruitment on the quality of education given to domestic students.

The Committee is expected to report back their findings in September next year and is chaired by Alan Manning, Professor of Economics at LSE. The MAC will shortly produce a call for evidence setting out how stakeholders can be involved in contributing to the assessment.  

As part of this series, the ONS has published an article ‘What’s happening with international student migration’ which provides recent research since April 2017 on developing an understanding on student migration.


Related Links:
CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 04/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

DeathRattleSports.com

William Hague: Brexit disaster can be averted thanks to Philip Hammond’s transition plan

Number 10 said on 31 July that it would be “wrong” to suggest that EU free movement to the UK would “continue as it is now” after 2019. But Home Secretary Amber Rudd has said that EU nationals will be able to continue to come to the UK during a post-March 2019 transition period so long as they go through a “registration and documentation” process. The senior Conservative has also commissioned a group of top economists, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), to investigate how the UK’s future immigration system “should be aligned with a modern industrial strategy”. The MAC, which is chaired by Professor Alan Manning, has been given a deadline of September 2018 to report back to Rudd.


Related Links:
DeathRattleSports.com - William Hague: Brexit disaster can be averted thanks to Philip Hammond’s transition plan

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Laundry and Cleaning News International

TSA appeals to membership to respond to Migration Advisory Committee

MAC chairman, Professor Alan Manning, has been asked to produce interim reports to guide Home Office officials attempting to draw up a post-Brexit immigration regime that will bring an end to free movement but will not cause economic damage or vital skills shortages. 


Related Links:
Laundry and Cleaning News International - TSA appeals to membership to respond to Migration Advisory Committee

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 04/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Pie News

UK Home Secretary calls for report on EU migration

The UK’s Home Secretary Amber Rudd has commissioned a report on the impact Brexit will have on the UK labour market. A key sector for enquiry will be higher education, where 17% of academic staff are EU nationals and a further 12,490 of EU staff are in non-academic positions. Despite the 2018 deadline, Rudd has requested interim reports, and MAC chair Alan Manning said the committee will “consider the possibility of producing interim responses”.


Related Links:
The Pie News - UK Home Secretary calls for report on EU migration

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 01/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

International Business Times

What Number 10 really said about ending free movement from the EU

…Rudd has commissioned a group of top economists, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), to investigate how the UK's future immigration system "should be aligned with a modern industrial strategy".

The MAC, which is chaired by Professor Alan Manning, has been given a deadline of September 2018 to report back to Rudd.


Related Links:
International Business Times - What Number 10 really said about ending free movement from the EU

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 31/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sputnik (Romania)

EU citizens will have the right to work in the UK after Brexit – under certain conditions

She [Amber Rudd] told committee chairman, Professor Alan Manning, that during the transition period a “simple system for registering and documenting new arrivals” will be in place.


Related Links:
Sputnik (Romania) - EU citizens will have the right to work in the UK after Brexit – under certain conditions

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

International Business Times

Eurosceptics plot mass leaflet drive to stop Tony Blair ‘hijacking' Brexit

Elsewhere, the UK government announced on Thursday that it has commissioned a group of top economists to investigate the financial benefits of migration from the EU. The independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), chaired by Professor Alan Manning, will make a "detailed assessment" of the issue as the two-year-long Brexit negotiations between the UK and the EU continue. "This is an important and extensive commission and the MAC welcome the opportunity to contribute to the UK's knowledge base in this area at this critical time," Manning said.

 


Related Links:
International Business Times - Eurosceptics plot mass leaflet drive to stop Tony Blair ‘hijacking' Brexit

Academy schools and pupil outcomes

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The National

Britain to ask committee to assess impact of migration from EU


Related Links:
The National - Britain to ask committee to assess impact of migration from EU

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

nrc.nl

Willen de Tories migranten nog toelaten? / Will the Tories still allow migrants?


Related Links:
nrc.nl - Willen de Tories migranten nog toelaten? / Will the Tories still allow migrants?

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Brexit EU migration study examines if British workers are at a disadvantage to foreign labour


Related Links:
The Telegraph - Brexit EU migration study examines if British workers are at a disadvantage to foreign labour

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

El Periodico de Mexico

Reino unido elaborara un informe sobre el impacto de la inmigracion europea en el pais/United Kingdom will produce a report on the impact of European immigration in the country


Related Links:
El Periodico de Mexico - Reino unido elaborara un informe sobre el impacto de la inmigracion europea en el pais/United Kingdom will produce a report on the impact of European immigration in the country

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newstalk.com (Ireland)

UK orders study looking at impact of ending free EU movement

A major study has been ordered by the British government to look at the economic impact of ending free movement of EU workers.

The UK Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, wants to know whether some parts of Britain will be affected more than others, whether there will be skills shortages and the impact on seasonal jobs. The study will be carried out by the UK's Migration Advisory Committee, a quango that advises the government there on immigration issues. It is set to report by September next year. In a letter to the committee's chairman, Professor Alan Manning, Ms Rudd said the government continues "working towards the goal of achieving sustainable levels of net migration".


Related Links:
Newstalk.com (Ireland) - UK orders study looking at impact of ending free EU movement

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Mirror online

Tories mocked for deciding to ask experts about EU migration… a year after the referendum

The Migration Advisory Committee will embark on a major study into the role of 3.2million EU nationals in Britain's economy and society. Its "extremely important" work will look at patterns of migration from Europe, regional distribution, skill levels and seasonal workers. But it will only report back in September 2018 - just six months before the deadline for Brexit on 29 March 2019. And its chairman played down Tory claims it would produce interim reports in the meantime. Professor Alan Manning said only that his committee will "consider the possibility" of doing so.


Related Links:
Mirror online - Tories mocked for deciding to ask experts about EU migration… a year after the referendum

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sky News online

Businesses clamour for clarity from ‘long overdue' migration study

Companies have been clamouring for clarity from the Government on the issue as the academic sector, agriculture, manufacturing and the hospitality trade all rely on large influxes of people to operate. The Confederation of British Industry says employers "urgently" need answers while the Institute of Directors calls the report "long overdue". Consider the timescale: the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) is made up of one chairman (Professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics) and three independent economists who now have to commission data and solicit responses from industry and Government.


Related Links:
Sky News online - Businesses clamour for clarity from ‘long overdue' migration study

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration – a year after referendum

The home secretary, Amber Rudd, is to commission the independent Migration Advisory Committee to carry out a detailed analysis of the economic and social contributions and costs of EU citizens in Britain. The MAC’s chairman, Prof Alan Manning, has been asked to produce interim reports to guide Home Office officials attempting to draw up a post-Brexit immigration regime that will bring an end to free movement but will not cause economic damage or vital skills shortages.


Related Links:
Guardian - Amber Rudd asks for analysis of EU migration – a year after referendum

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Sky news

Businesses clamour for clarity from 'long overdue' migration study

Consider the timescale: the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) is made up of one chairman (Professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics) and three independent economists who now have to commission data and solicit responses from industry and Government.

Related publications

1st Report - Brexit and the Labour Market


Related Links:
Sky news - Businesses clamour for clarity from 'long overdue' migration study

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal

Board Is Cited In Bank's Collapse

Snippet: “In Europe, you have 28 different banking systems, which were created nationally under different mandates,” said Tom Kirchmaier, deputy director of corporate governance at the

London School of Economics.

[No link available]


Related Links:
CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 25/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk

Economic Affairs Committee publishes its report on Brexit and the Labour Market

Professor Alan Manning, Chair of the Migration Advisory Committee and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics and Lord Layard member of the Economic Affairs Committee…

Related publications

1st Report - Brexit and the Labour Market


Related Links:
Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk - Economic Affairs Committee publishes its report on Brexit and the Labour Market

CEP Community CEP Wellbeing

Alan Manning webpage

Richard Layard webpage


News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Stanford News

Survey finds Europeans favor fairness in allocating asylum seekers, Stanford researchers say

In research appearing this week in Nature Human Behaviour, Kirk Bansak, Jens Hainmueller and Dominik Hangartner of Stanford’s Immigration Policy Lab asked 18,000 European citizens their opinions on the issue.


Related Links:
Stanford News - Survey finds Europeans favor fairness in allocating asylum seekers, Stanford researchers say

CEP Community

Dominik Hangartner webpage


News Posted: 28/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Europeans back allocation of asylum seekers proportionally, study finds

“We asked people what kind of asylum system they want and what kind of asylum system they believe is fair, because back then [in 2016 when the survey was conducted], and still now, it is obvious that the current Dublin system is not working,” said Dominik Hangartner, co-author of the research from the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Guardian - Europeans back allocation of asylum seekers proportionally, study finds

CEP Community

Dominik Hangartner webpage


News Posted: 26/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

4-traders

MORGAN STANLEY : Britain's financial power already on the wane

Among the matters at stake in those talks, which began in Brussels last Monday, is whether London can maintain its status as a global hub for finance after Brexit or be forced to watch as business flows to the continent or New York. Such an exodus would jeopardise an industry responsible for nearly a 10th of the economy and some 1.1 million jobs. “There will be a lot of political pressure to get as much of the finance industry moved to the EU as possible,” said Tom Kirchmaier, a fellow in the financial-markets group at the London School of Economics. “The big question will be what the final role of the City will be in Europe.”


Related Links:
4-traders - MORGAN STANLEY : Britain's financial power already on the wane

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 25/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Business Week

Britain's financial power is already seeping away

“There will be a lot of political pressure to get as much of the finance industry moved to the EU as possible,” said Tom Kirchmaier, a fellow in the financial-markets group at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Bloomberg Business Week - Britain's financial power is already seeping away

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Business Week

Britain’s Financial Power Is Already Seeping Away

“There will be a lot of political pressure to get as much of the finance industry moved to the EU as possible,” said Tom Kirchmaier, a fellow in the financial-markets group at the London School of Economics.


Related Links:
Bloomberg Business Week - Britain’s Financial Power Is Already Seeping Away

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Tom Kirchmaier webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

La Voce

Quando la mobilità del lavoro fa la differenza/When labour mobility makes the difference

What explains this persistence? The results of our recent work suggest some considerations.

The evolution of economic activity throughout the country has systematically favoured at the expense of other areas. For territories that have experienced positive changes in the demand for local work was higher the chance to learn about other positive changes in later times. And vice versa. The phenomenon is not a distinctive feature of our country. On the contrary, it seems stronger in other countries (such as the United States, see a recent work of Michel Amior and Alan Manning).


Related Links:
La Voce - Quando la mobilità del lavoro fa la differenza/When labour mobility makes the difference

The Persistence of Local Joblessness

CEP Community

Michael Amior webpage

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 132, Issue 2, May 2017

‘Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Do They Earn More?'

Article by Ross Levine; Yona Rubinstein

ISSN 0033-5533, EISSN 1531-4650.

 

Related publications

‘In brief...'Smart and illicit': the making of a successful entrepreneur’
Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013


Related Links:
Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 132, Issue 2, May 2017 - ‘Smart and Illicit: Who Becomes an Entrepreneur and Do They Earn More?'

In brief...'Smart and illicit': the making of a successful entrepreneur

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Yona Rubinstein webpage


News Posted: 25/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

St Louis Post-Dispatch (USA)

Stacy Washington: Minimum wage hike will hurt city of St. Louis

Researchers Maarten Goos and Alan Manning posit in “Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Great Britain” that there is a general “hollowing out of middle income routine jobs” while “high income cognitive jobs and low income manual jobs” continue to produce increasing job opportunities. While I disagree that entry-level food service and retail work is middle income, their point is well-made. Any human function that can be sequenced and programmed, such as taking orders, flipping burgers or operating fry baskets, can and will be automated to save money.

Related publications

‘Lovely and lousy jobs’, Alan Manning.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013 (http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/CentrePiece_18_2.pdf)

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp398.pdf


Related Links:
St Louis Post-Dispatch (USA) - Stacy Washington: Minimum wage hike will hurt city of St. Louis

Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Britain

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 10/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Newsin English.no (Norway)

Immigration tests the welfare state

Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, told newspaper Aftenposten in January that the Migration Advisory Committee he ...

Related Links:
Newsin English.no (Norway) - Immigration tests the welfare state

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 02/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Aftenposten (Norway)

Professor: 'Det er rett og slett ikke tilfelle at innvandrere tar jobbene fra dem som allerede bor i landet'

"It is simply not the case that immigrants are taking jobs from those who already live in the country"

Professor Alan Manning denied that immigrants take jobs.  If it were so, wouldn't Canada and Australia have been a financial chaos?


Related Links:
Aftenposten (Norway) - Professor: 'Det er rett og slett ikke tilfelle at innvandrere tar jobbene fra dem som allerede bor i landet'

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 10/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

LSE Brexit Vote blog

There is no inevitable negative effect of immigration on the quality of people's lives in the UK

Many people think that migrants take jobs away from citizens, reduce wages or both. Others argue that immigrants benefit the economy because they take risks and start businesses.  In three short videos below Alan Manning explains how migration affects your job prospects, presents the data from the UK and the world, and gives insights on managing migration in light of this evidence. Ultimately, he argues that there is no inevitable negative effect of immigration on the quality of people’s lives in the UK.

This post represents the views of the author.  It was first published at Migration Matters.


Related Links:
LSE Brexit Vote blog - There is no inevitable negative effect of immigration on the quality of people's lives in the UK

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 29/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Modern Diplomacy

President Trump - Incumbency is different from candidacy

The commonly held belief that immigrants hold down the wages of native workers is also doubtful. The economic literature is mixed although a paper by Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth of the London School of Economics found that economic migrants to the UK have little effect on natives' jobs or wages. New arrivals apparently affect the pay of recent immigrants. A President Trump may build a wall wasting $40-60 billion dollars, but for what?


Related Links:
Modern Diplomacy - President Trump - Incumbency is different from candidacy

The Labour Market Effects of Immigration

The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Marco Manacorda webpage

Alan Manning webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage


News Posted: 17/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Countercurrents.org

Can a President Trump follow his signature agenda?

The commonly held belief that immigrants hold down the wages of native workers is also doubtful. The economic literature is mixed although a paper by Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth of the London School of Economics found that economic migrants to the UK have little effect on natives’ jobs or wages. New arrivals apparently affect the pay of recent immigrants. A President Trump may build a wall wasting $40-60 billion dollars, but for what?

This article was published online by Countercurrents.org on November 17, 2016
Link to article here


Related Links:
Countercurrents.org - Can a President Trump follow his signature agenda?

The Labour Market Effects of Immigration

The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain

CEP Community CEP Labour Markets

Marco Manacorda webpage

Alan Manning webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage


News Posted: 17/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Telesur TV

Will President Trump's hands be tied?

The commonly held belief that immigrants hold down the wages of native workers is also doubtful.  The economic literature is mixed although a paper by Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth of the London School of Economics found that economic migrants to the UK have little effect on natives' jobs or wages.  New arrivals apparently affect the pay of recent immigrants.  President Trump may build a wall wasting $40-60 billion dollars, but for what?


Related Links:
Telesur TV - Will President Trump's hands be tied?

The Labour Market Effects of Immigration

The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain

CEP Labour Markets CEP Community

Marco Manacorda webpage

Alan Manning webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage


News Posted: 16/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Gov.UK

news story: Professor Alan Manning appointed as Chair of the Migration Advisory Committee

Professor Manning appointed for a 3 year term.

Professor Manning has been appointed for a 3 year term following a rigorous recruitment process regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd said:  Professor Manning will bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to his new role as chair of the Migration Advisory Committee.

Under his leadership, I am confident the government will continue to receive transparent, independent and evidence-based advice on migration issues. Professor Manning is a Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics (LSE) and is director of the Centre for Economic Performance’s research programme on community. His expertise is on labour markets, including but not confined to the impact of migration.


Related Links:
Gov.UK - news story: Professor Alan Manning appointed as Chair of the Migration Advisory Committee

CEP Community

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 16/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Migration Matters

Do migrants take away jobs?

Part 2/6 from six impossible ideas (after Brexit)
Many people think that migrants take jobs away from citizens, reduce wages or both. But you may also have heard the argument that immigrants benefit the economy because they take risks and start businesses. So, who's right?
We took this question to Alan Manning, Professor of Economics at LSE. In three short videos, Alan explains how migration affects your job prospects, presents the data from the UK and the world, and gives insights on managing migration in light of this evidence.

The episode of Migration Matters was posted on October 17, 2016
Link to the article and films here

Related publications
Recommended reading: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, Paper No.19, February 2015

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 17/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

Migration Matters

Do migrants take away jobs?

Part 2/6 from six impossible ideas (after Brexit)
Many people think that migrants take jobs away from citizens, reduce wages or both. But you may also have heard the argument that immigrants benefit the economy because they take risks and start businesses. So, who's right?
We took this question to Alan Manning, Professor of Economics at LSE. In three short videos, Alan explains how migration affects your job prospects, presents the data from the UK and the world, and gives insights on managing migration in light of this evidence.

The episode of Migration Matters was posted on October 17, 2016
Link to the article and films here

Related publications
Recommended reading: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, Paper No.19, February 2015

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 17/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

iNews

The politics behind pound sterling's volatile week

The pound has lost nearly 18 per cent of its value against the dollar since Britain voted Brexit, two per cent more than during the 2008 financial crash. On Thursday it reached its lowest point for 168 years. ''Movements in sterling in the past week have made it clear that news which increases the probability of a 'hard Brexit' reduces the value of the pound,'' Dr Thomas Sampson, an economics lecturer at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, told i. ''This reflects concerns that a 'hard Brexit' will increase the costs of trading with the EU and reduce the UK's output and living standards.''

This article was published by iNews on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Needed but not wanted

Economic migrants are seen as a threat to jobs and the welfare state. The reality is more complex. Immigration of low-skilled workers has become an increasingly contentious political issue in both America and Britain. Voters in host countries often see a sudden influx of people from places with lower wages, poorer working conditions and a less generous welfare system as a threat to their livelihoods and living standards.

A paper by Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, of the London School of Economics, concludes that immigrants to Britain are imperfect substitutes for native-born workers, so they have little impact on natives’ job prospects or wages. New immigrants tend to affect only the pay of recently arrived immigrants.

This article was published by The Economist on October 1, 2016

Link to article here.

Related links:
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Community Programme webpage

 


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Migration: Needed but not wanted

Economic migrants are seen as a threat to jobs and the welfare state. The reality is more complex
Until quite recently the academic literature treated migrants as substitutes for native workers. But what if they were complements; if low-skilled migrants helped to boost the productivity of low-skilled natives? Gianmarco Ottaviano, of the University of Bologna, and Giovanni Peri, of the University of California, Davis, find that for workers with at least a high-school qualification, the wage effects of low-skill immigration are positive if you drop the assumption that workers of the same age and education are perfect substitutes and that workers of one skill level, say cooks, do not affect the productivity of workers at other skill levels, say waiters or restaurant managers. The effect on the wages of high-school dropouts is only mildly negative. A paper by Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, of the London School of Economics, similarly concludes that immigrants to Britain are imperfect substitutes for native-born workers, so they have little impact on natives' job prospects or wages. New immigrants tend to affect only the pay of recently arrived immigrants.

This article was published by The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Immigration, offshoring, and American jobs, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Giovanni Peri and Gregory White, American Economic Review, 103(5), August 2013
Immigration: the link to international trade in services, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Giovanni Peri and Gregory White. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
The impact of immigration on the structure of wages: theory and evidence from Britain, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Journal of the European Economic Association, Volume 10, Issue 1, February 2012
The Labour Market Effects of Immigration, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 3, Winter 2008

Related links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

Robohub.org

The robot economy: interview with Alan Manning

In today's interview, we sat down with Alan Manning, Professor of Labour Economics at the London School of Economics. He is a leading author in his field, particularly in understanding the imperfections of labour markets.
How do you think robots will impact the economy?
Like any new technology, there will be winners and losers. On the whole, however, I believe there will be more winners.

Who will the winners be?
The winners will mostly be two groups: First robots will be used by firms to make production cheaper, which will in turn lower prices, and benefit the consumer. Second, because consumers are getting products cheaper, they will have more money to spend, which will boost the economy as a whole. ...

This article was published online by Robohub.org. on September 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 27/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Britain's economy is stable - and people are surprised

Swati Dhingra, one of those who forecast severe damage to the economy, says the danger hasn't past. Warnings about the impact of Brexit were focused on what might happen when Britain leaves the EU, and that won't happen for more than two years - at least. Until then, no one knows what the country's relationship with the EU will look like and what effect it will have on trade, labor supply and investment, she said.
''It's too early to tell,'' said Dhingra, an expert on trade and international economics at the London School of Economics. ''The trade policy changes have not yet happened. Why are we expecting things to change?''

This article was published online by the Daily Mail on September 7, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Britain's economy is stable - and people are surprised

Swati Dhingra, one of those who forecast severe damage to the economy, says the danger hasn't past. Warnings about the impact of Brexit were focused on what might happen when Britain leaves the EU, and that won't happen for more than two years - at least. Until then, no one knows what the country's relationship with the EU will look like and what effect it will have on trade, labor supply and investment, she said.
''It's too early to tell,'' said Dhingra, an expert on trade and international economics at the London School of Economics. ''The trade policy changes have not yet happened. Why are we expecting things to change?''

This article was published online by the Daily Mail on September 7, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway)

Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den såkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer på en rekke områder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljø, for å forsøke å måle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at også Norge burde gjøre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

PropertyWire

Researcher blames government not rich foreign buyers for UK housing crisis

Decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land and turn them into something like gold or artworks is to blame for the current housing crisis in the UK rather than foreign buyers, according to a new analysis. The problem is not foreign speculators buying luxury flats as an investment in London which then lie empty but that for more than 30 years not enough homes have been built, says Paul Cheshire, Professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by PropertyWire on August 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog

Reflections on the employer support for higher level skills report

Article by John Denham
For the past 20 years and longer, Ministers of all parties have wanted to see more employers support employees and apprentices to gain higher levels skills and higher education. With strong bi-partisan support in a relatively non-ideological area of policy it seems odd that employer supported higher skills have not become a more important part of the skills and education system. In a recent short project for the Institute of Public Affairs I wanted to examine why public policy had apparently failed. I have an interest: I was Secretary of State at the Department for Innovation and Skills from 2007 to 2009 and, more recently, had proposed radical reforms to higher education finance that depended heavily on the expansion of employer supported degrees.

This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog on August 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
In full: Employer Support for Higher Level Skills Report
CVER website


News Posted: 03/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

The aftermath of the Brexit vote - the verdict from a derided expert

John Van Reenen was disappointed but not surprised by the UK's vote to Leave the EU. Whilst his own research predicts serious economic and political damage in the case of Brexit, he thought a Leave vote was a real possibility ever since David Cameron committed to a vote in 2013. In his last post as Director of LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, he gives his verdict on the campaigns, the media, politicians, and being a derided expert.

There are multiple reasons for the Brexit vote, but by far the most important one can be summarised in a single word: immigration. In the last few weeks before the vote, the Leave campaign was ruthless in focusing on our fears of foreigners. Sadly, with the exception of London, this has been shown time and time again to be a great vote winner all over the world. The British people have suffered tremendously since the financial crisis. The real wages of the average person fell by about 10 per cent between 2007 and 2015. This is not about inequality - poor, middle and rich have all lost out. It has been the longest sustained fall in average pay since the Great Depression and it has made people very angry with the establishment - and rightly so. As LSE's Professor Stephen Machin, the new Director of the Centre for Economic Performance has shown, the areas with the biggest falls in average wages were the places most likely to vote for Brexit.

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on August 2, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

VideoVox

A 'Norway Temp' Deal

What will the arrangement with the EU be? In this video, Swati Dhingra discusses introducing a temporary Norway-like deal. This video is part of the ''Econ after Brexit'' series organised by CEPR and was recorded on 14 July 2016.

The interview was uploaded to view via CEPR Video Vox on July 29, 2016
View video here

Related publications
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

slugger o'toole blog

Remain campaign a victim of its own left liberal conceits?

A couple of thoughtful pieces to throw into the melee post-referendum. First Tim Harford in today's FT
And to the idea that economists don't know what they are talking about (a new broadly held myth scaled up by the fact no one saw the crash coming), he has this to note: The Institute for Fiscal Studies is full of experts on tax and household income; the Centre for Economic Performance studies globalisation, technology and education. Blaming these people for not foreseeing the collapse of Lehman Brothers is like blaming a brain surgeon for the spread of obesity.

This article was published online by slugger o'toole on July 20, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 20/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Business Day Live

Are economists at fault for Brexit?

John van Reenen, the outgoing director of the London School of Economics’s Centre for Economic Performance, doesn’t think the profession should be too down on itself. Had economists engaged more "in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference".

This article appeared in Business Day Live on 13 July. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage
News Posted: 13/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

FT.com

Consumers are bearing the extra cost of living wage

Researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance have also found that the NLW reduced the perceived profitability of firms in low-paying sectors. The stock market valuations of low wage firms — such as JD Wetherspoon, Next and the Mitie Group — fell significantly when the NLW policy was unexpectedly announced in July 2015.

This article appeared on the FT.com on 11 July 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
The Elusive Employment Effect of the Minimum Wage Alan Manning, May 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1428

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community programme webpage
News Posted: 11/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Newsweek - Europe

Brexit: The characteristics of areas that voted leave in EU Referendum

Article by Monica Langella and Alan Manning
This article reports the result of an exercise in which the vote share for Leave in the 380 areas of England, Wales and Scotland are regressed on a variety of area characteristics largely drawn from the census for 2011 and earlier decades. These characteristics are for the population as a whole - not for those eligible to vote (British citizens), registered to vote and actual voters in the referendum. Nevertheless the variables we use can explain 90 percent of the variation in the vote share across areas.

This article was published by Newsweek - Europe on July 7, 2016
Link to article here

Related article
This article was originally published in the London School of Economics and Political Science British Politics and Policy Blog on July 6, 2016.
Read the original article.

Related links
Monica Langella webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage


News Posted: 07/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Who voted Leave: the characteristics of individuals mattered, but so did those of local areas

Individual demographics had a huge effect in determining the outcome of the referendum, but the characteristics of local areas mattered as well, explain Monica Langella and Alan Manning. Immigration, the decline in manufacturing and in other sectors, as well as politics, all played an important role in deciding the outcome.

The UK's vote to leave the EU on 23 June has induced much speculation about the factors behind people's decision. From opinion polls (e.g. the Ashcroft Polls) we know that the old and the less educated were more likely to vote Leave. But it's likely that voting was not just determined by individual characteristics but by those of local areas. Indeed, the main hypotheses put forward for the Leave vote are that it represents the reaction of those who have been left behind because of globalization (as Gordon Brown argued) or immigration.

This article reports the result of an exercise in which the vote share for Leave in the 380 areas of England, Wales and Scotland are regressed on a variety of area characteristics largely drawn from the census for 2011 and earlier decades. These characteristics are for the population as a whole - not for those eligible to vote (British citizens), registered to vote and actual voters in the referendum. Nevertheless the variables we use can explain 90 per cent of the variation in the vote share across areas.

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on July 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Monica Langella webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage


News Posted: 06/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

World Politics Journal

To Brexit or not to Brexit? That's not the question!

