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News for Effective Intervention

Press coverage involving Effective Intervention staff or research is listed below.

iNews

The politics behind pound sterling's volatile week

The pound has lost nearly 18 per cent of its value against the dollar since Britain voted Brexit, two per cent more than during the 2008 financial crash. On Thursday it reached its lowest point for 168 years. ''Movements in sterling in the past week have made it clear that news which increases the probability of a 'hard Brexit' reduces the value of the pound,'' Dr Thomas Sampson, an economics lecturer at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, told i. ''This reflects concerns that a 'hard Brexit' will increase the costs of trading with the EU and reduce the UK's output and living standards.''

This article was published by iNews on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

China's highly successful demand for technology transfer in high-speed trains

The rate of growth in technological innovations in China has increased significantly in the past two decades (see Figure 1). What's more, it is widely believed that the ability to learn from foreign technology and chase the global technological frontier relatively quickly has been a key contributor to China's growth miracle (Van Reenen and Yueh, 2012). The Chinese government has actively pursued what it calls a 'market for technology' policy: demanding that in return for having market access, foreign multinationals should develop technology cooperation with local firms.
Our research explores the extent to which international technology transfer spurs domestic innovation. We focus on the best example of the market for technology policy: the introduction of state-of-the-art technology into China's high-speed railways (HSR) during the massive expansion of its HSR system in recent years.

This article was posted online by the LSE Business Review blog on October 13, 2016
Link to the article here

Related publications
High-speed rail in China, Yatang Lin, Yu Qin and Zhuan Xie. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 2, Autumn 2016
International Technology Transfer and Domestic Innovation: Evidence from the High-Speed Rail Sector in China, Yatang Lin, Yu Qin and Zhuan Zie, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1393, December 2015

Related links
Yatang Lin webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The East Anglian Times

Will you harm your child's academic progress if you buy them a new iPhone 7?

Last year, a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where mobile phones were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6%. Perhaps a study should look at the gains such a move could make when it comes to children's emotional well-being. I can't help thinking it would be worth more than 6%.

This article was published by The East Anglian Times on September 25, 2016
Link to article here

Also in:
Ipswich Star
Will you harm your child's academic progress if you buy them a new iPhone 7?

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015"
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Republic

The age of the never-ending performance review: Justin Fox

There’s also a pretty good chance that these new performance-management practices will have the desired effect, at some companies at least. For the past decade, Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom and a rotating crew of co-authors (most consistently MIT’s John van Reenen) have been documenting that the management best practices developed at high-performing companies and consulting firms and taught at business schools really do make companies more productive and profitable – and that HR practices that effectively identify and reward the most-productive workers are a big part of what separates successful companies from the rest.

This article appeared in the Daily Republic on 28 August 2016 Link to article

Related publications
Management Practices Across Firms and Countries, Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practices: the impact on company performance, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 2, Summer 2005

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Republic

The age of the never-ending performance review: Justin Fox

There’s also a pretty good chance that these new performance-management practices will have the desired effect, at some companies at least. For the past decade, Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom and a rotating crew of co-authors (most consistently MIT’s John van Reenen) have been documenting that the management best practices developed at high-performing companies and consulting firms and taught at business schools really do make companies more productive and profitable – and that HR practices that effectively identify and reward the most-productive workers are a big part of what separates successful companies from the rest.

This article appeared in the Daily Republic on 28 August 2016 Link to article

Related publications
Management Practices Across Firms and Countries, Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practices: the impact on company performance, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 2, Summer 2005

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 28/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway)

Do we need more goals for society than economic growth?

Therefore, among others, economics professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics urged to measure citizens' quality of life. OECD har i den sĺkalte «Bedre liv-indeksen» utarbeidet indikatorer pĺ en rekke omrĺder fra sysselsetting og bolig til frivillig aktivitetsliv og miljř, for ĺ forsřke ĺ mĺle livskvalitet i ulike land. OECD in the so-called "better life index" compiled indicators on a range of areas from employment and housing to volunteer aktivitetsliv and environment, in an attempt to measure quality of life in different countries. KrF fremmet forslag i Stortinget i 2009 om at ogsĺ Norge burde gjřre dette. KrF proposed in Parliament in 2009 that also Norway should do this. Dette har resultert i en omtale av livskvalitetsindikatorer i Nasjonalbudsjettet. This has resulted in a review of quality of life indicators in the National Budget.

This article appeared on Dagsavisen - Nyemeninger (Norway) on 26 August 2016 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Press Reader

ONS hires former MPC member for its experts panel

Britain's statistics office has recruited a group of economic heavyweights to boost its ability to crunch numbers on the health of the economy. ... Three economics professor have also been recruited to the working group: Thomas Crossley from the University of Essex, Peter Sinclair at the University of Birmingham and David Metcalf at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by the Press Reader on August 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
David Metcalf CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 18/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

PropertyWire

Researcher blames government not rich foreign buyers for UK housing crisis

Decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land and turn them into something like gold or artworks is to blame for the current housing crisis in the UK rather than foreign buyers, according to a new analysis. The problem is not foreign speculators buying luxury flats as an investment in London which then lie empty but that for more than 30 years not enough homes have been built, says Paul Cheshire, Professor Emeritus of economic geography at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by PropertyWire on August 17, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Foreign Affairs

The economic consequences of Brexit: A Conversation with Swati Dhingra

Before Britons voted to leave the European Union, Swati Dhingra, an assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics, wrote a series of papers with her colleagues trying to convince them otherwise by pointing to the economic consequences. Two weeks after the voters chose Brexit, Dhingra spoke with Foreign Affairs deputy managing editor Stuart Reid in London.

This article was published online by Foreign Affairs on July 26, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Sydney Morning Herald

We've hit peak panic – but the economy is still ticking over

But how worried should we be that political and financial uncertainty will feed through into the real economy? Stanford University economist Nicholas Bloom has been studying the impact of uncertainty on economies over the past decade and believes there is a link. He and colleagues have produced a neat set of "uncertainty trackers" for several countries that track mentions in articles of "uncertainty" or "uncertain" combined with references to the economy. The uncertainty index in Britain hit a record high during the Brexit debate and is at double the level of the Global Financial Crisis.

This article appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald on 8 July 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven J. Davis, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1379, October 2015
Fluctuations in Uncertainty Nicholas Bloom, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Volume 28, No.2, Spring 2014
Fluctuations in Uncertainty , Nicholas Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.38, December 2013


Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Sinarharian (Indonesia)

Brexit bakal cetus kesan domino

Meanwhile, Director of the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, John Van Reenen tell Brexit will give a significant impact in the short-term period. ''Impending situation where business refuses to make a decision or new investment because future is still ambiguous. It will give immediate effects of investment activities, thus causing slow growth,'' he said.

This article was published online by Sinarharian (Indonesia) on June 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

El Correo Gallego.es (Spain)

No hay prisa para salir

Parecidos resultados obtiene para los mismos escenarios el informe del Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics
In the three cases the fall of GDP in per cent, following the same order, would be 3.8, 6.2 and 7.5. Similar results obtained for the same scenarios the report of the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by El Correo Gallego (Spain) on June 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Seeking Alpha

The Consequences Of Brexit

These numbers all point to a significant deterioration in the economy. In fact, it is a disaster for the U.K. as inflation will skyrocket (note that the British pound dropped 15% against gold in one day) and incomes could drop 2.3% according to a report issued by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on Seeking Alpha on 26 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Why did people really vote for Brexit? If we don't face the psychological reasons, we'll never bring Britain together

Why did so many millions of people vote to leave the European Union? ... Some new research by the labour market economists Brian Bell and Stephen Machin, seen by The Independent, suggests the Leave vote tended to be bigger in areas of the country where wage growth has been weakest since 1997. This would seem to support the popular theory that this was essentially a giant protest vote against the political class by people who feel economically ''left behind'' in modern Britain.

This article was published by The Independent on June 26, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brian Bell and Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service - In the Balance

UK votes to leave EU

What does the UK's decision to leave the European Union mean for the future of the single market? Economists talk of sustained market turbulence, devaluations and an imminent recession, but will it be Britain or the EU suffering the worst effects long-term? And as eurosceptic political parties across the continent are buoyed by the UK's vote and call for their own referendums, what must the EU project itself do to survive? Ed Butler is joined by three guests from across the EU: Damien Lempereur from Debout La France, a political party which wants a French exit from the EU; Jens Zimmerman, a member of Germany's Social Democratic Party and part of Angela Merkels coalition government; and Swati Dhingra, from the London School of Economics.

This programme was broadcast on the BBC World Service Radio - In the Balance programme on June 26, 2016
Link to broadcast here [Swati Dhingra brought in to the interview 08:37]

Related publications
Full series of CEP Brexit Analyses can be seen here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Week

The EU isn't snookering Britain. Britain is hoodwinking the EU

Britain never joined the euro currency union, freeing it of all sorts of complicated policy commitments that the rest of the EU is obliged to abide by. But despite staying on the pound, Britain still has full access to Europe's ''single market''. Essentially, this single market allows all EU member countries to move goods, services, capital, and people between each other without barrier, tax, or tariff. ''That single market is about half a billion people,'' [John] Van Reenen said. It's an open question just how much benefit national economies derive from being able to participate in this sort of free trade. But they clearly derive some benefit. And Van Reenen's group thinks it's a lot.

This article was published online by The Week on June 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the final assessment, John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, June 2016

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera

Transcript: Norman Lamont on the Brexit and the EU

A study by the London School of Economics found that BREXIT could lead to a fall in national income equivalent to that of the financial crash of 2008. Facts?

This article appeared on Al Jazeera on 21 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

EU referendum: UK's top economic experts issue joint warning against Brexit

Challenging Leave campaign claims that Britain’s economy would not suffer from Brexit, the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) said that “almost all of those who have looked seriously at this issue” were predicting lower real wages in event of Brexit, higher prices for goods and services, higher borrowing costs and higher unemployment.

This article appeared in the Independnent on 21 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Neue Zurcher Zeitung

Brexit-Szenarien: Was der Brexit fur die EU-Wirtschaft bedeuten wurde

Relevant studies, among other things by the Bertelsmann Foundation in collaboration with the Ifo Institute, the Center for economic performance at the London School of Economics and the rating agency Standard & Poor's, come in the tendency to similar results: the economic consequences would be for the EU-27 is less severe than for Britain itself, but on balance but negative.

This article was published online by Neue Zurcher Zeitung (Germany) on June 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Cambridgeshire

Brian Bell interview

Brian Bell from CEP discusses report that shows foreigners do not commit any more crimes than the rest of the population.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Cambridgeshire on 7 June 2016. Link

Related Links
Brian Bell webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 07/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Reader's Digest

5 Scientific Reasons to Feel Optimistic on a Rainy Day

Your perception of the weather is what brings about negative feelings, the study authors suspect. “If it is sunny every day you get used to it and the sunshine doesn’t make you any happier,” Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics, said to the Telegraph

This article appeared in Reader's Digest on 6 June 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Belfast News Letter

Brexit campaign falls on poor grasp 'basic facts' says report

Economics experts have blasted key assumptions underpinning the Brexit campaign's financial arguments in favour of leaving the EU. The report by the London School of Economics and Political Science's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) has been seized on by the Remain campaign to back their warnings that exiting the EU is too dangerous.

This article was published online by Belfast News Letter on June 1, 2016
Read more: ...

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.06, May 2016
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

lenabellina blog

That'll do, chimps

The second programme I heard and was inspired by was this week's Radio 4 'All in the Mind'. The key messages here also chimed with much of my own thinking about the purpose of education, the pressures created by assessment in schools and the need to focus on wellbeing in schools. The programme included a discussion around tests and exams and the mental health of children which involved Lord Layard from The London School of Economics, Dr Berry Billingsley, Associate Professor of Science Education and Reading University and her colleague Tim Williams who is a clinical and educational psychologist. ... Lord Richard Layard who directs the Wellbeing Programme at the London School of Economics then spoke about a project called 'Healthy Mind' which is working with 30 schools around London to try and get data in relation to this issue. Hs opening statement: ''We are trying to help people learn how to live and not just how to pass exams.''

This article was published online on the lenabellina blog on May 29, 2016
Link to article here

Related broadcast
The full BBC Radio 4 'All in the Mind' Episode can be found here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

How do ‘Economists for Brexit' manage to defy the laws of gravity?

The possibility of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) has generated an unusual degree of consensus among economists. Acrimony and rancour surrounded debates around austerity and joining the euro, but analysis from the Bank of England to the OECD to academia has all concluded that Brexit would make us economically worse off. The disagreement is mainly over the degree of impoverishment (for example, Dhingra et al, 2016a; OECD, 2016; HM Treasury, 2016; PWC, 2016; NIESR, 2016). Perhaps the one exception is the recent and much publicised work of 'Economists for Brexit' (2016). Since any coherent economic case for leaving the EU was been largely 'missing in action', it is refreshing to get some clarity over the Leave campaign's vision of the UK's post-Brexit economic arrangements. The only modelling details provided by Economists for Brexit come from Professor Patrick Minford of Cardiff University (Minford, 2015; 2016; Minford et al, 2016). He argues that Brexit will raise the UK's welfare by 4% as a result of increased trade.

This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on May 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.06, May 2016
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta Online

What's at stake in the UK's EU vote

The claim, however, that migration is a drain on the welfare state is false. EU migrants for the most part move to Britain to work, and a study by the London School of Economics has shown that they are net contribu¬tors to the economy as a result of the taxes they pay.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta Online on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

'Turn our backs on the EU and risk losing hundreds of thousands of jobs'

When this is being backed up by the International Monetary Fund, the OECD, the London School of Economics, eight former US Treasury secretaries, the President of the United States of America, businesses big and small, every one of our allies and trading partners and the Governor of the Bank of England, it isn’t a conspiracy but a consensus.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC 6 o'clock News

BBC 1

John Van Reenen interviewed about migration figures

This programme was broadcast on 19 May 2016 (no link available)

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Project Syndicate

The economic consequences of Brexit

The London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance calculates that the long-term costs to Britain of lower trade with the EU could be as high as 9.5% of GDP, while the fall in foreign investment could cost 3.4% of GDP or more. Those costs alone dwarf the potential gains from Brexit. Britain's net contribution to the EU budget amounted to only 0.35% of GDP last year, and scrapping EU regulation would bring limited benefits, because the UK's labor and product markets are already among the freest in the world.

This article was published online by Project Syndicate on May 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

CEP State of Working Britain blog

SWOB 10: EU-turn if you want to. Brexit and immigration

State of Working Britain blog, article posted by Jonathan Wadsworth
Immigration has for some years been the uppermost worry among the issues thought to be facing Britain in many opinion polls so it - or rather people's perceptions of its extent and its effects - is almost certainly one of the key issues that will influence the upcoming vote on whether to stay or remain in the EU. A new report from the CEP looks into this. Workers have had a rough ride in recent times. Real (inflation adjusted) wages fell by around 10% in the years after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing austerity. Such a sustained fall in pay is unprecedented in British post-war history.

This article was posted online in the CEP State of Working Britain blog on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
The State of Working Britain blog webpage


News Posted: 11/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

CEP State of Working Britain blog

SWOB 10: EU-turn if you want to. Brexit and immigration

State of Working Britain blog, article posted by Jonathan Wadsworth
Immigration has for some years been the uppermost worry among the issues thought to be facing Britain in many opinion polls so it - or rather people's perceptions of its extent and its effects - is almost certainly one of the key issues that will influence the upcoming vote on whether to stay or remain in the EU. A new report from the CEP looks into this. Workers have had a rough ride in recent times. Real (inflation adjusted) wages fell by around 10% in the years after the global financial crisis of 2008 and the ensuing austerity. Such a sustained fall in pay is unprecedented in British post-war history.

This article was posted online in the CEP State of Working Britain blog on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
The State of Working Britain blog webpage


News Posted: 11/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement (TES)

'Phonics, decoding and whole-word recognition are a waste of time unless you then develop children as real readers'

Learning to decipher the squiggles on the page well enough to pass the key stage 1 Sats does not make you a reader, says author Susan Elkin
Teaching reading in itself is pointless. All the phonics, decoding skills and whole-word recognition in the world are a waste of time unless you then develop children as real readers. ... The trouble with learning the mechanics - of almost anything - is that if you don't immediately and continuously apply what you've learned, you lose the skills. That is probably why The Centre for Economic Performance recently reported that by the age of 11, having been exposed to phonics at an earlier age makes no difference to a child's reading. It also explains the alarming recent observation from the University of Sheffield that many undergraduates are unable to read whole books. We are failing to develop readers.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement (TES) on May 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Post

Leaving the European Union could cost every British family a month's pay, new report says

Less than two months before Britain's historic vote over whether to remain in the European Union, voters remain deeply divided over the decision. But among economists, there is little question that a so-called Brexit would be costly. The latest analysis was released Wednesday morning by the influential Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. It estimated the United Kingdom's economy would be 3 percent smaller in 2020 if Britain leaves the E.U., damaging consumer confidence, discouraging business investment and unleashing a new era of uncertainty in the financial center of Europe. The OECD's estimates echo recent analysis by the U.K. Treasury and the London School of Economics on the cost of Brexit. Even the think tank Open Europe, which has been more skeptical of the benefits of the E.U., has forecast a 2.2 percent hit to the U.K. economy by 2030 in its worst-case scenario.

This article was published by The Washington Post on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

OECD's Gurria-No Economic Upside for UK from Brexit

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Wednesday that he saw no potential benefits for the British economy if voters decide to leave the European Union at a referendum in June. Angel Gurria said a new OECD report showed a hit to British economic growth under all scenarios if the country left the EU compared with a decision to stay in the bloc. ''The best outcome is still worse than remaining and the worst outcomes are very bad indeed,'' he said in a speech at the London School of Economics as the OECD published its report on the impact of a so-called Brexit.

This article was published online by The New York Times on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

A Treasury analysis suggests the costs of Brexit would be high

THERE is much dispute in the Brexit debate over the economic effects of leaving the EU. Even Brexiteers accept that there would be some short-term costs from uncertainty, but they claim that in the long run Britain could still be better off. Most objective economic studies disagree, finding that there would be long-term costs as well. On April 18th the Treasury weighed in with a 200-page analysis. Its conclusion is that they will be high: the central estimate touted by George Osborne, the chancellor, is that GDP may be 6.2% lower than it would otherwise have been by 2030, an annual cost that he reckons works out at some £4,300 ($6,000) per household. ... The Treasury's numbers are bigger than those in some other recent studies, but that is mainly because they include the dynamic effects on productivity. A similar dynamic study by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics (LSE), came up with even bigger losses. To the disgust of Brexiteers, the Treasury agrees with the Bank of England that the benefits of EU membership considerably outweigh the costs. And it dismisses the possibility of a boost from less regulation in a post-Brexit world by pointing out that Britain is relatively lightly regulated already.