Economists and political analysts have debated over the long-term effects of the vote on the future of the British economy. Prior to the referendum many warned that Brexit could have dire consequences for Britain, including losing access to European markets, which account for 48% of British exports, eventually leading to a drop in exports and ultimately, a recession. Many have discussed the economic turmoil and have suggested that investments would drop due to uncertainty. Leading up to the referendum, the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics put out a research brief suggesting that exiting the EU would cause the British economy to suffer. The New York Times argued that the Brexit would make Britain poorer and Britain would become less productive. Others predicted a financial crisis.

This article was published online by the World Politics Journal on June 30, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

World Politics Journal

To Brexit or not to Brexit? That's not the question!

Economists and political analysts have debated over the long-term effects of the vote on the future of the British economy. Prior to the referendum many warned that Brexit could have dire consequences for Britain, including losing access to European markets, which account for 48% of British exports, eventually leading to a drop in exports and ultimately, a recession. Many have discussed the economic turmoil and have suggested that investments would drop due to uncertainty. Leading up to the referendum, the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics put out a research brief suggesting that exiting the EU would cause the British economy to suffer. The New York Times argued that the Brexit would make Britain poorer and Britain would become less productive. Others predicted a financial crisis.

This article was published online by the World Politics Journal on June 30, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagens Industri (Sweden)

Ekonomiprofessor räknar med fortsatt fall

...resultatet av folkomrostningen. Gianluca Benigno, ekonomiprofessor vid London School of Economics, sager att han forst...
...the result of the referendum. Gianluca Benigno, economics professor at the London School of Economics, says that he first...

This article was published online by Dagens Industri (Sweden) on June 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related Links
Gianluca Benigno webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Eurasia Review

What now for Britain and EU? - Analysis

The Prime Minister must now be regretting including the in/out referendum in his earlier election manifesto pledges to win over the far-right votes. Not taking lessons from the close call in the Scottish referendum, he gambled with the future of the country and lost, announcing he will step down. The public in the meantime were bombarded with polls and predictions of varying degrees of reliability. In a final attempt to highlight the economic dangers of Brexit, three top institutions - the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, Institute for Fiscal Studies and Centre for Economic Performance - released a joint statement on 21 June warning: ''A vote to leave the EU would almost certainly make us financially worse off compared with staying in the EU, quite possibly by a substantial amount.'' It seems that the majority of the British public chose to ignore the almost unanimous expert advice, with the belief that the UK can go it alone successfully, in a vote that truly went against the establishment.

This article was published online by Eurasia Review on June 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
June 20, 2016
CEP, NIESR and IFS blog
Leaving the EU would almost certainly damage our economic prospects
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily News Egypt

LuxLeaks, law and justice all part of tax scandal trial in Luxembourg

The LuxLeaks papers clearly illustrate that Luxembourg’s most important export product is tax avoidance. That is why French economics researcher Gabriel Zucman says that Luxembourg is “the center of European tax evasion.” Zucman, who has lectured at the London School of Economics since 2014, describes the grand duchy as an “economic colony of the international financial industry.”

This article appeared in Daily News Egypt on 28 June 2016. Link to article

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Forbes Online

Which Management Practices Are Most Beneficial To Firm Performance?

Along with colleagues Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, London School of Economics, Sadun challenges this view in a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Management as a Technology?

This article appeared in Forbes on 27 June 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Management as a Technology? Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, John Van Reenen, June 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1433

Related Links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 27/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Seeking Alpha

The Consequences Of Brexit

These numbers all point to a significant deterioration in the economy. In fact, it is a disaster for the U.K. as inflation will skyrocket (note that the British pound dropped 15% against gold in one day) and incomes could drop 2.3% according to a report issued by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on Seeking Alpha on 26 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

After 'Brexit' vote, investors are gripped by a panic last seen in 2008

In crudest outlines, the panic that followed Britain's vote to quit the European Union traced the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers, an event that turned an unfolding financial crisis into the bleakest economic downturn since the Great Depression. The similarities hung uneasily over markets on Friday, presenting a grim question: How ugly might things get? ... ''Lehman came out of the blue,'' said John Van Reenen, director of the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. ''This is like a train wreck where you can see the trains coming together for a long distance and you're hoping the trains will swerve away.''

This article was published by the New York Times on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

UK areas with stagnant wages are most anti-EU

A feeling of anger and frustration with the European Union is strongest in areas of Britain that have seen wages stagnate in recent years, according to research commissioned by the Financial Times. Two leading labour market economists, Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, found a statistically significant link between wage growth, or the lack of it, and the proportion of the vote secured by the anti-EU UK Independence Party in the 2015 general election.

This article was published by the Financial Times on June 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brian Bell and Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Financial Buzz

What are Brexit's real impacts?

The whole world is eager to know the result of Brexit poll on Thursday. The result could have far economic consequences for the EU and the rest of the world. The greater consequences are more subtle, gradual, and global. Brexit would be the postwar of decades against global integration. This consensus is boosting protectionism and anti-immigrant world-wide. The uncertainties would slow down global growth clouded by aging populations and inefficient productivity. Although the supporters on Brexit say EU integration improves the incomes only for elites, every skilled worker is also a consumer and, therefore, benefits the whole British economy by making products better and cheaper to compete in the world market. As for the immigration policy, it's probably a plus as well. EU immigrants to Britain are better educated and diligent compared to UK-born workers, and immigrants normally pay more in taxes than they receive in benefits, according to The Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by Financial Buzz on June 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis No.05, May 2016
Full series of CEP Brexit Analyses can be seen here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Consultancy.uk

Charles-Edouard Bouée reflects on the impact of a Brexit

And while some experts argue that FDI is high in the UK due to a favourable business environment, others, such as the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, suggest that ''being fully in the single market'' is what ''makes the UK an attractive export platform for multinationals as they do not face the potentially large costs from tariff and non-tariff barriers when exporting to the rest of the EU.''

This article was published online by Consultancy.uk on June 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Holger Breinlich webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Indian Express

Brexit: Beckham says remain

Leading economic institutions in Britain – the Institute for Fiscal Studies, NIESR, and the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance – have warned quitting the EU’s single market would make the UK “financially worse off"

This article appeared in The Indian Express on 21 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Leave to exit: how your money might be affected by Brexit

Last year, a report from the Bank of England supported his comment, suggesting that the wages of low-paid employees in catering, hospitality and care have been driven down by increased competition from EU workers.
However, the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, claimed that areas of the UK with large recent increases in EU immigration did not suffer greater falls in pay as a result, but that wages fell as a result of the global financial crisis. It added: ''Immigrants consume goods and services and this increased demand helps to create more employment opportunities.''

This article was published by The Independent on June 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

World Economic Forum

What's the real impact on economies of the minimum wage?

Economists care a great deal about the minimum wage because it is a policy prescription that increasingly affects a large portion of the workforce and because it is a clear case of government intervention, imposing a floor on the market price of labor. Minimum wages therefore offer a policy tool to test theories about how the labor market operates. In a new working paper, Alan Manning of the London School of Economics argues that a clear signal of the negative employment effects of the minimum wage is ''elusive,'' which should not be surprising if we think about the mechanisms underlying competition in the labor market.

This article was published online by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The elusive employment effect of the minimum wage, Alan Manning, Washington Center for Equitable Growth Working Paper 2016-06, June 2016

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Belfast News Letter

Brexit campaign falls on poor grasp 'basic facts' says report

Economics experts have blasted key assumptions underpinning the Brexit campaign's financial arguments in favour of leaving the EU. The report by the London School of Economics and Political Science's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) has been seized on by the Remain campaign to back their warnings that exiting the EU is too dangerous.

This article was published online by Belfast News Letter on June 1, 2016
Read more: ...

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.06, May 2016
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta Online

What's at stake in the UK's EU vote

The claim, however, that migration is a drain on the welfare state is false. EU migrants for the most part move to Britain to work, and a study by the London School of Economics has shown that they are net contribu¬tors to the economy as a result of the taxes they pay.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta Online on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta Online

What's at stake in the UK's EU vote

The claim, however, that migration is a drain on the welfare state is false. EU migrants for the most part move to Britain to work, and a study by the London School of Economics has shown that they are net contribu¬tors to the economy as a result of the taxes they pay.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta Online on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Liberation technology: mobile phones and political mobilisation in Africa

Article by Marco Manacorda and Andrea Tesei
Digital technologies have been widely used for political activism in recent years, including during the Arab Spring, the Occupy Wall Street movement, and the Indignados movement in Spain. This column reports research showing that the growing use of mobile phones in Africa leads to more political protests during recessions and periods of national crisis. The mobilising potential of digital technologies is more pronounced in autocratic countries and those where the raditional media are under state control, suggesting that this technology may play a key role in fostering political freedom.

This article was published online by Vox on May 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Liberation Technology: Mobile Phones and Political Mobilization in Africa, Marco Manacorda and Andrea Tesei, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1419, March 2016

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Gazata Do Povo

Salario minimo entra na rota das reformas economicas de Temer

Em uma entrevista ao jornal Financial Times, o professor Alan Manning, da London School of Economics, diz que em sua visao sobre a historia dos salarios minimos, ele sempre se surpreendeu com como e possivel aumenta-lo sem prejudicar as perspectivas de emprego.
In an interview with the Financial Times newspaper, professor Alan Manning, of the London School of Economics, says that in his view on the history of the minimum wage, he is always surprised with how you can increase it without harming the prospects of employment.

This article was published by Gazeta Do Povo (Brazil) on May 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
Big ideas: The UK's National Minimum Wage, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 14, Issue 2, Autumn 2009

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Spectator - 'Coffee House' blog

EU immigration hasn't hurt jobs or wages. Here's why:

Article by Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen
This morning's national insurance figures have further stoked the debate about immigration, and the extent to which leaving the EU would make a difference. Many British people are concerned that high levels of immigration have hurt their jobs, wages and quality of life. ... So it does make sense that many people believe this immigration wave has hurt UK workers and think that leaving the EU would make things better. To investigate this we crunched the most recent data and scoured the evidence in our new report. The bottom line is that EU immigration has not significantly harmed the pay, jobs or public services enjoyed by Britons. In fact, for the most part it has made us better off. Far from EU immigration being a 'necessary evil' that we must bear in order to gain access to the greater trade and foreign investment generated by the EU Single Market, immigration is at worst neutral and at best another economic benefit of membership.

This article was published online by The Spectator 'Coffee House' blog on May 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

CEP State of Working Britain blog

SWOB 10: EU-turn if you want to. Brexit and immigration

State of Working Britain blog, article posted by Jonathan Wadsworth
Immigration has for some years been the uppermost worry among the issues thought to be facing Britain in many opinion polls so it - or rather people's perceptions of its extent and its effects - is almost certainly one of the key issues that will influence the upcoming vote on whether to stay or remain in the EU. A new report from the CEP looks into this. Workers have had a rough ride in recent times. Real (inflation adjusted) wages fell by around 10% in the years after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing austerity. Such a sustained fall in pay is unprecedented in British post-war history.

This article was posted online in the CEP State of Working Britain blog on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
The State of Working Britain blog webpage


News Posted: 11/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Speech: PM speech on the UK's strength and security in the EU: 9 May 2016

The overwhelming weight of independent opinion - from the International Monetary Fund to the OECD, from the London School of Economics to the Institute for Fiscal Studies - also supports the fact that Britain will suffer an immediate economic shock, and then be permanently poorer for the long-term.

This article appeared on Bloomberg on 9 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

InFacts.org

Why Britain should stay in the EU: Brexit economists' barrage of blather

The Brexiteers' economic case has taken a real kicking in the last few weeks. The International Monetary Fund, the Treasury, the OECD, the London School of Economics and President Barack Obama have all put the boot in.

This article was published online by InFacts.org on April 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards', Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Series No.02, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

OECD's Gurria-No Economic Upside for UK from Brexit

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Wednesday that he saw no potential benefits for the British economy if voters decide to leave the European Union at a referendum in June. Angel Gurria said a new OECD report showed a hit to British economic growth under all scenarios if the country left the EU compared with a decision to stay in the bloc. ''The best outcome is still worse than remaining and the worst outcomes are very bad indeed,'' he said in a speech at the London School of Economics as the OECD published its report on the impact of a so-called Brexit.

This article was published online by The New York Times on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

OECD's Gurria-No Economic Upside for UK from Brexit

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Wednesday that he saw no potential benefits for the British economy if voters decide to leave the European Union at a referendum in June. Angel Gurria said a new OECD report showed a hit to British economic growth under all scenarios if the country left the EU compared with a decision to stay in the bloc. ''The best outcome is still worse than remaining and the worst outcomes are very bad indeed,'' he said in a speech at the London School of Economics as the OECD published its report on the impact of a so-called Brexit.

This article was published online by The New York Times on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Yorkshire Post

Obama's arrival in UK brings a boost for the Remain campaign

US PRESIDENT Barack Obama is expected to give a major boost to the Remain campaign tomorrow by backing David Cameron's call for Britain to stay in the European Union.
Earlier this week the Treasury published analysis suggesting Britain's departure from the European Union would cost households on average £4,300 a year. ... The Treasury forecast suggests Britain's GDP would be cut by 6.2 per cent but economists at the LSEs Centre for Economic Performance put the figure at between 6.3 and 9.5 per cent. Swati Dhingra, from the LSE, said: "The Treasury Report looks at the realistic options the UK will face after Brexit - and the cost of each. It takes a conservative approach to the potential costs."

This article was published online by The Yorkshire Post on April 21, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

A Treasury analysis suggests the costs of Brexit would be high

THERE is much dispute in the Brexit debate over the economic effects of leaving the EU. Even Brexiteers accept that there would be some short-term costs from uncertainty, but they claim that in the long run Britain could still be better off. Most objective economic studies disagree, finding that there would be long-term costs as well. On April 18th the Treasury weighed in with a 200-page analysis. Its conclusion is that they will be high: the central estimate touted by George Osborne, the chancellor, is that GDP may be 6.2% lower than it would otherwise have been by 2030, an annual cost that he reckons works out at some £4,300 ($6,000) per household. ... The Treasury's numbers are bigger than those in some other recent studies, but that is mainly because they include the dynamic effects on productivity. A similar dynamic study by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics (LSE), came up with even bigger losses. To the disgust of Brexiteers, the Treasury agrees with the Bank of England that the benefits of EU membership considerably outweigh the costs. And it dismisses the possibility of a boost from less regulation in a post-Brexit world by pointing out that Britain is relatively lightly regulated already.

This article was published by The Economist on April 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

UK Economy: Nuts and bolts of Treasury's view of Brexit

The Treasury will publish details of its long-term economic assessment of EU membership on Britain's economy and prosperity on Monday, but the approach the Treasury has taken is clear from a George Osborne article in the Times. ... The Treasury's work is similar to the dynamic model of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the most complete academic analysis of Brexit to date.

This article was published by The Financial Times on April 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Benefits Canada

How would Brexit impact the financial industry?

Whether Britain loses access to the single market depends on the terms of any exit. Under the optimistic scenario, Britain would join the European Economic Area as non-member countries like Norway and Switzerland have done, says Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. Membership in that area provides full single-market access. Under the pessimistic scenario, Britain wouldn't join the European Economic Area. ''Then there would be bilateral negotiations between Britain and the EU over what kind of access Britain has,'' says Sampson.

This article was published online by Benefits Canada on April 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Benefits Canada

How would Brexit impact the financial industry?

Whether Britain loses access to the single market depends on the terms of any exit. Under the optimistic scenario, Britain would join the European Economic Area as non-member countries like Norway and Switzerland have done, says Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. Membership in that area provides full single-market access. Under the pessimistic scenario, Britain wouldn't join the European Economic Area. ''Then there would be bilateral negotiations between Britain and the EU over what kind of access Britain has,'' says Sampson.

This article was published online by Benefits Canada on April 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Euro Insight

Op-Ed: Those who champion Brexit should rewind 40 years

Article by Swati Dhingra
Like the Out campaigners of the 1970s, Brexit supporters believe EU membership is bad for British workers and the British economy but the data tells another story

This article was published online by Euro Insight on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Eurasia Review

Regulation To Blame For England's Surging House Prices – Analysis, By Christian Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen

New causal evidence on the impact of supply constraints on house prices shows land use regulation to be a major culprit of England’s current housing affordability crisis. Absent regulation, house prices would be lower by over a third and considerably less volatile. Young households are the obvious losers, yet macroeconomic stability is also impaired and productivity may suffer from constrained labour supply to the thriving cities where demand is highest.

This article appeared on Eurasia Review on 11 April 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Christian Hilber webpage
Urban Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Money Week

Introducing the living wage

“My view of the history of minimum wages is that we’ve always been surprised about how you seem to be able to push them up without harming job prospects,” Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics told the Financial Times recently. “Of course, there would be a point, if you pushed it up too far, that there would be serious adverse effects. We just don’t quite know where that is.”

This article appeared in Money Week on 10 April 2016 Link to article

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

Uncertain economics influence 'Brexit' talk

The Center for Economic Performance, at the London School of Economics, which sees itself neutral, says the worst-case scenario in the event of a vote to leave the bloc is a 6.3 percent to 9.5 percent reduction in G.D.P., ''a loss of a similar size to that resulting from the global financial crisis of 2008/09.'' The best case, it suggests, is a loss of 2.2 percent of G.D.P., with the European Union imposing costs on Britain for leaving, and to discourage others from doing so.

This article was published by The New York Times on April 2, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Alan Manning interview

Alan Manning discusses rise of national living wage and the economic risks

This interview was broadcast on 2 April 2016. Link

Also on BBC World Service, BBC Wales

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Korea Times

Minimum wage hikes emerge as new economic stimulus

Some economists are cautioning against adverse effects that hiking the minimum wage will have on the economy. "If we raise the minimum wage too high, it will certainly lead to ill effects," said Alan Manning, professor at the London School of Economics. "The problem is that we don't know when such adverse effects will emerge and how." Other researchers agreed that raising the minimum wage has risks that could be as great as its benefits, and it is all but impossible to predict the results.

This article appeared in The Korea Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

cYceon.com

Brexit fears triggered an avalanche of reports

UK's exit from the European Union (EU) - the Brexit - could cost the UK economy £100 billion and 950,000 jobs by 2020, pointed out a PwC-made report commissioned by the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) whose 4 in 5 of its members, who employ ... Another report delivered by the London School of Economics (LSE)'s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) explained that the Brexit would cause a ...

This article was published online by cYceon.com on March 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards', Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Series No.02, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

World watches Britain's 'living wage' experiment

''My view of the history of minimum wages is that we've always been surprised about how you seem to be able to push them up without harming job prospects,'' says Alan Manning, a professor at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by the Financial Times on March 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014
Big ideas: The UK's National Minimum Wage, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 14, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
All CEP research publications on the National Minimum Wage can be seen here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

moneyexpert

CBI: EU exit could cost £100bn and 1m jobs

The Centre for Economic Performance at LSE released a report last week that also states that British living standards and trade will be damaged if an ''out'' vote wins the referendum. In their research, the body states that the best case scenario would still see household incomes hit by around £850 per year. The organisation went on to say that this figure could rise to as much as £6,400 per household if trade and productivity are more severely impacted; this represents a fall not seen since the peak of the financial crisis in 2008-09.

This article was published online by moneyexpert on March 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, March 2016.
Download the accompanying Technical Paper here
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

U.S. News and World Report

Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

U.S. News and World Report

Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Transport infrastructure: Life in the slow lane

Sometimes there is no option but to build big. On many London Underground lines—which already run as many as 30 trains an hour—it is hard to make incremental improvements; the only sensible way to create new capacity is to build a new line, as the government is doing now with Crossrail, an east-to-west London link. Still, it has mostly ignored the recommendations of the Eddington review, says John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, instead focusing its energy on larger, shinier projects.

This article appeared in the Economist on 5 March 2016. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Student Times

Better Degrees Really Do Help You Earn More

The study shows that those who get a first or a 2:1 - earn more than those getting a 2:2 or a third. It looked at graduates who were born in 1970 and graduated in 1991, and found those with first of 2:1 degrees earned 7-9 per cent more five years after graduation. The study, published by the London School of Economics, also found that the gap between earnings according to university performance is also widening as more people opt for a university education.

This article appeared on Student Times on 16 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith, Shqiponja Telhaj, November 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1392

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Student Times

Better Degrees Really Do Help You Earn More

The study shows that those who get a first or a 2:1 - earn more than those getting a 2:2 or a third. It looked at graduates who were born in 1970 and graduated in 1991, and found those with first of 2:1 degrees earned 7-9 per cent more five years after graduation. The study, published by the London School of Economics, also found that the gap between earnings according to university performance is also widening as more people opt for a university education.

This article appeared on Student Times on 16 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith, Shqiponja Telhaj, November 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1392

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Reader's Digest Online

The machines are taking over!

But Professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics is more sanguine. “There’s a very long history of believing that new technology will destroy jobs,” he explains. “While there have always been some workers who have lost out, most workers have gained. Almost everybody today is better off than they were 100 years ago because of new technology.”

This article appeared in Reader's Digest Online on 8 February 2016. Link to article

Related publications
Lovely and lousy jobs Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
Lovely and lousy jobs: The rising polarization of work in Britain, Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, The Review of Economic Studies, 89(1), February 2007
'Lovely and lousy jobs: The rising polarization of work in Britain', Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.604 December 2003

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

The key to beating a midlife crisis? Don't worry about being happy

Professor Paul Dolan, a specialist in behavioural science at LSE, says there is currently too much emphasis placed upon traditional self-improvement methods, such as weight loss and career ambition, and too little on simple pleasures. "Don't pay attention to how happy things make you," Dolan told The Observer. "Instead, find things which make you feel good, and do more of them. A long-term sustainable impact on your life can be achieved, but not by sitting about thinking if only I was slimmer, fitter, richer, then I would be happier. It's not going to happen, so you'll still be miserable."

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on 8 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why raising the minimum wage isn't the best way to reduce inequality

Other new research, however, has put that conclusion in doubt. Perhaps the most conclusive reassessment comes from economists David Autor, Alan Manning and Christopher Smith earlier this year. Using many more years of microdata from the CPS, as well as a different statistical approach, they found that the minimum wage explains at most 30 percent to 40 percent of the rise in wage inequality among the lowest earners.

This article appeared on The Conversation on February 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Open Democracy

Eastern Europe's crisis of compassion

In a recent lecture, based on the above mentioned Gallup Survey, professor Alan Manning from the London School of Economics estimated that 630 million people plan to migrate away from their home countries globally, with 48 million planning to leave in the next twelve months and 19 million of them already making preparations to move.

This article appeared in Open Democracy on 25 January 2016. Link to article

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Corrections and clarifications

A report (Pay growth predicted to stall at 2% as number of skilled workers rises, 30 December, page 20) said that over the past year almost three-quarters of new jobs created went to non-UK nationals, according to official figures - 326,000 compared with 122,000 jobs taken by UK workers. The ONS estimates relate to the number of people in employment, not to the number of jobs. The London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance has found that immigrants do not account for a majority of new jobs, but that ''the immigrant share in new jobs is - and always has been - broadly the same as the share of immigrants in the working age population''.

This online article was published by the Guardian on January 20, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market by Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses Series, Paper No.19, February 2015

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 20/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Grocer

Sunday trading: what's the case for longer hours?

Results from the Centre for Economic Performance study in March 2015 suggest deregulation of Sunday trading laws has a considerable positive impact on employment, which stems from new firms being able to enter the market and job creation in existing firms, too. It also found that deregulation increased expenditure as a whole.

This article was published in The Grocer on January 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Evaluating the Impact of Sunday Trading Deregulation', Christos Genakos and Svetoslav Danchev, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1336, March 2015

Related links
Christos Genakos webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Independent.ie (Ireland)

Frontline workers continue to toil full month after the first rains fell

New research co-authored by Dr Tom McDermott of the School of Economics and the Environmental Research Institute at UCC finds that in the past 30 years, more than 500,000 people have been killed by floods and more than 650 million displaced globally.

This article appeared in the Independent.ie on 6 January 2016 Link to article

Related publications
Flooded Cities Adriana Kocornik-Mina, Thomas K.J. McDermott, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1398, December 2015

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Top Treasury civil servant Sir Nick Macpherson to step down in April

The Treasury's top civil servant, Sir Nicholas Macpherson, is set to stand down in April, having led the Government department for over a decade. George Osborne, the Chancellor, said he would ''miss'' Sir Nicholas, 56, who he described as one of the ''outstanding public servants of his generation''. ... The Eton and Balliol college, Oxford educated civil servant has held various public sector roles since 1985, after starting a career as an economist at the Confederation of British Industry and Peat Marwick Consulting, which was absorbed by KPMG. Sir Nicholas is a visiting professor at King's College London, and chairs the Policy Committee of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He said that it had been ''a privilege to lead the Treasury through an extraordinary period''.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on January 4, 2016
Link to article here

See also
Accountancy Age
Macpherson to leave Treasury after 10 years in Permanent Secretary role

Related links
Centre for Economic Performance Policy Committee info.
News Posted: 04/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Health Management.org

Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Time

Costs of hospital operations can vary wildly by location

The cost insurance companies pay for a medical operation in a hospital varies dramatically from city to city within the U.S. and can even vary by a factor of nine within an individual city, according to new research. The study from researchers at Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania and other schools relies on data from private insurers to provide a lens into health care costs. Researchers found that the cost of hospital visits is the primary driver of differences in health care cost between regions. ''These price differences between hospitals can be thousands of dollars,'' said study author Martin Gaynor, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University.

This article was published online by Time on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais (Spain)

La digitalización y la robotización no aparecen en el PIB

Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels (2014) teachers at the University of Uppsala (Sweden) and the LSE, have written a study called 'Robots at Work' that has examined the effects of the use of robots in 14 manufacturing sectors, services and even agriculture and concludes that robots increase the productivity of labour without effecting so much wages.

This article was published online by El Pais (Spain) on December 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Aftenposten

Bergensere selger kaker som bistand til britisk ungdom

The opportunities for social mobility, that higher education and income than the parents, is less in the United Kingdom than in Norway. Professor Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance in the United Kingdom in 2005 published a sensational report on this subject, and says that today are few signs of progress. On the contrary, the issue is getting bigger on the single field.

This article was published online by Aftenposten.no (Norway) on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

La Comunidad Valenciana ante el dilemma de la reindustrializacion

Faced with the dilemma of re-industrialization Valencia
Andres Rodriguez-Pose, Professor at the London School of Economics, said for his part, that the Valencian economy is currently ''very weak''. And has highlighted the paradox that, despite being a territory historically exporter, the internationalization of enterprises is lower than the Spanish average. And that, despite being a community with entrepreneurial tradition, the level of training of entrepreneurs is also below the average.

This article was published by El Pais on December 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Andres Rodriguez-Pose webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Trade Only Today

Passion, energy and the other traits needed for entrepreneurial success

It turns out that whether in another hemisphere or right in our own backyard, entrepreneurial traits are strikingly similar ... being smart is only a start. Researchers at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business and the London School of Economics found that flourishing industrialists often got into trouble as teenagers - breaking the rules, taking things by force and challenging the status quo, as opposed to accepting what they were told (according to Ross Levine, who co-authored the study).