This article was published by The Economist on April 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

Minimum wage raised, critics downplay effect

The new increased amount compares with an 8.50 euro minimum wage rate in Germany and almost 9.70 euros in France. In Britain, where unemployment is relatively low at around 5%, large wage inequalities persist and London School of Economics professor Alan Manning described the NLW as “more symbolic” than anything else. “It’s significant but I don’t think one should exaggerate its significance,” he said.

This article appeared in The Gulf Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Also in:
The Gulf Today
Jamaica Observer

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

Minimum wage raised, critics downplay effect

The new increased amount compares with an 8.50 euro minimum wage rate in Germany and almost 9.70 euros in France. In Britain, where unemployment is relatively low at around 5%, large wage inequalities persist and London School of Economics professor Alan Manning described the NLW as “more symbolic” than anything else. “It’s significant but I don’t think one should exaggerate its significance,” he said.

This article appeared in The Gulf Times on 2 April 2016. Link to article

Also in:
The Gulf Today
Jamaica Observer

Related Publications
Minimum wages: the economics and the politics, Alan Manning. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Caledonian Trust PLC

Half yearly Report

In phase three, after the negotiated settlement, the economic effects are the subject of wide and varying analysis and speculation, based largely on the eventual outcome of the settlement. Put simply, there are two main variables: what will the settlement be and what are the effects of such a settlement? Most economic studies report that Brexit would damage the UK economy. Three recent reports from Centre for Economic Performance, the CBI/PWC and Oxford Economics all consider that in the worst case scenario the long-term effects would average about minus £4,000 per annum per household, while the best outcome would vary from minus £680 to plus £70. Martin Wolf, associate editor and chief economic commentator of the FT, forthright as usual, says: ''A vote for Brexit is a leap into the abyss''. UK Industry and Financial ''establishment'' figures are prominent amongst those predicting an unfavourable outcome for Brexit.

This Report was published by the Caledonian Trust PLC on March 31, 2016
Link to the Report here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Universities and economic growth go together

Some say of newer institutions that more means less, but that's not true - more universities mean a larger economy. ... A study from the London School of Economics, ''The economic impact of universities: evidence from across the globe'', aims to do just this, assessing the link between growth in university numbers and gross domestic product per capita between 1950 and 2010, using data on 15,000 universities in 78 countries. The conclusion of authors Anna Valero and John Van Reenen is that doubling the number of universities per capita is associated with over 4 per cent higher GDP per capita within the region, and that this also ''spills over'' to neighbouring regions.

This article was published online by The Times Higher Education on March 31, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Anna Valero webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy Blog

The question is not whether Brexit will cost the UK in economic terms but how much

For over two years, a research team at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) has been studying the likely impact of the UK leaving the European Union. Their latest report focuses on the impact of 'Brexit' through changing trade patterns. Under 'optimistic' assumptions, there is a fall in national income of 1.3 per cent (about £850 per household). Under 'pessimistic' assumptions, this doubles to 2.6 per cent. When the dynamic effects of higher trade costs on productivity are included, the cost may rise to between 6.3 per cent and 9.5 per cent in the long run

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on March 21, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards,Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.02, March 2016
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

De Tijd (Belgium)

'We zijn verplicht vluchtelingen te helpen ondanks kosten'

'We are required to help refugees despite costs'
De opvang van de vluchtelingen zal de Europese welvaartsstaten niet onder druk zetten. Dat stellen twee topprofessoren in het onderzoek naar migratie, Klaus Zimmermann en Alan Manning, in een lezing in Antwerpen.
The refugees will not put pressure on the European welfare States. Two top-level professors in research into migration, Klaus Zimmermann and Alan Manning, in a lecture in Antwerp. The professors advocate legal access to the EU.

This article was published online by De Tijd (Belgium)
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

De Tijd (Belgium)

'We zijn verplicht vluchtelingen te helpen ondanks kosten'

'We are required to help refugees despite costs'
De opvang van de vluchtelingen zal de Europese welvaartsstaten niet onder druk zetten. Dat stellen twee topprofessoren in het onderzoek naar migratie, Klaus Zimmermann en Alan Manning, in een lezing in Antwerpen.
The refugees will not put pressure on the European welfare States. Two top-level professors in research into migration, Klaus Zimmermann and Alan Manning, in a lecture in Antwerp. The professors advocate legal access to the EU.

This article was published online by De Tijd (Belgium)
Link to article here

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Community Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service Radio - The Inquiry

Why are wages so low?

John Van Reenen interviewed, giving his expert opinion on falling income levels.

This interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service programme 'The Inquiry' on March 8, 2016
Link to interview here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

U.S. News and World Report

Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Life after Brexit: the UK's options outside the EU

Article by Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson
In June, UK voters will decide whether to remain part of the EU. This column explores the UK's options if a majority votes in favour of Brexit. One possibility is for the UK, like Norway, to join the European Economic Area and thereby retain access to the European Single Market. An alternative would be to negotiate bilateral treaties with the EU, as Switzerland has done. All options, however, involve a trade-off between political sovereignty and economic benefits.

This article was published online by the Vox blog on March 4, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after BREXIT: What are the UK's options outside the European Union, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 20016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

The key to beating a midlife crisis? Don't worry about being happy

Professor Paul Dolan, a specialist in behavioural science at LSE, says there is currently too much emphasis placed upon traditional self-improvement methods, such as weight loss and career ambition, and too little on simple pleasures. "Don't pay attention to how happy things make you," Dolan told The Observer. "Instead, find things which make you feel good, and do more of them. A long-term sustainable impact on your life can be achieved, but not by sitting about thinking if only I was slimmer, fitter, richer, then I would be happier. It's not going to happen, so you'll still be miserable."

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on 8 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness by Design: Finding Pleasure and Purpose in Everyday Life Paul Dolan, 2014

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

More buyers wanted

Yet for all the ministerial airmiles and silver goblets, the country’s exports have remained fairly flat, and have been getting worse since 2012, certainly compared with those of the other big rich economies in the G7. The value of Britain’s exports fell by 1.5% in 2014 from 2013—the only G7 country where exports dropped—and last year’s figures were hardly inspiring, with a 1.5% fall in the three months to November compared with a year earlier. “It has been a disappointment, especially after the devaluation of sterling in 2008-09,” says John Van Reenen, head of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 5 February 2016. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage
News Posted: 05/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Dallas Healthcare Daily

Dallas Regional Chamber Meeting Shines A Light On Healthcare Costs

The report was prepared by researchers at Yale University, the University of Pennsylvania, Carnegie Mellon University, and the Centre for Economic Performance. It is among the first to analyse a database of private insurance claims, a fact that it qualifies as “an initial foray into understanding the cross sectional variation in healthcare spending”.

This article appeared in Dallas Healthcare Daily. Link to article

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured' Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Grocer

Sunday trading: what's the case for longer hours?

Results from the Centre for Economic Performance study in March 2015 suggest deregulation of Sunday trading laws has a considerable positive impact on employment, which stems from new firms being able to enter the market and job creation in existing firms, too. It also found that deregulation increased expenditure as a whole.

This article was published in The Grocer on January 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Evaluating the Impact of Sunday Trading Deregulation', Christos Genakos and Svetoslav Danchev, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1336, March 2015

Related links
Christos Genakos webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Economists' forecasts: Policies will not stop house price rises

Government initiatives to support home ownership and build new houses will fail to have any real impact in 2016, with UK property prices expected to keep climbing.

John Van Reenen, Director, Centre for Economic Performance:
As noted above they are simply stoking up demand whereas the problem is one of supply.

This article was published by The Financial Times on January 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research by Christian Hilber, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses No.33, April 2015

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Subsidies encourage housebuilding on floodplains, report finds

The UK taxpayer is left to pick up the cost of flooding because housebuilders do not contribute enough when building homes, giving them an incentive to build on floodplains, according to research. Flooding costs between 2 and 8 per cent of an area's economic activity in the year after a flood, the research for the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance found.

This article was published by The Financial Times on January 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Flooded Cities', Adriana Kocornik-Mina, Thomas K.J. McDermott, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1398, December 2015

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Subsidies encourage housebuilding on floodplains, report finds

The UK taxpayer is left to pick up the cost of flooding because housebuilders do not contribute enough when building homes, giving them an incentive to build on floodplains, according to research. Flooding costs between 2 and 8 per cent of an area's economic activity in the year after a flood, the research for the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance found.

This article was published by The Financial Times on January 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Flooded Cities', Adriana Kocornik-Mina, Thomas K.J. McDermott, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1398, December 2015

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Western Mail (Cardiff)

These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Western Mail (Cardiff)

These boots were made for walking

...gym membership for some good walking shoes. New research from the London School of Economics and Political ...

This article was published by the Western Mail (Cardiff) on December 21, 2015
[No link available.]

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Modern Healthcare

Data suggest hospital consolidation drives higher prices for privately insured

Commercial health plans that cover workplace benefits for millions of Americans pay higher prices to hospitals that have little or no competition, according to a new study that raises questions about how to slow U.S. health spending amid a wave of consolidation. In a study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, researchers analyzed health spending across multiple U.S. markets and compared the numbers for Medicare with claims data for 88 million patients with employer-sponsored health insurance.

This article was published online by Modern Healthcare on December 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Policy Network

Mind the gap: capital and labour in the digital economy

A recent study by Guy Michaels and Georg Graetz shows that robots might not drive people out of work. Instead they raise productivity which reduces the prices of goods and services. Lower prices increase demand to which firms react by hiring new workers. Although robots might not destroy jobs overall, there are strong indications that technology profoundly changes the structure of labour markets.

This article was published online by Policy Network on December 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

European Politics and Policy Blog

Debunking the myths about British science after an EU exit

“Our current assessment is that leaving the EU would be likely to impose substantial costs on the UK economy and would be a very risky gamble.” Analysis by economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)

This article appeared in the European Politics and Policy Blog on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How many calories can YOU burn by walking between subway stations?

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by the MailOnline on November 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Evening Standard

Let's build on green belt to ease squeeze on commuters

Real house prices — but not real incomes — have grown faster in the UK over the last 40 years than in any other developed country, according to the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Albawaba Business

World Innovation Summit for Health partner up with World Innovation Summit for Education

WISH has also established the Mental Health and Well-being in Children Forum, chaired by Professor the Lord Richard Layard, Wellbeing Program Director at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE). The Forum explored the role of education in well-being as part of its remit to produce evidence-based reports and provide recommendations for policymakers at the second WISH Summit that took place in February 2015 in Qatar.

This article was published online by Albawaba.com on November 8, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times of India

Brisk walking better way to lose weight than gymming

Regular, brisk walking may be a more effective method for weight loss than going to the gym, according to research. A study by the London School of Economics found that those who engaged in regular, brisk walking for longer than half an hour had lower Body Mass Indexes (BMI) and smaller waists than those who did other exercise such as going the gym or playing football or rugby. The results were particularly true for women, people over 50 and those on low incomes. Dr Grace Lordan, who led the study said, "The results thus provide an argument for a campaign to promote walking."

This article appeared in the Times of India on 8 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Ekonomi (Sweden)

Jobben som försvann bäddade för nya jobb

Several recently published studies suggests that the fear of the future robotiseringen is unfounded. Scientists Georg Graetz and Guy Michael from Uppsala University and the London School of Economics shows in a recently published and internationally acclaimed report, "Robots at Work", that robotiseringen brings higher wages and economic growth which in turn generate as many jobs as before. Graetz, Michael believes rather that robotiseringen is similar to that of the railway and highway construction would have on the economy.

This article appeared in Ekonomi (Sweden) on 8 November 2015 Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

NYSE Post

Walking 'more beneficial' to keeping weight down than visiting the gym

A study from the London School of Economics and Political Science found that people may benefit more from "high impact" walking than other activities, such as going to the gym.

This article apperaed in NYSE Post on 4 November 2015. Link to article

Also in:
Dallas Sun
Hometown News Group
Beat 102-103
Counsel and Heal
WKBW-TV - Online
Classic 105
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Gloucestershire

News

Grace Lordan's research on walking being better for weight loss than the gym mentioned.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Gloucestshire on 4 November 2015. Link

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mirror Online

Want to lose weight but hate the gym? We have some VERY good news

Study leader Dr Grace Lordan compared exercises that raise the heart rate and causes sweating – such as brisk walking, swimming, cycling, gym workouts, dancing, running, jogging, football, rugby and squash. And the study found those taking a half hour stroll had lowest body mass index and smaller waists.

This article apperaed in Mirror Online on 3 November 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Insider (Scotland)

Report: Immigration

''Immediately after the General Election in May this year, the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) was commissioned by the Conservative government to examine Tier 2 of the Points-Based System,'' ... The MAC indicated in August that there appeared to be a ''good case'' for increasing it, because eit was calculated in 2009 when lower-skilled jobs were eligible for sponsorship. However, chair of the MAC Professor David Metcalf has said salary levels should not be considered in isolation.

This article was published in the Business Insider (Scotland) magazine in November 2015
Link to magazine here (pp53-54)

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

Recetas contra la desigualdad: renta básica y subir el salario mínimo

Ciudadanos cree que el problema es "un sistema de contratación perverso y un modelo económico que no funciona", ha defendido Luis Garicano, responsable del programa económico del partido de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in El Pais on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadăos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista ŕ AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadăos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista ŕ AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadăos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista ŕ AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

BBC World News

Joan Costa Font comments on the elections in Catalonia

This interview was broadcast on BBC World Service on 27 September 2015 Link

Also on:
National Public Radio Link

Related Links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Razon

Colores primaries

Pero, a la hora de la verdad, Sala i Martin se ha negado a debatir públicamente con Luis Garicano, otro peso pesado, catedrático de la London School of Economics. Lo peor ha sido los decepcionantes argumentos que ha expuesto para su negativa, más ad hominem que ad rem, mezclados con expresiones clasistas de desprecio como matones de barrio.
But, when it comes to the truth, Sala i Martin has refused to discuss publicly with Luis Garicano, another heavyweight, Professor at the London School of Economics. The worst has been disappointing arguments that has exposed its refusal, more ad hominem that ad rem, mixed with class expressions of contempt as neighborhood thugs.

This article appeared in La Razson on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth webpage webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Inquiry looks at mobile phones' effect on how children behave

A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning phones from the classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Women CEOs in social enterprises earn 29% less than their male counterparts

Research finds that women CEOs in social enterprises earn significantly less than their male counterparts. But it also finds that women are happier with their jobs. Saul Estrin, Ute Stephan and Suncica Vuji unpick the paradox.

This article appeared in the LSE British Politics and Policy blog. Link to article

Related publications Do women earn less even as social entrepreneurs? Saul Estrin, Ute Stephan and Suncica Vuji, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1313, November 2014

Related links
Saul Estrin webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Gloucestershire

News

...the role of smart phones in the classroom its after research from the London school of economics suggested exam results improve in schools...

This broadcast was made by BBC Radio Glouchestershire on September 3, 2015
Link to interview here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Herald Sun (Australia)

Male teacher drought may hurt boys

THERE'S plenty to be said for life as a primary school teacher: ... A study by the London School of Economics found male students were more ...

This article was published by The Herald Sun (Australia) on August 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Students' Perceptions of Teacher Biases: Experimental Economics in Schools' by Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 133, January 2012
Pupils' progress: how children's perceptions influence their efforts, Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2011/2012

Related links
Amine Ouazad webpage
Amine Ouazad CEP publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
News Posted: 16/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Agerpres.ro (Romania)

RECORDURI: Cea mai fericita tara din lume

Records: the happiest country in the world
On April 24, 2015, the 2015 Edition of the happiness of the world (World Happiness Report) was published. The work includes a happiness measure, taking into account 158 countries for 2012-2014. ... The report on the world's happiness is coordinated by Professor John Helliwell University of British Colombia, Lord Richard Layard, director of welfare at the London School of Economics, and Professor Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Colombia University, U.S., and Adviser to the UN Secretary-General.

This article was published online by Agerpres.ro (Romania) on August 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2015', John F Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN).
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Cameron wants wage rises to replace benefits

Iain Duncan Smith, the welfare secretary, has exhorted companies to ''pay their full share'' of workers' remuneration rather than leaving it to the state to prop up incomes through tax credits. Professor Steve Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics said there was no evidence demonstrating that social security payments to low-wage workers enabled companies to pay people less.

The article was printed by The Financial Times on June 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Real Wages and Living Standards, Stephen Machin, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
CEP Real Wages Updates research series by David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin webpage

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

The secret of happiness (it's not what you think)

Money, as the song lyric has it, can't buy you love - or happiness. Happiness, as Richard Layard's research shows, depends much more on the quality of our personal relationships than on our income. In many ways, the most important external factor in well-being is whether we feel this closeness.

This article was published by the Huffington Post on June 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Global Apollo programme seeks to make clean energy cheaper than coal

Lord Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics and member of the Apollo group, said it was barely believable that the world only spent 2% of its R&D money on its ''most pressing problem'' of climate change and clean energy. He said: ''We do not think this problem can be conquered unless we reduce the cost of renewable energy below the cost of dirty energy.''

This article was published online by the Guardian on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

News

Interview with Lord Layard regarding launch of the 'Apollo' programme to make renewables cheaper than fossil fuels.

The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service News on June 2, 2015
[No link available.]

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

What would you pay to be happy?

Richard Layard, a British social economist and associate of Kahneman, found himself at the top table of Britain's New Labour government when it took power in 1997. The press gave him the title Happiness Tsar, and his 2005 book, Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, remains a hugely influential international bestseller.

This article was published by The Guardian on May 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
News Posted: 10/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Rent controls that aren't

Both labour and its opponents make too much of a new policy
Labour made two housing policy commitments over the weekend, only one of which was interesting. The uninteresting one was the promise to cut stamp duty for first-time buyers. That just aligns Labour with the coalition government in a silly rivalry for measures that help aspiring homeowners with one hand while pulling their goal out of reach with the other. In a supply-constrained market, the effect of demand subsidies (which all of these are) is just to drive up the price. That point is made in the best short guide to UK housing policy, a new election briefing from the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published by The Financial Times on April 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'UK Housing and Planning Policies: the evidence from economic research', Christian Hilber, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.33, April 2015
CEP #ElectionEconomics video interview with Christian Hilber on 'Housing' - view here

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre website

News Posted: 27/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mirror

General Election 2015: Three charts that expose the flaws in Cameron's 'economic recovery'

It looks good for the Tories, the economy is recovering and employment is up. BUT, as an LSE economist put it, ''When viewed over the longer term, the state of the UK economy is not pretty''. ... Why is this? Two reasons: there's been an 8-10 percent fall in real wages since the recession and productivity has fallen. As Professor John Van Reenen points out, ''UK output per hour is now about 30 per cent lower than in the US, Germany and France''.

This article was published by The Daily Mirror on March 31, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Austerity: Growth Costs and Post-Election Plans, John Van Reenen, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015.
Regarding public service spending, the UK electorate faces real choices this election, John Van Reenen, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, March 30, 2015.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 31/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian - Economics blog

Why falling inflation is a false pretext for keeping wages low

According to Bank of England, earnings should be rising by 4 percent a year, but they are struggling to get above 2 percent - it is time the government and employers tilted wages in favour of labour.
There was a time, as the LSE economist Alan Manning notes in his contribution to a collection of essays published by the Resolution Foundation when year after year of falling real wages would not have been tolerated. ''Forty years ago an improving labour market and prices rising faster than wages would have led trade unions to march into the boardroom demanding higher wages and threatening strike action if those demands were not met. Pretty soon, union leaders would have been invited round to No 10 for beer and sandwiches to be cajoled into wage moderation to prevent and inflationary spiral taking hold. A lot has changed in the past 40 years.''

This article was published by The Guardian - Economics blog on March 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Manning, A. (2015) Shifting the Balance of Power: workers, employers and wages over the next parliament, in Gavin Kelly and Conor D'Arcy (Eds) (2015) Securing a Pay Rise: the path back to shared wage growth, Resolution Foundation

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Community Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

Related links
Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

Related links
Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

Adam Smith Institute blog

Peer effects: they exist but they're not very big

A paper newly published in the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics tests the size of these effects on achievement by looking at the random component of sorting that occurs when most British children transition from primary to secondary school at age 11. 'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, finds that although having brighter peers raises someone's grades a bit, the effect size is very small.

This article was published in the Adam Smith Institute blog on February 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, in progress
Details here
Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England, by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.63, May 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

Adam Smith Institute blog

Peer effects: they exist but they're not very big

A paper newly published in the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics tests the size of these effects on achievement by looking at the random component of sorting that occurs when most British children transition from primary to secondary school at age 11. 'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, finds that although having brighter peers raises someone's grades a bit, the effect size is very small.

This article was published in the Adam Smith Institute blog on February 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, in progress
Details here
Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England, by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.63, May 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

European Business Review

A Greek idea: 'Let the Germans finally pay their World War 2 debts!'

According to the new Greek government, Germany has an enormous unpaid account in Greece. The Germans never paid anything for the murdering and plundering in the Second World War. The 'Zwangsanleihe', an extorted loan of half a billion Reichsmark, was never paid back. This claim only is worth more than 11 billion Euros. May be time for an adjustment? The historian Albrecht Ritschl of the London School of Economics (LSE) and Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz share the opinion that such an adjustment is not a weird idea.

This article was published online by The European Business Review on February 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial

La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
Link here

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

World Economic Forum

How to conduct social science

[Joshua] Angrist, the Ford Professor of Economics, has long been one of the leading advocates of research that uses ''ceteris paribus'' [other things being equal] principles. Now, along with Jorn-Steffen Pischke of the London School of Economics, Angrist has written a book on the subject for a general audience, Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect, published later this month by Princeton University Press.

This article was published online by the World Economic Forum blog on December 1, 2014
Link to article here.

Related publications
Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke, Princeton University Press, December 2014
Details

Related links
Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

O Globo Online - blog

Homens ficam mais altos em democracia do que em regime comunista

Men are taller in a democracy than if grown up in a communist regime
''Men who grow up in a democracy tend to be taller than those who have lived their first 20 years of life under a Communist regime.'' The assertion may seem strange to those who read. But this is one of the findings of a survey conducted by political economists at the London School of Economics (LSE), Joan Costa-Font and Lucia Kossarova.

This article was published by the blog O Globo online on November 20, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and videos
'Anthropometric Dividends of Czechoslovakia's break up' by Dr Joan Costa-i-Font and Dr Lucia Kossarova, is available here
'Joan Costa-i-Font: The Link between Democracy and Height'. Video link here

Related links
Joan Costa-i-Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

Mail Online UK

High speed rail 'tsar' to spark fresh controversy with new HS2 route and stations recommendations

A panel of academic experts told the Treasury select committee that the report overstated the benefits by six to eight times. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who is to give evidence to the committee on Tuesday, said findings used a procedure that was 'essentially made up'.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on October 24, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
HS2: assessing the costs and benefits Henry Overman, February 2012 Paper No' CEPCP361 in CentrePiece Vol. 16 Issue. 3 Winter

Related Links
Henry Overman webpage
SERC webpage
Globalisation webpage
News Posted: 24/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

DiarioLibre.com

Es la 'crisis de la mediana edad' solo una excusa?

Is the mid-life crisis just an excuse?
However, a study published earlier this year found that an average decrease of subjective happiness, or welfare as described by economists in middle age, between 40 and 42 years occurs. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, coauthor of the longitudinal research conducted in three countries, said that this confirms previous studies showing a relationship between age and the use of antidepressants. ...
Dr. Hannes Schwandt, Princeton University, believes midlife, unlike childhood and old age, has not been investigated. Last year, he published the research focused on the ''unfulfilled expectations''. It was found that young people are optimistic perhaps even ''too optimistic'' - while those in their forties and fifties feel repentance before they feel at peace with themselves in older age. ''Maybe people of middle age can learn from the elderly, who are less regretful and more accepting'' he suggests. ...
Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness by Design believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure to feel truly happy. In a future article, argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crisis centers on our assessments of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences. In other words, the stories we tell ourselves about what makes us happy, which a prestigious job is good- even depress us our daily experience of this work.

This article was published online by DiarioLibre.com on October 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
Happiness by Design: Finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, Paul Dolan, Allen Lane, August 2014, ISBN 9780241003107 Details

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Hannes Schwandt webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

DiarioLibre.com

Es la 'crisis de la mediana edad' solo una excusa?

Is the mid-life crisis just an excuse?
However, a study published earlier this year found that an average decrease of subjective happiness, or welfare as described by economists in middle age, between 40 and 42 years occurs. Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee, coauthor of the longitudinal research conducted in three countries, said that this confirms previous studies showing a relationship between age and the use of antidepressants. ...
Dr. Hannes Schwandt, Princeton University, believes midlife, unlike childhood and old age, has not been investigated. Last year, he published the research focused on the ''unfulfilled expectations''. It was found that young people are optimistic perhaps even ''too optimistic'' - while those in their forties and fifties feel repentance before they feel at peace with themselves in older age. ''Maybe people of middle age can learn from the elderly, who are less regretful and more accepting'' he suggests. ...
Paul Dolan, professor of behavioral science at the London School of Economics and author of Happiness by Design believes we need a mix of purpose and pleasure to feel truly happy. In a future article, argues that much of the economic literature on midlife crisis centers on our assessments of what makes us happy rather than our actual experiences. In other words, the stories we tell ourselves about what makes us happy, which a prestigious job is good- even depress us our daily experience of this work.

This article was published online by DiarioLibre.com on October 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013
Happiness by Design: Finding pleasure and purpose in everyday life, Paul Dolan, Allen Lane, August 2014, ISBN 9780241003107 Details

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Hannes Schwandt webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Clarin

No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Clarin

No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

World Economic Forum

Why busts hurt more than booms help

Article by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Michael I. Norton
We find evidence that the life satisfaction of individuals is between two and eight times more sensitive to negative growth as compared to positive economic growth. People do not psychologically benefit from expansions nearly as much as they suffer from recessions. These results suggest that policymakers seeking to raise wellbeing should focus more on preventing busts than inculcating booms. Our results also offer an explanation for why increases in GDP do not always pay off in increases in happiness - the modest happiness gains accrued over years of growth can be wiped out by just a single year of contraction.

This article was published online by the World Economic Forum on October 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and films
The untold story of the recession: the psychological cost
The psychological cost of a few years of recession can wipe out the benefits of many years of growth. Jan-Emmanuel De Neve of the Centre for Economic Performance explains his latest research on the effect of the recent recession on people's wellbeing.
View here.

'Individual Experience of Positive and Negative Growth is Asymmetric: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data', Femke De Keulenaer, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Georgios Kavetsos, Michael I. Norton, Bert Van Landeghem and George W. Ward, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1304, October 2014


Related links
Jan-Emmanuel De Neve webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Le Plus

Des ados partent faire le djihad en Syrie : comme le suicide, un comportement de fuite

Some researchers have studied the characteristics of happy people. They identified six factors which only concern the economy (unemployment), the others being: divorce rate, the level of trust between the people, the number of participants in non-religious organizations, the number of believers and the quality of government. (Reference: Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2005).

This article was published by Le Plus on October 8, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
News Posted: 08/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

The McKinsey Quarterly

Why management matters for productivity

Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 19/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 19/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

EurAsia Review

Is there a 'taste for discrimination'? - Analysis

Article by Alex Bryson and Arnaud Chevalier
This column presents evidence from a new test of taste-based discrimination. Examining hiring decisions in the English Fantasy Premier League, the authors do not find that employers discriminate based on race. One explanation for this is that good productivity measures minimise the opportunities for statistical discrimination, which according to studies drives the racial difference in market outcomes.

This article was published online by the EurAsian Review on August 18, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'What happens when employers are free to discriminate? Evidence from the English Barclays Premier Fantasy Football League', Alex Bryson and Arnaud Chevalier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1283, July 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Why UK house prices have grown faster than anywhere else

House prices have grown faster in England since late 1973 than almost all other European countries. So what is going on? The problem is clearly that there is too little supply, given the demand and the growing population. But why? There are two possible kinds of constraints. The first are regulatory: ... The second kind are natural and physical: a scarcity of land, for example, or an uneven topography that makes it very hard to build. So which of the two factors are most important in the case of the UK? And what would happen to prices in their absence? Christian A. L. Hilber of the London School of Economics and Wouter Vermeulen of the CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis have just produced a dispassionate analysis of the problem, which will be published shortly in the Economic Journal.

This article was published by The Telegraph on August 5, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England', Christian A.L. Hilber and Wouter Vermeulen, SERC Discussion Paper No.119, September 2012 (revised 2014).

Related links
Christian Hilber webpage
SERC website

News Posted: 05/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

LSE News online

Internet speed closely linked to property values

Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
Link to press release here

Related publications
'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
SERC website

News Posted: 31/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Argentina

Plan Terapia para Todos: la salud mental de los economistas y las series policiales de Film and Arts

''En los paises ricos, las enfermedades mentales son el 38 percent de todas las enfermedades; y el porcentaje trepa a 50 percent en la poblacion trabajadora'', dice Richard Layard, economista de la London School of Economics, que promueve en Inglaterra algo asi como un plan de Terapia para Todos. Layard cuenta, en un libro escrito junto al psicologo David Clark, que los costos de un programa a gran escala de terapias cognitivo-conductuales cortas - 16 sesiones - ''basadas en evidencia con resultados reales'' son mucho menores a los costos que implican las dolencias emocionales en terminos de dias no trabajados, desmotivacion, etcetera.

This article was published online by Yahoo! Argentina on July 25, 2014
Link to article here

See also
Yahoo! En Espanol
Yahoo! Colombia
La Nacion
Yahoo! Mexico

Related Publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies, Richard Layard and David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
David Clark webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Dagen

Debattinnlegget er skrevet av Kåre Eriksen, kommunikasjonsrådgiver i Digni

Men det finnes grenser. Professor Richard Layard ved London School of Economics har funnet ut at tilfredshet og lykke stiger dramatisk med okt kjopekraft - inntil man nar en arsinntekt pa rundt 20.000 dollar, eller rundt 120.000 kroner. Etter dette gir ikke okte inntekter saerlig utslag pa lykkeskalaen.
But there are limits. Professor Richard Layard at the London School of Economics has found that contentment and happiness rises dramatically with increased purchasing power-until one reaches an annual income of around 20,000 dollars, or around 120,000 dollars. After this, it does not provide any increased revenues, in particular, reflected on the happiness index.

This article was published online by Dagen on July 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition, 2011
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Express

'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 06/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Express

'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 06/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Grupo Aseguranza

Los expertos ven en el copago una oportunidad para desarrollar el seguro de Salud (Experts see an opportunity to develop health insurance)

Joan Costa Font, del London School of Economics, ha asegurado en el I Congreso de Seguros Personales para el Ahorro y la Salud organizado por ICEA, que “en Espana, donde haya copago habra posibilidad de ofrecer un seguro sanitario que lo cubra”.

This article was published by Grupo Aseguranza on June 11, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Joan Costa Font webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 11/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Britain's housing crisis will morph into catastrophe if politicians don't change, by Paul Cheshire

THE HOUSING crisis – worst in London, but bad across Britain – is fundamentally driven by lack of supply. For the past five years, we have been building fewer houses than in any peacetime period since before World War One. But house building has been on a downwards trend since the 1960s. Reasonable estimates suggest the shortfall in England has been 1.6m to 2.3m houses between 1994 and 2012. Moreover, too many of those we have built have not been in locations where demand is highest. We persistently build houses where they are relatively most affordable and job prospects are relatively worst.

This article appeared in City AM on 4 June 2014 link to article

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 04/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Talking therapies are better than pills, but you have to find the right one

When the Depression Report was published by the Centre for Economic Performance's mental health policy group in 2006, it quantified the effects of that over-medicalisation for the first time. Talking therapies, particularly CBT, could be shown to be more effective than medication in cases of mild to moderate depression, both in getting people back to work and preventing recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines already stated that talking therapies should be offered before drugs; the problem was that there weren't enough qualified therapists. The Depression Report showed clearly that investment in making CBT and similar therapies more widely available would be better for the economy in the long run than handing out pills.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28 May 2014 link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
Mental Illness and Unhappiness Dan Chisholm, Richard Layard, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, September 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1239

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 28/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Talking therapies are better than pills, but you have to find the right one

When the Depression Report was published by the Centre for Economic Performance's mental health policy group in 2006, it quantified the effects of that over-medicalisation for the first time. Talking therapies, particularly CBT, could be shown to be more effective than medication in cases of mild to moderate depression, both in getting people back to work and preventing recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines already stated that talking therapies should be offered before drugs; the problem was that there weren't enough qualified therapists. The Depression Report showed clearly that investment in making CBT and similar therapies more widely available would be better for the economy in the long run than handing out pills.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28 May 2014 link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
Mental Illness and Unhappiness Dan Chisholm, Richard Layard, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, September 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1239

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 28/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

LSE USA Politics and Policy Blog

Firms with more structured management practices are more productive, innovative and have faster employment growth

In 2010, the US Census Bureau conducted the first large-scale survey of management practices in America, gathering data on more than 30,000 manufacturing plants. Nicholas Bloom and colleagues find strong links between establishments performance and the quality of their systems of monitoring, targets and incentives.

This article was published by the LSE USA Politics and Policy blog on May 21, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief: Management in America, Nicholas Bloom, Erik Brynjolfsson, Lucia Foster, Ron Jarmin, Megha Patnaik, Itay Saporta-Eksten and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, 19 (1) Spring 2014
'IT and Management in America', Nicholas Bloom, Erik Brynjolfsson, Lucia Foster, Ron Jarmin, Megha Patnaik, Itay Saporta-Eksten and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1258, February 2014.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

Cyprus Mail

Initiative looks at how to overcome cuts in education

THE Cyprus Volunteer Team of Supporters of the European Citizens' Initiative ''Invest in Education'' is organising an open event tomorrow regarding a campaign to put an end to cuts in education due to austerity measures. Sir Christopher Pissarides, the Cypriot Nobel Prize Winner for Economics, will be delivering the key-note speech. He is one of the supporters of the initiative.

This article was published by Cyprus Mail on May 15, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

EU elections 2014: Is immigration good for Britain?

Last year, the Centre for Economic Performance, a think-tank, found that the arrival of Polish children in British schools had helped lift their native classmates’ results. The researchers said one explanation is that Polish children’s stronger work ethic encourages their British peers.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 12 May 2014 link to article

Related Publication
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance? by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012


Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 12/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

New Statesman

Why the costly, pointless war on drugs must come to an end

The London School of Economics has attempted to begin counting the costs of the war on drugs in a new report, Ending the Drug Wars: Report of the LSE Expert Group on the Economics of Drug Policy…….Signatories also include the LSE’s most recent Nobel Laureate Professor Sir Christopher Pissarides.

This articles appeared in the New Statesmen on 6 May 2014 link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal (US)

British household lending highest since financial crisis

Research by the London School of Economics suggests wages won't grow substantially for some time, suggesting debt will grow further in order for consumer spending to continue to rise. ''It is quite clear that the economy is still well below full employment and there is a large amount of slack in the labor market,'' former Bank of England member David Blanchflower, currently a professor of economics at Dartmouth College in Hannover, N.H., and Stephen Machin, professor of economics at University College London and a member of the Low Pay Commission, said in the LSE research. ''We see little evidence of widespread skill shortages, which would push up wages; and public sector pay freezes with continuing redundancies continue to push down on workers' bargaining power.''

This article was published in the Wall Street Journal (US) on May 1, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Falling Real Wages, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. Article forthcoming in CentrePiece Vol 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

tutor2u.net

UK Economy: the Economics of Falling Real Wages

The prospects of significant wage increases for typical UK workers are bleak, according to Professors David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin writing in the Spring 2014 issue of CentrePiece magazine. It is quite clear that the economy is still well below full employment and there is a large amount of slack in the labour market, they say. There is little evidence of widespread skill shortages, which would push up wages; and public sector pay freezes with continuing redundancies continue to push down on workers' bargaining power.

This article was posted online by tutor2u.net on May 1, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Falling Real Wages, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. Article in the forthcoming CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Thomas Piketty's bestselling post-crisis manifesto is horrendously flawed

Piketty's believes that in a peacetime free-market economy, the returns on capital - dividends, interest, rents and capital gains - inevitably grow faster than the overall economy. The owners of capital will therefore end up grabbing an ever-greater slice of the pie, leaving workers with less and less. I buy neither the prediction nor the proposed solution. For a start, Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen from the LSE have shown that the share of UK income going to labour is largely the same now as it was 40 years ago, unlike in America. And if the returns to capital do go up, more money will eventually be invested to reap the rewards - and that, in turn, will increase productivity and hence wages, and keep down capital's share of GDP.