This article was published online by Trade Only Today on November 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief ... 'smart and illicit': the making of a successful entrepreneur, Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein, CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
Smart and illicit: Who becomes an entrepreneur and does it pay?, Ross Levine and Yona Rubinstein, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1237, August 2013

Related links
Yona Rubinstein webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Sharper elbows

Poor students have been protected by a generous maintenance grant and relaxed terms for the repayment of loans. Their participation rate has grown at a faster rate than that of their richer peers since the reform, finds Gill Wyness of the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Higher Education Gill Wyness, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA026

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Economonitor

Nicaragua: a success story in the making

All said, are Nicaraguans happier? According to the World Happiness Report 2015, edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, Nicaraguans are indeed happier now than they were in 2007. Nicaragua ranks first as the country in the world that increased its happiness levels the most from 2007 to 2014.

This article was published online by EconoMonitor on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2015, John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Economonitor

Nicaragua: a success story in the making

All said, are Nicaraguans happier? According to the World Happiness Report 2015, edited by John Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey Sachs, Nicaraguans are indeed happier now than they were in 2007. Nicaragua ranks first as the country in the world that increased its happiness levels the most from 2007 to 2014.

This article was published online by EconoMonitor on November 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
World Happiness Report 2015, John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Nation (Pakistan)

30-minute walk more effective to lose weight

A study by scientists at the London School of Economics, this week, claimed a brisk 30-minute walk each day is a more effective way to lose weight than running or going to the gym. But, how much exercise do personal trainers, whose jobs depend on their getting results, say we need to do to shed pounds? Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics led the research at LSE. Her team compared the measurements of people who performed half-an-hour of fast-paced walking compared to those who did the same amount of heavy housework, manual labour and sports, including rugby.

This article appeared in the Nation (Pakistan) on 8 November 2015 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health, Medical, and Science Updates

Brisk walks better at keeping weight off than going to the gym: new UK study

Research by the London School of Economics discovered people who walked a lot had lower BMIs and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport. Dr Grace Lordan, a specialist in health economics who led the research, compared the measurements of people who took part in activities which increased heart rate and caused perspiring.

This article appeared in Health, Medical, and Science Updates on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Express

Just 30 minutes of walking a day will keep you slim

Research from the London School of Economics said that people who regularly stride out are more likely to have slimmer waistlines and a lower body mass index than people who do high-intensity workouts.

This article appeared in The Express on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider (Scotland)

Report: Immigration

''Immediately after the General Election in May this year, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) was commissioned by the Conservative government to examine Tier 2 of the Points-Based System,'' ... The MAC indicated in August that there appeared to be a ''good case'' for increasing it, because eit was calculated in 2009 when lower-skilled jobs were eligible for sponsorship. However, chair of the MAC Professor David Metcalf has said salary levels should not be considered in isolation.

This article was published in the Business Insider (Scotland) magazine in November 2015
Link to magazine here (pp53-54)

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

RTM - Rail Technology Magazine

Awards, contracts and appointments: £100bn Adonis commission to help shape Crossrail 2 and HS3

Other members will include ... a former member of the LSE's Growth Commission and a former chief adviser to the Great London Authority.

This article was published online by RTM - Rail Technology Magazine on October 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
LSE Growth Commission webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

iMagazine

Lord Richard Layard, article by Richard Layard

There is a shocking fact. Despite our huge increase in affluence, opinion research data for most developed countries show that people in the West have grown no happier In the last 50 years. This should make us rethink everything, including our work-life balance and our attitudes to tax.

This article appeared in iMagazine on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Why Tech Execs Don't Rush to Get Their Children Smartphones

The Huffington Post

Considering that teens use their phones almost solely for entertainment, it's not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that a ban on smartphones at school considerably improved kids' test scores. The formula is simple: Putting phones away makes for better schools.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Academic research cuts through Theresa May's immigration claims

In her address to the Conservative party conference, the home secretary delivered a pointed speech saying that ''there is no case, in the national interest, for immigration of the scale we have experienced over the last decade''. But are her claims supported by academic research? ... Although immigration increases the number of people living in the UK, it is up to the government to decide whether to build more infrastructure and housing. A 2014 study by Diego Battiston shows that, while immigrants are slightly more likely to live in social housing, the main reason why Britons find it hard to find places is the scarcity of property. A 2012 paper by Charlotte Geay presents evidence that, prima facie, the proportion of non-native English speakers in a year group has a detrimental impact on the educational attainment of native speakers at the end of primary school. However, this impact is modest and reflects factors including that immigrant children tend to go to less prestigious schools. Finally, in 2012 Jonathan Wadsworth showed that immigrants in the UK tend to use GP services and hospitals at roughly the same rate as the native born population, and are just as likely to self-report poor health.

This article was published by the Financial Times on October 6, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Immigration and the access to social housing in the UK', Diego Battiston, Richard Dickens, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1264, April 2014
'Non-native speakers of English in the classroom: what are the effects on pupil performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012
'Musn't grumble. Immigration, health and health service use in the UK and Germany', Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1166, September 2012
'The impact of immigration on the structure of male wages: Theory and evidence from Britain', Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006
The impact of immigration on the structure of wages: Theory and evidence from Britain, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Journal of the European Economic Association, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp120-151, February 2012.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Shops and call centres are not the answer for those in the wilderness

Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics has studied unemployment in former industrial areas and says every city needs the equivalent of an export sector - something to bring money from outside the area, whether it's a hospital, a university, or a successful business sector. Without that, areas fall into long-term decline. ''The areas that have negative labour demand shocks like this are the areas that lose population; then the housing stock is bigger than is needed for the population.'' That can depress property prices, and at worst, chronic urban decay sets in.

This article was published in The Observer on October 4, 2015
Link to article here

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The rocky road to regeneration of post-industrial areas

Ever since Thatcher's Teesside stroll, breathing life into blighted areas has met with mixed success. Understanding what might work is a step in the right direction.
Professor Alan Manning of the London School of Economics has studied unemployment in former industrial areas and says every city needs the equivalent of an export sector - something to bring money from outside the area, whether it's a hospital, a university, or a successful business sector. Without that, areas fall into long-term decline.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article was published online by the Essex Chronicle on September 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

YLE Alueellinen tv-uutistoiminta Lounais-Suomen uutiset (Turku) - Online

EU och nationalismen

Det finns intressanta paralleller till den här problematiken i en studie gjord av doktor Joan Costa Font och professor Frank Cowell vid London School of Economics. De fann en stark länk mellan en ökning av den europeiska identiteten, en minskning av den nationella stoltheten och förändringar i ekonomiskt beteende. There are interesting parallels to this issue in a study made by doctor Joan Costa Font and professor Frank Cowell at the London School of Economics. They found a strong link between an increase in the European identity, a reduction of national pride and changes in economic behavior.

This article appeared in YLE Alueellinen tv-uutistoiminta Lounais-Suomen uutiset on 24 September 2015 Link to article

Related publications
European Identity and Redistributive Preferences Joan Costa Font and Frank Cowell, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1362, July 2015

Related links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

France 24 (TV)

Dennis Novy interview

Dennis Novy live interview on the Greek election.

This programme was broadcast on France 24 on September 18, 2015
(no link available).

Also on:
Al Jazeera

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Times

Information technology and schools

Sir, – At last the penny is dropping among educationalists that technology in the classroom can be a hindrance to learning. A study by the London School of Economics in 2014 found that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones to school showed a sustained improvement in exam results, compared to schools that allowed students to carry mobile phones. The improvements in education standards, by eliminating the distraction of phones, was most pronounced in disadvantaged schools.

This article appeared in the Irish Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Wiltshire

News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ORF.at

Vom Lernen in der 'smarten' Schule - news.ORF.at

Für ein Verbot spricht eine Studie zum Thema, mit der die London School of Economics im Mai aufhorchen ließ. Wie die BBC berichtete, erhöhten sich die Leistungen der Schüler nach dem Verbot der Smartphones um sechs Prozent. Besonders schwache Schüler aus ärmeren Familien profitierten laut der Studie von der Verbotsmaßnahme. Die fehlende Ablenkung habe den Fokus der Schüler wieder vermehrt auf den Unterricht gelenkt, so die Forscher.
A study on the issue of the London School of Economics in may prick up their ears had talks for a ban. As the BBC reported that the student increased after the ban of smartphones by six percent. According to the study, particularly weak students from poorer families have benefited from the prohibition. Missing distraction have again increasingly directed focus of the students on teaching, according to the researchers.

This article appeared on ORF.at on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Women CEOs in social enterprises earn 29% less than their male counterparts

Research finds that women CEOs in social enterprises earn significantly less than their male counterparts. But it also finds that women are happier with their jobs. Saul Estrin, Ute Stephan and Suncica Vuji unpick the paradox.

This article appeared in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog. Link to article

Related publications Do women earn less even as social entrepreneurs? Saul Estrin, Ute Stephan and Suncica Vuji, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1313, November 2014

Related links
Saul Estrin webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Independent – online

Britain to consider a ban on smartphones in the classroom

Britain could ban smartphones and other personal electronic devices, like tablets, from the classroom over fears that they cause too much disruption to lessons. In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester, which suggested that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian.com

Higher Education Network What will Jeremy Corbyn's win mean for UK universities?

John Van Reenen, professor of economics at the London School of Economics, says: This policy will win Corbyn some support among students and middle-class parents, who will save money sending their kids to university at the expense of lower-income families whose kids do not go to university. Having loans with higher fees has been the right way to go as there is a direct tie between costs and benefits. Making them income-contingent, so no one has to pay anything back until they get the average wage, means that the risk for those on lower incomes is largely removed. We should have kept a more generous maintenance grant for those from very low-income families – it was a mistake by the chancellor to make these into loans.

This article appeared in the Guardian online on 12 September 2015 link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Magazine (Romania)

Analysts: Greece will remain in 'intensive care' for a long time, in the absence of substantial aid

Christopher Pissarides, London School of Economics, the winner of a Nobel Prize, said that Greece still has structural problems such as low productivity and lack of competitiveness. Greece is likely to need international aid for a longer period of time than the 3 to 4 years.

This article was published in Business Magazine (Romania) on September 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macroeconomics Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Magazine (Romania)

Analysts: Greece will remain in 'intensive care' for a long time, in the absence of substantial aid

Christopher Pissarides, London School of Economics, the winner of a Nobel Prize, said that Greece still has structural problems such as low productivity and lack of competitiveness. Greece is likely to need international aid for a longer period of time than the 3 to 4 years.

This article was published in Business Magazine (Romania) on September 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macroeconomics Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Magazine (Romania)

Analysts: Greece will remain in 'intensive care' for a long time, in the absence of substantial aid

Christopher Pissarides, London School of Economics, the winner of a Nobel Prize, said that Greece still has structural problems such as low productivity and lack of competitiveness. Greece is likely to need international aid for a longer period of time than the 3 to 4 years.

This article was published in Business Magazine (Romania) on September 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macroeconomics Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Ibero News (Spain)

¡Ojo! Este es el gran problema y mayor riesgo para los países emergentes

Pero no es el único que comparte ese punto de vista. También Luis Garicano, profesor de la London School of Economics, analizaba los retos a los que se enfrenta la economía global en los próximos años en un encuentro reciente, en el que también
But he is not the only one who shares this point of view. Also, Luis Garicano, Professor at the London School of Economics, analysed the challenges faced by the global economy in the coming years at a recent meeting, which also put the focus on the situation.

This article appeared on Ibero News on 11 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Business Review

Companies like Amazon need to run more tests on workplace practices

Leaders could also test whether specific work conditions or policies affect workers' performance. ... Nick Bloom of Stanford University and his colleagues conducted a randomized experiment on working from home using a NASDAQ-listed Chinese travel agency called CTrip, which has 16,000 employees. Employees who volunteered to work from home were randomly assigned to either work from home or in the office, and their performance was monitored for the next nine months. The results: Working from home led to a 13percent increase in productivity, greater work satisfaction, and lower turnover.

This article was published online by the Harvard Business Review on August 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013
Does working from home work? Evidence from a Chinese experiment, Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 130(1), February 2015

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Go back to school

It's a well-known fact that Essex is blessed with an excellent choice of schools, in both the public and private sectors. And thanks to some research published a couple of years ago by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the link between schools and house prices is now a proven fact.

This article was published by the Essex Chronicle on August 12, 2015
[No link available]

Also in
Brentwood Gazette
Go back to school
[No link available]

Related publications
Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Journal of Urban Economics, Volume 75, May 2013, Pages 15-28
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume Autumn 2012
'Valuing School Quality Using Boundary Discontinuities', Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.132, January 2012
'Houses and Schools Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market. EALE 2010 Presidential Address', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Gulf Today

Hammond's migrant remarks 'shameful'

A study by researchers at the London School of Economics earlier this year found that immigration to Britain has not increased unemployment or reduced wages.

This article was published by The Gulf Today on August 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
EA019: Immigration and the UK Labour Market, Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses Series, February 2015

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Market Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

George Osborne's magic has fooled us, for now

A large body of empirical evidence suggests either that reasonable minimum wages do not destroy jobs at all, or that they do not destroy very many. The evidence is, of course, mixed and contested. Much of it comes from the US and concerns the experience of teenagers, who - in the words of Alan Manning of the London School of Economics, ''represent about 2 per cent of hours worked and 98 per cent of the studies of the minimum wage''. But it is clear enough that if modest increases in the minimum wage were disastrous for jobs, we would know that by now.

This article was published by The Financial Times on July 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Manning, A. (2015) Shifting the Balance of Power: workers, employers and wages over the next parliament, in Gavin Kelly and Conor D'Arcy (Eds) (2015) Securing a Pay Rise: the path back to shared wage growth, Resolution Foundation

Related podcast
The minimum wage in the UK and beyond, Alan Manning
LSE Works: Centre for Economic Performance public lecture, 26 February 2015

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 10/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Summer budget: High hopes for the productivity plan - is enough being done?

Article by Anna Valero
In the 2015 summer budget, George Osborne at last identified the UK's productivity performance as an important issue that needs to be tackled. Here, Anna Valero reviews some of the measures ahead of further detail on the government's productivity plan due out tomorrow.
The issue of productivity was left out of the March budget and somewhat ignored during the general election campaign - much to the dismay of economists, for whom weak productivity performance since the financial crisis is the number one problem facing the UK economy. Therefore, Osborne's post-election announcement that dealing with weak productivity would be a priority in this parliament was welcome news.

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on July 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Productivity and Business Policies, Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
Further info here

Related CEP video/podcast
'Productivity and Business'. Interview with Anna Valero.
Low productivity is probably the greatest challenge facing the UK economy.
View video here

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Desperate Greece puts it to the people

''I don't understand what kind of economics they have in their minds, or who is deciding that this is economics,'' said Christopher Pissarides, a Nobel prizewinner at the London School of Economics. ''Who is going to invest in Greece under these circumstances? There is no place in Europe with a worse corporate environment.''

This article was published by The Sunday Times on June 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Desperate Greece puts it to the people

''I don't understand what kind of economics they have in their minds, or who is deciding that this is economics,'' said Christopher Pissarides, a Nobel prizewinner at the London School of Economics. ''Who is going to invest in Greece under these circumstances? There is no place in Europe with a worse corporate environment.''

This article was published by The Sunday Times on June 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Free lunch: The wrong tax reform

For the first question, the argument for lowering the rate is that a higher rate makes people behave in such a way that there is less income to be taxed in the first place. So a higher rate may not bring in much more money for the government - and may in theory shrink the total revenue. Whether this is the case with the UK's top rate is not obvious. In part this is because it has only been left unchanged for short periods - the 50p rate lasted three years and everyone expects the Tories to lower the 45p rate as soon as they see fit - so any behavioural change reflects people's attempts to time their tax burden rather than a long-term effect of a stable rate. But Alan Manning from the London School of Economics reports that the range of estimates agree on a small if uncertain effect on government revenues.

This article was published by the Financial Times on June 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Top rate of income tax', Alan Manning, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
Details here

Related video
'Top rate of Tax'
If politicians want to raise the top rate of tax, they need to do more to tackle tax avoidance and evasion. That is the main argument of Alan Manning.
View video here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

TES News

‘Encouraging a growth mindset is not just about boosting academic achievement'

First Richard Layard, my colleague in the Lords, blogged about why schools should teach character as well as competence. Their research at the LSE, using the British Cohort Study, found that the strongest predictor of a satisfying adult life is a child's emotional health, and least important is academic achievement.

This article was published online by Times Education Supplement (TES) on June 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Stern

Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Stern

Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Stern

Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Rent controls that aren't

Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre website

News Posted: 27/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Free lunch: read my lips

In a recent briefing from the London School of Economics, Alan Manning writes that raising tax from 45 to 50 per cent has highly uncertain, but small, effects on the public finances. But what is clear is that if the higher rate leads to a fall in the tax base (the Laffer curve effect), it is certainly not because the highly paid work less but because they put more effort into tax avoidance. Now all the parties promise to reduce the revenue loss from tax avoidance. But even if they fail, the implication is that a higher top rate of income tax does not have noxious effects on the economy.

This article was published by the Financial Times on April 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Top rate of income tax', Alan Manning, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
Details here

Related video
'Top rate of Tax'
If politicians want to raise the top rate of tax, they need to do more to tackle tax avoidance and evasion. That is the main argument of Alan Manning.
View video here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Hindu

Labour Talks Tough on Immigration

In a significant repositioning of Labour's views on immigration, Ed Miliband on Saturday pledged a series of measures to control immigration if his party is voted to power.

Jonathan Wadsworth of the London School of Economics says
'Fears about adverse consequences of rising immigration regularly seen in opinion polls have not, on average, materialised. It is hard to find evidence of much displacement of U.K. workers or lower wages. Any negative impacts on wages of less skilled groups are small.'

This article appeared on The Hindu on 19th April 2015. Link to article

Related links:
CEP Election Analysis #19 - Immigration and the UK Labour Market
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Further Links:

CEP's Election 2015 Coverage



News Posted: 19/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian - Economics blog

Why falling inflation is a false pretext for keeping wages low

According to Bank of England, earnings should be rising by 4 percent a year, but they are struggling to get above 2 percent - it is time the government and employers tilted wages in favour of labour.
There was a time, as the LSE economist Alan Manning notes in his contribution to a collection of essays published by the Resolution Foundation when year after year of falling real wages would not have been tolerated. ''Forty years ago an improving labour market and prices rising faster than wages would have led trade unions to march into the boardroom demanding higher wages and threatening strike action if those demands were not met. Pretty soon, union leaders would have been invited round to No 10 for beer and sandwiches to be cajoled into wage moderation to prevent and inflationary spiral taking hold. A lot has changed in the past 40 years.''

This article was published by The Guardian - Economics blog on March 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Manning, A. (2015) Shifting the Balance of Power: workers, employers and wages over the next parliament, in Gavin Kelly and Conor D'Arcy (Eds) (2015) Securing a Pay Rise: the path back to shared wage growth, Resolution Foundation

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Highs and lows of the minimum wage

The economist Alan Manning recently gave a public lecture at the London School of Economics, where he drew parallels between the Equal Pay Act and the minimum wage, pointing out that in both cases theoretical concerns were later dispelled by events. ... In response to Alan Manning's lecture, Nicola Smith of the Trades Union Congress looked forward to more ambition from the Low Pay Commission in raising the minimum wage ''in advance of the evidence'', or using ''the evidence more creatively''.

This article was published by The Financial Times on March 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Manning, A. (2015) Shifting the Balance of Power: workers, employers and wages over the next parliament, in Gavin Kelly and Conor D'Arcy (Eds) (2015) Securing a Pay Rise: the path back to shared wage growth, Resolution Foundation

Related podcast
The minimum wage in the UK and beyond, Alan Manning
LSE Works: Centre for Economic Performance public lecture, 26 February 2015

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Four concerns about schools at the top of the election agenda

Article by Sandra McNally
With education policy set to play an important part in the May general election campaign, debates around the future direction of the school system will take place against the backdrop of fast-paced reforms made during the coalition's time in office.
These four key issues are likely to face scrutiny when it comes to schools policy:
    •How the UK measures up
    •Academies
    •School budgets
    •Helping disadvantaged children
This article was published by The Conversation on March 24, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Schools: the evidence on academies, resources and pupil performance, Sandra McNally, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015

Related video
#ElectionEconomics video - 'School Spending'. Sandra McNally interview.
Spending on schools needs to be protected - in real terms - as research shows that spending matters for a child's education.
View video here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

London School of Economics to host new Centre for Vocational Education Research

A new £3m project aimed at researching new ideas for FE will be based at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Skills Minister Nick Boles will today announce that a new Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) will be led by Dr Sandra McNally from the LSE and based at its Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published in FE Week on 24 March 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Profile of Sandra McNally in FE Week
'New vocational research centre 'won't clash' with Education and Training Foundation, FE Week
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website

News Posted: 24/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE European Politics and Policy (EUROPP) blog

Governments need a more convincing narrative if they want to sway the public debate on TTIP

Article by Dennis Novy
If successfully concluded, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) would be the most ambitious free trade agreement in history. Dennis Novy writes that while the potential benefits from liberalised transatlantic trade are large, getting there will be an arduous process, with significant difficulties still to be overcome.

This article was published by LSE'S EUROPP blog on February 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
TTIP: if free trade coming to the North Atlantic?, Dennis Novy. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 3, Winter 2014/15

Related links
Dennis Novy webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How do YOU think NHS money should be spent? Boob jobs, liver transplants for alcoholics or vital support for dementia patients? New TV show asks the public for their view

Can the NHS cope with the rapid rise in dementia patients? Ros is one of 670,000 carers, but she needs help - £350 will provide a support nurse
Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said: 'One of the biggest numbers we should worry about is the number of people who have dementia now in the UK, it is estimated at more than 800,000'.

This article was published in the Mail online on February 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How do YOU think NHS money should be spent? Boob jobs, liver transplants for alcoholics or vital support for dementia patients? New TV show asks the public for their view

Can the NHS cope with the rapid rise in dementia patients? Ros is one of 670,000 carers, but she needs help - £350 will provide a support nurse
Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said: 'One of the biggest numbers we should worry about is the number of people who have dementia now in the UK, it is estimated at more than 800,000'.

This article was published in the Mail online on February 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Love? That's no route to happiness

Bestselling behavioural scientist Paul Dolan - also known as 'Professor Happy' - busts a few myths about love
It is the week before Valentine's Day, and in his office at the London School of Economics (LSE), Dolan ''also known as Professor Happy'' is mulling over the reasons why love barely features in his book about happiness.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on February 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness by Design, Paul Dolan published by Penguin on the 28th August 2014
Details

Related links
Related links Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

European Business Review

A Greek idea: 'Let the Germans finally pay their World War 2 debts!'

According to the new Greek government, Germany has an enormous unpaid account in Greece. The Germans never paid anything for the murdering and plundering in the Second World War. The 'Zwangsanleihe', an extorted loan of half a billion Reichsmark, was never paid back. This claim only is worth more than 11 billion Euros. May be time for an adjustment? The historian Albrecht Ritschl of the London School of Economics (LSE) and Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz share the opinion that such an adjustment is not a weird idea.

This article was published online by The European Business Review on February 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Robots are leaving the factory floor and heading for your desk - and your job

Alan Manning, an economist at the London School of Economics, takes issue with the assertion that economic trends observed in the US are caused by technological unemployment. While he agrees US data shows rising productivity and stagnating employment, it isn't the case in Britain. For about a decade UK productivity has been stagnating while employment, if anything, is up. If technology was having a big effect, he argues, it might show up in US data a bit earlier but wouldn't be entirely absent elsewhere.

This article was published in The Guardian on February 9, 2015
Link to article here

Also in
February 8, 2015
The Observer Tech Monthly
My name is Herb but beware: I am after your job

Related publications
'Lovely and lousy jobs: Job polarisation continues to be an important feature of the way that Britains labour market is evolving', Alan Manning, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, January 2014
Lovely and lousy jobs, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain',Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 604, December 2003
Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain, Review of Economics and Statistics 89(1): 118-33, February 2007

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

Playing with political fire

Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics says it is Syriza that has misjudged badly, both by teaming up in coalition with a virulently anti-German party, and by violating Troika terms across the board – halting privatisation, raising the minimum wage to €750 a month, re-hiring 10,000 civil servants, and blocking mortgage foreclosures. “Tsipras is slapping the Germans in the face: it is almost as if he wishes to be thrown out of Europe. I can’t see any political support for Syriza from any government in southern Europe. They are all terrified of their own populist movements,” he says.

This article appeared in The Telegraph on 2 February 2015 link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

Themenheft Mindeslogn (Germany)

'Die Geschichte Ist Voller Heulender Wölfe'

Der Mindestlohn in GroÐ’britannien
Alan Manning interviewed and Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) research on the minimum wage mentioned in an issue produced by the German government about the introduction of the minimum wage in Germany.

This article was published by Themenheft Mindeslogn (Germany) on January 29, 2-15
Link to article here

Related publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Universal

El 99% restante

There is a human mass that despite being available for work and knowledge loses ability to be employed. This generates a terrific competition by seeking higher returns among the cheapest labour in Asia and the suppressor technology jobs in the developed world. This seriously affects the social fabric of both. For the first because it depresses deliberately and systematically the cost of labour so. For developed countries because it leads to what Alan Manning of the London School of Economics has called the ''polarization of employment'' and David Author of MIT has called the ''missing middle''. That is the phenomenon whereby only the jobs located to the ends of the career ladder are growing.

This article was published by El Universal on January 28, 2015
Link to article here or translation here

Related publications
Lovely and lousy jobs, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
Lovely and lousy jobs: The rising polarization of work in Britain, Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, The Review of Economic Studies, 89(1), February 2007
'Lovely and lousy jobs: The rising polarization of work in Britain', Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.604, December 2003

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

ESRC

Paving the way for the Minimum Wage

ESRC-funded research provided crucial evidence for the introduction of a UK National Minimum Wage in 1999, encompassing 1.3 million workers in 2013. The research was cited prior to minimum wage legislation in Hong Kong in 2011 and Germany in 2015.

When exploring the impact of a UK National Minimum Wage in 1997, the Low Pay Commission (LPC) relied heavily on research by Alan Manning, Stephen Machin and Richard Dickens at the ESRC Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) to assess claims that a minimum wage would destroy up to two million jobs. The research, which investigated the impact of Wages Councils and the agricultural sector's minimum wage legislation, did not find any evidence that the minimum wage led to large-scale job losses.

Following recommendations from the LPC, the National Minimum Wage was subsequently introduced in 1999. The introduction of the minimum wage raised the pay of around 1.3 million low-paid workers by around 15 per cent overnight. By 2006 more than two million people received the minimum wage.

A 2007 CEP assessment of the impact of the minimum wage showed that it had raised the real and relative pay of low-wage workers, narrowed the gender pay gap and positively influenced pay for one in ten workers.

This article was published online by the ESRC on January 19, 2015
Link to article here


Related publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014


Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial

La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
Link here

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Express Bangladesh

How's life with rural people?