This article was published by the Daily Telegraph on April 29, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality, Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Golf takes more land in Surrey than houses

More land in Surrey is dedicated to playing golf rather than housing, new research has shown. Prof Paul Cheshire, researcher at the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the LSE said green belts were driving up the price of houses and subsidising activities such as golf Prof Cheshire said in London alone there was enough green belt land to build an estimated 1.6 million new homes with average densities. He said the land bank was about 32,500 hectares and could have an impact on the cost of homes in the region.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 27 April 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Turning Houses Into Gold: The Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire April 2014, in CentrePiece, volume 19 issue 1

Related Links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC webpage
News Posted: 27/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

Wellesley.edu.com

Capital Ebbs and Flows blog

Blog by Joseph P. Joyce, Professor of Economics at Wellesley College and the Faculty Director of the Madeleine Korbel Albright Institute for Global Affairs.

Ukraine's track record with the IMF is not a good one. In November 2008 as the global financial crisis intensified, the IMF offered Ukraine an arrangement worth $16.4 billion. But only about a third of that amount was disbursed because of disagreements over fiscal policy. Another program for $15.3 billion was approved in 2010, but less than a quarter of those funds were given to the country.

The recidivist behavior is the product of a lack of political commitment to the measures contained in the Letters of Intent signed by the government of Ukraine. Ukraine, like other former Soviet republics, was slow to move to a market system, and therefore lagged behind East European countries such as Poland and Romania in adopting new technology. Andrew Tiffin of the IMF attributed the countr's economic underachievement to a 'market-unfriendly institutional base' that has allowed continued rent-seeking. Promises to enact reform measures have been made but not fulfilled. Are the chances of success any better now? Peter Boone of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Simon Johnson of MIT are not convinced that there has been a change in attitude within the Ukrainian government, despite the overthrow of President Viktor Yanukovych. Consequently, they write: 'There is no point to bailing out Ukraine's creditors and backstopping Ukrainian banks when the core problems persist: pervasive corruption, exacerbated by the ability to play Russia and the West against each other.'

The article was posted online on the Wellesley.edu.com blog on March 31, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 31/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times Economix blog

China's Shadow Banking Malaise

Article by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson
With the United States economy still struggling to regain full employment, the European economy becalmed in the aftermath of a serious sovereign debt crisis and many emerging markets looking increasingly vulnerable, global macroeconomic attention has become increasingly focused on China. Will China's economy slow down, and would such a development carry serious financial fallout, even some sort of crisis?

This article was posted on The New York Times Economix blog on March 27, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 27/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

Why regulation - on yogurt and more - is blocking Greece's recovery

In its report the OECD made 329 recommendations for rules that should be changed to open up competition and give a much-needed boost to the economy of Greece. John Van Reenan, director of the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, says this sort of overregulation holds back innovation and economic growth and explains, in part, the gap in material wealth between Europe and the United States. ''It's a very big issue,'' he says. ''It takes a lot longer for European business to grow and achieve scale.''

This article was published online by Reuters on March 11, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

What Ukraine needs for sustained prosperity

Article by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson for the NYTimes' Economix
This is an important and hopeful moment for Ukraine. While we are optimistic that it can be seized, with greater prosperity for millions of people, Ukraine has faced similar hopeful moments, and subsequent disappointment, several times in the last 20 years. This time will not be different unless Ukraine's new rulers make a definite break with the established ways of its economic and political elite.

This article was published by the New York Times Economix on February 27, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
News.Gnom.Es
What Ukraine Needs for Sustained Prosperity

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC2

Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC2

Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

New Republic.com

The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 14/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

SpitsNieuws

Gewonnen geld maakt rechtser

"Het ziet ernaar uit dat geld een rechts-conservatief gedachtegoed bevordert." Bij mannen is dit effect overigens sterker dan bij vrouwen.
“It seems that money promotes a right-wing conservative ideology.” In men, this effect is stronger than in women

This article appeared in SpitsNieuws on 11 February 2014 link to article

Related Links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 11/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Job polarisation and the decline of middle-class workers' wages

Article by Michael Boehm
... routinisation has not only replaced middle-skill workers' jobs but also strongly decreased their relative wages. Policymakers who intend to counteract these developments may want to consider the supply side: if there are investments in education and training that help low and middle earners to catch up with high earners in terms of skills, this will also slow down or even reverse the increasing divergence of wages between those groups.

This article was published by the Vox online on February 8, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Has job polarisation squeezed the American middle class? Michael Boehm. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Has job polarisation squeezed the American middle class?', Michael Boehm, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1215, May 2013

Related Links
Michael Boehm webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 08/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

Social Europe Journal

Why increasing the minimum wage does not necessarily reduce employment

Article by Alan Manning
Alan Manning takes a close look at the economics and the evidence of these claims, finding that one of their basic assumptions, that labor markets are highly competitive, does not hold.

The article was published by the Social Europe Journal on January 27, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Minimum Wages and Wage Inequality: Some Theory and an Application to the UK', Tim Butcher, Richard Dickens and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1177, November 2012

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 27/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

HandVNews

Scientists call for push on energy storage

Leading economists and science experts in the UK have called for an international push akin to the Apollo space mission to kick-start the deployment of renewable energy storage technology, PV-Tech reported. Speaking at an event at the UK's House of Lords, Sir David King, the former UK chief scientific advisor, Lord Richard Layard, programme director at the London School of Economics, and Mark Maslin, professor of climatology at University College London, called for a campaign to secure international renewable energy storage funding. The event, 'Running out of time - climate change', hosted speakers and debate on resolutions to international energy issues.

This article was published online by H&VNews on January 23, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Times of India

Low-cost initiatives help cut neonatal mortality

HYDERABAD: Neonatal mortality can be reduced substantially through low-cost healthcare interventions, experts said after a new study conducted in the state showed that 24.6 percent of babies, who would probably not have lived for more than a month, were saved through basic life-saving techniques. Dr Peter Boone, executive chair, effective intervention at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, and co-author, described the intervention as strongly justified in rural areas. ''It is of potential use in other rural settings with similar economic and educational circumstances, similar neonatal mortality profiles, and the existence of some private health provision'', he said.

This article was published by The Times of India on November 9, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme website
News Posted: 09/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

KPMG defends key HS2 report

However, concerns about the KPMG report, surfaced when the FT revealed misgivings about it among some of the government's own advisers. Dan Graham, a professor of statistical modelling at Imperial College London, told the committee of MPs on Tuesday ''I don't think the statistical work is reliable''. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics and a former adviser on HS2, went further. ''They [KPMG] apply this procedure which is essentially made up, which provides them with an estimate. It is something that really shouldn't be done in a situation where we are trying to inform public debate using statistical analysis.'' Prof Overman said he thought the ÂŁ15bn estimate could be overstated by a factor of six to eight.

This article was published by the Financial Times online on November 6, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
HS2: assessing the costs and benefits, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2012

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 06/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Businessgreen.com

Sir David King calls on business leaders to embrace 'drivers for change'

Former chief scientist urges businesses to challenge impression that low carbon transition is a 'hair shirts and sandals' programme
King argued these drivers should manifest themselves through new technologies and changed behaviours. In particular, he highlighted the campaign he recently launched alongside Lord Richard Layard for a Sun Power Programme, modelled on the Apollo programme that would accelerate and co-ordinate research and development efforts to make solar power cost competitive with fossil fuels. ''The aim is to target funding at any blockage points that are stopping the solar power becoming cheaper than fossil fuels'', he explained. ''Solar is already cheaper in many off grid communities... But the question is how do we make it cheaper everywhere? One of the main blockage points is energy storage. At the moment energy storage R&D is the Cinderella of the energy industry. If we can overcome that challenge we can make solar the standard choice for energy generation.''

The article was published by Businessgreen.com on November 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Lancashire Telegraph

Warning of mixed ability classes

TEACHING mixed ability groups could damage the confidence of pupils who believe they are in the bottom half of their class, a study suggests. Researchers from the London School of Economics claim that children who achieved high grades in primary school, then perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smart but because their previous success in class had boosted their confidence. Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt analysed test data of more than two million pupils in England and carried out a survey on the confidence of 15,000 young people.

This article was published by the Lancashire Telegraph on October 29, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Yam (China)

Later business success from confidence in early years

According to a study by the London School of Economics, the loss of confidence due to low class rank can have serious long-term implications for students.

This article was published by Yam (China) on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Yam (China)

Later business success from confidence in early years

According to a study by the London School of Economics, the loss of confidence due to low class rank can have serious long-term implications for students.

This article was published by Yam (China) on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Times

A debilitating problem that is still medicine's poor relation

However there is a long way to go before the charities compete with the likes of Cancer Research with its ÂŁ480 million annual turnover. The London School of Economics sums it up: ''The undertreatment of people with crippling mental illness is the most glaring cause of health inequality in our country.''

This article was published in The Times on October 11, 2013
[No link available, subscription needed to access the article]

Related publications
The Depression Report. A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders, The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group, June 2006
How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS. A Report by the Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group, June 2012

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Are children who are non-native speakers making education worse for native speakers? Presenting new research on England, this column by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj uses two different research strategies showing that there are, in fact, no spillover effects. These results support other recent studies on the subject. The growing proportion of non-native English speakers in primary schools should not be a cause for concern.

This article was published by Vox online on September 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Toronto Star online

Material gain won't fix unhappy planet: Goar

The United Nations has released its World Happiness Report, making the case for a more sophisticated definition of national success.

This article was published by the Toronto Star online on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

Today programme

Coverage of Lord Layard's letter to the Telegraph on schooling - ''Children start school too young'' experts say.

The item was broadcast on the BBC's Today Programme on September 12, 2013
[No link available.]

Also on
LBC
News

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Times of Oman

Oman among happiest countries in the world

Oman ranks among the top 25 list of the ''happy countries'' in the world. The Sultanate has been ranked 23rd among 156 nations and second in the Gulf region in the World Happiness Report 2013 released yesterday. The report was edited by Professor John F. Helliwell of the University of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; Lord Richard Layard, Director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE's Centre for Economic Performance; and Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Director of the SDSN, and Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General.

The article was published in The Times of Oman on September 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

CBC Ottawa

Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

CBC Ottawa

Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

CBC Ottawa

Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Valuewalk.com

Five out-of-office ways to invigorate your career this fall

Even if you are not heading back to school, fall can be a great time to energize your career. Here are five ways you can boost your job performance and your overall career satisfaction - and they all involve new beginnings.
Sources: Layard, Richard. Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Penguin Press, 2005

This article was published online by Valuewalk.com on August 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Richard Layard, Penguin Press, 2nd edition, 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage
News Posted: 27/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

Forbes India - Magazine

The correlation between money and happiness

Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage
News Posted: 12/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

Dagbladet (Norway)

En gate ingen vil lose

Eller ta arbeidslivet. Politikerne bekymrer seg for at dagens velferdsniva trues av manglende arbeidskraft. Vi vet at flere uforetrygdes pa grunn av psykiske lidelser, og at det er en kraftig okning i sykefraværet for lettere psykiske lidelser. Okonomen Richard Layard har for lengst vist at lett tilgjengelig psykologisk behandling er selvfinansierende, ikke minst fordi folk kommer tilbake i arbeid.
A puzzle noone will solve
Or take the world of work. Politicians worry that the current level is threatened by a lack of welfare workers. We know that more uføretrygdes because of mental illness, and that there is a sharp increase in sick leave for easier mental disorders. The economist Richard Layard has long since proven that readily available psychological treatment is self-sustaining, not least because people are going back to work.

This article was published by Dagbladet on August 8, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. June 2006

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental health research webpage
News Posted: 08/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

Dagbladet (Norway)

En gate ingen vil lose

Eller ta arbeidslivet. Politikerne bekymrer seg for at dagens velferdsniva trues av manglende arbeidskraft. Vi vet at flere uforetrygdes pa grunn av psykiske lidelser, og at det er en kraftig okning i sykefraværet for lettere psykiske lidelser. Okonomen Richard Layard har for lengst vist at lett tilgjengelig psykologisk behandling er selvfinansierende, ikke minst fordi folk kommer tilbake i arbeid.
A puzzle noone will solve
Or take the world of work. Politicians worry that the current level is threatened by a lack of welfare workers. We know that more uføretrygdes because of mental illness, and that there is a sharp increase in sick leave for easier mental disorders. The economist Richard Layard has long since proven that readily available psychological treatment is self-sustaining, not least because people are going back to work.

This article was published by Dagbladet on August 8, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. June 2006

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental health research webpage
News Posted: 08/08/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Baby first, job later for young women

10 years earlier, after several decades in which female employment rates were on a rising trend, according to research by Alan Manning of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. ''The main message is that the youngest generations of women are not working any more than slightly older women, so female labour market progress has stalled'', he said.

This article appeared in The Sunday Times on July 28, 2013
[Subscription necessary to view the article.]

Related links
Newspaper articles based on charts Prof Manning showed in a lecture for the royal statistical society in 2010. Details
Alan Manning webpage
Communities Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Class worrier

The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Class worrier

The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Class worrier

The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

She's 23, he's 69 - and so satisfied

A paper to be published this week by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics reveals that these are the peak years for feeling satisfied. By contrast, people in their mid-fifties are the least content.

The article was published in The Sunday Times on July 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-shape in Human Wellbeing', Hannes Schwandt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1229, July 2013

Related links
Hannes Schwandt webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

It's the middle class's empty quarter

A recent study from the Spatial Economics Research Centre at the London School of Economics points out that, in many countries, the second-largest city is half the size of the largest and the third-largest is a third of the size.

This article was published in The Sunday Times on July 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The economic future of British cities, Henry Overman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

Related links
Henry Overman webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 21/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

Obama: ‘I remember when I first saw 'Star Wars'

Here are five things we're reading/watching today:
that a study out of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science was conducted using a smartphone app. Cleaning the house and waiting on line were more pleasant than work, according to the study's findings.

This article was published in the Washington Post on July 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times - Economix

An economic primer for spies

Article by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson
Following the disclosure that American Intelligence services has bugged the communications of European diplomats stationed in Washington, the authors say the goal seems to involve capturing some kind of economic secrets. They offer a brief primer on where the intelligence services should focus their attention in the economic realm.

This article appeared in The New York Times's Economix blog on July 4, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Bobby D Show

10 things that put you in a better mood...and eight that make it worse

Researchers at the London School of Economics asked people to keep track of what MOOD they were in, using a smartphone app. Here are the 10 activities that improve your mood the MOST:...

This article was broadcast on the Bobby D (radio) Show on July 3, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

A moda prefere os esqueletos

...ajustamos o no, arguye Joan Costa-Font, profesor de Economa Poltica de la London School of Economics y coautor de un estudio que concluyo que la presion social es determinante para explicar...
Fashion prefers you as skeletons
...we adjust or not!, argues Joan Costa-Font, Professor of economic policy at the London School of Economics and co-author of a study that concluded that social pressure is crucial to explain the anorexia...

This article appeared in El Pais on July 1, 2013
Link to article here

See also
Sunday 7 July
Periodico am
Optan por esqueletos
Link to article here

Related links
Joan Costa-Font webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/07/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Nation (Pakistan)

Two big mysteries

...some economists, who once championed flexible labour markets without reservation, like Daron Acemoglu of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, have begun to have second thoughts. Acemoglu does not doubt the positive economic effects of flexible labour markets, but he has begun to be concerned about their political and distributional consequences. They might help the economy grow overall, but they may also be contributing to the hollowing out of the middle class by weakening its political bargaining power. That is why a recent paper by Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, both of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, makes such fascinating reading. They set out to unravel the two big mysteries about Britain's economic performance over the past five years. The backdrop to both is the devastation that Britain, with its oversize banking sector, suffered in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. "The big story in the UK is that the economy has shrunk by 2.5 percent since the pre-crisis period", Van Reenen said. "That is the longest depressed economy in this country for more than a hundred years." Britain's dismal economic performance certainly helps to explain the grimness of British politics at the moment, and the growing appeal of the nationalist fringe. But the story becomes more mysterious when you start investigating what is happening inside the country's shrunken economy.

This article was published in The Nation (Pakistan) on June 29, 2013
Link to article here

See also
Friday 28 June
Reuters
Mysteries of the middle-class
Link to article here
Thursday 27 June
Yahoo! Finance
Mysteries of the middle class: Chrystia Freeland
Link to article here

Related publications
The UK Productivity and Jobs Puzzle: Does the Answer Lie in Labour Market Flexibility?, Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.31, June 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

In pursuit of happiness

Over the past decade, Easterlin's core premise has been expanded upon by research in other fields. In Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, proposed seven areas that could explain the paradox, and that should be the focus of policy makers - family relationships, friends, employment, financial situation, health, personal freedom and personal values. Layard does not dismiss money - and as a labour economist stresses the misery caused by unemployment - but the Easterlin paradox is an important assumption behind his work. And while much of this is intuitive, happiness research implies a scope of analysis and a response that is alien to most governments.

This article was published in the Financial Times on June 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Penguin, 2nd edition, April 2011.
Details.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Business

How big are the government's infrastructure plans?

The planning uncertainty caused by short-sighted government policy has been cited by a London School of Economics study as the main impediment to infrastructure investment.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on June 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, LSE Growth Commission Report, January 2013

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada)

Thatcher's legacy offers lessons of labour pain, and gain

One of the legacies of Thatcherism can be seen in an unusual aspect of the British economy during the past five years, which is how unemployment has remained relatively moderate (currently at 7.8 per cent) during a period of severe recession followed by weak recovery. "Over the past five years there have been wage cuts in real terms, which was not the case in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and part of the reason for this is that the trade unions are weaker today", says John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. "Whereas in 1979 two-thirds of British workers had their wages set by trade unions, today the figure is less than a quarter, and heavily concentrated in the public sector."

This article was published in The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada) on June 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Fall in joblessness fails to prove Spain's case for economic revival

But my sense is they will only do the reforms that are impossible to avoid and where there is strong pressure from the EU, said Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics. Both private sector economists and academics have warned of the danger of complacency, arguing the government must not succumb to reform fatigue.

This article appeared in Financial Times on 5 June 2013 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/06/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Joblessness on the up as incomes are squeezed

The number of people in full-time employment increased by 10,000 to 21.68 million in the three months to March, while those working part-time fell 53,000 to 8.03 million. The number of self-employed people fell by 42,000 to 4.18 million. John Van Reenen, of the London School of Economics, said that the fact that more people were in work today than before the crisis began in 2008 was "misleading" as the numbers were boosted by the rising adult population.

This article was published in The Times on May 16, 2013
No link available.

Related publications
British Politics and Policy blog at LSE: Jobs, wages and poor growth
John Van Reenen, May 15 2013

Related links
JohnVan Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/05/2013      [Back to the Top]

ESRC - press release

Researchers celebrated for outstanding impact

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has rewarded researchers for their outstanding economic and social impact in the first Celebrating Impact Prize. The winners and runners up were announced at the awards ceremony held at Church House in Westminster, London on 14 May by BBC broadcaster and former economics editor, Evan Davis. The applications were judged by a panel of experts from business, academia and the public sector. The shortlisted entrants were invited to attend an interview, with a user of their research, to further demonstrate to the panel their role in achieving outstanding research impact. There were six categories in the prize.... Second place was awarded to:... Mr Richard Murphy, London School of Economics, for Outstanding Early Career Impact.

The press release was published on the ESRC news website on May 15, 2013
Link to the release here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/05/2013      [Back to the Top]

ESRC - press release

Researchers celebrated for outstanding impact

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has rewarded researchers for their outstanding economic and social impact in the first Celebrating Impact Prize. The winners and runners up were announced at the awards ceremony held at Church House in Westminster, London on 14 May by BBC broadcaster and former economics editor, Evan Davis. The applications were judged by a panel of experts from business, academia and the public sector. The shortlisted entrants were invited to attend an interview, with a user of their research, to further demonstrate to the panel their role in achieving outstanding research impact. There were six categories in the prize.... Second place was awarded to:... Mr Richard Murphy, London School of Economics, for Outstanding Early Career Impact.

The press release was published on the ESRC news website on May 15, 2013
Link to the release here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/05/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Business Edition with Tanya Beckett

Professor Albrecht Ritschl was interviewed from Berlin about World War 2 reparations.

The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service on May 13, 2013

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/05/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Family, not area, is key to a child's education: Children with parents who spent extra year in education get better grades

A report's findings indicate it is the attitude towards education within their family unit that really matters. The research involved two groups of disadvantaged children in cities across England, all of whom were waiting to move into social housing in some of the most deprived neighbourhoods...Dr Felix Weinhardt, who conducted the research, said: "We have always tried to help the most disadvantaged children to get better life chances and one of the ways we thought we could do this is through housing policy." "But research now increasingly tells us that bad neighbourhood environments have no causal influence on these children's school performances at all." The postdoctoral fellow in the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance added: "These two groups of students really get very bad grades - very similar to students who live in high-density social housing neighbourhoods and never moved."

This article appreared in the Daily Mail on 4 April 2013 link to article

Related links
See Felix Weinhardt webpage for publications link to webpage
SERC Website
News Posted: 04/04/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Credit in the euro area: still crunching

A recent paper by Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender of the London School of Economics looked at the impact of financial constraints in Spain. By comparing firms that are foreign-owned, and therefore have access to other forms of financing, with those that are domestic, and so rely on local banks, the authors can see what uncertainty about financial access did to their decision-making after the 2008 crisis. The Spanish-owned firms cut investment by 19 percent more than the foreign-owned companies, and reduced employment by 6 percent more.

The article was published in The Economist on March 9, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Survive Another Day: Does Uncertain Financing Affect the Composition of Investment?', Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1188, February 2013

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Claudia Steinwender webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/03/2013      [Back to the Top]

Japan Today

Putting the magnifying glass on the 1%

The top 1% received 15.4% of the national income in 2007 compared with 5.9% in 1979... 'A lot of the action has been at the very top end of the distribution, the top 1% or the top 0.1%', John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, told me. 'It shows you that the media's focus on the very rich and on bankers' bonuses wasn’t misplaced.'

The article was published in Japan Today on February 16, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Bankers and their Bonuses', Brian Bell, John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No. 35, February 2013
'Extreme Wage Inequality: Pay at the Very Top', Brian Bell, John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.34, February 2013

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Brian Bell webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2013      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post UK

A Degree Is No Longer Enough

The number of people with postgraduate qualifications has almost trebled since the mid-1990s, as employers expect more from potential employees, research by the Sutton Trust suggests. But the study raises concerns that students from lower and middle-class families are being priced out, leaving postgraduate study the preserve of the better off.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 7 February 2013 link to article

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Sutton Trust Research Report, February 2013 link to report

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website
News Posted: 08/02/2013      [Back to the Top]

Irish Daily Mail

Whether daring or just clueless, Rajoy could end the Troika's lies

As the international economists Peter Boone and Simon Johnson recently wrote in the Baseline Scenario blog, 'Both Portugal and Ireland have made progress implementing their austerity programmes, but they are not growing and their debts remain very large… If tough austerity programmes do not wrest nations free from high unemployment and over-indebtedness, then how are they to get back on the path to growth?' If Spain keeps control of its own finances long enough to defy EU demands and demonstrate how deadly the Troika programmes are, it will expose the fundamental lie of the bailout, that a country caught in a currency union can deflate itself into growth. If Spain finally breaks away from its almost-bailout, and takes up policies that allow growth, the poisonous nature of the Troika programmes will be beyond dispute.

This article was published in The Irish Daily Mail on October 1, 2012
No link available.

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 01/10/2012      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

"The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

The Business

A tangible Olympic economic boost?

Several of our essayists are likewise sceptical about the existence of clear economic and business benefits to Olympic host cities and countries. Max Nathan, research fellow with the Spatial Economics Research Centre, London School of Economics, writes that hoped-for impacts from job creation, transport improvement and inducements to healthier living usually turn out to be small. He also warns that it will take years for any lasting benefits to become clear.

This article was published in The Business on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Max Nathan webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

New York Times – Economix blog

Introducing the Latin Euro

In an article with Simon Johnson, Peter Boone says that the fact that the European Central Bank is willing to purchase unlimited debt from highly indebted nations should not make anyone jump for joy: this is not the end of the crisis but rather the next stage.

The article was published in the New York Times blog 'Economix' on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2012      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Shut Down the World Bank: Jin Yong Kim Should Be Its Last President

Yet no amount of aid could overcome the impact of bad economic policies. To the contrary, aid discouraged reform of growth-defeating policies since it minimized the pain of failure and enabled governments to protect their most important political constituencies. For instance, Peter Boone of the London School of Economics surveyed developing economies, reporting that "Poverty is not caused by capital shortage, and it is not optimal for politicians to adjust distortionary policies when they receive aid flows."

This article was published in Forbes.com on Monday 23 July, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

See also
Tuesday 24 July
Cato Institute
Shut Down the World Bank: Jin Yong Kim Should Be Its Last President
News Posted: 23/07/2012      [Back to the Top]

BBC

Could debt relief ease Euro woes?

Albrecht Ritschl Professor of Economic History at the London School of Economics explains how Germany received debt relief: "Every recipient country of the Marshall Plan had to sign a waiver which said that all Marshall aid would amount to what was known as a first charge to Germany - it meant that unless this debt was repaid by the Germans, no other charges could be brought against Germany."

This article appeared on the BBC Website on 16 June 2012

See also
London Wired
Could debt relief solve Europe's problems
Despite measures and initiatives being proposed by political leaders, history suggests that the path leading Europe back to prosperity will not be smooth. Apart from debt relief in African countries, there has been a precedent in Europe. In the effort to promote recovery after World War II, part of the Marshall Plan - America's huge aid programme - was a strategy for dealing with the vast debts that the vanquished nations of Europe had run up - most notably, those of Germany. Albrecht Ritschl Professor of Economic History at the London School of Economics, explains how Germany received debt relief.
Link to article

UKwirednews
Could debt relief solve Europe's problems link to article

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/07/2012      [Back to the Top]

Department for Business Innovation and Skills

Responses to Government Consultations and Reports

The Centre for Economic Performance(CEP)responds to Government call for evidence on unfair dismissal and Beecroft more generally.

Department for Business Innovation & Skills Consultations

Responses to Government Consultations and Reports
BIS - Executive Remuneration Discussion Paper
Link to consultation | Link to CEP response

BIS - Trade White Paper: Call for Evidence
Link to consultation | Link to CEP response

Department for Work and Pensions - 21st Century Welfare
Link to consultation | Link to CEP response

BIS - Financing the Private Sector Recovery
Link to consultation | Link to CEP response

National Science Foundation (NSF/SBE) - Future Research in the Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences
Link to consultation | Link to CEP response
News Posted: 01/06/2012      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Curb cuts in social capital to deliver the boost we need

Article by Lord [Richard] Layard, London School of Economics.
Fewer cuts in social spending would provide a quicker boost to employment than extra physical spending, which always takes time.

Article in the Financial Times on 25 May, 2012. Link to article.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/05/2012      [Back to the Top]

CEP Press Release

Executive Pay: share ownership by institutional investors improves the link to corporate performance

Executive Pay:

Share ownership by institutional investors improves the link to corporate performance

Publicly quoted UK firms with higher levels of institutional ownership of their shares have a stronger and more symmetric link between corporate performance and executive pay.

That is one of the findings of new research by Dr Brian Bell and Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

Download full press release here

Related links:
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen Webpage webpage
Productivity Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/05/2012      [Back to the Top]

The Washington Post

England Student Debt Unprecedented as Government Shifts Funding

U.S. education debt can't be discharged through bankruptcy and almost 2 million Americans with student debt are over 60, according to the New York Federal Reserve. About $85 billion in student debt was delinquent in the third quarter of 2011. In March, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said U.S. student-loan debt had reached $1 trillion, based on preliminary findings. "The American system is brutal" said Tim Leunig who teaches economic history at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the The Washington Post on 23 April 2012 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/04/2012      [Back to the Top]

The Sales Director.com

Small businesses ‘creating many new jobs'

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics study revealed that businesses which received grants worth up to ten per cent of the cost of a business project, or around ÂŁ5,000, created seven per cent more local jobs than if the grant had not been made.

This article appeared in The Sales Director.com on 2 February 2012 link to article

Related publications
The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy by Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen, SERC Discussion Paper No. 98 is available here
The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy by Chiara Criscuolo, Ralf Martin, Henry Overman and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1113 is available here

Related links
Chiara Criscuolo webpage
Ralf Martin webpage
Henry Overman webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
SERC website webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/02/2012      [Back to the Top]

Labour Party

Rethinking mental health in the twenty-first century – speech by Andy Burnham

Andy Burnham MP, Labour's Shadow Health Secretary, in a speech to the Centre for Social Justice, said: I recently shadowed a GP in Coventry and was surprised by the number of time he referred to IAPT. As he said, a huge step forward and an avenue that simply wasn't available only a few years ago. It came about because of Lord Richard Layard's work, who made both the social justice case, but also the economic case.

Posted on the Labour Party website on January 31, 2012. Link to the speech

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin books, 2011 (second edition) Details
Measuring Subjective Wellbeing for Public Policy, Paul Dolan, Richard Layard, and Robert Metcalfe (2011), Office of National Statistics, February

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Researchwebpage
News Posted: 31/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Impact of fees hike to be monitored by independent commission

An independent commission has been set up to see if higher tuition fees are deterring poorer students from applying to university. Chaired by former Observer editor Will Hutton, principal of Hertford College, Oxford, the commission will also include Sutton Trust chairman Peter Lampl, Stephen Machin professor of economics at University College London, and Times journalist Libby Purves, who presents the BBC Radio 4 education programme The Learning Curve.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education on 27 January 2012 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Impact of fees hike to be monitored by independent commission

An independent commission has been set up to see if higher tuition fees are deterring poorer students from applying to university. Chaired by former Observer editor Will Hutton, principal of Hertford College, Oxford, the commission will also include Sutton Trust chairman Peter Lampl, Stephen Machin professor of economics at University College London, and Times journalist Libby Purves, who presents the BBC Radio 4 education programme The Learning Curve.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education on 27 January 2012 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

DCSF.gov.uk

Michael Gove speech on academies

In a speech given yesterday (4 January 2012) at Haberdashers' Aske's Hatcham College, Michael Gove cited "a landmark assessment" of the Academy Schools scheme by Steve Machin and James Vernoit.

This article appeared on the DCSF.gov.uk on 5 January 2012 link to article

See also
Conservative Party
Michael Gove: Who are the ideologues now? link to article

Related publications
"Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education" Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.123 April 2011
"Academy Schools: Who Benefits?" Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
"A Note on Academy School Policy" Centre for Economic Performance Policy Briefing, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
News Posted: 05/01/2012      [Back to the Top]

New Statesman

Fragmentation or integration

Comment: Econometric studies at the LSE and the University of Bristol appear to demonstrate that hospital based competition has improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals that are subject to greater competition. The price of competition
By Carol Propper
Piece in The New Statesman’s supplement titled ‘Competition in a New Society: National Health’ The government’s resolve will have been buoyed by recent research by the LSE and the University of Bristol. These econometric studies appear to demonstrate that the hospitalbased competition introduced by the previous government (the patient choice initiative) improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals subject to greater competition. While the validity of this evidence has been contested by other academics, it has been cited by David Cameron to support a more hawkish competition policy

This article appreared in the New Statesmen on 9 December 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Management in Healthcare: Why Good Practice Really Matters’ Report from McKinsey & Company and the Centre for Economic Performance, October 2010
‘Management practices in the NHS’ CentrePiece 14 (3), Winter 2010 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/CentrePiece/browse.asp?vol=14&issue=3) pages 16-19, by Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/12/2011      [Back to the Top]

Marketplace

Europe weighs greater fiscal consolidation

Of course, if the eurozone turned itself into a real fiscal union with all the member states guaranteeing each other's debt, that would stop the crisis in its tracks. But Tim Leunig of the London School of Economics says that's not going to happen.
Tim Leunig: Germany is not going to want to give huge amounts other people who it sees as feckless. But equally, other people are not going to want to be bossed about by Germany and told what they can and cannot spend their money on. This article was published in Marketplace on Sunday December 4, 2011. Link to article

Link to BBC News, Foreign student visa review call by UK advisory body 4th December 2009

Related Links

Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/12/2011      [Back to the Top]

Radio Free Europe

What if the Eurozone collapses?

Many experts believe that if the eurozone were to break apart it would be because richer members leave it rather than continue to try to bail out poorer ones. In fact, there are already some signs that the richer countries -- the so-called "core" or northern countries of the zone -- are already considering that option."They've discussed having a treaty amongst a smaller number of countries that would have a lot more fiscal coordination and a centralized treasury even, perhaps a eurobond at the end of it all, and I think that's the direction in which they are going to move," says Peter Boone, a senior visiting fellow at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on Radio Free Europe on Friday December 2, 2011
Link to article.

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/12/2011      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Demand for new laws to defeat unions

Demand for new laws to defeat unions: Prof Alan Manning from the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, said: "There are many areas of conflict between the public sector and government. They are unlikely to be resolved very soon."

This article appeared in City AM on December 1, 2011
Link to article.

Related links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/12/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Study challenges belief on executive pay

The pay of top executives rises when their company does well and falls when their company does badly, according to academic research, which challenges the suspicion that executive pay rises inexorably regardless of corporate performance. The study by Dr Bell and Professor John Van Reenen did not address the question of whether company performance would have been better or worse without incentive-based pay.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 4, 2011
Link to article

Related Publications
Firm Performance and Wages: Evidence from Across the Corporate Hierarchy, Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1088, November 2011

Related Links
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
ESRC Festival of Social Science Event: ‘Top Pay in the UK’ on Friday 4 November 2011.
Details
News Posted: 04/11/2011      [Back to the Top]

Regional Studies Prize for Henry Overman

For joint paper: 'Economic linkages across space'

SERC Director Henry Overman has been awarded the Best Paper in Regional Studies prize for 2011, for his paper 'Economic linkages across space', written with SERC colleagues Patricia Rice and Anthony J. Venables.

Download paper here

More information on the 2011 awards can be found on the Regional Studies Association website
News Posted: 19/10/2011      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

Jeff Randall Live

Christopher Pissarides comments on tax avoidance in the Greek economy.

This interview was broadcast on Sky News on 5 September 2011 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/09/2011      [Back to the Top]

Korea Herald

[Simon Johnson] Behind euro, a crisis unfolds in slow motion

The loss of liquidity for both banks and governments is just a symptom of an underlying malaise. Too much moral hazard crept into the European financial system and the run-up in debts was unsustainable. As I argued in a recent Peterson Institute for International Economics policy paper, written with Peter Boone a visiting fellow at the London School of Economics Europe must choose between restructuring debts in a systematic fashion or issuing a great deal of money, increasing the moral hazard and possibly creating significant inflation.

This article appeared in the Korea Herald on 29 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

LaBolsa.com Noticias

Economía.- Garicano cree que Alemania comienza a valorar la posibilidad de emitir eurobonos

El catedrático de Economía y Estrategia de la London School of Economics, Luis Garicano ha afirmado que en los últimos días se ha experimentado un "cambio enorme" en la postura de Alemania ante la posible...

This article appeared in LaBolsa.com on 16 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Southwest Florida Herald Tribune

Investors fret at costs if rescues are needed

In a widely circulated research paper published last month by the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington on the debt burden of Europe’s 90 biggest banks, the authors, Peter Boone and Simon Johnson, suggest that the euro zone’s banking crisis was more than a short-term liquidity problem — that it might, in the worst case, require some banks to be bailed out by their governments, adding to the governments’ own debt woes.

This article appeared in Southwest Florida Herald Tribune on 11 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

SanCarlosPatch.com

Stock market roller coaster: what does it mean for San Carlos?

"It’s a bad sign for local government,” said Nick Bloom associate professor of economics at Stanford University. “This is now the second uncertainty shock and we only had one year of normal growth. Generally it’s going to make it harder to raise taxes and revenue which means more cutting, and a lot of these small cities have already made major cuts.”

This article appeared on SanCarlosPatch.com on 11 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Markets turmoil and US downgrade: global reaction

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone included in roundup of reactions from analysts and commentators from around the world to threat of a global economic crisis.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 8 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Markets turmoil and US downgrade: global reaction

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone included in roundup of reactions from analysts and commentators from around the world to threat of a global economic crisis.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 8 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

El Pais

El BCE en su laberinto

Article co-written by Luis Garicano, Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde and Tano Santos

The debt crisis worsens and endangers the survival of the euro

This article appeared on El Pais on 7 August 2011 link to article

Also in
ON24 (online)
El Banco Central Europeo en su laberinto

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Sound Money

Eurozone debt crisis is back with a vengeance

Tim Leunig: The question is: do Germans want to guarantee Greek, Italian and Spanish debt? I don't see any evidence of that.