Richard Layard in his book 'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' notes that as the Western societies got richer, their people have not become happier.

This article appeared in the Financial Express on 10 December 2014 link to article

Related publications Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
News Posted: 10/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Express Bangladesh

How's life with rural people?

Richard Layard in his book 'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' notes that as the Western societies got richer, their people have not become happier.

This article appeared in the Financial Express on 10 December 2014 link to article

Related publications Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
News Posted: 10/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

Herald Scotland

We need to plan better for precious years of childhood

The new understanding that childhood emotional wellbeing is key to a fulfilled adulthood comes from the Wellbeing research programme at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. Its study analysed data from around 9,000 people over 40 years.

This article was published by the Herald Scotland on November 11, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being', Andrew E. Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1245, October 2013
What Predicts a Successful Life? A Life-Course Model of Well-Being, Richard Layard, Andrew Clark, Francesca Cornaglia, Nattavudh Powdthavee and James Vernoit, Economic Journal, Feature Issue, Vol. 124, Issue 580, pp. F720-F738, November 2014

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Andrew Clark webpage
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

X factor over evidence: the failure of early years education

Article by Jo Blanden
As free nursery places for three year olds fail to deliver lasting educational benefits, Dr Jo Blanden argues we need to see a sensible approach to early years policy.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on October 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP Publications webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Britain News.Net

Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and films
Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 16/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Britain News.Net

Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and films
Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 16/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Clarin

No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Clarin

No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Clarin

No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

World Economic Forum

Why busts hurt more than booms help

Article by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Michael I. Norton
We find evidence that the life satisfaction of individuals is between two and eight times more sensitive to negative growth as compared to positive economic growth. People do not psychologically benefit from expansions nearly as much as they suffer from recessions. These results suggest that policymakers seeking to raise wellbeing should focus more on preventing busts than inculcating booms. Our results also offer an explanation for why increases in GDP do not always pay off in increases in happiness - the modest happiness gains accrued over years of growth can be wiped out by just a single year of contraction.

This article was published online by the World Economic Forum on October 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and films
The untold story of the recession: the psychological cost
The psychological cost of a few years of recession can wipe out the benefits of many years of growth. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve of the Centre for Economic Performance explains his latest research on the effect of the recent recession on people's wellbeing.
View here.

'Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data', Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem and George W. Ward, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1304, October 2014


Related links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 19/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

David Cameron should do some homework before sounding off about immigration and jobs

The impact of immigration on the labour market is a serious subject. And there has been some serious academic research on it. Work by Jonathan Wadsworth at the London School of Economics suggests that around 17 per cent of new hires in the economy have been going to people born outside the UK.

This article appeared in the Independent on 21 August 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Immigration, the European Union and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, May 2014 Paper No' CEPPA015

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 21/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

Tech Republic

AI destroys more jobs than it creates: What that means and how to stop it

History teaches us that labour markets are able to recover from the changes wrought upon them by technological change, said Alan Manning, professor of economics at the London School of Economics. ''If I take an historical perspective then technical change has always destroyed some jobs and created others, and this would in some sense be no different from that'', Manning said. ''There will be some people who have spent 20 or 30 years specialised in a job and suddenly there is no demand for that. They suffer big losses but in the long run that washes out, no young people go into those jobs and they go into something else and there is always something else to go into.''

This article was published by Tech Republic on August 18, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Lovely and lousy jobs, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 18, Issue 3, Autumn 2013
'Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Britain', Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.604, December 2013
Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain, Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, The Review of Economics and Statistics, 89(1), February 2007

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage
Communities Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

LSE News online

Internet speed closely linked to property values

Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
Link to press release here

Related publications
'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
SERC website

News Posted: 31/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Argentina

Plan Terapia para Todos: la salud mental de los economistas y las series policiales de Film and Arts

''En los paises ricos, las enfermedades mentales son el 38 percent de todas las enfermedades; y el porcentaje trepa a 50 percent en la poblacion trabajadora'', dice Richard Layard, economista de la London School of Economics, que promueve en Inglaterra algo asi como un plan de Terapia para Todos. Layard cuenta, en un libro escrito junto al psicologo David Clark, que los costos de un programa a gran escala de terapias cognitivo-conductuales cortas - 16 sesiones - ''basadas en evidencia con resultados reales'' son mucho menores a los costos que implican las dolencias emocionales en terminos de dias no trabajados, desmotivacion, etcetera.

This article was published online by Yahoo! Argentina on July 25, 2014
Link to article here

See also
Yahoo! En Espanol
Yahoo! Colombia
La Nacion
Yahoo! Mexico

Related Publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
David Clark webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Age (Australia)

Minimum wage rises don't lift unemployment, analysts agree

And over the past 20 years, academic economists have done many empirical studies showing that's not how minimum wages work in practice. They've also developed more sophisticated theories that better fit the empirical facts. It's all explained in the June issue of the ACTU's Economic Bulletin. ... Monopsonistic models don't have an unambiguous prediction for the employment effect of a minimum wage. A paper by Bhaskar, Manning and To, published in the 'Journal of Economic Perspectives' in 2002, concluded that ''a minimum wage set moderately above the market wage may have a positive effect or a negative effect on employment, but the size of this effect will generally be small''.

This article was published online by The Age (Australia) on July 11, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets (2005) Alan Manning, Princeton University Press
Details

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Why Do Fewer Than One in Three People With Mental Illness Receive Treatment? By David Clark and Richard Layard

It is not surprising that most mental illness goes untreated. While most people with physical illness are in treatment, this is true for fewer than one in three people with mental illness. This figure applies throughout the advanced world, and even for major depressions the figure is under a half in Britain, the USA, and continental Europe. If your pancreas is not working you automatically get treatment, but if your mind has been disordered for decades you do not.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 4 July 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
David Clark webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Guardian online - Dave Hill's London Blog

Boris Johnson: brown fields and green elephants

According to Professor Paul Cheshire, you could build 1.6 million homes at average densities if just a fraction of that greenbelt space, much of it riding schools and golf courses, were reclassified.

This article was published in the guardian.co.uk Dave Hill's London Blog on June 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 16/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Guardian online - Dave Hill's London Blog

Boris Johnson: brown fields and green elephants

According to Professor Paul Cheshire, you could build 1.6 million homes at average densities if just a fraction of that greenbelt space, much of it riding schools and golf courses, were reclassified.

This article was published in the guardian.co.uk Dave Hill's London Blog on June 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 16/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Britain's housing crisis will morph into catastrophe if politicians don't change, by Paul Cheshire

THE HOUSING crisis – worst in London, but bad across Britain – is fundamentally driven by lack of supply. For the past five years, we have been building fewer houses than in any peacetime period since before World War One. But house building has been on a downwards trend since the 1960s. Reasonable estimates suggest the shortfall in England has been 1.6m to 2.3m houses between 1994 and 2012. Moreover, too many of those we have built have not been in locations where demand is highest. We persistently build houses where they are relatively most affordable and job prospects are relatively worst.

This article appeared in City AM on 4 June 2014 link to article

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 04/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

CNN

Opinion: Does minimum wage make sense? Yes, but...

Article by Alan Manning
Why this widespread enthusiasm for the minimum wage? There is both economics and politics at play.

This article was published online by CNN on May 22, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
KSPRabc33 - broadcaster's online news
Does minimum wage make sense? Yes, but...

Related publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

UK could be plunged into another crisis if it left EU

Economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), which is part of the London School of Economics, described a British exit as a ''very risky gamble''. It said the move would cost jobs, reduce investment and push up the price of goods, even if the Government managed to a strike Swiss-style agreement to keep trade channels open.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on May 17, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Brexit or Fixit? The Trade and Welfare Effects of Leaving the European Union', G.I.P. Ottaviano, Joao Paulo Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis No.16, May 2014
The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Joao Paulo Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP mimeo/technical paper, May 2014

Related links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

UK could be plunged into another crisis if it left EU

Economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), which is part of the London School of Economics, described a British exit as a ''very risky gamble''. It said the move would cost jobs, reduce investment and push up the price of goods, even if the Government managed to a strike Swiss-style agreement to keep trade channels open.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on May 17, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Brexit or Fixit? The Trade and Welfare Effects of Leaving the European Union', G.I.P. Ottaviano, Joao Paulo Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis No.16, May 2014
The Costs and Benefits of Leaving the EU, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Joao Paulo Pessoa, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP mimeo/technical paper, May 2014

Related links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

Centre for Economic Performance Press Release

New research findings from CEP

New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Spring 2014 issue of CentrePiece magazine.

  • Social housing: Natives and immigrants both suffer from failure to increase stock

  • Big data: Lessons from the economic impact of the transatlantic telegraph cable

  • Minimum wages: Growing popularity with voters as a way of tackling inequality

  • New technology: Gains for nurses, teaching assistants and medical technicians

  • American management: More intensive use of ICT linked to better practices

  • Gender gaps: Lab experiments find differences in attitudes to risk and competition

  • Planning: Don't blame the foreigners: it's we Brits who turned houses into gold

  • Pay: The prospects of significant wage increases for typical UK workers are bleak

  • Education: Better school management is associated with better pupil achievement


  • The CEP press release was published online on May 8, 2014
    Link to press release here.

News Posted: 08/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Britons suffer 'unprecedented' fall in real wages

British workers have suffered an ''unprecedented'' decline in real wages over the past six years, with the average employee £2,000 worse off since the financial crisis hit, according to new research. The average worker saw a 8pc decline in real wages between 2008 and 2013. ''The scale of the real wage falls is historically unprecedented, certainly in the past 50 years where broadly comparable records exist,'' said Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin and Marina Fernandez-Salgado, the authors of the report.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on May 1, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
The Squeeze on Real Wages - And What it Might take to End it, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin and Marina Fernandez-Salgado. Article in the National Institute Economic Review, Volume 228, No.1, May 2014.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Business

Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
UK Wired News

Related publications
'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
Link to report here
Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Nicholas Oulton webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

Fox Business

The pay gap is alive and well — and hurting women

Economist Alan Manning of the London School of Economics also found that the pace of the declines in the pay gap has slowed down, and that working women could make less than men for the next 150 years due to discrimination.

This article was published online by Fox Business on April 2, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

IZA Newsroom

In the gym and on the job: creatine makes successful

Researchers show that a higher level of creatinine is correlated with a higher income and more working years.

This press release was published by IZA on March 28, 2014
Link to press release here

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Alex Bryson CEP Publications webpage
News Posted: 28/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Economist (Online)

Happy Now?

The commission’s authors (who include Richard Layard, an academic who has long supported more use of well-being indices in policy), favour the second measure of general satisfaction with life. More comprehensive cross-country measurements, they suggest, might help governments adopt useful innovations from other countries. Many considerations turn out to be widely shared across cultures. Work matters more for psychological reasons than pecuniary ones. Trust in one’s local community figures highly as a source of mental ease. Physical environments and good urban planning also figure highly . Emotional health might be enhanced by inculcating virtues like resilience more energetically at school.

This article appeared in the Economist on 27 March 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Wellbeing and Policy, Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, March 2014 Link to report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Gus O'Donnell webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

American Thinker

Jobs numbers: The real story

Another possibility for the declining average workweek is the Affordable Care Act. That law induces businesses with fewer than 50 full-time employees—full-time defined as 30 hours per week—to keep the number of hours low to avoid having to provide health insurance. The jury is still out on this explanation, but research by Luis Garicano, Claire LeLarge and John Van Reenen (National Bureau of Economic Research, February 2013) has shown that laws that can be evaded by keeping firms small or hours low can have significant effects on employment.

This article appeared on American Thinker on 17 March 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Firm Size Distortions and the Productivity Distribution: Evidence from France, Luis Garicano, Claire Lelarge, John Van Reenen, February 2012 , Paper No' CEPDP1128
Firm Size Distortions and the Productivity Distribution: Evidence from France, Luis Garicano, Claire LeLarge, John Van Reenen, NBER Working Paper No. 18841 February 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 17/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

e-fundresearch.com

Die Rückkehr des US-Konsumenten

Bereits im Jahr 2003 beschrieb Prof. Alan Manning (London School of Economics) in seinem Paper Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain, ein Phänomen, dass wir im Jahr 2014 als empirisch validiert betrachten dürfen. Er prägte den Begriff ''job polarisation''. Dieser bedeutet, dass Anstellungen im höchsten und niedrigsten Einkommenssegment zunehmen, während Mittelschicht Jobs abhanden kommen. In den USA sehen wir seit 2009 exakt jene Job Polarisation. Laut einer Untersuchung des National Employment Law Projects (NELP) betrafen 22 percent der Kündigungen während der Great Recession Low-Wage-Jobs (bis USD 13,83). Nun zeichnen sich eben diese für 58 percent der Recovery Jobs verantwortlich. Bei Middle-Income-Jobs verhält es sich genau umgekehrt.
Already in 2003, Professor Alan Manning (London School of Economics) described in his paper Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain, a phenomenon that we must consider in 2014 as empirically validated. He coined the term ''job polarization''. This means that positions in the highest and lowest income brackets take to get lost during middle-class of jobs. In the United States, we see that job since 2009 exactly polarization. According to a study of the National Employment Law project (NELP) 22 percent of the cancellations concerned during the great recession low-wage jobs (up to US $13.83). Now that 58 percent of the recovery are characterized responsible jobs. Middle income jobs it behaves exactly the opposite way.

This article was published by e-fundresearch.com on March 17, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Lovely and lousy jobs, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain, Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 604, December 2003
This paper has also been published as: Review of Economics and Statistics 89(1): 118-33, February 2007

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Low Pay Commission should become 'powerful watchdog', says founder

The body that sets Britain's national minimum wage should be transformed into a ''powerful new watchdog'' with the aim of lifting a further 1m workers out of low pay, its founder has urged. Prof Sir George Bain, who formerly chaired the Low Pay Commission, which recommends the level for the minimum wage, said the system was in need of serious reform to tackle the pervasive problem of low-pay. In the final report of his review for the Resolution Foundation, a think-tank, Sir George, who set up the LPC in 1999, said the cautious approach of the late 1990s was right for its time, but was now too narrow and shortsighted. Professor Alan Manning of the Centre for Economic Performance was a panel member contributing to the Resolution Foundation Report.

This article was published in the Financial Times on March 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
More than a Minimum: The Resolution Foundation Review of the Future of the National Minimum Wage: The Final Report. Published 13 March 2014.
The UK's National Minimum Wage, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Vol 14 issue 2, Summer 2009
'Minimum Wages and Wage Inequality: Some Theory and an Application to the UK', Tim Butcher, Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1177, November 2012

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Low Pay Commission needs shake-up to keep up with changing world

Fundamental reform of the minimum wage is needed to keep the system that was introduced 15 years ago up to speed with the changing world of work, according to one of the policy’s key architects. Professor Sir George Bain helped formulate the scheme to tackle poor wages as founding chairman of the Low Pay Commission, the independent body which recommends pay levels to government. But he now wants the body to take on a wider remit, with greater powers. Prof Bain has worked with the Resolution Foundation think tank towards today’s(Thurs)) release of More Than A Minimum, a review of the minimum wage which recommends new ways to keep the commission relevant, now and into the future.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on 12 March 2014 link to article

Related publications
More than a Minimum: The Resolution Foundation Review of the Future of the National Minimum Wage: The Final Report. Published 13 March 2014.
The UK's National Minimum Wage, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Vol 14 issue 2, Summer 2009
'Minimum Wages and Wage Inequality: Some Theory and an Application to the UK', Tim Butcher, Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1177, November 2012

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera London

Fears of erosion of the middle class in Britain

Professor Alan Manning of the Centre for Economic Performance was interviewed for a news piece on the topic of the demise of the middle class in Britain.

The news item was broadcast by Al Jazeera London on March 3, 2014
Link to recording here

Related publications
Lovely and lousy jobs, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Lousy and Lovely Jobs: The Rising Polarization of Work in Britain', Maarten Goos and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 604, December 2003
This paper has also been published as: Review of Economics and Statistics 89(1): 118-33, February 2007

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC2

Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

Reuters UK - blog

What we know about income inequality: America's disappearing ‘middle-skill' jobs and falling wages

America is losing middle class jobs - and middle class pay. Not only are ''middle-skill'' jobs disappearing as routine tasks become computerized (think everything people do in the television show ''The Office''), but that job loss has contributed to stagnating wages, according to a recent paper by Michael Boehm of the University of Bonn.

This article was published online by Reuters US on February 12, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Has job polarisation squeezed the American middle class?, Michael Boehm. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
'Has job polarisation squeezed the middle class? Evidence from the Allocation of Talents', Michael Boehm, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1215, May 2013

Related links
Michael Boehm webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

SpitsNieuws

Gewonnen geld maakt rechtser

"Het ziet ernaar uit dat geld een rechts-conservatief gedachtegoed bevordert." Bij mannen is dit effect overigens sterker dan bij vrouwen.
“It seems that money promotes a right-wing conservative ideology.” In men, this effect is stronger than in women

This article appeared in SpitsNieuws on 11 February 2014 link to article

Related Links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 11/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

RAC Magazine

Scientists call for push on energy storage

former UK chief scientific advisor, Lord Richard Layard, programme director at the London School of Economics, and Mark Maslin, professor of climatology at University College London, called for a campaign to secure international renewable energy storage funding.

This article appeared on RAC Magazine on 30 January 2014 link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 30/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Horrors fade but fragility concerns remain

a host of Nobel-prize winning economists travelling to the forum, Professor Edmund Phelps of Columbia University said the outlook was "good but not great" while Professor Chris Pissarides of the London School of Economics said that outside the eurozone he had "confidence that [countries] can withstand the start of monetary policy normalisation". Unlike José Manuel Barroso, the European Commission president,

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 22 January 2014 link to article

Also in
El Espectador
Davos 2014: desaparecen los horrores, pero sigue la fragilidad, January 22, 2014


Related Links
Chris Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Evening Standard

Letter: No easy way to increase wages

Osborne may be trying to talk up average earnings growth but it is no longer clear anyone is on the other end of the line.

Professor Alan Manning, LSE
THE fact that growth is once again reliant on increases in household debt shows the failure of the experiment with free market capitalism.

The Coalition appears content to sustain an economic system that favours a small elite, trying to compensate for its flaws by backing another house price bubble through Help to Buy. Ed Miliband gives the impression of recognising fundamental change is needed, but has yet to articulate how Labour would bring about an export- and investment-led recovery. Policies like a British Investment Bank are a step in the right direction but not enough.

Britain needs an active industrial strategy focused on delivering the skilled workforce, infrastructure and finance exporters need to compete in the global economy. And if the Government wants businesses to invest in the future, it will have to do so too.

This Letter was published in The Evening Standard (print edition) on January 20, 2014

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

Conservative Home

The artificial stupidity of our politics is no match for the rise of artificial intelligence

Perhaps we simply assume that technological progress will always create more jobs than it destroys. It would seem reasonable to do so - after all, 2013 was the year when the number of people in work reached thirty million for the first time in our history. Despite the overall rise in employment, the warning signs are clear: ''What is sobering is that we have already seen convincing evidence of the impact of technology on the job market. Alan Manning of the London School of Economics coined the term 'job polarisation' a decade ago, when he discovered that employment in the UK had been rising for people at the top and the bottom of the income scale. There was more demand for lawyers and burger flippers. It was middle-skill jobs that were disappearing.''

This article was posted on Conservative Home online on January 2, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

FT's annual poll of economists

Professors Christopher Pissarides and John Van Reenen amongst economists invited to respond to the Financial Times newspaper's annual poll.


FT Survey Q1: Economy
Q: To what extent will the UK maintain its recent pace of economic growth in 2014? Will households start to feel better off?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: I think it will maintain it and households will feel better off. There is ''recession fatigue'' at the moment, both here and in Europe, and households are looking for reasons to be cheerful about. The small but apparently robust recovery will give it to them.
Full response here

Comment by Professor John van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: The UK is likely to continue growing at a brisk rate which is unsurprising given that it has suffered the deepest recession and slowest recovery for a century. Households may well not feel better off because of planned public spending cuts and slow wage growth.
Full response here


FT Survey Q2: Sustainability
Q: Is the recovery set fair, or will this upswing end in tears? Why?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: I think it is fair because I do not expect more fiscal tightening beyond the one announced, the US is recovering well, the European market is gradually recovering and the Bank of England is not expected to do the unexpected and confuse markets. All in all I see small positive growth that will be sustained throughout the year.
Full response here

Comment by Professor John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: I am concerned about the downside risks due to the fact that consumption and the property market seem to be major driving forces of recent growth. The foolish ''Help To Buy'' scheme is helping push up property prices and create an artificial feelgood factor. Investment and exports are still disappointingly low.
Full response here


FT Survey Q3: Monetary policy
Q: Will the Bank of England change its forward guidance in the coming year? Should it?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: No and no. The policy selected is a reasonable one and with a new governor who wants to establish credibility (and it is essential that he should do) the MPC will be loathed to change the policy.
Full response here

Comment by Professor John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: There is no need to change forward guidance, but I would recommend that the Bank does not prematurely start raising interest rates when unemployment dips below the threshold set by the new Governor. Inflation risks seem much muted whereas risks to growth are more severe.
Full response here


FT Survey Q4: Fiscal policy
Q: Has George Osborne's ''plan A'' been vindicated by the recovery in 2013 and should the planned pace of deficit reduction continue unaltered?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: ''Vindicated'' is not the right word: no one thought the economy would be in recession for ever. Sooner or later a flexible open economy like Britain's will come out of recession whatever the debt reduction policy (provided it is not getting progressively tighter).
Full response here

Comment by Professor John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: Absolutely not. George Osborne retreated from plan A in the face of a collapsing economy, but not by as much as most of us hoped. UK GDP is still below 2008 levels and real wages have been in free fall. Part of this is undoubtedly due to the unnecessarily excess austerity of the Chancellor after 2010, especially the cuts in public investment by almost half. This is the opposite of standard macroeconomic advice which is to expand public investment in a deep recession when we are at the zero lower bound of interest rates. The standard macro advice is vindicated and the economic model of the Chancellor refuted, especially the foolishness of ''expansionary contractions'' touted in 2010. It's not all the Chancellor's fault of course, the eurozone crisis has also exacted a major toll. But this is in large part because the eurozone has been following similar austerity policies recommended by the Chancellor. The US, by contrast, did not consolidate so quickly and has come out more strongly from the recession much better. Again, as standard macro advice would predict.
Full response here


FT Survey Q5: Labour Market and Productivity
Q: By the end of next year, what are we most likely to be saying about the productivity puzzle?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: I expect productivity to pick up as demand grows and companies start working longer hours before opening new jobs. But it remains a puzzle and we might see slower response.
Full response here

Comment by Professor John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: I think (and hope) that as the economy recovers productivity will improve. This illustrates that the puzzle was more to do with depressed demand than supply. But the recovery will take a long time. Low levels of activity and wasted resources risk hysteresis and damage to the supply capacity of the UK.
Full response here


FT Survey Q6: Housing
Q: To what extent does the housing market need to be restrained? If so, what policies might work?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: It does need to be restrained but I do not see what policies night work at the top end, which drives the London market in particular. There is nothing you can do to restrain cash buyers from abroad. There should certainly not be ''citizenship'' favours for overseas housebuyers of the kind offered by many continental countries. A combination of higher taxes for the higher-end of the market with breaks for first time buyers and buyers of lower cost housing would also be effective in restraining price hikes.
Full response here

Comment by Professor John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: Abolish Help to Buy. Institute a land value tax (or at a minimum update the value of housing so council tax bands are based on something more sensible). Reform Housing Associations to get more entry level housing built. Follow recommendations of LSE Growth Commission on infrastructure more generally.
Full response here


FT Survey Q7: Scotland
Q: How would a yes vote for independence affect the Scottish economy and the rest of the UK in 2014?
Comment by Professor Chris Pissarides, LSE: It would not be good for either, especially the Scottish economy. Being part of the UK gives a smaller economy like Scotland's the assurance that if something goes wrong there will be help forthcoming. The last thing any Scot should wish is to give up the support potentially available from the UK (England?) for support from the European Union under Germany's rules.
Full response here

Comment by Professor John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance: It would have a negative effect on Scotland and the UK. Scottish debt would face a larger risk premium because of being a smaller and more volatile economy (as it is resource based).
Full response here


News Posted: 01/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

The Polish Paradox

Parts of England and Wales with many east European migrants have seen a drop in property crime and no increase in violence, according to researchers at the LSE and University College London. Recorded crime and anti-social behaviour in Corby has fallen by more than half since 2006; in the rest of England and Wales it is down by about a third. The proportion of the town's residents worrying about anti-social behaviour has plummeted from 56 percent to just 8 percent.

This article was published by The Economist on December 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves by Brian Bell, Francesco Fasani and Stephen Machin, The Review of Economics & Statistics, October 2013, 95(4): 1278-1290
'Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves', Brian Bell, Stephen Machin and Francesco Fasani, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.984, June 2010

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

Zeit online

'Ohne Fairness kanndas System nicht uberleben'

Der Brite Alan Manning erforscht seit mehr als 30 Jahren, wie Arbeitsmarkte funktionieren. Er sagt: Es ist die Zeit gekommen, fur mehr Gerechtigkeit zu sorgen.
The system cannot survive without fairness
The Briton Alan Manning has researched for more than 30 years, how labour markets work. He says: it is time to provide greater fairness.

This article was published online by Zeit.de on December 3, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
Alan Manning CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 03/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

Businessgreen.com

Sir David King calls on business leaders to embrace 'drivers for change'

Former chief scientist urges businesses to challenge impression that low carbon transition is a 'hair shirts and sandals' programme
King argued these drivers should manifest themselves through new technologies and changed behaviours. In particular, he highlighted the campaign he recently launched alongside Lord Richard Layard for a Sun Power Programme, modelled on the Apollo programme that would accelerate and co-ordinate research and development efforts to make solar power cost competitive with fossil fuels. ''The aim is to target funding at any blockage points that are stopping the solar power becoming cheaper than fossil fuels'', he explained. ''Solar is already cheaper in many off grid communities... But the question is how do we make it cheaper everywhere? One of the main blockage points is energy storage. At the moment energy storage R&D is the Cinderella of the energy industry. If we can overcome that challenge we can make solar the standard choice for energy generation.''

The article was published by Businessgreen.com on November 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Lancashire Telegraph

Warning of mixed ability classes

TEACHING mixed ability groups could damage the confidence of pupils who believe they are in the bottom half of their class, a study suggests. Researchers from the London School of Economics claim that children who achieved high grades in primary school, then perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smart but because their previous success in class had boosted their confidence. Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt analysed test data of more than two million pupils in England and carried out a survey on the confidence of 15,000 young people.

This article was published by the Lancashire Telegraph on October 29, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Yam (China)

Later business success from confidence in early years

According to a study by the London School of Economics, the loss of confidence due to low class rank can have serious long-term implications for students.

This article was published by Yam (China) on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

What would be the impact on the global economy if Washington defaulted?

Among the first to feel the impact would be foreign countries, institutions, and market funds that have bought U.S. Treasury bills as a safe way to keep money and earn interest. ''If there were an outright default on Treasury [bill] obligations, there is no doubt that would create huge chaos in financial markets'', says Ethan Ilzetzki, a professor of economics at the London School of Economics. ''For one thing, these assets are used as reserves by many private banks, by many central banks, and if their value suddenly plummeted it is hard to fathom the exact implications of that.''

This article was published online by Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty on October 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Ethan Ilzetzki CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Over here and over productive: let's welcome foreign owners

Article by John Van Reenen
The proportion of UK-quoted shares owned by overseas investors passed the 50% mark for the first time last week. Predictably there was much wringing of hands about the decline of British business and short-termism of UK investors. But the fact is that the growth in foreign ownership is something to be welcomed, not feared. First and foremost, it is a sign of confidence in the long-run prospects of the economy. Despite the policy mistakes over premature austerity in the last few years, the underlying fundamentals of the UK economy are strong. As pointed out by the LSE Growth Commission the stable rule of law, flexible labour markets and good competitive conditions are attractive to international investors.

This article was published online by The Conversation on September 30, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Alternative Paths of Fiscal Consolidation on Output and Employment in the UK, Nitika Bagaria, Dawn Holland, Jonathan Portes and John Van Reenen. Article in VOX, 14 August 2012.
Executive Summary, LSE Growth Commission Report, January 2013
Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, Report of the LSE Growth Commission, January 2013
LSE Growth Commission book – Investing for Prosperity – A manifesto for growth, Tim Besley and John Van Reenen (Eds), LSE publication, September 2013
Details
Purchase details here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Are children who are non-native speakers making education worse for native speakers? Presenting new research on England, this column by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj uses two different research strategies showing that there are, in fact, no spillover effects. These results support other recent studies on the subject. The growing proportion of non-native English speakers in primary schools should not be a cause for concern.

This article was published by Vox online on September 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Sky News (web)

Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today programme

Coverage of Lord Layard's letter to the Telegraph on schooling - ''Children start school too young'' experts say.

The item was broadcast on the BBC's Today Programme on September 12, 2013
[No link available.]

Also on
LBC
News

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today programme

Coverage of Lord Layard's letter to the Telegraph on schooling - ''Children start school too young'' experts say.

The item was broadcast on the BBC's Today Programme on September 12, 2013
[No link available.]

Also on
LBC
News

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today programme

Coverage of Lord Layard's letter to the Telegraph on schooling - ''Children start school too young'' experts say.

The item was broadcast on the BBC's Today Programme on September 12, 2013
[No link available.]

Also on
LBC
News

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Times of Oman

Oman among happiest countries in the world

Oman ranks among the top 25 list of the ''happy countries'' in the world. The Sultanate has been ranked 23rd among 156 nations and second in the Gulf region in the World Happiness Report 2013 released yesterday. The report was edited by Professor John F. Helliwell of the University of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; Lord Richard Layard, Director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE's Centre for Economic Performance; and Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Director of the SDSN, and Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General.

The article was published in The Times of Oman on September 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

CBC Ottawa

Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Civil Service World

Review calls for an independent infrastructure commission

An independent national infrastructure commission should be set up to evaluate the UK's long-term infrastructure needs, according to a report published today by Sir John Armitt, former chairman of the Olympic Delivery Authority and ex-chief executive of Network Rail. Armitt's proposals have the backing from the London School of Economics Growth Commission as well as the Institute of Civil Engineering.

This article was published by Civil Service World magazine on September 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission book - Investing for Prosperity: A manifesto for growth, Tim Besley and John Van Reenen (Eds), LSE publication, September 2013
Details
Purchase details here
LSE Growth Commission Report - Investing for Prosperity Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website
News Posted: 05/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Real recovery needs an overhaul of the investment machine

It could also do worse than pinch a few ideas from the LSE's excellent Growth Commission report, and promise to depoliticise national infrastructure decisions and beef up education for poorer kids. All of these would help to build a more solid, sustainable business model.

This article was published in The Observer on August 25, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission Report - 'Investing for Prosperity Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation', by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013
Link to Report here

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website
News Posted: 25/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Scotsman

Education 'has failed to improve with devolution'

Academics at the London School of Economics (LSE) said that while the Scottish system remains on a par with those elsewhere in the UK, it has not progressed at the same rate as the English system since 1999. The authors of the report note that the performance of the education system is one of the questions that voters may consider in the run-up to next year's independence referendum. Written by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, of LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, the report states: ''Our analysis of national statistics showed that Scotland's performance has been very stable over time whilst, in contrast, England's performance has been increasing.''

This article was published by The Scotsman on August 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013
'Education in a Devolved Scotland A Quantitative Analysis. A Report to the Economic and Social Research Council', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

Forbes India - Magazine

The correlation between money and happiness

Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage
News Posted: 12/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

Forbes India - Magazine

The correlation between money and happiness

Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage
News Posted: 12/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mirror

British workers suffer one of biggest falls in real wages in Europe

Economics commentator Professor John Van Reenen yesterday described the wages dip in the UK since the first of George Osborne's austerity budgets as ''stunning''.

This article was published in The Daily Mirror on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation programme webpage
News Posted: 12/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

Rai.it

I lavoratori britannici hanno subito uno dei più grandi crolli dei salari reali in Europa

Il professor John Van Reenen, direttore del Centre for Economic Performance della London School of Economics - interrogato dall'Independent - ha descritto la caduta dei salari reali nel Regno Unito come ''stupefacente: non era mai accaduto prima, dalla recessione dal dopoguerra in qua''. Secondo lui ''tutto si tiene'': una performance cosi negativa sarebbe il riflesso di una crescita debole e della caduta del PIL, che e sotto di 3,5 punti rispetto all'epoca precedente alla crisi finanziaria.
British workers have suffered one of the biggest meltdowns of real wages in Europe
Professor John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics - questioned by Independent - he described the fall of real wages in the United Kingdom as ''amazing it had never happened before, the post-war recession in here.'' According to him, ''all held'': a performance so negative would be a reflection of weak growth and fall of GDP, which is down 3.5 points compared to the previous period of the financial crisis.

This article was published online by Rai.it on August 11, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

It's the middle class's empty quarter

A recent study from the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics points out that, in many countries, the second-largest city is half the size of the largest and the third-largest is a third of the size.

This article was published in The Sunday Times on July 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 21/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

Turkiyegazetesi

FED YAKIN ZAMANDA PARASAL GENand#304;and#350;LEMEDEN ÇIKMAYACAK

The Fed Is Also Close To Tears Out Of Monetary Expansion [Translated from Turkish]
London School of Economics and Political Science, Center for Economic Performance Director, Prof. John Van Reenen is currently available to support the Fed's exit strategy data of the data stated. Prof Van Reenen said, "The FEDS desire monetary expansion. Unfortunately what to do when a lot of the markets react to the FED? Currently in the United States, the economic recovery is not strong enough to reduce unemployment, and is weak. The FED's monetary expansion, I don't expect to happen any time soon, especially in the current climate."

The article was published by Turkiyegazetesi on July 6, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Bobby D Show

10 things that put you in a better mood...and eight that make it worse

Researchers at the London School of Economics asked people to keep track of what MOOD they were in, using a smartphone app. Here are the 10 activities that improve your mood the MOST:...

This article was broadcast on the Bobby D (radio) Show on July 3, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Business

How big are the government's infrastructure plans?

The planning uncertainty caused by short-sighted government policy has been cited by a London School of Economics study as the main impediment to infrastructure investment.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on June 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, LSE Growth Commission Report, January 2013

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Increasing deficit cuts right through the Chancellor's spin on Britain's economy

Article by David Blanchflower
Also last week, a couple of my good friends, a present professor at the London School of Economics and a former one, received richly deserved knighthoods - Nobel laureate in economics Chris Pissarides and the chairman of the Migration Advisory Committee and external examiner on my PhD thesis, David Metcalf. This is two for the good guys.

This article was published in the Independent on June 24, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Chris Pissarides webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Fall in joblessness fails to prove Spain's case for economic revival

But my sense is they will only do the reforms that are impossible to avoid and where there is strong pressure from the EU, said Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics. Both private sector economists and academics have warned of the danger of complacency, arguing the government must not succumb to reform fatigue.

This article appeared in Financial Times on 5 June 2013 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Joblessness on the up as incomes are squeezed

The number of people in full-time employment increased by 10,000 to 21.68 million in the three months to March, while those working part-time fell 53,000 to 8.03 million. The number of self-employed people fell by 42,000 to 4.18 million. John Van Reenen, of the London School of Economics, said that the fact that more people were in work today than before the crisis began in 2008 was "misleading" as the numbers were boosted by the rising adult population.

This article was published in The Times on May 16, 2013
No link available.

Related publications
British Politics and Policy blog at LSE: Jobs, wages and poor growth
John Van Reenen, May 15 2013

Related links
JohnVan Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/05/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Osborne's growth strategy 'chaotic'

GEORGE OSBORNE will come under renewed attack over his growth strategy this week, with one leading economist describing the Treasury's investment plans as "chaotic". The influential London School of Economics Growth Commission will call for a new approach to investment in Britain's energy and transport networks. Government plans, it says, are beset by "procrastination and instability".

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 28 April 2013 (no link available)

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission Report - "Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation", by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013 link to report

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website
News Posted: 28/04/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

Related links
See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
SERC Website
News Posted: 04/04/2013      [Back to the Top]

LSE Politics and Policy blog

The Chancellor has finally shifted towards stimulating growth

Commenting on the Chancellor's budget, Linda Yueh sees a lot of positive stimulus measures that are better late than never, such as increased infrastructure spending and measures to cut corporate taxes. However, the Chancellor could have done more to boost confidence by setting out a convincing vision instead of knitting together disparate pieces of stimulus.

This article was published by the LSE Politics and Policy blog on March 20, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/03/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

We've been on a roll - and can do it again

Britain's economy. It set out some good ideas about how to generate growth over the medium and long term through infrastructure, innovation, education and skills. More striking was that the London School of Economics (LSE) Growth Commission stressed that Britain approaches the future with very considerable advantages, and an economy that is far from broken.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 3 February 2013 link to article

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission Report Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013 link to report

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website
News Posted: 04/02/2013      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Public sector pay stays neck and neck with private sector for the long race

Over a whole career, men in the public sector will earn the same as their commercial peers - and women will do better.

It is essential that any proposed reforms of the total remuneration package available to current and future public sector employees are evaluated carefully...

Related publications
Are public sector employees overcompensated? by Alexander Danzer, Peter Dolton. Article in CentrePieceVolume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
This article summarises 'Total Reward and Pensions in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors' by Alexander Danzer and Peter Dolton, Labour Economics 19(4): 584-594, August 2012

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/10/2012      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Public sector pay stays neck and neck with private sector for the long race

Over a whole career, men in the public sector will earn the same as their commercial peers - and women will do better.

It is essential that any proposed reforms of the total remuneration package available to current and future public sector employees are evaluated carefully...

Related publications
Are public sector employees overcompensated? by Alexander Danzer, Peter Dolton. Article in CentrePieceVolume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
This article summarises 'Total Reward and Pensions in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors' by Alexander Danzer and Peter Dolton, Labour Economics 19(4): 584-594, August 2012

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/10/2012      [Back to the Top]

ETSG 2012 Leuven Fourteenth Conference Chair Jacquemin Prize

Swati Dhingra and John Morrow recipients of the Chair Jacquemin Prize

Congratulations to Swati Dhingra and John Morrow for yet another prize - Prize Jacquemin - for their paper 'The Impact of Integration on Productivity and Welfare Distortions under Monopolistic Competition'. The Chaire Jacquemin of the Universite Catholique de Louvain in collaboration with the LICOS Research Centre of KULeuven (Belgium) awarded the prize at the ETSG Conference 2012 in Leuven.

More information on the history and the mission of the Chaire Jacquemin can be found here

Related publications
'The Impact of Integration on Productivity and Welfare Distortions Under Monopolistic Competition', Swati Dhingra and John Morrow, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1130, February 2012

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
John Morrow webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

"The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

"The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

The Business

A tangible Olympic economic boost?

Several of our essayists are likewise sceptical about the existence of clear economic and business benefits to Olympic host cities and countries. Max Nathan, research fellow with the Spatial Economics Research Centre, London School of Economics, writes that hoped-for impacts from job creation, transport improvement and inducements to healthier living usually turn out to be small. He also warns that it will take years for any lasting benefits to become clear.

This article was published in The Business on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Max Nathan webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

The Business

A tangible Olympic economic boost?

Several of our essayists are likewise sceptical about the existence of clear economic and business benefits to Olympic host cities and countries. Max Nathan, research fellow with the Spatial Economics Research Centre, London School of Economics, writes that hoped-for impacts from job creation, transport improvement and inducements to healthier living usually turn out to be small. He also warns that it will take years for any lasting benefits to become clear.

This article was published in The Business on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Max Nathan webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

Individual.com

Manufacturing managers 'share blame'

Consulting firm McKinsey & Company claims managers at Australia's manufacturing firms are partially responsible for the country's sluggish productivity. McKinsey notes that a London School of Economics survey of 21 nations reported Australia has more low-performing firms than more innovative countries.

This article appeared in Individual.com on 13 August 2012 link to article

Related publications
Related publications 'Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
World Management Survey (WMS) webpage
News Posted: 13/08/2012      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Curb cuts in social capital to deliver the boost we need

Article by Lord [Richard] Layard, London School of Economics.
Fewer cuts in social spending would provide a quicker boost to employment than extra physical spending, which always takes time.

Article in the Financial Times on 25 May, 2012. Link to article.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/05/2012      [Back to the Top]

CEP Press Release

Executive Pay: share ownership by institutional investors improves the link to corporate performance

Executive Pay:

Share ownership by institutional investors improves the link to corporate performance

Publicly quoted UK firms with higher levels of institutional ownership of their shares have a stronger and more symmetric link between corporate performance and executive pay.

That is one of the findings of new research by Dr Brian Bell and Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

Download full press release here

Related links:
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen Webpage webpage
Productivity Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/05/2012      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The World at One

John Van Reenen discussed predictions for the 2012 Budget.

This interview was broadcast on 20 March 2012 (no link avaliable)

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/03/2012      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

QE has also benefitted pension funds

Sir, Pension funds are right that quantitative easing has reduced gilt yields, to the detriment of pension funds ("QE blamed for rise in pensions shortfall", March 8). But QE has also underpinned strong performances by stock markets to the benefit of pension funds.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 13 March 2012 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/03/2012      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Impact of fees hike to be monitored by independent commission

An independent commission has been set up to see if higher tuition fees are deterring poorer students from applying to university. Chaired by former Observer editor Will Hutton, principal of Hertford College, Oxford, the commission will also include Sutton Trust chairman Peter Lampl, Stephen Machin professor of economics at University College London, and Times journalist Libby Purves, who presents the BBC Radio 4 education programme The Learning Curve.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education on 27 January 2012 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

Reuters Africa

Reuters Magazine – Chrystia Freeland: The one percent war

Brian Bell and John van Reenan two economists at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, have done a careful study of Britain's super-rich. Peering inside the top 1 percent, they found a distribution almost as skewed as that within the economy as a whole - the top 2 percent of the 1 percent captured 11 percent of the wage share of this top slice overall in 1998 and 13 percent in 2008.

This article appeared on Reuters Africa on 17 January 2012 link to article

Related publications
Firm Performance and Wages: Evidence from Across the Corporate Hierarchy Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1088, November 2011

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

Times Education Supplement

Painting over cracks is not enough for apprentices

In countries where apprenticeships are far more popular with employers than in England, participants are expected to carry out nine times the amount of training: a minimum of 900 hours compared to just 100 in this country. That is one of the headline figures of a new policy analysis that lays bare the "dysfunctional funding and delivery model" of apprenticeships in England. Written by Hilary Steedman senior research fellow at the London School of Economics, it returns to the original announcement of modern apprenticeships in 1993 and notes that the then Conservative government's pledge of 40,000 level 3 apprenticeship qualifications each year has not been met in 18 years.

This article appeared in the Times Education Supplement on 6 January 2012 link to article

Related publications
Apprenticeship Policy in England: Increasing Skills versus Boosting Young People’s Job Prospects Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis by Hilary Steedman, published December 2011 link to publication

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 06/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

Marketplace

Eurozone leaders meet in France

Professor Albrecht Ritschl of the London School of Economics says the Germans face a stark choice.
Albrecht Ritschl:They will indeed have to be the decision between accepting a probably softer eurozone, or thinking seriously about going it alone.

This article appeared in Marketplace on the 5th December 2011 link to article

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/12/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Study challenges belief on executive pay

The pay of top executives rises when their company does well and falls when their company does badly, according to academic research, which challenges the suspicion that executive pay rises inexorably regardless of corporate performance. The study by Dr Bell and Professor John Van Reenen did not address the question of whether company performance would have been better or worse without incentive-based pay.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 4, 2011
Link to article

Related Publications
Firm Performance and Wages: Evidence from Across the Corporate Hierarchy, Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1088, November 2011

Related Links
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
ESRC Festival of Social Science Event: ‘Top Pay in the UK’ on Friday 4 November 2011.
Details
News Posted: 04/11/2011      [Back to the Top]

Regional Studies Prize for Henry Overman

For joint paper: 'Economic linkages across space'

SERC Director Henry Overman has been awarded the Best Paper in Regional Studies prize for 2011, for his paper 'Economic linkages across space', written with SERC colleagues Patricia Rice and Anthony J. Venables.

Download paper here

More information on the 2011 awards can be found on the Regional Studies Association website
News Posted: 19/10/2011      [Back to the Top]

New research from SERC

Everybody needs good Neighbours? Evidence from students' outcomes in England

Stephen Gibbons, Olmo Silva, Felix Weinhardt
IZA DP No. 5980


We estimate the effect of neighbours’ characteristics and prior achievements on teenage students’ educational and behavioural outcomes using census data on several cohorts of secondary school students in England. Our research design is based on changes in neighbourhood composition caused explicitly by residential migration amongst students in our dataset. The longitudinal nature and detail of the data allows us to control for student unobserved characteristics, neighbourhood fixed effects and time trends, school-by-cohort fixed effects, as well as students’ observable attributes and prior attainments. The institutional setting also allows us to distinguish between neighbours who attend the same or different schools, and thus examine interactions between school and neighbourhood peers. Overall, our results provide evidence that peers in the neighbourhood have no effect on test scores, but have a small effect on behavioural outcomes, such as attitudes towards schooling and anti-social behaviour. Link to paper
News Posted: 10/10/2011      [Back to the Top]

New research from SERC

Everybody needs good Neighbours? Evidence from students' outcomes in England

Stephen Gibbons, Olmo Silva, Felix Weinhardt
IZA DP No. 5980


We estimate the effect of neighbours’ characteristics and prior achievements on teenage students’ educational and behavioural outcomes using census data on several cohorts of secondary school students in England. Our research design is based on changes in neighbourhood composition caused explicitly by residential migration amongst students in our dataset. The longitudinal nature and detail of the data allows us to control for student unobserved characteristics, neighbourhood fixed effects and time trends, school-by-cohort fixed effects, as well as students’ observable attributes and prior attainments. The institutional setting also allows us to distinguish between neighbours who attend the same or different schools, and thus examine interactions between school and neighbourhood peers. Overall, our results provide evidence that peers in the neighbourhood have no effect on test scores, but have a small effect on behavioural outcomes, such as attitudes towards schooling and anti-social behaviour. Link to paper
News Posted: 10/10/2011      [Back to the Top]

MercadoContinuo

El FMI cree que puede haber una recesión inminente

"Europa vive una encrucijada histórica. Hemos llegado al límite de lo que se podía hacer sin cambios sustanciales. Mientras, llegan muy malas noticias de Grecia e Italia, que parece un país sin rumbo", asegura Luis Garicano, de la London School of Economics.

This article appeared in MercadoContinuo on 6 September 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/09/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Cycling worth £3bn a year for UK, report reveals

Cycling generates nearly £3bn a year for the UK economy, according to a report from the London School of Economics. The figure includes £51m in revenue for British manufacturers from the 3.7m cycles sold in 2010 – a rise of 28% on 2009. Dr Alexander Grous, of the LSE, who conducted the research, said: "The good news is that structural, economic, social and health factors seem finally to have created a true step-change in the UK's cycling scene."

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 21, 2011
Link to article

Related Publications
The British Cycling Economy:‘Gross Cycling Product Report’, by Alexander Grous, for Sky and British Cycling, August 2011

Related Links
Alexander Grous webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also in:
The Times
Million more Britons get on their bikes
Metro
Cyclists keep wheels of industry turning with £2.9bn injection
The Sunday Times
On your bike, Britons, and pick the green and healthy route into work
The Independent
Cycling workers take fewer sick days a year
The Sun (23 August)
I love bikes

News Posted: 21/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Investors Chronicle

Nearly rational markets

Research by Klaus Adam of Mannheim University and Albert Marcet at the London School of Economics shows that even a small degree of irrationality by investors can produce volatility on stock markets.

This article appeared in the Investors Chronicle on 12 August 2011 (no link avaliable).

Related publications
‘Booms and Busts in Asset Prices’, Klaus Adam and Albert Marcet, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1059, July 2011 link to article
‘House Price Booms and the Current Account’, Klaus Adam, Pei Kuang and Albert Marcet, Centre for Economic Performance discussioin Paper No.1064, July 2011 link to article

Related links
Albert Marcet webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Markets turmoil and US downgrade: global reaction

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone included in roundup of reactions from analysts and commentators from around the world to threat of a global economic crisis.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 8 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Oxford

James Cannon show

Linda Yueh interviewed, speaking on the U.S. debt ceiling wrangles.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Oxford on August 1, 2011
[No link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also on
BBC Radio Wales
Good Morning Wales
[No link available.]
News Posted: 01/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Oxford

James Cannon show

Linda Yueh interviewed, speaking on the U.S. debt ceiling wrangles.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Oxford on August 1, 2011
[No link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also on
BBC Radio Wales
Good Morning Wales
[No link available.]
News Posted: 01/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

CNN

Opinion: Debt deal no cause for celebration

Article by Ethan Ilzetzki on the US debt deal. He says raising the debt ceiling should have been a "no-brainer".

This article appeared on CNN on August 1, 2011
Link to article

Related Links
Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
Macro Programme webpage

Also in
Tuesday 2 August
CNNExpansion.com (Mexico)
Opinion: El acuerdo sobra la deuda no es de celebrar
Article by Ethan Ilzetzki
…es conferencista y profesor adjunto del Departamento de Economía y Asociado al Centro de Presentaciones Económicas de la London School of Economics. Se ha desempeñado en posiciones de políticas e investigación...

News Posted: 01/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

NHS competition saves lives, study shows

An LSE study shows that 300 heart attack patients have been saved yearly due to competition being introduced to the NHS. Dr Zack Cooper of the LSE said there had been 'across the board' improvements.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on July 28, 2011
Link to article

Related Publications
Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency? An Analysis of the Recent Market-Based Reforms to the English NHS, Zack Cooper, Steve Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, The Economic Journal, 121, August 2011.

Related Links
Zack Cooper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Further information on health economics and NHS policy
Summary of research papers on NHS reform
News Posted: 28/07/2011      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Explaining the unemployment figures

Traditionally, such long spells of unemployment have been a rather un-American thing, being more common in Europe. Let Richard Layard explain:

But if you break down unemployment into shortterm (under a year) and long-term, you find that short-term unemployment is almost the same in Europe as in the U.S. – around 4% of the workforce. But in Europe there are another 4% who have been out of work for over a year, compared with almost none in the United States. The most obvious explanation for this is that in the U.S. unemployment benefits run out after 6 months, while in most of Europe they continue for many years or indefinitely.
That is indeed how it has traditionally been. Yet in this current recession the eligibility period for unemployment pay has been extended to 99 weeks across the US.


This article appeared in Forbes (blog) on 9 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Welfare to Work and the New Deal’, Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001 link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Labour Market Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details
News Posted: 29/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

Newsroom Panama

What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

Newsroom Panama

What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

Newsroom Panama

What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Academy schools mean more competition for schools – but must dog eat dog?

The move to convert schools to academy status is underpinned by research, most recently a paper by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit of the London School of Economics, which found Labour's academies not only improved their own performance, but also raised standards in neighbouring schools.

The study found this beneficial effect happened even though high-achieving pupils started leaving neighbouring schools to attend academies.

They attribute this effect to "increased choice [and] competition and also ... the sharing of the academy school facilities and expertise with the wider community".

This article appeared in The Guardian on 23 May 2011 - link to article

Related publications:
Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, April 2011, Paper No' CEEDP0123

Academy schools: who benefits? Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, November 2010, CentrePiece Magazine : Paper No' CEPCP325

Related links:
Steve Machin's webpage
James Vernoit's webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/05/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Academy schools mean more competition for schools – but must dog eat dog?

The move to convert schools to academy status is underpinned by research, most recently a paper by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit of the London School of Economics, which found Labour's academies not only improved their own performance, but also raised standards in neighbouring schools.

The study found this beneficial effect happened even though high-achieving pupils started leaving neighbouring schools to attend academies.

They attribute this effect to "increased choice [and] competition and also ... the sharing of the academy school facilities and expertise with the wider community".

This article appeared in The Guardian on 23 May 2011 - link to article

Related publications:
Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, April 2011, Paper No' CEEDP0123

Academy schools: who benefits? Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, November 2010, CentrePiece Magazine : Paper No' CEPCP325

Related links:
Steve Machin's webpage
James Vernoit's webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/05/2011      [Back to the Top]

New Book: Combatting Unemployment

IZA Prize in Labor Economics - by Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell

Combatting Unemployment is a collection of key papers from seminal labour economists Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell.

The authors received the IZA Prize in Labor Economics in 2008 for their path-breaking work on the relationship between labor market institutions and unemployment

Why is unemployment higher in some countries than others? Why does it fluctuate between decades? Why are some people at greater risk than others?

Layard and Nickell have worked on these issues for thirty years. Their famous model, first published in 1986, is now used throughout the world. It asserts that unemployment must be high enough to reduce the real wages for which workers settle to the level justified by productivity. So what affects 'wage push'? The authors showed early on that the key factors affecting 'wage push' are how unemployed workers are treated and how wages are negotiated. If unemployed people get benefits without being required to accept jobs, vacancies go unfilled and mass unemployment results. The solution is welfare-to-work policies like those now introduced in most parts of the world.

The authors have proposed these policies for the last twenty-five years in a series of key articles reproduced in this book. Their original analysis explains the subsequent movement of unemployment over the last two decades. They conclude the book with a new chapter on what should be done in the recession: no-one, they say, should be given unemployment benefit beyond a year, after which they should be offered work.

Book details:

Combatting Unemployment
IZA Prize in Labor Economics
Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell.
Edited by Werner Eichhorst and Klaus F. Zimmermann
OUP (May 2011)
ISBN 978-0-19-960978-9
£35.99

Purchase this book from the publisher


News Posted: 19/05/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Young Fabian Blog

Finding a cure

…number of jobless young could reach 1 million. The prognosis for the economy is bleak. Research by the London School of Economics suggests that the average ‘NEET’ (young person Not in Employment, Education or Training) costs the state £97,000 over their lifetime. More importantly, there are shocking implications...