This article appeared in Sound Money on August 3, 2011
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2011      [Back to the Top]

Forbes

Explaining the unemployment figures

Traditionally, such long spells of unemployment have been a rather un-American thing, being more common in Europe. Let Richard Layard explain:

But if you break down unemployment into shortterm (under a year) and long-term, you find that short-term unemployment is almost the same in Europe as in the U.S. – around 4% of the workforce. But in Europe there are another 4% who have been out of work for over a year, compared with almost none in the United States. The most obvious explanation for this is that in the U.S. unemployment benefits run out after 6 months, while in most of Europe they continue for many years or indefinitely.
That is indeed how it has traditionally been. Yet in this current recession the eligibility period for unemployment pay has been extended to 99 weeks across the US.


This article appeared in Forbes (blog) on 9 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Welfare to Work and the New Deal’, Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001 link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Labour Market Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details
News Posted: 29/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details
News Posted: 29/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details
News Posted: 29/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

MSN Prodigy

Nueva divisa

En el lado opuesto del argumento se ubica Tim Leunig profesor de Historia Económica de la London School of Economics (LSE), quien no vacila en seńalar que estas monedas virtuales esencialmente...

This article appeared in MSN Prodigy on 29 June 2011 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

BBC Mundo

Bitcoins: los dos lados de 'la moneda del futuro'

En el lado opuesto del argumento se ubica Tim Leunig profesor de Historia Económica de la London School of Economics (LSE), quien no vacila en seńalar que estas monedas virtuales esencialmente...

This article appeared in BBC Mundo on 26 June 2011 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Don't rubbish my research. Competition really does improve the NHS

Separate research by economists Bloom, Propper, Seiler and Van Reenen at Stanford, Imperial and the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found competition led to improvements in hospital management which resulted in lower death rates, higher patient satisfaction and efficiency gains.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 24 June 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘In brief… Competition in the public sector: good for the goose, good for the gander?’, Zack Cooper, CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011 link
‘Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency? An Analysis of the Recent Market-Based Reforms to the English NHS’, Zack Cooper, Steve Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010 link

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Further information on health economics and NHS policy link
Summary of research papers on NHS reform link
News Posted: 24/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

Newsroom Panama

What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2011      [Back to the Top]

New Book: Combatting Unemployment

IZA Prize in Labor Economics - by Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell

Combatting Unemployment is a collection of key papers from seminal labour economists Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell.

The authors received the IZA Prize in Labor Economics in 2008 for their path-breaking work on the relationship between labor market institutions and unemployment

Why is unemployment higher in some countries than others? Why does it fluctuate between decades? Why are some people at greater risk than others?

Layard and Nickell have worked on these issues for thirty years. Their famous model, first published in 1986, is now used throughout the world. It asserts that unemployment must be high enough to reduce the real wages for which workers settle to the level justified by productivity. So what affects 'wage push'? The authors showed early on that the key factors affecting 'wage push' are how unemployed workers are treated and how wages are negotiated. If unemployed people get benefits without being required to accept jobs, vacancies go unfilled and mass unemployment results. The solution is welfare-to-work policies like those now introduced in most parts of the world.

The authors have proposed these policies for the last twenty-five years in a series of key articles reproduced in this book. Their original analysis explains the subsequent movement of unemployment over the last two decades. They conclude the book with a new chapter on what should be done in the recession: no-one, they say, should be given unemployment benefit beyond a year, after which they should be offered work.

Book details:

Combatting Unemployment
IZA Prize in Labor Economics
Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell.
Edited by Werner Eichhorst and Klaus F. Zimmermann
OUP (May 2011)
ISBN 978-0-19-960978-9
Ł35.99

Purchase this book from the publisher


News Posted: 19/05/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Vickers' proposals will not be enough to cut risks in global banking

Ahead of the publication of the ICB interim report, Peter Boone visiting fellow at the LSE and Simon Johnson, former IMF chief economist, argue that for global banking to become safer the creditors of banks must share the losses when a bank fails and that there needs to be tougher equity capital requirements internationally, while reducing the incentive to accumulate debt.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 11 April 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage

News Posted: 11/04/2011      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

The future of banking: is more regulation needed?

Peter Boone from the LSE argues that more regulation is needed to prevent the banking sector repeating the mistakes that led to the crisis in the system.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 11 April 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage
News Posted: 11/04/2011      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

Coalition eyes auction plan to push down fees

Ministers are looking closely at a proposal for allocating all university places in an auction, with the government judging bids according to which ones offer the best deals for the taxpayer. The plan, set to be published on 7 April in a report by Tim Leunig would establish the likely loss to the government of lending money to students at different institutions and on various courses.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement on 7 April 2011 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/04/2011      [Back to the Top]

BNet

Study: How CEOs Really Spend their Time

According to research from four professors - Oriana Bandiera and Andrea Prat, of the London School of Economics, Luigi Guiso of European University Institute, and Raffaella Sadun of Harvard University – at those companies, CEOs spend much more time on activities that are personally beneficial to them.

This article appeared in BNet on 18 March link to article

Raffaella Sadun webpage
Raffaella Sadun publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

'Land auctions' plan to stimulate growth

It is mentioned that Ed Davey and the LSE's Tim Leunig had in 2007 made a proposal in relation to gaps in land pricing.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 14 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

'Land auctions' plan to stimulate growth

It is mentioned that Ed Davey and the LSE's Tim Leunig had in 2007 made a proposal in relation to gaps in land pricing.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 14 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

Data junkie Savouri helps Toscafund recovery

Trusting in hard numbers rather than the forecasts of company managements is key for Toscafund chief economist Savvas Savouri, as he helps one of the UK's best-known hedge fund firms recover from a tough credit crisis. will have the ammo to smoke them out of their script.” It was at the London School of Economics, where he took his undergraduate degree and later a doctorate, that Savouri developed his fascination with data, working with the likes of Stephen Nickell Sushil Wadhwani and and Charles Bean, who all later served on the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee.

This article appeared on Reuters on 8 march 2011 link to article

Related links
Charlie Bean CEP publications
Stephen Nickell CEP publications
Sushil Wadhwani CEP publications

News Posted: 08/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Health bill changed to stop price war

Health economists say the government should be "congratulated for listening". Zack Cooper a health economist at the London School of Economics had warned that price competition "would be a retrograde step because in healthcare you cannot easily link outcome and quality of care to price in the short term. It takes a long time to work out that relationship. The international evidence is that it does not work."

This article appeared in the Guardian on 3 March 2011 link to article

Related Links
Zack Cooper webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 03/03/2011      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

China looks for inner richness

Although China has become the world's second-largest economy, its domestic markets need reform for its citizens' sake.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 February 2011 link to article

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/02/2011      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Government to create extra 100,000 apprenticeships

Apprenticeships and vocational training schemes are increasingly being promoted by business leaders and politicians from all sides as a cost-effective way to address skills shortages in several UK industry sectors. Despite this, a recent report by the Centre for Economic Performance found there are only 11 apprenticeships for every 1,000 workers in the UK. Historically such schemes have been beset by high dropout rates, with low rates of pay among the main contributing factors.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 7 February 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘The State of Apprenticeship in 2010’. A CEP Special Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman.
download report


Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Hilary Steedman publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/02/2011      [Back to the Top]

Globe and Mail (Canada)

Canada's talent challenge

We did a survey of manufacturing management, drawing on a measurement technique developed by Professor Nick Bloom at Stanford and McKinsey and Co., the consulting firm. How good is our management? We were up there in the top tier, we were as good as Sweden, Germany and Japan. We were all behind the Americans [in terms of management].

This article appeared in Globe and Mail (Canada) link to article

Related publications
‘Management Practice and Productivity’ Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007
‘Management Practices Across Firms and Nations’ Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen, June 2005

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

NewsKF

How much my house worth?

[first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

NewsKF

How much my house worth?

[first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

Pensions World

Conference report SPC riveting stuff

Dr Tim Leunig of the London School of Economics and Policy Exchange mesmerised delegates in the next session entitled “What is required to turn the tide?” First he debunked the myth that the pensions system was better in the olden days.

This article appeared in Pensions World on December 3, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/12/2010      [Back to the Top]

MSN – UK

Angela Merkel's bailout battle

It is the German government's loose talk that has brought Europe to the brink of another debt crisis." These were the words of Simon Johnson, a former chief economist of the IMF, and Peter Boone chairman of effective intervention at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance

This article appeared in MSN money on 24 November 2010 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

The New Yorker

What good is Wall Street?

In a recent article titled “What Do Banks Do?,” which appeared in a collection of essays devoted to the future of finance, Turner pointed out that although certain financial activities were genuinely valuable, others generated revenues and profits without delivering anything of real worth—payments that economists refer to as rents. “It is possible for financial activity to extract rents from the real economy rather than to deliver economic value,” Turner wrote. “Financial innovation . . . may in some ways and under some circumstances foster economic value creation, but that needs to be illustrated at the level of specific effects: it cannot be asserted a priori.”

This article appeared in the The New Yorker on November 22, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
The Future of Finance: and the theory that underpins it
Contributors: Adair Turner, Andrew Haldane, Paul Woolley, Sushil Wadhwani, Charles Goodhart, Andrew Smithers, Andrew Large, John Kay, Martin Wolf, Peter Boone, Simon Johnson and Richard Layard

Related Links
The ‘Future of Finance’ Conference was held on Wednesday 14 July 2010.
Conference details
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Entrepreneur key to 1980s reforms

Profile of Lord Young, who has recently resigned from a government post. The LSE's Tim Leunig is quoted as saying that Lord Young is at the end of his career.

This article appeared in the Financial Times Online on November 20, 2010
[No link available to article.]

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
Tim Leunig publications webpage

See also
November 19, 2010
BBC Radio Wales
Good evening Wales
Dr Tim Leunig comments on Lord Young's resignation.
News Posted: 20/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Entrepreneur key to 1980s reforms

Profile of Lord Young, who has recently resigned from a government post. The LSE's Tim Leunig is quoted as saying that Lord Young is at the end of his career.

This article appeared in the Financial Times Online on November 20, 2010
[No link available to article.]

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
Tim Leunig publications webpage

See also
November 19, 2010
BBC Radio Wales
Good evening Wales
Dr Tim Leunig comments on Lord Young's resignation.
News Posted: 20/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Economic Voice

Europe's monetary cordon sanitaire

Article by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson
Peter Boone, chairman of effective intervention at the London School of Economics' Center for Economic Performance, is a principal in Salute Capital.
Germany is moving weaker eurozone countries towards default.

This article appeared in European Voice on November 19, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Truthout

The debt problems of the European periphery

Article co-authored by Peter Boone, associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.
Last week's renewed anxiety over bond market collapse in Europe's periphery should come as no surprise. Greece's EU/IMF program heaps more public debt onto a nation that is already insolvent, and Ireland is now on the same track. Despite massive fiscal cuts and several years of deep recession Greece and Ireland will accumulate 150% of GNP in debt by 2014. A new road is necessary: The burden of financial failure should be shared with the culprits and not only born by the victims.

This article appeared in Truthout on November 17, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Truthout

The debt problems of the European periphery

Article co-authored by Peter Boone, associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.
Last week's renewed anxiety over bond market collapse in Europe's periphery should come as no surprise. Greece's EU/IMF program heaps more public debt onto a nation that is already insolvent, and Ireland is now on the same track. Despite massive fiscal cuts and several years of deep recession Greece and Ireland will accumulate 150% of GNP in debt by 2014. A new road is necessary: The burden of financial failure should be shared with the culprits and not only born by the victims.

This article appeared in Truthout on November 17, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Truthout

The debt problems of the European periphery

Article co-authored by Peter Boone, associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.
Last week's renewed anxiety over bond market collapse in Europe's periphery should come as no surprise. Greece's EU/IMF program heaps more public debt onto a nation that is already insolvent, and Ireland is now on the same track. Despite massive fiscal cuts and several years of deep recession Greece and Ireland will accumulate 150% of GNP in debt by 2014. A new road is necessary: The burden of financial failure should be shared with the culprits and not only born by the victims.

This article appeared in Truthout on November 17, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The Coalition doesn't need to reinvent the Blairite wheel

Comment. It is likely that some of the coalitions’ reforms will succeed, and some will fail. It is mentioned that a study by Zack Cooper and others at the LSE came to the conclusion that patients were more likely to expire where the provider of NHS services is a monopoly provider.

This article appeared in The Independent on November 16, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Zack Cooper webpage
Zack Cooper CEP publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

Britain News.Net

Tuesday newspaper review; Irish business news and international stories

Just look at the countries that have weathered the recession the best; Ethan Ilzetzki of the London School of Economics and Enrique G. Mendoza and Carlos A. Vegh of the University of Maryland examined stimulus efforts in 44 countries.

This article appeared in Britain News.Net on November 16, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
'How Big (Small?) are Fiscal Multipliers?', Ethan Ilzetzki, Enrique G. Mendoza and Carolos A. Végh, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1016, October 2010

Related Links
Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

EurActiv

Europe's monetary cordon sanitaire

The German government's proposed debt-restructuring mechanism immediately shifts weaker eurozone countries towards default, write Simon Johnson, former chief economist of the IMF and Peter Boone, chairman of Effective Intervention at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared online on EurActiv on November 15, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/11/2010      [Back to the Top]

BBC Today

What is the social value of sport?

How will the government measure the value of the different areas in which it plans implement its cuts? Correspondent Tim Franks considers the value of sport in the time of austerity, and interviews Richard Layard on the disadvantage of using the normal model of GNP to calculate effect of spending cuts.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC Today programme (7.20am) on October 8, 2010
Link to interview

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/10/2010      [Back to the Top]

Business Standard (India)

An epic economic disaster

…dangerous to societies” is a major argument of a chapter by Johnson and Peter Boone in this recently released book from the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Business Standard (India) on October 7, 2010
No link available.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone publication webpage
News Posted: 07/10/2010      [Back to the Top]

Gulf Times

The eurozone facing new sovereign default risk

Article by Simon Johnson and Peter Boone
Today’s conventional view of the eurozone is that the crisis is over – the intense, often existential concern earlier this year about the common currency’s future has been assuaged, and everything now is back under control. This is completely at odds with the facts. European bond markets are again delivering a chilling message to global policymakers. With bonds of “peripheral” eurozone nations continuing to fall in value, the risk of Irish, Greek, and Portuguese sovereign defaults is higher than ever.

This article appeared in the Gulf Times on September 20, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/09/2010      [Back to the Top]

Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey)

Top economist voices concern about second global dip

There is a high possibility that a second economic dip in the U.S. economy could occur, triggering a “snowball effect” throughout the rest of the world, according to a prominent London-based economist. “If someone had asked me about the direction of the economy eight months ago, I would have said the risk had receded,” John Van Reenen, the director of the London-based Centre for Economic Performance, an applied economics research center, recently told the Hürriyet Daily News & Economic Review. “But now, looking at recent data, I am much concerned that we may have a second dip and go back to a recession again.”

This article appeared in Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey) on September 20, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
John Van Reenen publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/09/2010      [Back to the Top]

Mmegi online

Bardy bonds for the eurozone

Article by Simon Johnson and Peter Boone
Today’s conventional view of the eurozone is that the crisis is over… This is completely at odds with the facts.

This article appeared Mmegi online on September 17, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

Also in:
Wirtschafts Blatt on September 16, 2010
Link to Article
News Posted: 17/09/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

Zombie buildings shadow Spain's Economic future

One risk, says Luis Garicano, an economist at the London School of Economics, is that Spanish lenders could follow in the footsteps of Japan's so-called zombie banks, "holding on to capital in order to cover their losses."

This article appeared in The Wall Street Journal on September 16, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/09/2010      [Back to the Top]

GlobalResearch.ca

Economic fault lines deepen

In a recent New York Times article entitled, “In Ireland, Dangers Still Loom”, authors Simon Johnson and Peter Boone warn of the consequences of the type of austerity programs being introduced across Europe—especially for those countries forced to pay off a growing burden of debt. They note that the finance markets remain unimpressed by the measures taken by the Irish government, which have sharply cut public sector wages and driven up unemployment to record levels.

This article appeared in GlobalResearch.ca on September 11. 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/09/2010      [Back to the Top]

Seeking Alpha

Canadian taxpayers on the hook as housing cools

“With such ready access to taxpayer bailouts, Canadian banks need little capital. They naturally make large profit margins, and they can raise money even if they act badly,” write Peter Boone and Simon Johnson in an article titled ‘The Canadian Banking Fallacy.’

This article appeared in Seeking Alpha on September 4, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/09/2010      [Back to the Top]

BBC 1/World News

World Business Report

Linda Yueh did the newspaper review, covering issues such as GM's future, U.S. and China's partnership in Latin America, grain exports/imports in Russia, and media coverage of fad diets.

This interview was broadcast on 19 August 2010 Link

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/08/2010      [Back to the Top]

BBC

Breakfast

Linda Yueh was interviewed, to analyse the implications of the European bank stress tests.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Breakfast on 23 July 2010 (no link avaliable).

Also on
Bloomberg TV – ‘Start Up’

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/07/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Once more into the ring

Recent research from the London School of Economics shows that competition among hospitals can improve care, efficiency and management. Work by the King’s Fund found that giving people choice helps to keep hospitals focused on what matters to patients.

This article appeared in the Economist on 15 July 2010 link to article

Related publications
'Does Hospital Competition Save Lives?' Zack Cooper, Stephen Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Working Paper No16, LSE Health, January 2010
'Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency' Zack Cooper, Stephen Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010.
'The Impact of Competition On Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals' Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.983, May 2010.

Related links Nick Bloom webpage
Zack Cooper webpage
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephan Seiler webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/07/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Once more into the ring

Recent research from the London School of Economics shows that competition among hospitals can improve care, efficiency and management. Work by the King’s Fund found that giving people choice helps to keep hospitals focused on what matters to patients.

This article appeared in the Economist on 15 July 2010 link to article

Related publications
'Does Hospital Competition Save Lives?' Zack Cooper, Stephen Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Working Paper No16, LSE Health, January 2010
'Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency' Zack Cooper, Stephen Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010.
'The Impact of Competition On Management Quality: Evidence from Public Hospitals' Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.983, May 2010.