This article appeared on the Young Fabian Blog on 3 May 2011 link to article

Related Publications
The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Joint CEP and Princes Trust Report, April 2007.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/05/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Young Fabian Blog

Finding a cure

…number of jobless young could reach 1 million. The prognosis for the economy is bleak. Research by the London School of Economics suggests that the average ‘NEET’ (young person Not in Employment, Education or Training) costs the state £97,000 over their lifetime. More importantly, there are shocking implications...

This article appeared on the Young Fabian Blog on 3 May 2011 link to article

Related Publications
The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Joint CEP and Princes Trust Report, April 2007.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/05/2011      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Action for Happiness movement launches with free hugs and love

"Despite the fact that we are getting richer, after 60 years we still haven't managed to produce a happier society," said Professor Richard Layard head of the wellbeing programme at the London School of Economics. "We are asking people for an individual commitment to aim to produce more happiness and less misery.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 12 April 2011 link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 12/04/2011      [Back to the Top]

The New Republic blogs

Richard Branson's Secret: Talent or Skills?

…which leaves aspiring entrepreneurs asking: is entrepreneurship a natural or acquired ability? Innate, says Olmo Silva of the London School of Economics. In a study of Italian entrepreneurs, Silva found that entrepreneurs did "tend to be experienced in a wider variety of fields," and that each additional field an individual worked in increased the probability of becoming an entrepreneur by 15%

This article appeared in the New Republic blog on 7 April 2011 link to article

Related publications
Michelacci, Claudio and Silva, Olmo (2007) Why so many local entrepreneurs? Review of economics and statistics, 89 (4). pp. 615-633
Silva, Olmo (2007) The Jack-of-All-Trades entrepreneur: innate talent or acquired skill? Economics letters, 97 (2). pp. 118-123

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/04/2011      [Back to the Top]

Harvard Crimson

Harvard Business School panellists examine health care flaws

Closing out the discussion, Raffaella Sadun an assistant professor at the Business School, revealed results from a recent study that analyzed the correlation between management performance and the quality of health care in a total of 19 countries. Using MBA students to interview hospital executives, the results revealed a very strong relationship between health care quality and management. Hospitals with higher scores had lower levels of mortality rates as well as higher profits.

This article appeared in Harvard Crimson on 1 April 2011 link to article

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Raffaella Sadun CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 01/04/2011      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

Moody's contra el Banco de España

Pero en este pulso los economistas consultados disparan contra Moody's: para Luis Garicano de la London School of Economics, "la arrogante pereza que supone no esperar a que el saque sus números (no sea que haya que estudiarse los datos antes de opinar) es incomprensible en...

This article appeared in El Pais on 20 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

Moody's contra el Banco de España

Pero en este pulso los economistas consultados disparan contra Moody's: para Luis Garicano de la London School of Economics, "la arrogante pereza que supone no esperar a que el saque sus números (no sea que haya que estudiarse los datos antes de opinar) es incomprensible en...

This article appeared in El Pais on 20 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Financial News

Little blue pill

The director of the Centre for Economic Performance, a London School of Economics-based research centre, said in a public lecture last week that with the UK economy contracting at the end of last year and more recent news that Pfizer is to shut its main research lab in the UK, the country needs not only a Plan B as an alternative to its austerity drive, but also a Plan V.

This article was published in the Financial News, 21 February 2011
Read the full article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/02/2011      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

China looks for inner richness

Although China has become the world's second-largest economy, its domestic markets need reform for its citizens' sake.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 February 2011 link to article

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/02/2011      [Back to the Top]

Managing IP

Panel announced for UK IP review

Boyle is a professor at Duke Law School. And [Mark] Schankerman is professor of economics at the London School of Economics. The review's scope will be limited to four issues: barriers to new internet-based models, cost and complexity of enforcement; IP and competition interaction; and cost and complexity for SMEs.

The panel was announced on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Independent Review of IP and Growth link
Intellectual Property Office Press Release link
Mark Schankerman webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

NewsKF

How much my house worth?

[first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

NewsKF

How much my house worth?

[first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Can a Christmas pudding ever be worth £250?

Third, many of us have read the works of the wonderful Richard Layard and digested the notion that stuff, per se, does not make you happy. Friends do, communities do, interests do, doing good does: but stuff?

This article appeared in the Observer on the 5th December 2010 link to article

Related publications
‘The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders’ the Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2006 Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (2005), Richard Layard details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 05/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

Pensions World

Conference report SPC riveting stuff

Dr Tim Leunig of the London School of Economics and Policy Exchange mesmerised delegates in the next session entitled “What is required to turn the tide?” First he debunked the myth that the pensions system was better in the olden days.

This article appeared in Pensions World on December 3, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Associated Press

Get happy! UK government to measure well-being

Richard Layard, an emeritus professor at the London School of Economics who has contributed to British government studies on how best to measure happiness, praises the trend. "I think it's wonderful," he said. "It's something I and others have been advocating for some time. It's based on the idea that unless you measure the right things, you won't do the right things."

This article appeared in the Associated Press on November 15, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Also in
SignOn San Diego
Get happy! UK government to measure well-being
British officials said Monday they will start measuring national happiness in addition to gauging more traditional data like income levels and fear of violent crime. Richard Layard, an emeritus professor at the London School of Economics who has contributed to government studies on the best ways to measure subjective well-being, praises the trend.


News Posted: 15/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Budget cuts force NHS hospitals to stop non-emergency surgery

Unions claim that the mismanagement of NHS trusts is behind the temporary closure of hospital services. Experts said they were "shocked" by the scale of the trust's proposals, and pointed out that suggested they presented a political challenge to the health secretary, Andrew Lansley, as he pushed health service reforms. "I have never heard anything like it," said Zack Cooper, a health economist at the London School of Economics. "Patients in Basildon cannot access IVF, but in London they can. I think this is going to be a real sore for the government. The other problem is that hospitals will face having to pay staff while not getting any income because they have been forced to close their doors to patients. It's a little crazy."

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 12, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Zack Cooper webpage
Zack Cooper publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/10/2010      [Back to the Top]

PS Public Service co.uk

We should be proud of our first 100 days

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg gave a speech on social mobility in which he said the coalition was committed to making decisions today that will promote a better future, with a more prosperous economy and a fairer society. In his speech he cited research on intergenerational mobility from the Centre for Economic Performance with the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in PublicService.com
link to article Related publications
‘Recent trends in intergenerational mobility: will the downward trend continue?’ Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece vol 13(2), Autumn 2008.
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

See also publications on LSE Research Online link

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/08/2010      [Back to the Top]

BBC

Breakfast

Linda Yueh was interviewed, to analyse the implications of the European bank stress tests.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Breakfast on 23 July 2010 (no link avaliable).

Also on
Bloomberg TV – ‘Start Up’

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/07/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Once more into the ring

Recent research from the London School of Economics shows that competition among hospitals can improve care, efficiency and management. Work by the King’s Fund found that giving people choice helps to keep hospitals focused on what matters to patients.

This article appeared in the Economist on 15 July 2010 link to article

Related publications
'Does Hospital Competition Save Lives?' Zack Cooper, Stephen Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Working Paper No16, LSE Health, January 2010
'Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency' Zack Cooper, Stephen Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010.
'The Impact of Competition On Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals' Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.983, May 2010.

Related links Nick Bloom webpage
Zack Cooper webpage
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephan Seiler webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/07/2010      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

Weekend Lunchtime

Linda Yueh was interviewed, speaking on the European economies: UK and the euro crisis.

This interview was broadcast on Sky News on 23 May 2010 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance Magazine

UK efforts to cut carbon emissions are ineffective

A study from the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics, also concluded that carbon taxes hit the poor hardest, as low-income groups spend proportionally more on fuel and energy-intensive goods such as food.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on 5 May 2010 Link to article

Related publications
CEP Election Analysis ‘Climate Change: Consensus on the long-run targets – but will we get policies that deliver?’ by Ralf Martin download
CEP Policy Analysis ‘Still time to reclaim the European Union Emissions Trading System for the European tax payer’ Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muûls and Ulrich J. Wagner, May 2010 download

News Posted: 05/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance Magazine

UK efforts to cut carbon emissions are ineffective

A study from the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics, also concluded that carbon taxes hit the poor hardest, as low-income groups spend proportionally more on fuel and energy-intensive goods such as food.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on 5 May 2010 Link to article

Related publications
CEP Election Analysis ‘Climate Change: Consensus on the long-run targets – but will we get policies that deliver?’ by Ralf Martin download
CEP Policy Analysis ‘Still time to reclaim the European Union Emissions Trading System for the European tax payer’ Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muûls and Ulrich J. Wagner, May 2010 download

News Posted: 05/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

ABC (Australia)

Newsline

Linda Yueh interviewed for programme, to comment on the state of the global economy following the G20 finance ministers’ meeting focused on the Greece debt crisis and proposed banking regulatory reforms.

This interview was broadcast on ABC Australia on 26 April 2010. (No link avalible)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Times online (blog)

The economists and their letter

What to make of the economists - led by Robert Skidelsky and Richard Layard - writing in support of Gordon Brown's position on borrowing?

This article appeared on Times Online on 15 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage

News Posted: 15/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Times online (blog)

The economists and their letter

What to make of the economists - led by Robert Skidelsky and Richard Layard - writing in support of Gordon Brown's position on borrowing?

This article appeared on Times Online on 15 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage

News Posted: 15/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

EU Business

Greek bailout masks Argentine slippery slope: analysts

Europe's bailout will only stick a patch on Greek finances and do nothing for the euro's long-term health, with the slippery slope to an Argentina-style default a real concern, analysts warn. "It all seems horribly reminiscent to those early days when Argentina slid towards a cruel collapse," said Canadian Peter Boone , a research associate at the London School of Economics, in a detailed paper that argued against International Monetary Fund support.

This article appeared in ebusiness.com on 14 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone Publications webpage

News Posted: 14/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Strengths Foundation

H:is for happiness

Richard [Layard] is a Professor at the London School of Economics. His primary focus is well-being, together with the economic and other benefits this brings to society. You can discover more at his profile page at the LSE

This article appeared on the Strength Foundation's website on 18 March 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2010      [Back to the Top]

New Statesman

Smile now, cry later

In 2005, [Richard] Layard published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, which drew on positive psychology. In the past, psychology had been "focused heavily on what had gone wrong with people", he wrote. "Human beings have largely conquered nature but they have yet to conquer themselves."

The impact of this thinking in Britain has been as widespread as it was in the US. Before Layard, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) - which is based on short-term treatments of between six and eight sessions - was one of many therapies offered by the NHS. Now it is almost the only one.

This article appeared in the New Statesmen on 12th March 2010 Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/03/2010      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Unequal Britain: richest 10% are now 100 times better off than the poorest

Commissioned by Harriet Harman, minister for women and equality, the National Equality Panel has been working on the 460-page document for 16 months, led by Prof John Hills of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Download
Details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report: Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Unequal Britain: richest 10% are now 100 times better off than the poorest

Commissioned by Harriet Harman, minister for women and equality, the National Equality Panel has been working on the 460-page document for 16 months, led by Prof John Hills of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Download
Details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report: Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

Times

The eclipse stakes

The action by striking workers at BA shows flagrant disregard for its customers. It is also reckless with the company in such a poor state, comments a Times editorial. "Even allowing for the selfishly narrow motivation of the workforce, the strike is highly unlikely to pay off. A study of strikes in the 1980s by economists at the London School of Economics found that the average increase in annual pay produced by strikes was only 0.3 per cent, while the average strike lasted 11 days."

This article appeared in the Times on December 15, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Do Strikes Pay?’, Peter Ingram, David Metcalf and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.92, August 1992 (hard copy only)
'Do Strikes Pay?', in New Perspectives on Industrial Disputes, David Metcalf and Simon Milner (Eds.), Routledge, USA & UK, 1993.

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times

The eclipse stakes

The action by striking workers at BA shows flagrant disregard for its customers. It is also reckless with the company in such a poor state, comments a Times editorial. "Even allowing for the selfishly narrow motivation of the workforce, the strike is highly unlikely to pay off. A study of strikes in the 1980s by economists at the London School of Economics found that the average increase in annual pay produced by strikes was only 0.3 per cent, while the average strike lasted 11 days."

This article appeared in the Times on December 15, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Do Strikes Pay?’, Peter Ingram, David Metcalf and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.92, August 1992 (hard copy only)
'Do Strikes Pay?', in New Perspectives on Industrial Disputes, David Metcalf and Simon Milner (Eds.), Routledge, USA & UK, 1993.

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times

The eclipse stakes

The action by striking workers at BA shows flagrant disregard for its customers. It is also reckless with the company in such a poor state, comments a Times editorial. "Even allowing for the selfishly narrow motivation of the workforce, the strike is highly unlikely to pay off. A study of strikes in the 1980s by economists at the London School of Economics found that the average increase in annual pay produced by strikes was only 0.3 per cent, while the average strike lasted 11 days."

This article appeared in the Times on December 15, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Do Strikes Pay?’, Peter Ingram, David Metcalf and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.92, August 1992 (hard copy only)
'Do Strikes Pay?', in New Perspectives on Industrial Disputes, David Metcalf and Simon Milner (Eds.), Routledge, USA & UK, 1993.

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times

The eclipse stakes

The action by striking workers at BA shows flagrant disregard for its customers. It is also reckless with the company in such a poor state, comments a Times editorial. "Even allowing for the selfishly narrow motivation of the workforce, the strike is highly unlikely to pay off. A study of strikes in the 1980s by economists at the London School of Economics found that the average increase in annual pay produced by strikes was only 0.3 per cent, while the average strike lasted 11 days."

This article appeared in the Times on December 15, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Do Strikes Pay?’, Peter Ingram, David Metcalf and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.92, August 1992 (hard copy only)
'Do Strikes Pay?', in New Perspectives on Industrial Disputes, David Metcalf and Simon Milner (Eds.), Routledge, USA & UK, 1993.

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times Online - UK

Anthony Seldon: Teaching Wellington College new tricks

He found the works of Martin Seligman, an American guru of positive psychology; Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence; and Richard Layard a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), who had just published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Such works “provided a framework for what I’d been feeling and thinking for a long time”, says Seldon.

This article appeared on Times Online on 13 December 2009. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times Online - UK

Anthony Seldon: Teaching Wellington College new tricks

He found the works of Martin Seligman, an American guru of positive psychology; Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence; and Richard Layard a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), who had just published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Such works “provided a framework for what I’d been feeling and thinking for a long time”, says Seldon.

This article appeared on Times Online on 13 December 2009. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times Online - UK

Anthony Seldon: Teaching Wellington College new tricks

He found the works of Martin Seligman, an American guru of positive psychology; Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence; and Richard Layard a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), who had just published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Such works “provided a framework for what I’d been feeling and thinking for a long time”, says Seldon.

This article appeared on Times Online on 13 December 2009. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Knowledge Problem – blog

Digging into the resource curse: research into oil revenue and Brazilian municipalities

A paper by Francesco Caselli and Guy Michaels, “Do Oil Windfalls Improve Living Standards? Evidence from Brazil,” takes a closer look at how the resource curse works its anti-magic.

This article appeared in the blog, Knowledge Problem Link to article

Related publications
‘Do Oil Windfalls Improve Living Standards? Evidence from Brazil’, Francesco Caselli and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.960, December 2009.
Link to article

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme: David Metcalf on work and residence visas to non-EU students

The government's chief immigration adviser has called for a review of "lower tier" colleges over fears that too many foreign students are being given visas at the end of their degree courses. Professor David Metcalf said he was "stunned" to discover hundreds of colleges which were not "proper" universities could grant two-year work and residence visas to non-EU students. Professor Metcalf discusses visa system.

Link to The Today Programme Archive for Friday 4th December 2009.(includes recording with David Metcalf).

Link to BBC News, "Foreign student visa review call by UK advisory body" 4th December 2009

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 04/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg TV 'Countdown' programme

LInda Yueh

Linda Yueh interviewed, to comment on the EU-China relationship and the valuation of the Chinese currency.

This interview was broadcast on Bloomberg on 27 November 2009. (no link available)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg TV 'Countdown' programme

LInda Yueh

Linda Yueh interviewed, to comment on the EU-China relationship and the valuation of the Chinese currency.

This interview was broadcast on Bloomberg on 27 November 2009. (no link available)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Free Market Mojo - blog

Did the National Minimum Wage affect UK prices?

Jonathan Wadsworth has a relatively new discussion paper looking into how the national minimum wage affected UK prices.

This article appeared on the blog 'Free Market Mojo' on November 8, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Did the National Minimum Wage Affect UK Prices?’, Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.947, August 2009

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Civil Service Network

Taking the rep

How much does Whitehall pay trade union representatives, and what do these officials do? Making this information public for the first time ever, Civil Service World presents the data on each department. Tim Leunig, an economic historian at the London School of Economics who specialises in industrial relations, thinks that in reality a Tory government will need the cooperation of the civil service unions too much to withdraw the “miniscule” sums involved in facility time.

This article appeared on Civil Service Network on 5th November 2009 Link

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
.
News Posted: 05/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4 News

Linda Yueh interview

Linda Yueh was interviewed, to comment on the UK banks, RBS and Lloyds, in terms of the additional government funding, rights issues, and restructuring on competition grounds.

This interview was broadcast on Channel 4 News on 3 November 2009.

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

From Poverty to Power – blog

by Duncan Green

Whether they can do so in a way that actually gets the attention of the politicians is a different issue, and a subject for tomorrow's blog. Off to listen to Richard Layard now.

This article appeared in Duncan Green's Blog From poverty to Power on 29 October 2009 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/10/2009      [Back to the Top]

Observer

Is it finally time to end the bonus culture in the City?

LSE's Professor Willem Buiter is quoted on the bonus culture in the banking sector.

This article appeared in the Observer on 18th October 2009. Link to article

Related links
Willem Buiter webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/10/2009      [Back to the Top]

Forbes.com

Joblessness has a lasting psychological impact, particularly on those with existing mental health problems

Depression factor. This last issue has become a much more significant aspect of public policy in the last few years, associated in particular with economist Richard Layard, who argues in his 2006 study, "The Depression Report," that the effect of mental illness on happiness is underestimated and that mental illness is related to labor market experience.

This article appeared on Forbes.com on 24th August 2009. Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders Download report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/08/2009      [Back to the Top]

New Statesmen

Suicide rates rose at shocking speed after the Wall Street Crash of 1929 – and have done with each recession in the past century

Richard Layard - economist and prominent promoter of happiness - is concerned about the psychological impact of the current financial gloom. How much additional mental illness will there be? A lot, he thinks. But one should not exaggerate that, he says, "because there's so much already". There are about a million people on incapacity benefit in the UK due to mental illness, and roughly six million people suffering from depression or anxiety.

This article appeared in the New Statesmen on 20th August 2009 Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. Download Report


Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/08/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Brandon Muir: media's obssession with child tragedies a danger, warns peer

The media’s obsession with childhood tragedies, such as that of Brandon Muir, is making social workers more concerned with “covering their backs” than focusing on their jobs, the economist Lord Layard suggested yesterday. Lord Layard, Emeritus Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics, was discussing A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age , which he co-authored with Judy Dunn.

This article appeared in the Times on 20th August 2009. Link to article

Related publication
A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age by Richard Layard and Judy Dunn. Published February 2009. Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/08/2009      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh interviewed, on the decline in foreign direct investment to China in the past year.

This article appeared in RBC Daily - Russia on July 3, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/07/2009      [Back to the Top]

iStockAnalyst

The Baseline Scenario

The Baseline Scenario authored by Peter Boone, Simon Johnson and James Kwak, is dedicated to explaining some of the key issues in the global economy and developing concrete policy proposals. Since it was launched in September 2008, this blog has been cited by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal (Real Time Economics), The Economist (Free Exchange), The Financial Times, Time Magazine, NPR (Planet Money), and many other sites around the Internet.
Peter Boone is chair of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity, and an Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared on iStockAnalyst.com on 3rd July 2009. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/07/2009      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Andy Hobsbawm: From social media to social good

The reason more people are trying to find meaning in social contribution can be explained by the work of economist Richard Layard. Despite 50 years of GDP growth, he notes, surveys in Britain and American consistently report back that we haven’t got any happier.

This article appeared in the Independent on 25th June 2009. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

Business Standard, India

Arvind Subramanian: Fiscal prudence, now and here

The first view, expressed most forcefully by Paul Krugman in his recent Lionel Robbins lectures at the London School of Economics, calls for additional fiscal stimulus.

This article appeared in Business Standard, India on 23 June 2009. Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009.
News Posted: 23/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

CNBC Europe

Squawk Box

CNBC Europe "Squawk Box" Linda Yueh was a guest host, commenting on global economic developments.

This interview was broadcast on 22 June 2009. (No link avaliable)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

U.TV - Belfast,Northern Ireland

Balls' warning to schools: two years to improve

A study by the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics found no evidence that a school that is turned into an academy improves its exam results more than any other in its neighbourhood.

This article appeared on U.TV on 16th June 2009. Link to article

Related publications
‘Academy schools and pupil performance’ by Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson in CentrePiece Vol 14 Issue 1 Spring 2009 published June 4 2009.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Joan Wilson webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

News Posted: 16/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

MSN Money

Late Rally brings Market Back

Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

MSN Money

Late Rally brings Market Back

Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

MSN Money

Late Rally brings Market Back

Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Me, me, me is past its sell-by date

All research, such as that conducted by Richard Layard in his wonderful book Happiness, shows that provided you have somewhere to live, enough food and enough money to enable you to enjoy the simpler things of life, then you are no less happy than the person who owns yachts and fast cars and villas in Mus-tique, because money really does not buy you happiness.

This article appeared in the Times on May 31, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme httpwebpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 31/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Me, me, me is past its sell-by date

All research, such as that conducted by Richard Layard in his wonderful book Happiness, shows that provided you have somewhere to live, enough food and enough money to enable you to enjoy the simpler things of life, then you are no less happy than the person who owns yachts and fast cars and villas in Mus-tique, because money really does not buy you happiness.

This article appeared in the Times on May 31, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme httpwebpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 31/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Broadcasting House

Linda Yueh was interviewed on UK's rating in the international arena in the aftermath of possible downgrade of its sovereign debt due to high deficits.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 - 'Broadcasting House' on May 24, 2009
Link to broadcast

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

China reluctant to make further purchase of cheap dollars

Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on China diversifying its reserves.

This article appeared in the RBC Daily (Russia) on May 19,2009
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

Radio 4

The Today Programme

Despite some optimistic talk of signs of economic recovery - optimism not shared by the Bank of England in its latest assessment of things - unemployment is continuing to rise. Lord Richard Layard, director of the Wellbeing programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, discusses if there is a dramatic deterioration in job prospects for young people.

Related Links
Richard Layard's Webpage

Richard Layard's interview on the Today Programme


News Posted: 14/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Leave them kids alone

A Good Childhood by London School of Economics professor Lord Richard Layard, the British government's "happiness tsar", and co-authored by King's College psychiatry professor Judy Dunn is based on a 2009 report commissioned by The Children's Society charity; its subtitle frames the book's agenda: "searching for values in a competitive age".

This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 9, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age (2009), Richard Layard and Judy Dunn, Penguin
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Leave them kids alone

A Good Childhood by London School of Economics professor Lord Richard Layard, the British government's "happiness tsar", and co-authored by King's College psychiatry professor Judy Dunn is based on a 2009 report commissioned by The Children's Society charity; its subtitle frames the book's agenda: "searching for values in a competitive age".

This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 9, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age (2009), Richard Layard and Judy Dunn, Penguin
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

Republica (Italy)

Uomini e senza laurea dirigenti made in Italy

Press coverage of the management survey in an Italian newspaper.

This article appeared in Republica on the 27th March 2009. Link to article.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

EurekAlert (press release) - Washington,DC,USA

Global poverty is still a priority

"How will the global financial crisis impact the extremely poor and extreme poverty?" asks Dr Peter Boone, of the ESRC's Centre for Economic Performance. "Subsistence living and lack of accumulated wealth mean many of the extremely poor are well-insulated from the current crisis. However, the problems are in the future: reduced public finances, less global growth, less foreign aid, and possibly more civil wars, will mean the extremely poor do not get the health services, education and opportunities needed to pull themselves and their children out of poverty.

This article appeared EurekAlert on the 18th March 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

New Scientist

The credit crunch: what happened?

Work by Nick Bloom at Stanford University in California has shown that even the temporary surges in uncertainty that followed previous shocks had destructive effects.

This article appeared in the New Scientist on the 18th March 2009.
Link to article.

'In brief: The recession will be over sooner than you think’ article in CentrePiece 13(3) Winter 2008/9 Winter 2008/9
'The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation’ by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
'Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?' by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

guardian.co.uk – UK

A hard-hitting study of the social effects of inequality has profound implications

Epidemiologists Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett’s description of unequal societies as "dysfunctional" suggests implicit criticism of the approach taken by Britain's "happiness tsar" Richard Layard, who recommended that the poor mental health of many Britons be "fixed" or improved by making cognitive behavioural therapy more easily available.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14th March 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Now is the time for a less selfish capitalism

Lord Layard asks how we should measure progress and suggests we should stop the worship of money and create a more humane society where the quality of human experience is the criterion. Lord Layard is at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 12th March 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Now is the time for a less selfish capitalism

Lord Layard asks how we should measure progress and suggests we should stop the worship of money and create a more humane society where the quality of human experience is the criterion. Lord Layard is at the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 12th March 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 12/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

Business Spectator, Melborne, Australia

Alan Kohler Capitalism will renew itself

For example the Financial Times has a begun series under that title, including a piece today by Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, ...

This article appeared in the Business Spectator on 12th March 2009. Link to article.

Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 12/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

CNBC

'Worldwide Exchange'

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss Japan's economic outlook.

This interview was broadcast on CNBC on 11th March 2009.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Parents' admissions trauma is down to gross inequality outside school gates

Peter Wilby comments on school selection: "As research from the London School of Economics has shown, the differences between intakes even among community comprehensives is enormous

This article appeared in the Guardian on 5th March.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘School segregation and its consequences’ by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 3, Winter 2007/08.

Related Links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Parents' admissions trauma is down to gross inequality outside school gates

Peter Wilby comments on school selection: "As research from the London School of Economics has shown, the differences between intakes even among community comprehensives is enormous

This article appeared in the Guardian on 5th March.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘School segregation and its consequences’ by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 3, Winter 2007/08.

Related Links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

LSE Public Lecture

A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

Listen to the Podcast: MP3


News Posted: 11/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

LSE Public Lecture

A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

Listen to the Podcast: MP3


News Posted: 11/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

Communitycare.co.uk - Sutton UK

Children's Society highlights rise in mental health problems

The report was co-authored by economist Richard Layard , who inspired the government's programme to expand talking therapies provision for adults....

This article appeared on Communitycare.co.uk on the 3rd February 2009.
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Good Childhood Inquiry by Richard Layard and Judy Dunn is published by Penguin details
Other publications by Richard Layard details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental Health Group webpage

News Posted: 03/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

Radio Lithuania

'Ryto Garsai'(Morning)

Linda Yueh interviewed on the 'News Map' segment on reforming the international economic system.

This interview was broadcast on Radio Lithuania on the 30th January 2009.
[No link avaliable]

Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Radio Lithuania

'Ryto Garsai'(Morning)

Linda Yueh interviewed on the 'News Map' segment on reforming the international economic system.

This interview was broadcast on Radio Lithuania on the 30th January 2009.
[No link avaliable]

Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Financial

Obama's LSE alumni

Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

Related Publications
‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Financial

Obama's LSE alumni

Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

Related Publications
‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Financial

Obama's LSE alumni

Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

Related Publications
‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Republika, Serbia

Crni (finansijski) oktobar u Velikoj Britaniji

... je nego u svim vecim razvijenijim državama (‘Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain’, Centre for Economic Performance – LSE, 2007).

This article appeared in Republika, Serbia.
Related Publications
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling
by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Republika, Serbia

Crni (finansijski) oktobar u Velikoj Britaniji

... je nego u svim vecim razvijenijim državama (‘Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain’, Centre for Economic Performance – LSE, 2007).

This article appeared in Republika, Serbia.
Related Publications
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling
by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Tories target 'problem families.' to break cycle of dependency

Shadow secretary Chris Grayling suggests that entire "problem families" should be targeted for intervention by social services to break a cycle of benefit dependency and educational failure that limits social mobility in Britain. Labour insists that social mobility is rising, but a London School of Economics study concluded that it has not improved in the past 30 years.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on the 9th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Tories target 'problem families.' to break cycle of dependency

Shadow secretary Chris Grayling suggests that entire "problem families" should be targeted for intervention by social services to break a cycle of benefit dependency and educational failure that limits social mobility in Britain. Labour insists that social mobility is rising, but a London School of Economics study concluded that it has not improved in the past 30 years.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on the 9th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

News Posted: 09/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Prospect

More mobile than we think

In 2005, the Sutton Trust funded and publicised the work of three economists—Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Paul Gregg —who burrowed into the British cohort studies (social data on a big sample of individuals born in a particular year) and found a significant decline in upward mobility between the cohort born in 1958 and that born in 1970. They attributed this fall to the growing income inequality of the 1980s and to the expansion of higher education being monopolised by the better off.

This article appeared in Prospect on the 19th November 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Prospect

More mobile than we think

In 2005, the Sutton Trust funded and publicised the work of three economists—Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Paul Gregg —who burrowed into the British cohort studies (social data on a big sample of individuals born in a particular year) and found a significant decline in upward mobility between the cohort born in 1958 and that born in 1970. They attributed this fall to the growing income inequality of the 1980s and to the expansion of higher education being monopolised by the better off.

This article appeared in Prospect on the 19th November 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Response I did not stammer when the Queen asked me about the meltdown

Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the department of management, London School of Economics, comments on the Queen discussing the economy with him.

This article appeared in the The Guardian on the 18th of November 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Response I did not stammer when the Queen asked me about the meltdown

Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the department of management, London School of Economics, comments on the Queen discussing the economy with him.

This article appeared in the The Guardian on the 18th of November 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”
News Posted: 14/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5

Five Live Drive

Interview with Professor Luis Garicano, in which he talked about his conversation with Her Majesty The Queen about the credit crunch, at the opening of the New Academic Building.

Related Links

Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also mentioned in BBC Radio Bristol News:
Reference to Her Majesty The Queen opening the New Academic Building and asking why nobody saw the credit crunch coming.
News Posted: 05/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Employment for Students

'university is increasing social mobility'

University students looking for graduate jobs in London may be interested to hear that Labour policy is helping to improve social mobility, according to new government research. And it cites research from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, which shows the mobility improvements only started to take effect in 2000.

This article appeared on Employment for Students website on the 4th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4

Channel 4 News

Dr Jonathan Wadsworth , CEP, discusses race in a time of recession.

This was broadcast on Channel 4 news on 28th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘On the Relative Gains to Immigration: A Comparison of the Labour Market Position of Indians in the USA, the UK and India’, Jonathan Wadsworth and Augustin de Coulon, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.851 February 2008.
Labour Market Effects of Immigration’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, in CentrePiece Magazine 12(3), February 2008.
‘Immigration to the UK: The Evidence from Economic Research’ by Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Policy Analysis, December 2007.
‘The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754 October 2006.

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4

Channel 4 News

Dr Jonathan Wadsworth , CEP, discusses race in a time of recession.

This was broadcast on Channel 4 news on 28th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘On the Relative Gains to Immigration: A Comparison of the Labour Market Position of Indians in the USA, the UK and India’, Jonathan Wadsworth and Augustin de Coulon, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.851 February 2008.
Labour Market Effects of Immigration’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, in CentrePiece Magazine 12(3), February 2008.
‘Immigration to the UK: The Evidence from Economic Research’ by Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Policy Analysis, December 2007.
‘The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754 October 2006.

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Le Temps

La Chine appelée à sauver le monde

La crise financière est au menu du sommet Asie-Europe qui s'ouvre ce vendredi à Pékin. «La Chine dispose de 2000 milliards de dollars de réserves, fait remarquer Linda Yueh, professeure à l'Université d'Oxford et à la London School of Economics. Elle est dans une position d'aider les Etats-Unis et l'Europe à faire face à la crise de crédit.» Selon elle, il s'agit pour la Chine de préserver ses marchés d'exportation. Les marchés européen et américain absorbent plus de 60% des exportations chinoises.

This article appeared in Le Temps on the 24th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme website
News Posted: 24/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

Nick Bloom’s column argues that the wave of uncertainty troubling the markets will likely induce a recession – and render policy instruments powerless to prevent it.

This article appeared online in Vox on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Wall Street Journal
Secondary sources: recession?, Obama bailout, $4 gas
Writing for the voxeu blog, Nicholas Bloom says that the credit crisis will likely lead to recession. “So the current situation is a perfect storm — a huge surge in uncertainty that is not only generating a rapid slowdown in activity but also limiting the effectiveness of standard monetary and fiscal policy to prevent this.”

Economist's View (blog site)
Will the credit crunch lead to recession?
Nick Bloom’s article argues that "A recession looks likely," and that policy won't be able to prevent it from happening.

Saturday 14 June
Kathimerini (Greece)
"The credit crisis will probably lead to widespread recession." Article by Nick Bloom on how the credit crunch is inevitable given the state of uncertainty in the markets.
Link to article
News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

LSE Magazine

Low social mobility in UK

Two articles on CEP research appear in the latest issue of LSE Magazine:
Low social mobility in UK
Social mobility in the UK remains at the low level it was for those born in 1970, with recent generations of children’s educational outcomes still overwhelmingly tied to their parents’ income. This is one of the key findings from a report by Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Stephen Machin of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, funded by the Sutton Trust.
p.33

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Can pay regulation kill?
Findings of research by Professor John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance and Carol Propper of Bristol University suggest that a ten per cent increase in the gap between the wages paid to NHS nurses and those paid to women working in the private sector locally raises the fatality rate among people admitted with a heart attack by five per cent.
p.34

Related Publications 'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance' by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research, Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online.

The articles appeared in LSE Magazine on June 1, 2008
Link to magazine

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

LSE Magazine

Low social mobility in UK

Two articles on CEP research appear in the latest issue of LSE Magazine:
Low social mobility in UK
Social mobility in the UK remains at the low level it was for those born in 1970, with recent generations of children’s educational outcomes still overwhelmingly tied to their parents’ income. This is one of the key findings from a report by Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Stephen Machin of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, funded by the Sutton Trust.
p.33

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Can pay regulation kill?
Findings of research by Professor John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance and Carol Propper of Bristol University suggest that a ten per cent increase in the gap between the wages paid to NHS nurses and those paid to women working in the private sector locally raises the fatality rate among people admitted with a heart attack by five per cent.
p.34

Related Publications 'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance' by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research, Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online.

The articles appeared in LSE Magazine on June 1, 2008
Link to magazine

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

A star-studded cast

Profile of Nick Bloom, an associate in the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement on May 29, 2008
Link to article

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily

Russian news

Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on the economic losses stemming from the earthquake in China:

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on May 22, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily

Russian news

Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on the economic losses stemming from the earthquake in China:

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on May 22, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Politics Today

ESRC: Closing the productivity gap in Ireland

The ESRC Public Policy Seminar research briefing ‘Sub-sectoral productivity in Nothern Ireland’ is funded jointly by the ESRC and the DETI (Northern Ireland). The briefing accompanied a one-day seminar that explored the issue of Northern Ireland’s productivity held in Belfast on 22 April 2008.
The briefing featured presentations by the two seminar speakers Dr Chiara Criscuolo (BSc, MSc, PhD), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Professor Richard Harris (BA, MA, PhD), Director of the Centre for Public Policy for Regions (CPPR) and the Cairncross Professor of Applied Economics at the University of Glasgow.

This article appeared in Politics Today on May 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Chiara Criscuolo webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Further press cutting
Wednesday 14 May
Genetic Engineering News (New Rochelle, NY, USA)
Closing the productivity gap in Northern Ireland
The briefing features presentations by the two seminar speakers Dr Chiara Criscuolo (BSc, MSc, PhD), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.
News Posted: 13/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

Risks mount for stressed traders as markets gyrate

Two Citigroup workers , including a trader, fell from office blocks in London and Miami in 2006. ‘The pressure on traders when the market goes wrong is always huge,’ said Tim Leunig, a lecturer in the economic history department at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). ‘There will be a lot of bitten fingernails today. It is exactly the same, you can lose you job, your standard of living and you won't get it back, that's pressure.’

This article appeared in Reuters news on May 5, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also in
Birmingham Post
Rise in suicides as credit crunch stress gets to traders
News Posted: 05/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Royal Mail strategy to tackle sick days reaps big savings

Royal Mail has saved many times the cost of a 46m ($91m) investment in sickness absence management in a programme that could generate savings of 1.45bn a year if applied to the worst-affected parts of the economy, according to a new LSE report. Article includes comments from Professor David Marsden who conducted the research.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 2, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, ‘Value of Rude Health’ by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the CEP Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage
News Posted: 02/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Clinics at work cut sicknotes, says study

David Marsden, a professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said there would be a huge bonus for the economy if similar schemes could be introduced in the 13 industrial sectors with the poorest occupational health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on May 1, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage
News Posted: 01/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

ABC News online (Australia)

Cigarette price hike 'leads to more intense smoking'

Francesca Cornaglia spoke at the Australian National University in Canberra to challenge several policies aimed at reducing the harm associated with smoking.

This article appeared on ABC News online (Australia) on April 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

Related links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

ABC News online (Australia)

Cigarette price hike 'leads to more intense smoking'

Francesca Cornaglia spoke at the Australian National University in Canberra to challenge several policies aimed at reducing the harm associated with smoking.

This article appeared on ABC News online (Australia) on April 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

Related links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liberal Democrats - London, UK

Government must wake up to cost of mental health

Danny Alexander writes "Richard Layard’s report highlighted the cost of mental health four years ago, yet the Government is still commissioning reviews rather than tackling the problem."

This article appeared in Liberal Democrats - London, UK on March 17, 2008
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Mehr Wettbewerb kann töen - zentrale Lohnfindung auch

Competition study covered in the "Wissenswert" column, together with a related study by Carol Propper, Emma Hall and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on March 3, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Mehr Wettbewerb kann töen - zentrale Lohnfindung auch

Competition study covered in the "Wissenswert" column, together with a related study by Carol Propper, Emma Hall and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on March 3, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Business Zone

We have to stop meeting like this

In fact, the same survey mentioned earlier revealed that employees believe 37% of the meetings they attend do not need to be conducted face-to-face, and can in fact be counter-productive. In addition, with further research from the London School of Economics showing that overall UK productivity is lower than in industrial rivals such as France, Germany and the US, perhaps it is time we re-evaluated just how many meetings we attend.

This article appeared in Business Zone on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

China investment

Linda Yueh gave an interview to journalist Vladimir Pavlov on the investment strategy of China’s sovereign wealth fund.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on February 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Little India

What price happiness?

Says Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics and author of the 2005 book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science: ‘People don't want to think they live in a world of ruthless competition where everyone is against everyone. Valuable things are being lost, such as community values, solidarity.’

This article appeared in Little India online on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

Further press cuttings
Monday 11 February
Daily Telegraph
Family holidays: the expert's advice
Holidays, according to Professor Richard Layard, author of Happiness: A New Science, are vital to personal wellbeing. They are also, he says, extremely important for families.
News Posted: 10/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Business

Job creation schemes

Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Business

Job creation schemes

Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Handing it down

Nick Bloom has studied the management of family firms where the father passes the business on to the eldest son. “We looked at 5,000 companies and we found that around a third of the medium-sized manufacturing firms were family owned. In about half of them the eldest son was the CEO. They are very badly managed.”

This article appeared on BBC News on January 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Handing it down

Nick Bloom has studied the management of family firms where the father passes the business on to the eldest son. “We looked at 5,000 companies and we found that around a third of the medium-sized manufacturing firms were family owned. In about half of them the eldest son was the CEO. They are very badly managed.”

This article appeared on BBC News on January 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.
News Posted: 29/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Paying a deadly price

Researchers — Emma Hall and Carol Propper of Bristol University, and John Van Reenen of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance — investigate the impact on medical care of imposing virtually uniform pay rates in the NHS throughout England, even though wages in the private sector vary widely among regions.

This article appeared in The Economist on January 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press Release on LSE Press and Information News webpage.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage

Further press cuttings
Wednesday 23 January
Guardian - Policy briefs
Pay problems for nurses
New research from the Centre for Economic Performance paints a bleak picture of how centralised pay for nurses impacts on patient care.
[No link available]
News Posted: 24/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Paying a deadly price

Researchers — Emma Hall and Carol Propper of Bristol University, and John Van Reenen of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance — investigate the impact on medical care of imposing virtually uniform pay rates in the NHS throughout England, even though wages in the private sector vary widely among regions.

This article appeared in The Economist on January 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press Release on LSE Press and Information News webpage.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage

Further press cuttings
Wednesday 23 January
Guardian - Policy briefs
Pay problems for nurses
New research from the Centre for Economic Performance paints a bleak picture of how centralised pay for nurses impacts on patient care.
[No link available]
News Posted: 24/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

A private education can boost earnings by a fifth

Academics at the London School of Economics said the private school "premium" of better exam results and admission to the top universities was worth 19 per cent in extra income to pupils, irrespective of parents' wealth. Professor Francis Green's (Centre for the Economics of Education) research shows that the gap between the independent and state sectors has been increasing over the past 50 years as above-inflation fee increases enable headmasters to employ more staff and improve facilities faster. This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Competition for Private and State School Teachers' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008
'The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Most employers fail to tackle stress at early stage

Article refers to a 2006 study by Richard Layard (CEP) at the London School of Economics which claimed a £750 course of cognitive behavioural therapy was both cheaper and more effective than drug-based solutions.

This article appeared in Personnel Today online on December 4, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/12/2007      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Most employers fail to tackle stress at early stage

Article refers to a 2006 study by Richard Layard (CEP) at the London School of Economics which claimed a £750 course of cognitive behavioural therapy was both cheaper and more effective than drug-based solutions.

This article appeared in Personnel Today online on December 4, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/12/2007      [Back to the Top]

24 Dash

Grammar schools labelled 'ghettos for wealthy'

Researchers based at the London School of Economics also found that the decision to expand grammar education in Northern Ireland had boosted average exam results. Access to grammar schools in Northern Ireland was widened in 1989 so another 15 per cent of all pupils could attend. The research said: ‘An expansion of grammar school places is potentially beneficial to both (higher and lower income) groups but access to grammar schools is very unequal.’

This article appeared in 24 Dash online on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

PresseBox - Rastatt, Germany

14th Handelsblatt Annual Congress on 'Strategic IT Management' 28 - 30 January 2008, in Berlin

"Without making changes to the internal organisation, additional IT investments do not make any significant difference," says Centre for Economic Performance Director John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in PresseBox - Rastatt, Germany on November 14, 2007
Link to access press release

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Best practice

Speaking at the launch of the NPC last month, Macri said: ‘According to research from McKinsey and the London School of Economics the combination of improving technology, management capability and innovation can yield productivity improvements of up to 20 per cent. That's why bringing together the expertise of both organisations [the IMI and Microsoft] delivers real insight on how to address productivity and gives executives from the private and public sector the opportunity to explore how these kinds of solutions can be applied to their own organisations.’

This article appeared in the Irish Times on November 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Irish Times

Best practice

Speaking at the launch of the NPC last month, Macri said: ‘According to research from McKinsey and the London School of Economics the combination of improving technology, management capability and innovation can yield productivity improvements of up to 20 per cent. That's why bringing together the expertise of both organisations [the IMI and Microsoft] delivers real insight on how to address productivity and gives executives from the private and public sector the opportunity to explore how these kinds of solutions can be applied to their own organisations.’

This article appeared in the Irish Times on November 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Too much social mobility in Britain

The common belief that Britain is socially immobile comes from a study published in 2005 by the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Too much social mobility in Britain

The common belief that Britain is socially immobile comes from a study published in 2005 by the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Laurie Taylor column

What is your degree worth to an employer? According to Anna Vignoles, a leading education economist, student tuition fees should be based on the worth of the degree to employers. Dr Anna Vignoles is a research associate in the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE.

This article appeared in the THES on September 14, 2007
Link to article [subscribers only]

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

CareandHealth (press release)

Speech in the House of Commons, by Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP

Richard Layard’s argument for funding talking therapies mentioned in the House of Commons speech given by the Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP. [No working link]

This article appeared in Care and Health - London UK on September 13, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Publications
'The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders' by Richard Layard
Download

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Smith names head of new migration advisory body

The home secretary today announced that David Metcalf would be the new chair of the committee set up to control the flow and quality of migrant workers. Mr Metcalf, professor of industrial relations at LSE, will spearhead the independent Migration Advisory Committee, which will advise ministers on which occupations should qualify as being short of necessary skills.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
BBC News Online
Head named for immigration panel
News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Union demise is plain to see in the yawning wealth gap

Each year the news get worse, union membership falls further, the outlook is grimmer. This year, research from the Centre for Economic Performance says falling membership has left union finances "in a parlous state".

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues: The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’. Download
Article in the forthcoming Autumn 2007 issue of CentrePiece magazine which summarises ‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, CEP Discussion Paper No. 768, December 2006.
Also forthcoming in Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations, Elsevier Press.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage
News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The brothers' blues

In 1979 approximately half of British workers carried a union card; barely one in four does so today. Tellingly, the big issue this week - as in most recent disputes - is public-sector pay. The fear of litigation keeps public servants' subs flowing, but only one private employee in six now pays their dues. Today a Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) report highlights the effect on unions' solvency. That should not just worry the brotherly barons, but ordinary workers as well. Trade unions, after all, secure higher pay for their members and other benefits too; without them the industrial workers whose pensions disappeared with the dotcom bubble would never have won compensation.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues:  The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’.
Download
‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.768, December 2006.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage
News Posted: 10/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Cameron should count on happiness

Richard Layard, one of those responsible for coming up with the idea of the non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment in the 1980s, has become a strong advocate of policies designed to maximise happiness.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Spiked

Towards an age of abundance

Article refers to Richard Layard’s research into happiness. He is emeritus professor of economics at LSE.

This article appeared in Spiked online on August 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Bouncing into schools

Britain is at the bottom of the European social mobility league table, as John van Reenen and Stephen Machin show in this summer's Fabian Review.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Schools Are the Best Tools for Tackling Social Mobility by John Van Reenen and Stephen Machin in The Fabian Review, Summer 2007: The Education Issue

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Bouncing into schools

Britain is at the bottom of the European social mobility league table, as John van Reenen and Stephen Machin show in this summer's Fabian Review.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Schools Are the Best Tools for Tackling Social Mobility by John Van Reenen and Stephen Machin in The Fabian Review, Summer 2007: The Education Issue

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Bytestart

We have to stop meeting like this

Article refers to research from the School showing that overall UK productivity is lower than in industrial rivals such as France, Germany and the US.

This article appeared in Bytestart Online on August 3, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis: UK Productivity during the Blair Era, June 2007, Download PDF

Related Links
CEP Productivity & Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

Bytestart

We have to stop meeting like this

Article refers to research from the School showing that overall UK productivity is lower than in industrial rivals such as France, Germany and the US.

This article appeared in Bytestart Online on August 3, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis: UK Productivity during the Blair Era, June 2007, Download PDF

Related Links
CEP Productivity & Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Burmese service - International Business Analysis

Linda Yueh discussed China's trade surplus and economic growth on the programme.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on July 30, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Burmese service - International Business Analysis

Linda Yueh discussed China's trade surplus and economic growth on the programme.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on July 30, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Land for Housing

Local bid for housing land can boost supply

Article by Tim Leunig, an Associate of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance and lecturer in Economic History, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Land for Housing on July 25, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Links
Related links Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Land for Housing

Local bid for housing land can boost supply

Article by Tim Leunig, an Associate of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance and lecturer in Economic History, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Land for Housing on July 25, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Links
Related links Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Land for Housing

Local bid for housing land can boost supply

Article by Tim Leunig, an Associate of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance and lecturer in Economic History, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Land for Housing on July 25, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Links
Related links Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde

Epoque: En attendant le bonheur

Relevant que plus de richesse ne crée pas nécessairement plus de bonheur, Richard Layard, professeur à la London School of Economics, propose en utopie quelques critères d'une société heureuse fondée sur le lien social, le respect, la confiance, l'empathie, le travail sur soi, la compassion.

This article appeared in Le Monde, France on July 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Youngsters opt to do nothing

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics calculates that the number of neets aged 16 to 24 increased by 15 per cent between 1997 and 2006, from 1.06m to 1.24m.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Business Brief

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss China's released GDP and CPI figures.

Her interviews were broadcast on July 18, 2007
BBC World Service, 'Business Brief'
BBC World Service, 'The World Today'
BBC World Service, 'World Business Report'

Further press cutting
July 19, 2007
CNBC, 'Worldwide Exhange'
[No links available]

Further links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Cairns Post

Busting the myth

Andrew Charlton, on the other hand, is a renowned Australian economist working at the prestigious London School of Economics. He's eminently qualified to talk about the facts and forces driving our financial system and the markets and wealth swirling around within it. And he's got a message for everyone sucked in by the ‘myth of Australia's economic superheroes’. ‘The Howard Government has been carried from one election victory to another on the crest of an economic wave that it did not create’ Charlton writes in his new book Ozonomics.

This article appeared in The Cairns Post - Australia on July 14, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes (2007) by Andrew Charlton
Random House: Australia. Release – July 2007.
Details

Related links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times - India

Bright young things take multinational path

According to John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, the US’s good standing stems from the country’s high degree of worker flexibility and tough competition.

This article appeared in The Financial Times - India on July 11, 2007
[Link to article no longer active.]

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times - India

Bright young things take multinational path

According to John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, the US’s good standing stems from the country’s high degree of worker flexibility and tough competition.

This article appeared in The Financial Times - India on July 11, 2007
[Link to article no longer active.]

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Exduco.net - Tuscany, Italy

How productivity benefits from competition

Chad Syverson, associate professor of economics at the University of Chicago and a productivity specialist spoke to students and faculty at a Brown Bag lunch lecture hosted by The Becker Center of Chicago Price Theory and sponsored by Vishal Verma, ’07 (XP-76), May 10 at the Charles M. Harper Center. His lecture mentioned the Centre for Economic Performance study on productivity – how Nick Bloom’s and John Van Reenen’s research included interviewing managers at 750 medium-sized firms in the United States, United Kingdom, France and Germany. The study correlated high management evaluations with high productivity, Syverson said. Two factors influenced productivity: the amount of competition and “prima geniture,” in which a family-owned firm passes leadership down to the eldest son.

This article appeared online on Exduco.net - Tuscany, Italy
Link to article

Related Publications
Bloom, N. and Van Reenen, J. (2007), ‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today Programme

Special report on new LSE research, in conjunction with the Sutton Trust, on the current state of social mobility in Britain.

This report was broadcast at 7.09a.m. on BBC Radio 4's the Today Programme on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today Programme

Special report on new LSE research, in conjunction with the Sutton Trust, on the current state of social mobility in Britain.

This report was broadcast at 7.09a.m. on BBC Radio 4's the Today Programme on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Globe and Mail

Happy is as happy learns

Richard Layard, an economics professor at the London School of Economics and the author of his own happiness manual, Happiness: Lessons From a New Science, is now rolling out well-being courses for 11-to-13-year-olds in Manchester, Hertfordshire and South Tyneside.

This article appeared in the Globe and Mail (Canada) on June 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Schools need to get serious on teaching values

A Letter from Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 19, 2007
Link to published letter

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Political Affairs Magazine

Tony Blair's real legacy - minimum wage and union recognition

Tony Blair’s critics should not dismiss significant policy achievements of the past ten years. Recent research by Professor David Metcalf of LSE reveals the UK’s first national minimum wage has lifted out of poverty tens of thousands of low-paid workers with no detrimental impact on job creation.

This article appeared in Political Affairs Magazine on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment? by David Metcalf, CEP Discussion Paper No.781, April 2007

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Belfast Telegraph

Exams plan spiralling out of control

The 11-plus is on the way out, but the jury is still out on the question of academic selection. Grammar school supporters are already highlighting a report from the London School of Economics which found that selective education benefited children from a working class background.

This article appeared in the Belfast Telegraph on June 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Belfast Telegraph

Exams plan spiralling out of control

The 11-plus is on the way out, but the jury is still out on the question of academic selection. Grammar school supporters are already highlighting a report from the London School of Economics which found that selective education benefited children from a working class background.

This article appeared in the Belfast Telegraph on June 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Labour is failing

The government is failing to capitalise on economic growth because of tax hikes and rising inequality. Britons take prosperity for granted and are focusing on the Government's failure to turn higher taxes into public service improvements, said John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Source: Lexis Nexis. No link to article.

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Blair's Economic Legacy. 'In brief' article by John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 13/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

If you're not a fat cat or a footballer, new problems keep on popping up

Incidentally, people who still have social consciences and who are worried about the way the world is going can take heart from a paper by the eminent labour economist David Metcalf, of the London School of Economics. Its very title - Why has the British national minimum wage had little or no impact on employment? - gives the game away. For all those predictions by (usually) right-wing economists that a minimum wage would produce economic disaster, it hasn't happened. Indeed, Metcalf concludes: 'The national minimum wage has raised the real and relative pay of low-paid workers, tempered wage inequality and contributed to the narrowing of the gender wage gap.' It has not had adverse effects on employment; nor has it been inflationary.

This article appeared in The Observer on June 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
'Why has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment?' by David Metcalf, Discussion Paper No.781, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, April 2007.

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

AlterNet - San Francisco, CA

Why having more no longer makes us happy

In the words of the economist Richard Layard, "We now know that what people say about how they feel corresponds closely to the actual levels of activity in different parts of the brain, which can be measured in standard scientific ways."