Related links Nick Bloom webpage
Zack Cooper webpage
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephan Seiler webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/07/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Hamish McRae: Let's pay attention to our service sector: you know it makes sense

Some new research from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (and published in CentrePiece) concludes that if the UK's aid budget were spent well, current funding levels would be more than adequate and lower levels not inconceivable. The research is by Dr Peter Boone who makes the sensible point that the attention of the Department for International Development (DFID) should be on making aid work better, not on the amount spent.

This article appeared in the Independent on 11 July 2010 Link to article

Related publications
‘Making the UK’s aid budget work better’ Peter Boone CentrePiece Vol 15, Issue 1 July 2010

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/07/2010      [Back to the Top]

Management Today

New economics: making forecasts after the recession

Last year, Queen Elizabeth went to the London School of Economics to try and understand what had taken so much wealth out of her Commonwealth. 'Why did nobody predict it?' the monarch asked the hapless host, professor Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in Management Today on June 1, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/06/2010      [Back to the Top]

Politics.ie

Ireland worse than Greece, faces financial ruini, say two leading economists

There was an analysis of a similarly gloomy nature by Dr Peter Boone from the London School of Economics and Simon Johnson, a former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, in the New York Times last week. According to the two economists, Ireland’s problems are “sadly, far deeper than the need for simple fiscal austerity”.

This article appeared on Business and Leadership.com Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

It's not about Greece anymore

The Greek “rescue” package announced last weekend is dramatic, unprecedented and far from enough to stabilize the euro zone. Article by Peter Boone, chairman of the charity Effective Intervention and a research associate at the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Simon Johnson.

This article appeared in the New York Times on 6 May 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! UK and Ireland

Europe seeks new ‘dawn' after Greek crisis

Canadian Peter Boone a renowned research associate at the London School of Economics, went further, expressing the view that Europe is 'still searching for a solution.'

This article appeared on Yahoo on 3 May 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal – Business

ECB watch: ECB capitulates, suspending rules for Greece

Canadian Peter Boone, a renowned research associate at the London School of Economics, went further, expressing the view that Europe is 'still searching for a solution.'

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on 3 May 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/05/2010      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

Can Europe save itself?

Peter Boone and Simon Johnson article
When Jean-Claude Trichet (head of the European Central Bank) and Dominique Strauss-Kahn (head of the International Monetary Fund) rushed to Berlin this week to meet Chancellor Angela Merkel and the German Parliament, the moment was eerily reminiscent of September 2008 — when then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson stormed up to the United States Congress, demanding $700 billion in relief for the largest American banks. Remember the aftermath of that debacle? Despite the Treasury argument that this would be enough, much more money was eventually needed, and Mr. Paulson left office a few months later under a cloud. The problem this time is bigger. It is not only about banks; it is about the essence of the euro zone, and the political survival of all the public figures responsible.

This article appeared in the New York Times on 29 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Winnipeg Free Press (Canada)

Robert Allison, April 26

According to Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Research [sic] and Daniel Nettle of Open University, "Happiness is an imaginary goal that gives us direction and progress.” But, it is not often attained because “we get accustomed to what we get and crave more,” and because we “constantly compare what we have with what others have.”

This article appeared in Winnipeg Free Press on 26 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage

News Posted: 26/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Independent (Education and Careers)

Why the Swedes' idea may backfire

Sandra McNally of the London School of Economics comments on plans for parents to set up their own schools being greeted with scepticism.

This article appeared in the Independent on 22 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
'Evaluating Education Policies: the Evidence from Economic Research' CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally
Sandra McNally publications webpage
Full series of Election Analyses 2010

News Posted: 22/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Independent (Education and Careers)

Why the Swedes' idea may backfire

Sandra McNally of the London School of Economics comments on plans for parents to set up their own schools being greeted with scepticism.

This article appeared in the Independent on 22 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
'Evaluating Education Policies: the Evidence from Economic Research' CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally
Sandra McNally publications webpage
Full series of Election Analyses 2010

News Posted: 22/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

This is money

City pay 'has done most to widen wealth gap'

Some 60% of the increase in the gap between the richest and poorest between 1998 and 2008 is down to soaring financial services earnings, according to a report from the London School of Economics. Dr Brian Bell who authored the research from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance with fellow academic John van Reenen said rising bonuses had played a huge part.

This article appeared in This is Money on 20 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
‘Bankers’ Bonuses’ CEP Election Analysis by Brian Bell
‘Bankers’ Pay and Extreme Wage Inequality in the UK’ by Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.21, April 2010
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal online

A bailout will still leave Greece struggling with debt

But as Peter Boone of the London School of Economics and Simon Johnson, a former IMF chief economist, point out in their Baseline Scenario blog even a cutback of this magnitude leaves Greece seeking to raise more than €50 billion this year, money that will finance interest payments and expand its borrowing by a further 4%.

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal online on 19 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage

News Posted: 19/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times (FT Weekend Magazine)

Why recessions aren't all about job losses

Christopher Pissarides of the London School of Economics points to research showing that workers who hop from one job to another during a boom enjoy a hefty jump in take-home pay, while workers who change jobs during a recession do not. That suggests, claims Pissarides, that wages (or at least the wages offered to new hires) are more flexible than many economic theorists assume. Not so fast, respond those theorists.

This article appeared in the FT magazine on 17 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides publications webpage
News Posted: 17/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

Economix: the next global problem: Portugal

Peter Boone is chairman of the charity Effective Intervention and a research associate at the Center [sic] for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the New York Times on 16 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage

News Posted: 16/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo UK and Ireland

Greek bonds falter again, Portugal raises two billion euros

Some analysts suggest that the deal, which in the first instance would enable Greece to borrow up 30 billion euros (41 billion dollars) from the eurozone this year if necessary, is only prolonging the agony. They contend it would be far better to let Greece default and restructure quickly than keep the country afloat by adding ever more debt to its books. Peter Boone of the London School of Economics and Simon Johnson of MIT's Sloan School noted that the International Monetary Fund's experience in Argentina in the 1990s which eventually defaulted after many years of support.

This article appeared on Yahoo UK and Ireland on 14 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone publications webpage

News Posted: 14/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

EU Business

Greek bailout masks Argentine slippery slope: analysts

Europe's bailout will only stick a patch on Greek finances and do nothing for the euro's long-term health, with the slippery slope to an Argentina-style default a real concern, analysts warn. "It all seems horribly reminiscent to those early days when Argentina slid towards a cruel collapse," said Canadian Peter Boone , a research associate at the London School of Economics, in a detailed paper that argued against International Monetary Fund support.

This article appeared in ebusiness.com on 14 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone Publications webpage

News Posted: 14/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

EU Business

Greek bailout masks Argentine slippery slope: analysts

Europe's bailout will only stick a patch on Greek finances and do nothing for the euro's long-term health, with the slippery slope to an Argentina-style default a real concern, analysts warn. "It all seems horribly reminiscent to those early days when Argentina slid towards a cruel collapse," said Canadian Peter Boone , a research associate at the London School of Economics, in a detailed paper that argued against International Monetary Fund support.

This article appeared in ebusiness.com on 14 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Peter Boone Publications webpage

News Posted: 14/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

Diariocritico de la Comunitat Valenciana

Fusiones como 'matrimonios de conveniencia política'

El catedrático de Estrategia y Ciencias Económicas de la London School in Economics (LSE) Luis Garicano, defendió este martes las fusiones de cajas de ...

This article appeared in Diariocritico de la Comunitat Valenciana on 4 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Luis Garicano publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/04/2010      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

Greece, the Latest and Greatest Bubble

Bubbles are back as a topic of serious discussion, as they were before the financial crisis. The questions today are: (1) Can you spot bubbles? (2) Can policy makers do anything to deflate them gently? (3) Can anyone make money when bubbles get out of control? Column by Simon Johnson and Peter Boone chairman of the charity Effective Intervention and a research associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the New York Times on 11 March 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘The Doomsday Cycle’ by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson, article in CentrePiece Volume 14 Issue 3, Winter 2009/2010

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/03/2010      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Top economists hit back at Tories over spending cuts

A war of words has broken out among some of Britain's most respected economists over Conservative plans to begin cutting public spending immediately if they win the general election. Fifty heavyweight academics, many of them professors, have issued a stinging rebuke to the claim by shadow chancellor George Osborne that a consensus of economic experts supports his policies. Signatories to today's letter include John Van Reenen, director of the centre for economic policy at the LSE.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 19th February 2010 Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Richard Layard webpage

News Posted: 19/02/2010      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Cornwall

Laurence Reed

Professor John Hills, LSE, discusses the National Equality Report.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Cornwall on 27th January 2010. (No link avaliable)

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
details of report


Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

eGov monitor

TUC Calls On Government To Provide Universal Job Guarantee

The coalition, which includes the TUC, Demos Open Left Project, Professor Paul Gregg, Professor Richard Layard, the Resolution Foundation, The Work Foundation and James Purnell MP, has written to Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Yvette Cooper MP warning against a repeat of mistakes of the last two recessions, when unemployment was allowed to spiral out of control.

This article appeared in eGov monitor on the 25th January 2010. Link to article

Related publication
‘A Job Guarantee’, Paul Gregg and Richard Layard, March 2009 Link

Related links
Paul Gregg webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

CBC News

Why a persistent whiff of doom hangs over economy

Why is doom so popular? Whether spurred by U.S. President Barack Obama's attack on the banks or China's latest plan to manipulate the economy, there is always some economic commentator strutting the electronic streets with a sandwich board bearing the words, "The End Is Near" in ragged type.
The word "doomsday" actually got into a headline in this week's Financial Times in a commentary insisting that it is not high interest rates but low interest rates that will bring down the world economy. The authors, Peter Boone and Simon Johnson, economists at the London School of Economics and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, respectively, effectively agree with a recent Economist lead article that "something's got to give."

This article appeared in CBC News on 21 January 2010. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

A bank levy will not stop the doomsday cycle

“During the final years of communism’s decline, Soviet bureaucrats argued for futile tweaks to laws that would crack down on speculators and close “loopholes” – all in the vain hope they could keep the unproductive system of incentives intact. The US, UK and key European countries are now making the same errors. Rather than recognising the dangerous systemic failures in our financial system, their leaders are proposing bandages that can – at best – only postpone another, possibly much larger, meltdown.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 19th January 2010 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

Peninsula On-line (Quatar's leading English daily)

Global boom builds for epic bust

Peter Boone and Simon Johnson column warns us to look a little farther down the road and you see serious trouble. The heart of the matter is, of course, the US and European banking systems.
This article appeared on Peninsula On-line on the 6th January 2010. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

Also appeared in the following on the 7th January:
Trinidad & Tobago Express webpage
The Business Times (Singapore) webpage

News Posted: 06/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Times

Force the big banks to shrink

Peter Boone research associate at the LSE, with Simon Johnson discuss the need for a cheap pound for a long time in order for the UK to "get out of its mess".

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 3rd January 2010. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/01/2010      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph (Business)

Moody's 'axe blow' to Spanish debt rating

Professor Luis Garciano from the London School of Economics comments on Spain's property bubble

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on the 18th December 2009. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

News Posted: 18/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times Online - UK

Anthony Seldon: Teaching Wellington College new tricks

He found the works of Martin Seligman, an American guru of positive psychology; Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence; and Richard Layard a professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), who had just published Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Such works “provided a framework for what I’d been feeling and thinking for a long time”, says Seldon.

This article appeared on Times Online on 13 December 2009. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/12/2009      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg TV 'Countdown' programme

LInda Yueh

Linda Yueh interviewed, to comment on the EU-China relationship and the valuation of the Chinese currency.

This interview was broadcast on Bloomberg on 27 November 2009. (no link available)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

How big is too big?

Peter Boone is chairman of the charity Effective Intervention and a research associate at the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the New York Times on 26 November 2009 Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 26/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

DeHavilland - London

Scottish Motion

... in view of research by Professors Richard Wilkinson, Kate Pickett and Richard Layard suggesting that an unequal society is unhealthy and unhappy.

This article appeared in DeHavilland on 24 November 2009 Link to article (log in needed)

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

New York Times

The great shrinking American dollar

Peter Boone, chairman of Effective Intervention, at the Center for Economic Performance co-writes with Simon Johnson that the American dollar is in the midst of a large fall in its value, as compared with other major currencies.

This article appeared in the New York Times on November 12, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Free Market Mojo - blog

Did the National Minimum Wage affect UK prices?

Jonathan Wadsworth has a relatively new discussion paper looking into how the national minimum wage affected UK prices.

This article appeared on the blog 'Free Market Mojo' on November 8, 2009
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Did the National Minimum Wage Affect UK Prices?’, Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.947, August 2009

Related Links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Touchstone (blog)

A job guarantee: a new promise on long-term unemployment

Professor Lord Richard Layard will be speaking at Beyond Crisis, a TUC / Guardian one-day conference on progressive responses to the financial crisis on 16 Nov.

This article appeared on the blog 'Touchstone' on November 3, 2009
Link to article

Related publications
Richard Layard's publications webpage

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4 News

Linda Yueh interview

Linda Yueh was interviewed, to comment on the UK banks, RBS and Lloyds, in terms of the additional government funding, rights issues, and restructuring on competition grounds.

This interview was broadcast on Channel 4 News on 3 November 2009.

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/11/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

How to manage the gigantic financial cuckoo in our nest

Peter Boone of the London School of Economics is mentioned in an article about the state of the financial sector.

This article appeared in the Financial Times Online on October 21, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention webpage
News Posted: 21/10/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Relationship of trust is permanently damaged

Willem Buiter, professor of European political economy at the London School of Economics, says that it is a fallacy to think economic models, particularly those based on history, can hope to understand the fundamental relationships in a large and complex economy.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on October 6, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Willem Buiter webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/10/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Relationship of trust is permanently damaged

Willem Buiter, professor of European political economy at the London School of Economics, says that it is a fallacy to think economic models, particularly those based on history, can hope to understand the fundamental relationships in a large and complex economy.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on October 6, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Willem Buiter webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/10/2009      [Back to the Top]

PhysOrg

Lab-grade economics

Now [Joshua] Angrist, Ford Professor of Economics at MIT, has distilled those insights into a surprise-hit book, "Mostly Harmless Econometrics," along with co-author Jorn-Steffen Pischke, a former MIT professor who now teaches at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on Physorg.com. Link to article

Related publications
Mostly Harmless Econometrics by Joshua Angrist and Jorn-Steffen Pischke, Princeton University Press, January 2009 Details of book

Related links
Steve Pischke webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/09/2009      [Back to the Top]

Forbes.com

Joblessness has a lasting psychological impact, particularly on those with existing mental health problems

Depression factor. This last issue has become a much more significant aspect of public policy in the last few years, associated in particular with economist Richard Layard, who argues in his 2006 study, "The Depression Report," that the effect of mental illness on happiness is underestimated and that mental illness is related to labor market experience.

This article appeared on Forbes.com on 24th August 2009. Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders Download report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/08/2009      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

Bankrupt or bailed out?

Article for Economix - Explaining the Science of Everyday Life, written by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson
Peter Boone is chairman of Effective Intervention, a charity based in Britain, and a research associate of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.
Another day, another potential bailout decison for the government - yesterday it was the CIT Group.

This article appeared in the New York Times - Economix on July 16, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/07/2009      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

Bankrupt or bailed out?

Article for Economix - Explaining the Science of Everyday Life, written by Peter Boone and Simon Johnson
Peter Boone is chairman of Effective Intervention, a charity based in Britain, and a research associate of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.
Another day, another potential bailout decison for the government - yesterday it was the CIT Group.

This article appeared in the New York Times - Economix on July 16, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/07/2009      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh interviewed, on the decline in foreign direct investment to China in the past year.

This article appeared in RBC Daily - Russia on July 3, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/07/2009      [Back to the Top]

iStockAnalyst

The Baseline Scenario

The Baseline Scenario authored by Peter Boone, Simon Johnson and James Kwak, is dedicated to explaining some of the key issues in the global economy and developing concrete policy proposals. Since it was launched in September 2008, this blog has been cited by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal (Real Time Economics), The Economist (Free Exchange), The Financial Times, Time Magazine, NPR (Planet Money), and many other sites around the Internet.
Peter Boone is chair of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity, and an Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared on iStockAnalyst.com on 3rd July 2009. Link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/07/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Age - Melbourne,Victoria ,Australia

Counting the high cost of happiness

Who wouldn’t like a pay rise? Just about everyone would, according to convenetional political, economic and business theories. Economist Richard Layard begs to differ. The founder of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economic, Layard examines the big conundrum of the past 50 years. Average incomes have more than doubled in that period…but people are no happier.

This article appeared in The Age, Melborne, Australia on 23 June 2009. Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Link to details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 23/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

manager-magazine.de – Germany

'Amerika wird eher wie Europa'

Richard Freeman interviewed.

This article appeared on manager-magazine.de on 11th June 2009. Link to article

Related Links
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Nobel Laureate Krugman Says Recession May End ‘This Summer'

The U.S. economy probably will emerge from the recession by September, Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman said. “I would not be surprised if the official end of the U.S. recession ends up being, in retrospect, dated sometime this summer,” he said in a lecture today at the London School of Economics.

This artticle appareared on Bloomberg on 8th June 2009. Link to article.

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

MSN Money

Late Rally brings Market Back

Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

MSN Money

Late Rally brings Market Back

Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

MSN Money

Late Rally brings Market Back

Today's late-day rally was triggered in part by a comment from Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman that the U.S. economy may start to emerge from the recession in September, Bloomberg News reported. Krugman made the comment at a lecture at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared on MSN Money on 8th June 2009 Link to article

Paul Krugman: The Return of Depression Economics.
For details of the lectures and access to the podcasts go to Lionel Robbins Lectures 2009 .
News Posted: 08/06/2009      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

China reluctant to make further purchase of cheap dollars

Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on China diversifying its reserves.

This article appeared in the RBC Daily (Russia) on May 19,2009
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

China reluctant to make further purchase of cheap dollars

Linda Yueh was interviewed for an article on China diversifying its reserves.

This article appeared in the RBC Daily (Russia) on May 19,2009
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

CNN.com

Commentary: Is stock rally for real

Simon Johnson, is a professor at MIT Sloan School of Management and former International Monetary Fund chief economist. Peter Boone is a research associate of the Centre for Economic Performance and chairman of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity.

In their commentary they say we have zombie banks and zombie companies.
Stocks are rallying as if the economy is out of the woods. However, that is premature, and we could be in for a long period of stagnation.