This article appeared in AlterNet - San Francisco, CA on March 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Race to close productivity gap

Britain has been slowly but steadily catching up in productivity to the US. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance points out: “Since the mid-1990s, American productivity growth has been exceptionally strong, so we have done well even to keep up.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further Press Cuttings
The Financial Times, Wednesday 22 March
The quest for improved productivity
Quote by John Van Reenen used again in article by Scheherazade Daneshkhu discussing the latest Budget announcement from Gordon Brown.
Link to article
News Posted: 21/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Life Style Extra - UK

Small carbon tax could double environment budget

In his study published in his Centre's journal CentrePiece, Dr Ralf Martin, of the Centre for Economic Performance, shows how a small carbon tax on US car owners could double world public spending on research into tackling global warming.

This article appeared in Life Style Extra - UK on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies by Ralf Martin. CEP Policy Analysis published in 2006.

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Life Style Extra - UK

Small carbon tax could double environment budget

In his study published in his Centre's journal CentrePiece, Dr Ralf Martin, of the Centre for Economic Performance, shows how a small carbon tax on US car owners could double world public spending on research into tackling global warming.

This article appeared in Life Style Extra - UK on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies by Ralf Martin. CEP Policy Analysis published in 2006.

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Life Style Extra - UK

Small carbon tax could double environment budget

In his study published in his Centre's journal CentrePiece, Dr Ralf Martin, of the Centre for Economic Performance, shows how a small carbon tax on US car owners could double world public spending on research into tackling global warming.

This article appeared in Life Style Extra - UK on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Technologies to Tackle Global Warming by Ralf Martin in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Climate Change: Economic Sense and Non-sense of Carbon Mitigation Policies by Ralf Martin. CEP Policy Analysis published in 2006.

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 14/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta

A demographic puzzle

As the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church puts it, the family sustains work if it provides the serene background of leisure and education that an unstressed, confident workforce needs. Studies on the ‘economics of happiness’, such as the recent one by Professor Layard, of the London School of Economics, support the general idea.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta on March 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 08/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta

A demographic puzzle

As the Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church puts it, the family sustains work if it provides the serene background of leisure and education that an unstressed, confident workforce needs. Studies on the ‘economics of happiness’, such as the recent one by Professor Layard, of the London School of Economics, support the general idea.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta on March 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 08/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

La Tribune

Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
[No direct link to article available.]

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
Details

‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
Details

Related link
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage
Richard Jackman webpage
News Posted: 20/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The nasty country

The most influential advocate of happiness being a proper subject for government in recent years has been the economist Richard Layard with his book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 19, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage


News Posted: 19/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

It's a mad world

Richard Layard's Happiness Forum meetings and his research into 'wellbeing' featured in the column by Oliver James.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report by Richard Layard
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Socialist Worker

Downwardly mobile

A Report from the Centre for Economic Performance for the Sutton Trust published in 2005 is cited in this article in the Socialist Worker (Issue 2037, 10th February). The article says that it is harder for disadvantaged people to progress in society now than it was when the present Prime Minister came to office.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker online on February 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Statesman, Ghana

Moving up the social ladder is never easy

Article refers to LSE research that has shown that early cognitive development, measured in children as young as 22 months, predicts final qualifications about 25 years later.

This article appeared in the Statesman on January 8, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Pre-school Educational Inequality? British Children in the 1970 Cohort Leon Feinstein, September 1998 Paper No' CEPDP0404

Related Links
Leon Feinstein is an Associate of the Education and Skills research programme at CEP. He is also the Director of the Centre for Research on the Wider Benefits of Learning, Institute of Education, London. VIew webpage
News Posted: 08/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

South Wales Echo

Consultant radical vision for capitalism

CHINESE leaders and representatives of some of the world's biggest companies are turning to a St Davids-based consultancy for corporate guidance which fuses idealism and business acumen.
Article refers to Richard Layard’s report on mental health, that ‘identified improving mental health as a priority for Britain’

This article appeared in icWales Online on January 5, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard: download pdf

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Radio Singapore

FOCUS 2006 - Economic Trends

Linda Yueh was recorded for ‘FOCUS 2006 - Economic Trends’ broadcast by Radio Singapore.

This broadcast featured on Radio Singapore on December 22, 2006
Link to transcript.

Related links
Linda Yueh's webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Ministers deny it but the truth is out there

The government appears to have backed Richard Layard’s recommendations for increases in therapy provision to tackle depression – overall funding has increased over the past decade although from a very low base. In fact mental health services have been disproportionately affected by cuts in 2006.

This article appeared in The Guardian on December 20, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

Kathimerini

How do companies with bad management survive?

An article in the Greek newspaper Kathimerini related to the management study done in 2004 by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Kathimerini (Greece) on December 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries' by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

Kathimerini

How do companies with bad management survive?

An article in the Greek newspaper Kathimerini related to the management study done in 2004 by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Kathimerini (Greece) on December 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries' by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

Kathimerini

How do companies with bad management survive?

An article in the Greek newspaper Kathimerini related to the management study done in 2004 by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Kathimerini (Greece) on December 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries' by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

Slate - USA

The not-so-dismal science - how economists measure whether you're happy

In an article on how happiness research is starting to show up in policy proposals, Richard Layard's campaign for more government funding to provide cognitive behavioural therapists is cited.

This article appeared in Slate (a US daily magazine on the web) on December 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Programme webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

Japan Times

Revolution in market values

"Economic reform" has been the banner slogan of Japanese governments for the last 10 years, and the new government promises more of it.
An article by Ronald Dore

This article appeared in the Japan Times on 9 November 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
Ron Dore's webpage
News Posted: 09/11/2006      [Back to the Top]

Government News Network - GNN

Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance announced

Environment Secretary David Miliband and Trade and Industry Secretary Alistair Darling will jointly chair a Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance. Members of the Commission will be drawn from business, NGO's, academia, trade unions and public sector organisations. Professor John Van Reenen is amongst those who have provisionally agreed to sit on the commission.

This article appeared in the Government News Network on 8 November 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
DTI Environmental Industries Unit webpage
DEFRA website
News Posted: 08/11/2006      [Back to the Top]

Government News Network - GNN

Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance announced

Environment Secretary David Miliband and Trade and Industry Secretary Alistair Darling will jointly chair a Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance. Members of the Commission will be drawn from business, NGO's, academia, trade unions and public sector organisations. Professor John Van Reenen is amongst those who have provisionally agreed to sit on the commission.

This article appeared in the Government News Network on 8 November 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
DTI Environmental Industries Unit webpage
DEFRA website
News Posted: 08/11/2006      [Back to the Top]

Online Opinion

A touchstone time for Russia

For the past 100 years Russia has been a country of extreme ideas, and extreme policies based on those ideas. This has resulted in an overall poor economic performance and immense human suffering. As so often in Russian history, what happens now depends very much on one man and on the attitudes of others to him.
This article refers to Richard Layard and a visit he made to Moscow in 1992

This article appeared in Online Opinion on 8 November 2006
Link to article.
News Posted: 08/11/2006      [Back to the Top]

Online Opinion

A touchstone time for Russia

For the past 100 years Russia has been a country of extreme ideas, and extreme policies based on those ideas. This has resulted in an overall poor economic performance and immense human suffering. As so often in Russian history, what happens now depends very much on one man and on the attitudes of others to him.
This article refers to Richard Layard and a visit he made to Moscow in 1992

This article appeared in Online Opinion on 8 November 2006
Link to article.
News Posted: 08/11/2006      [Back to the Top]

Hindustan Times

Urban sprawl has no connection with body weight

Urban sprawl does not affect weight in any way, researchers at the University of Toronto, the London School of Economics and Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Spain, have found.

This article appeared in the Hindustan Times on 5 November 2006
Article also appeared in:
NewKerala.com
Yahoo News India
SouthAsiaNews.com

Related Publications
Fat City: The Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Obesity, Jean Eid, Henry G Overman, Diego Puga and Matthew A Turner, November 2006, Paper No' CEPDP0758

Related Links
Henry Overman's webpage
Diego Puga webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Revolutionary' economist wins Nobel Prize

Article about US economist Edmund Phelps who has won a Nobel Prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences. Includes quote from Professor Christopher Pissarides, of the Centre for Economic Performance: ‘The prize was richly deserved and long overdue. He revolutionised our way of thinking about the inflation-unemployment trade-off, which has influenced policymakers since the 1960s.’

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article.
News Posted: 11/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Revolutionary' economist wins Nobel Prize

Article about US economist Edmund Phelps who has won a Nobel Prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences. Includes quote from Professor Christopher Pissarides, of the Centre for Economic Performance: ‘The prize was richly deserved and long overdue. He revolutionised our way of thinking about the inflation-unemployment trade-off, which has influenced policymakers since the 1960s.’

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article.
News Posted: 11/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Revolutionary' economist wins Nobel Prize

Article about US economist Edmund Phelps who has won a Nobel Prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences. Includes quote from Professor Christopher Pissarides, of the Centre for Economic Performance: ‘The prize was richly deserved and long overdue. He revolutionised our way of thinking about the inflation-unemployment trade-off, which has influenced policymakers since the 1960s.’

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article.
News Posted: 11/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Airbus's role as a business model is in question

When the head of Arcelor was trying earlier this year to fend off the take-over bid from Mittal, he described his company as the Airbus of European steel - a symbol of Europe's unity and its ability to compete with all comers in strategic industries.

A few weeks ago Christopher Mohn, German head of Lycos Europe, called for the creation of an Airbus of the internet, a counterpart to US rivals such as Google and Ebay. Mr Mohn was referring to Quaero, the search engine project backed by the French and German governments and several big companies. Catching up with Google might take a long time, he said, but the attempt was worth making...

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 9 October 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Links
Sir Geoffrey Owen's webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Airbus's role as a business model is in question

When the head of Arcelor was trying earlier this year to fend off the take-over bid from Mittal, he described his company as the Airbus of European steel - a symbol of Europe's unity and its ability to compete with all comers in strategic industries.

A few weeks ago Christopher Mohn, German head of Lycos Europe, called for the creation of an Airbus of the internet, a counterpart to US rivals such as Google and Ebay. Mr Mohn was referring to Quaero, the search engine project backed by the French and German governments and several big companies. Catching up with Google might take a long time, he said, but the attempt was worth making...

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 9 October 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Links
Sir Geoffrey Owen's webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

THES

Data no help in campaign for better pay

Academics earn more per hour than most other highly qualified workers, but they put in more overtime than most other professionals in the public sector, a report has revealed. The report’s authors are Dr Vignoles, reader in the economics of education at the Institute of Education and lecturer at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE and James Walker.

This article appeared in the THES on 6 October, 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Publications
Higher Education Academic Salaries in the UK, Anna Vignoles with James Walker & Mark Collins, Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website
News Posted: 06/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Archbishop: ease up on kids

Members of the Good Childhood Inquiry panel, including the economist Richard Layard will call for evidence from children, young people and adults about childhood in the UK.

This article appeared in the Sun on September 18, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
The Good Childhood Inquiry
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

Sydney Morning Herald

Going into therapy

Cognitive behaviour therapy has a high success rate among people suffering depression and anxiety. It can make them feel happier. The positive findings have prompted an eminent British economist, and happiness guru, Professor Lord Richard Layard, to argue in favour of training thousands of therapists in the technique.

This article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on September 16, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Link

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Australian

Share the benefits or beware the backlash to globalisation

In a paper given at the annual economic symposium organised by the Federal Reserve bank of Kansas City at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Tony Venables noted the entrenched advantages of agglomerations of economic activity - the gains from proximity.

This article appeared in The Australian (Australia) on September 7, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Tony Venables is Director of the Globalisation Research Programme at CEP.
News Posted: 07/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Australian

Share the benefits or beware the backlash to globalisation

In a paper given at the annual economic symposium organised by the Federal Reserve bank of Kansas City at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Tony Venables noted the entrenched advantages of agglomerations of economic activity - the gains from proximity.

This article appeared in The Australian (Australia) on September 7, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Tony Venables is Director of the Globalisation Research Programme at CEP.
News Posted: 07/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Stephen King: the pursuit of happiness is so problematic

Stephen King, managing director of economics at HSBC, discusses Richard Layard’s book ‘Happiness: Lessons from a New Science’.

This article appeared in The Independent on September 4, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard’s webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

Other press cuttings
The Times, September 4, 2006
Swiss know the answer to apathy
To re-engage disillusioned voters, Britain should adopt a version of direct democracy. Mention of Richard Layard’s book ‘Happiness: Lessons from a New Science’
News Posted: 04/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Leading article: Listen to Lord Layard

Back in June Professor Lord Layard published research to show that only a quarter of those who suffer from mental illness, in terms of anxiety and depression, are getting proper treatment.

This article appeared in The Independent on September 4, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Link

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
The Independent on September 4, 2006
Claire Rayner: John Hogan. How could he?
Easily enough. The father, whose leap from a balcony killed his son, suffers from clinical depression. Don't condemn him.
It is great to hear that Lord Layard, the "happiness tsar", and the Government are to spend a little more money on those suffering from depression...

News Posted: 04/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

The Observer publishes LSE Depression Report

This Sunday, 3 September 2006, The Observer newspaper circulated to all its readers a copy of the LSE’s Depression Report, written by the Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, led by Professor Lord Richard Layard. The report has received the support of The Observer, The Guardian, the Royal College of General Practitioners and leading mental health charities – Mind, Rethink, the Mental Health Foundation and the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health.

Click here to download the report
News Posted: 03/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview
News Posted: 09/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview
News Posted: 09/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview
News Posted: 09/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview
News Posted: 09/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Express

Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research
News Posted: 05/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Express

Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research
News Posted: 05/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Express

Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research
News Posted: 05/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Bay Windows

Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Bay Windows

Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Ireland online

Trade unionists want government to legislate for flexible working options

Trade unionists have urged employers to carry out audits of their pay-scales to ensure gender equality between male and female staff. Research by LSE shows women in Europe could be earning less than their male counterparts for the next 150 years. In Ireland, men earn an average of €180 a week more than women.

This article appeared in Ireland online on July 29, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Gender Pay Gap by Alan Manning in CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006
'The Part-time Pay Penalty' by Alan Manning and Barbara Petrongolo, CEP Discussion Paper No. 679, March 2005
'The Gender Gap in Early Career Wage Growth' by Alan Manning and Joanna Swaffield, CEP Discussion Paper No. 700, July 2005
The Women and Work Commission (2006), Shaping a Fairer Future

Related Links
Alan Manning's webpage
Labour Markets research programme at CEP

Also in
• News.com, Australia
150-year wait for equal pay: study
• RTE.ie, Ireland
Women to wait 150 years for equal pay - study
• FinFacts, Ireland
Study says fall in UK gender pay gap masks some less positive developments in recent years
• Times of India
Eves have to wait 150 more yrs for equal pay
• Agency France Presse
Women to wait 150 years for equal pay: British study
[No link]
• Evening Standard
‘150 years’ to close gender salary gap
[No link]
• The Gold Coast Bulletin, Australia
Fair pay day is years away
[No link]
• Daily Star
150-year delay for fair pay
[No link]
• Advertiser, Australia
Gender gap; Equal pay for women now '150 years away'
[No link]
News Posted: 29/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

Workplace Law Network

Sexual orientation can effect pay

Men in same-sex relationships were paid 6% less than their heterosexual counterparts, and were also 3% less likely to be employed, according to the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared on the Workplace Law Network online on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage
The Labour Markets Research Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Gay.com, July 28, 2006
The pink pound, a myth?
The Centre for Economic Performance's CentrePiece magazine reported that men in gay relationships were paid 6% less than straight men and 3% were less likely to be employed.
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Be afraid of the happy brigade

The author of the article refers to Professor Richard Layard’s theories about how people can become happier: ‘Consider just three findings from the ‘new science of happiness’ as Richard Layard, the economist and Labour peer, describes it. Above about £15,000, increasing your income adds little to your happiness. Believing in God makes you happy. Getting divorced makes you unhappy. These facts explain why Westerners are no happier now than 50 years ago; our increased wealth has been accompanied by more divorce and less belief in God.’

This article appeared in the Times on July 27, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

The great unknown

Fair Trade for All, a polemic by Nobel Prize winner Stiglitz and LSE academic Andrew Charlton about the Doha round of the global trade talks, is mentioned with regard to the issues of relieving poverty in the developing world.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on July 7, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development is an Oxford University Publication.
Details

Related Links
Andrew Charlton's webpage
Globalisation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

The great unknown

Fair Trade for All, a polemic by Nobel Prize winner Stiglitz and LSE academic Andrew Charlton about the Doha round of the global trade talks, is mentioned with regard to the issues of relieving poverty in the developing world.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on July 7, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development is an Oxford University Publication.
Details

Related Links
Andrew Charlton's webpage
Globalisation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Searching for a cure for google envy

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance suggests that British groups have benefited greatly from US R&D spending simply by placing offices in Silicon Valley and paying attention to what is going on.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 20, 2006
[No link available]

Related Publications
How Special is the Special Relationship? Using the Impact of R&D Spillovers on UK Firms as a Test of Technology Sourcing, by Rachel Griffith, Rupert Harrison and John Van Reenen. CEP Discussion Paper No.659, November 2004

Further information
Rachel Griffith is a Deputy Director at the Institute for Fiscal Studies
Rupert Harrison is a Research Economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London
John Van Reenen's CEP webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4: The Today Programme

Richard Layard - The Depression Report

Interview with Richard Layard, the author of The LSE's Depression Report – published on Monday 19 June 2006. The report urges that psychological therapy should be made available to all people suffering from depression, chronic anxiety and schizophrenia.

This interview was broadcast on The Today Programme, BBC Radio 4 on June 19, 2006
Listen to the broadcast (MP3)

Related Publications
THE DEPRESSION REPORT: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

Related Links
Mental Health Group webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC (TV)

Business Breakfast

John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, was interviewed for this morning's Business Breakfast shown on BBC television. Professor Van Reenen spoke about a new revised OECD jobs strategy report titled OECD Employment Outlook - 2006 Edition: Boosting Jobs and Incomes.

This interview was broadcast by the BBC on June 13, 2006
[No link available.]

Related Links
John Van Reenen’s webpage
News Posted: 13/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Focus: Which Cameron really means business?: Why we are richer but no happier

Economists, used to dealing with hard numbers, have started to study happiness. Lord Richard Layard, the London School of Economics’ professor and Labour peer, is the most prominent British economist to turn his attention to happiness

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on May 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness research webpage
News Posted: 28/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Open independent school doors to all

Mention of research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin from CEP, that finds social mobility in the UK has declined.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on May 24, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Alissa Goodman's webpage
News Posted: 24/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

The New Statesman

In search of the good life

"Ask yourself if you are happy," John Stuart Mill wrote, "and you cease to be so." If Mill was right - and he was - bibliophiles are in trouble. Books about happiness are pouring off the presses. Happiness: Lessons from a new science by Richard Layard in comparison to the latest published literature on happiness.

This article appeared in The New Statesman on May 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.

Related Links
Episode guide for the BBC2 programme ‘The Happiness Formula’ being broadcast on Wednesday evenings at 7pm.

Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness research webpage
News Posted: 22/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Noticias

Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 17/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Noticias

Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 17/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Noticias

Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 17/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Noticias

Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 17/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Noticias

Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 17/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Labour Party online

Early experience vital in tackling poverty

Children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when they are young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty, new research by Jo Blanden published today shows.

This article appeared on the Labour Party Website, May 16, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': What enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 16/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

News Posted: 11/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

News Posted: 11/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

News Posted: 11/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

News Posted: 11/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

News Posted: 11/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Making the apprenticeship work

How to help the 'forgotten half'. Rigid teaching styles are preventing the 'forgotten half' from attaining necessary skill levels, writes Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow in the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on May 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Hilary Steedman's webpage
The Education and Skills Programme
News Posted: 03/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Wirtschaft

Besseres management macht glücklich

Economist John van Reenen, one of the authors of a joint CEP/McKinsey Report, speaks of a "positive correlation" between good management and good Work Life balance.

This article appeared in the German newspaper Wirtschaft on April 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
Nick Bloom's webpage
Tobias Kretschmer's webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme


News Posted: 22/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

Wirtschaft

Besseres management macht glücklich

Economist John van Reenen, one of the authors of a joint CEP/McKinsey Report, speaks of a "positive correlation" between good management and good Work Life balance.

This article appeared in the German newspaper Wirtschaft on April 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
Nick Bloom's webpage
Tobias Kretschmer's webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme


News Posted: 22/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

Common Dreams Newswire

Study finds widening wage gap between immigrant and US-born workers

A new report by economists John Schmitt and Jonathan Wadsworth finds that the earnings gap between immigrant and US-born workers increased substantially between 1980 and 2000. The report, Changing Patterns in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the United States, 1980-2000, was written by John Schmitt, economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and Jonathan Wadsworth, economist at the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in Common Dreams Newswire Washington DC online on April 18, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Changing Patterns in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the United States, 1980-2000
by John Schmitt and Jonathan Wadsworth
CEP Election Analysis, April 2006, by Jonathan Wadsworth Immigration: the Evidence from Economic Research

Related Links
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 18/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Post

Why U.S. business is winning

CEP research by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen found that American firms and their European subsidiaries are better managed and the superior management practices account for more than half of the productivity gap between American and European firms.

This article appeared in The Washington Post on March 27, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Tobias Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
Nick Bloom's webpage
Tobias Kretschmer's webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme
News Posted: 27/03/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Family-run businesses 'perform poorly'

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group has found that objective assessments of managerial performance are important in explaining why UK companies tend to have lower productivity and profitability.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 15, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links: Nick Bloom’s webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage
CEP’s Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

Letters to the FT in response to CEP research results
Increase family directors' degree of accountability
Letter in response to research by the Centre for Economics Performance at LSE in "Family-run businesses perform poorly".
What matters is how the family business is handed on
Five years of research... (No direct link.)
“Sir, Five years of research by the Centre for Economics Performance at the London School of Economics and McKinsey is an expensive way to say "clogs to clogs in three generations.”
News Posted: 15/03/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

We could all do with a liberal dose of happiness

Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance and author of the book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science has explored the relationship between happiness and work.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on March 2, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness research webpage
News Posted: 02/03/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Tony Blair's School Report

Research from the CEP offers some answers to the question of how the "education, education, education" Government has done so far.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 24, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related Links
Sandra McNally's webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Tony Blair's School Report

Research from the CEP offers some answers to the question of how the "education, education, education" Government has done so far.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 24, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related Links
Sandra McNally's webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Are you rude enough to be an entrenpreneur?

What makes someone a good businessperson is not, necessarily, what will make that person an entrenpreneur. The Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen, makes some interesting observations.

This article appeared in The Times Online on February 20, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
News Posted: 20/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Joseph Stiglitz: It takes more than free trade to end poverty

Joseph Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate in economics and chair of the Brooks World Poverty Institute at the University of Manchester, and Andrew Charlton of LSE, are the co-authors of Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development.

"Opening the door to trade is one thing, but the real challenge is to help developing countries go through it."

This article appeared in The Independent on February 03, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development is an Oxford University Publication. A description of the book and details on how to order a copy are available at: Oxford University Press webpage

Related Links
Andrew Charlton is a Research Officer with CEP's Globalisation programme.
News Posted: 03/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Work-life balance called into question

Providing employees with a good work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, according to research published today. The study by three academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics finds that the evidence for "the win-win view, espoused by the government, that better work-life balance will improve productivity is rejected" and that "there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for".

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 10, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.
News Posted: 10/01/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Work-life balance called into question

Providing employees with a good work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, according to research published today. The study by three academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics finds that the evidence for "the win-win view, espoused by the government, that better work-life balance will improve productivity is rejected" and that "there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for".

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 10, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.
News Posted: 10/01/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Work-life balance called into question

Providing employees with a good work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, according to research published today. The study by three academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics finds that the evidence for "the win-win view, espoused by the government, that better work-life balance will improve productivity is rejected" and that "there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for".

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 10, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.
News Posted: 10/01/2006      [Back to the Top]

Scotland on Sunday

Class divide: now it's even harder for poor to get on

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, that compared children born in the 1950s and the 1970s and found that greater educational opportunities disproportionately benefited those from better-off backgrounds.

This article appeared in Scotland on Sunday on 11 December, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications

Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002 Paper No' CEEDP0026

Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 11/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Copper bottom

Dr Linda Yueh quoted regarding the credibility of China as a trading partner.

This article appeared in The Observer on 20 November, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh's staff biography page.

Further Information
News Posted: 20/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

EU set for clash on 'Anglo-Saxon' versus 'social' welfare models

Before the summit of the European Union at Hampton Court, the journalist Nicholas Timmins poses the question 'Does much of mainland Europe need to break up its "social model" welfare state in favour of an "Anglo-Saxon" model along UK and US lines? Richard Layard replies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 21 October, 2005
Link to article


News Posted: 21/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

EU set for clash on 'Anglo-Saxon' versus 'social' welfare models

Before the summit of the European Union at Hampton Court, the journalist Nicholas Timmins poses the question 'Does much of mainland Europe need to break up its "social model" welfare state in favour of an "Anglo-Saxon" model along UK and US lines? Richard Layard replies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 21 October, 2005
Link to article


News Posted: 21/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

IT Week.com

IT's Business Value Endorsed

Technology investment has a subtantial, quantifiable impact on business productivity according to Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in a report published with the Office of National Statistics (ONS).

This article appeared on the IT Week website
Link to article

Related Publication
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates
News Posted: 12/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Fears about job destruction proved to be unfounded

In a study on the impact of the national minimum wage, the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE concluded that 'there is no evidence of significant job losses for the workers most affected by the minimum wage and there have been no obvious knock-on effects on the wages of better-paid workers'.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 30 September, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
The article in the FT draws on the CEP published Election Analysis 'The National Minimum Wage: the evidence of its impact on jobs and inequality' by Mirko Draka, spring 2005.

Related Publications
The employment effects of the October 2003 increase in the National Minimum Wage
Richard Dickens and Mirko Draca, June 2005
Paper No. CEPDP0693

Has the National Minimum Wage reduced UK wage inequality?
Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, June 2002
Paper No. CEPDP0533
News Posted: 30/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Fears about job destruction proved to be unfounded

In a study on the impact of the national minimum wage, the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE concluded that 'there is no evidence of significant job losses for the workers most affected by the minimum wage and there have been no obvious knock-on effects on the wages of better-paid workers'.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 30 September, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
The article in the FT draws on the CEP published Election Analysis 'The National Minimum Wage: the evidence of its impact on jobs and inequality' by Mirko Draka, spring 2005.

Related Publications
The employment effects of the October 2003 increase in the National Minimum Wage
Richard Dickens and Mirko Draca, June 2005
Paper No. CEPDP0693

Has the National Minimum Wage reduced UK wage inequality?
Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, June 2002
Paper No. CEPDP0533
News Posted: 30/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

People Management

Highway to Hell?

The gathering of the TUC in Brighton saw the trade union movement at a watershed. David Metcalf and Brendan Barber, general secretary of the TUC debate the future of trade unions - resurgence or perdition?

This article appeared in People Management on 15 September, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Trade Unions: Resurgence or Demise? Sue Fernie and David Metcalf, Editors. Published by Routledge, July 2005

Related Links
CentrePiece Vol 10, Issue 2 webpage


News Posted: 15/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

"We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.
News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

"We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.
News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]