This article appeared in CNN.com (USA) on May 8, 2009
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme wepage
News Posted: 08/05/2009      [Back to the Top]

Bristol University News

Professor Paul Gregg comments on Budget 2009

Professor Paul Gregg from the Bristol University's Centre for Market and Public Organisation was interviewed on BBC Radio Bristol's Breakfast Show 22 April about his predictions for the Budget. He will also provide analysis on the show tomorrow shortly before 7am.

Paul Gregg's interviews tool place on BBC Radio Bristol's Breakfast Show on 22 and 23 April 2009.


News Posted: 22/04/2009      [Back to the Top]

EurekAlert (press release) - Washington,DC,USA

Global poverty is still a priority

"How will the global financial crisis impact the extremely poor and extreme poverty?" asks Dr Peter Boone, of the ESRC's Centre for Economic Performance. "Subsistence living and lack of accumulated wealth mean many of the extremely poor are well-insulated from the current crisis. However, the problems are in the future: reduced public finances, less global growth, less foreign aid, and possibly more civil wars, will mean the extremely poor do not get the health services, education and opportunities needed to pull themselves and their children out of poverty.

This article appeared EurekAlert on the 18th March 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

New Scientist

The credit crunch: what happened?

Work by Nick Bloom at Stanford University in California has shown that even the temporary surges in uncertainty that followed previous shocks had destructive effects.

This article appeared in the New Scientist on the 18th March 2009.
Link to article.

'In brief: The recession will be over sooner than you think’ article in CentrePiece 13(3) Winter 2008/9 Winter 2008/9
'The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Firm Level Estimation and a 9/11 Simulation’ by Nick Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.718, March 2006
'Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession?' by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1 Spring 2008

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty - Prague,Czech Republic

US-Europe split on economic stimulus erupts ahead of G20

Peter Boone, a Europe expert at the London School of Economics, says the answer is in the different ways the two sides view the Great Depression of the ...

This interview appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty on the 11th March 2009. Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 11/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

Reformatorisch Dagblad, Netherlands

Geloof en geweld vaak ten onrechte met elkaar verbonden

Richard Layard (zelf een atheďst) presenteert in zijn Lionel Robins Lecture in 2002 een overzichtstabel van de literatuur naar de factoren die menselijk ...

This article appeared in Reformatorisch Dagblad on 6th March 2009.
Link to article.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

BBC One

World Business Report

Linda Yueh interviewed, spoke on China’s economic stimulus package.

This interview was broadcast on BBC One World Business Report on 5th March 2009.
[No link avaliable]

Also interviewed on:
BBC News Channel, discussing the Bank of England's interest rate decision and use of quantitative easing measures.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 05/03/2009      [Back to the Top]

Press Release

Economic research receives further funding boost

Economic Research Receives Further Funding Boost

Following the latest call for proposals, the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is pleased to announce overall funding of £16.5m over 5 years from 2009/10 to 2015/16 for three new Centres focusing on the economic wellbeing of the UK. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), at the London School of Economics receives Ł6.08m. Conducting world class and policy relevant research on economic performance, CEP's globalisation programme will include research on macroeconomic growth. The Centre will also research how our national capabilities change as a result of globalisation, such as how high levels of immigration may foster growth through diversity but may also undermine performance and wellbeing through loosening of community times.

The full press release from the ESRC is available to download.


Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Centre for Economic Performance Research Programmes webpage
News Posted: 26/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

Press Release

Economic research receives further funding boost

Economic Research Receives Further Funding Boost

Following the latest call for proposals, the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) is pleased to announce overall funding of £16.5m over 5 years from 2009/10 to 2015/16 for three new Centres focusing on the economic wellbeing of the UK. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), at the London School of Economics receives Ł6.08m. Conducting world class and policy relevant research on economic performance, CEP's globalisation programme will include research on macroeconomic growth. The Centre will also research how our national capabilities change as a result of globalisation, such as how high levels of immigration may foster growth through diversity but may also undermine performance and wellbeing through loosening of community times.

The full press release from the ESRC is available to download.


Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Centre for Economic Performance Research Programmes webpage
News Posted: 26/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

LSE Public Lecture

A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

Listen to the Podcast: MP3


News Posted: 11/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

LSE Public Lecture

A Good Childhood: searching for values in a competitive age

This public lecture was held on Wednesday 11 February 2009, in the Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE.

Speakers: Professor Judy Dunn, Professor Lord Richard Layard

Is childhood all it should be? Or has it been spoilt by broken homes, junk food, alcohol and exam stress? The speakers will present the findings of The Good Childhood Inquiry.

Judy Dunn is professor of developmental psychology at King’s College London, and was chair of The Good Childhood Inquiry. Richard Layard is director of the Well-being Programme in the LSE Centre for Economic Performance.

Listen to the Podcast: MP3


News Posted: 11/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

Scotland on Sunday

Abba-solutely Fabulous

According to economists Richard Layard and Richard Easterlin, who have made a business of studying happiness, the reasons for the smooth functioning of ...

This article appeared in Scotland on Sunday on the 8th February 2009.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard details
.
Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

Communitycare.co.uk - Sutton UK

Children's Society highlights rise in mental health problems

The report was co-authored by economist Richard Layard , who inspired the government's programme to expand talking therapies provision for adults....

This article appeared on Communitycare.co.uk on the 3rd February 2009.
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Good Childhood Inquiry by Richard Layard and Judy Dunn is published by Penguin details
Other publications by Richard Layard details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental Health Group webpage

News Posted: 03/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Look beyond number one

Despite greater affluence, life has become more difficult for our children. According to yesterday's A Good Childhood report, this increased stress is due to the excessive individualism in our society, which produces increased family break-up, excessive pressure to consume, too much exam stress and too great inequality.

These are not nostrums but carefully documented facts, leading to specific targeted proposals. Surveys show that, since around 2000, one in six of our children have been suffering from serious emotional or behavioural problems, compared with only one in 10 some 15 years earlier. The problem arises in every social class. What causes it?

Read the full article by Richard Layard on the Guardian Online - Comment is freeLook beyond number one: Schools should take the lead in helping our young people to find a sense of purpose published 03 February 2009.

Lord Layard is co-author of the Children's Society-commissioned report A Good Childhood

Related Publications
A Good Childhood: Searching for Values in a Competitive Age by Richard Layard. Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
The Children's Society - The Good Childhood Inquiry


News Posted: 03/02/2009      [Back to the Top]

Radio Lithuania

'Ryto Garsai'(Morning)

Linda Yueh interviewed on the 'News Map' segment on reforming the international economic system.

This interview was broadcast on Radio Lithuania on the 30th January 2009.
[No link avaliable]

Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Radio Lithuania

'Ryto Garsai'(Morning)

Linda Yueh interviewed on the 'News Map' segment on reforming the international economic system.

This interview was broadcast on Radio Lithuania on the 30th January 2009.
[No link avaliable]

Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 30/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Published this week

‘Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion’ by Joshua D. Angrist, professor of economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Jorn-Steffen Pischke, professor of economics, London School of Economics Princeton University Press, Ł54.00 and Ł24.95 Angrist and Pischke show how the basic tools of applied econometrics allow data to speak, explaining why fancier econometric techniques are typically unnecessary and even dangerous.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement on the 29th January 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Steve Pischke webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 29/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

To save the banks we must stand up to the bankers

Peter Boone and Simon Johnson warn against bank nationalisation in the US. Peter Boone is chairman of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity, and a research associate at The Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 27th January 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

finchannel.com

LSE professor awarded knighthood

Professor Anthony Venables was awarded a CBE. Professor Venables is now an associate in the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE but is based at Oxford University.

This article appeared on finchannel.com on 25th January 2009.
Link to article.

Related Publications
See publications webpages for Professor Tony Venables.

Related Links
Tony Venables webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

finchannel.com

LSE professor awarded knighthood

Professor Anthony Venables was awarded a CBE. Professor Venables is now an associate in the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE but is based at Oxford University.

This article appeared on finchannel.com on 25th January 2009.
Link to article.

Related Publications
See publications webpages for Professor Tony Venables.

Related Links
Tony Venables webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 25/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Financial

Obama's LSE alumni

Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

Related Publications
‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Financial

Obama's LSE alumni

Two LSE economics professors have paid tribute to the brilliance of Barack Obama’s new budget director Peter Orszag, who is one of an impressive retinue of LSE alumni appointed to the president-elect’s administration. Professor Emeritus Lord Richard Layard was so impressed with Orszag’s work as a Masters student that he invited him to Moscow in 1992 in the early post-Soviet period to work on the influential monthly publication Russian Economic Trends. 'I invited him to Russia because he was a brilliant, outstanding chap,' said Professor Layard.

This article appeared in the Financial on 20th January 2009. [No link avaliable]

Related Publications
‘The Conditions of Life’, A. Illarionov, R. Layard and P. Orszag, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 165, August 1993.
‘Dumping on Free Trade: The US Import Trade Laws’, P. Orszag and J. Stiglitz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 210, October 1994.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage

News Posted: 20/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal

Guest Post: Time to Recapitalize Banks Fully

As debate continues over the release of the second half of the Treasury Department’s Troubled Asset Relief Program, Peter Boone and Simon Johnson argue that it’s time to stop taking half steps and make sweeping moves to fight bank insolvency. Boone is chairman of Effective Intervention, a U.K.-based charity, and a research associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, and Johnson is a former IMF chief economist, and is currently a professor at MIT Sloan School of Management and a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. They run the economic crisis website BaselineScenario.com

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on 15th January 2009.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Not a question of faith

Control over admissions is what makes a difference to a school, writes Peter Wilby. Unfortunately, there is not a scrap of evidence that the success of church or other faith schools has anything to do with religious teaching, moral ethos or principled commitment to equality. All the research, mostly from the London School of Economics, shows the schools' apparent success is almost entirely explained by the characteristics of the pupils who attend them.

This article apperared in the Guardian on the 6th January 2009.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?’, by Steve Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.72 , November 2006.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Steve Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/01/2009      [Back to the Top]

Amdocs on Marketwatch

When 0% isn't low enough

That's not really the case, and it is why the Fed statement stressed the wide-ranging open market operations it will use to inject money into the economy and drive down interest rates along the entire interest-rate curve, not just at the short end.

"We need to have significant inflation: 2 per cent is not enough to improve solvency significantly, and we may experience 5-10 per cen for a year or two," Johnson and Peter Boone of the London School of Economics wrote in a recent posting on WSJ.com."Inflation has major drawbacks and creates its own risks, but compared to the alternatives, it would be a relief."

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation/Effective Intervention Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Republika, Serbia

Crni (finansijski) oktobar u Velikoj Britaniji

... je nego u svim vecim razvijenijim državama (‘Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain’, Centre for Economic Performance – LSE, 2007).

This article appeared in Republika, Serbia.
Related Publications
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling
by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed by Vladimir Pavlov on Chinese growth and rural subsidies.

This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 2nd December 2008.
Link to article.


Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed by Vladimir Pavlov on Chinese growth and rural subsidies.

This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 2nd December 2008.
Link to article.


Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily - Russia

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed by Vladimir Pavlov on Chinese growth and rural subsidies.

This article appeared in RBC Daily, Russia on the 2nd December 2008.
Link to article.


Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/12/2008      [Back to the Top]

Wall Street Journal Blogs, NY

Guest Post: Inflation Should Be Just Around the Corner

Peter Boone is chairman of Effective Intervention, a UK-based charity, and a research associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on the 24th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

News Posted: 24/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

News

Linda Yueh on the rise of China and impact on the U.S.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jeezera English on the 21st November 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
UTVi (India) - “Business Scene” discussing the financial crisis and Citigroup.
CBC Radio One (Canada) - “The Current” interviewed on flagship morning programme on the wider implications of China’s economic stimulus package
News Posted: 21/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Islington Gazette

Job losses 'to hit bars and eateries'

Professor Christopher Pissarides , of the London School of Economics, agreed the outlook for bar and restaurant workers in Islington was grim. He said: "I would expect bars and restaurants to be hit because they are small companies that cannot afford to keep workers on if there is a short-term fall in demand."

This article appeared in the Islington Gazette on the 19th November 2008.
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Response I did not stammer when the Queen asked me about the meltdown

Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the department of management, London School of Economics, comments on the Queen discussing the economy with him.

This article appeared in the The Guardian on the 18th of November 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”
News Posted: 14/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”
News Posted: 14/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera English

Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”
News Posted: 14/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5

Five Live Drive

Interview with Professor Luis Garicano, in which he talked about his conversation with Her Majesty The Queen about the credit crunch, at the opening of the New Academic Building.

Related Links

Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also mentioned in BBC Radio Bristol News:
Reference to Her Majesty The Queen opening the New Academic Building and asking why nobody saw the credit crunch coming.
News Posted: 05/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Employment for Students

'university is increasing social mobility'

University students looking for graduate jobs in London may be interested to hear that Labour policy is helping to improve social mobility, according to new government research. And it cites research from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, which shows the mobility improvements only started to take effect in 2000.

This article appeared on Employment for Students website on the 4th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

News Posted: 04/11/2008      [Back to the Top]

Macleans.ca Canada

A silver lining for Russia

Already, oil prices have dropped below the budget-critical $70 per barrel. If they go much lower, Russia will start running a deficit. Its rainy day reserves, designed to deal with low oil prices in times of crises, can only sustain the country for up to a year and a half. So far, there’s no sign the bottom has been reached, says Peter Boone , an associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics: “The world is at the start of what appears to be a potentially deep, global recession, and could expect demand for oil to fall sharply.”

This article appeared on Macleans.ca website on 30th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation programme webpage

News Posted: 30/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Sympatico MSN Finance Canada

Canadians struggle with what they earn

By pursuing money this way, we are, says economist Richard Layard, doomed to keep running on a "hedonic treadmill" that will only lead to trouble.

This article appeared in Sympatico MSN Finance, Toronto, Canada on the 21st October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

News Posted: 21/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Washington Post

Russian elite look to Kremlin for aid as wealth evaporates

Analysts said the financial crisis could strain the unspoken pact between Putin and the tycoons, who have been allowed to prosper as long as they do not challenge his rule. "They're going to be fighting to get money from the Kremlin, and behind the scenes, people inside the Kremlin will be fighting to get control of assets," said Peter Boone, an associate at the London School of Economics who studied the Russian economy for investment banks. "That's when the politics get tough."

This article appeared in the Washington Post on October 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Reuters News - USA

Kremlin holds key as crisis threatens oligarchs

"There is going to be an enormous political battle over who is going to be bailed out by the government's reserves," said Peter Boone, an associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article appeared in Reuters News on October 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also in
Sharewatch
Kremlin holds key as crisis threatens oligarchs
Easybourse
La crise met le Kremlin en position de force face aux oligarques
"Une énorme bataille politique va se jouer pour déterminer qui sera renfloué au moyen des réserves gouvernementales", déclare Peter Boone, de la London School of Economics and Political Science.
News Posted: 13/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Silicon.com

US firms get more out of IT than UK rivals

Three pieces of government-backed research have confirmed that effective use of IT can give companies a "significant" productivity boost. The first paper, 'It ain't what you do it's the way that you do IT' from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that US multi-national enterprises in the UK are eight per cent more productive than their UK counterparts. The researchers said more than 80 per cent of this productivity advantage can be explained by better use of IT.

This article appeared in Silicon.com on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005/6
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. - Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Office for National Statistics
'Americans do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 788, April 2007

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

Public Service Onlilne

Social mobility 'improved since 2000'


News Posted: 03/10/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Evening Standard

Brown had to act over HBOS

GIVEN the extraordinary events being played out on global capital markets, should we even be shocked by Lloyd's TSB gobbling up HBOS to create a new banking behemoth? Yes, we should, and not just because of its sheer size some 38 million people will bank or borrow with the combined group.

John Van Reenen's letter was printed in Readers' Views section of The Evening Standard on September 19, 2008
[No link available.]

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 19/09/2008      [Back to the Top]

Marketing Magazine (Ireland)

Ads under attack

John Fanning questions the argument made by author Oliver James that advertising is a bad influence on society.
Although the subject of happiness and the fulfilled life have been discussed ever since man emerged as homo erectus, it has taken on a renewed lease of life since the Nobel Prize for economics was awarded for the first time to a psychologist, Daniel Kahneman, in 2002 for his studies in hedonic psychology and was the subject of British peer Richard Layard's Happiness: Lessons From a New Science.

This article appeared in Marketing Magazine (Ireland) on June 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Delivering on absence management at Royal Mail

A London School of Economics (LSE) report out last month found that between 2004-07, Royal Mail reduced absence rates for its 167,000-strong workforce from 7% to 5%. About 3,600 employees who had previously been absent were back at work, saving the group Ł227m.

This article appeared in Personnel Today on June 12, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage
News Posted: 12/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

Nick Bloom’s column argues that the wave of uncertainty troubling the markets will likely induce a recession – and render policy instruments powerless to prevent it.

This article appeared online in Vox on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Wall Street Journal
Secondary sources: recession?, Obama bailout, $4 gas
Writing for the voxeu blog, Nicholas Bloom says that the credit crisis will likely lead to recession. “So the current situation is a perfect storm — a huge surge in uncertainty that is not only generating a rapid slowdown in activity but also limiting the effectiveness of standard monetary and fiscal policy to prevent this.”

Economist's View (blog site)
Will the credit crunch lead to recession?
Nick Bloom’s article argues that "A recession looks likely," and that policy won't be able to prevent it from happening.

Saturday 14 June
Kathimerini (Greece)
"The credit crisis will probably lead to widespread recession." Article by Nick Bloom on how the credit crunch is inevitable given the state of uncertainty in the markets.
Link to article
News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Resource Investor

Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

In an article for Resource Investor, Nick Bloom writes "Much like the credit crunch today, the Great Depression began with a stock market crash and a meltdown of the financial system."

This article appeared in Resource Investor (Herndon, VA, USA) on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/06/2008      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

A star-studded cast

Profile of Nick Bloom, an associate in the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education Supplement on May 29, 2008
Link to article

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

The World Today

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss corruption in China and the Sichuan earthquake.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service - The World Today programme on May 19, 2008
[No link available]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further interviews
Monday 12 May
CNBC Europe Tonight
Discussing the economic implications of the earthquake in China.
Monday 19 May
BBC News Channel (formerly News 24)
Discussing the Chinese Government's handling of the Sichuan earthquake
Tuesday 20 May
BBC World Service - Hewshour
Discussing the economic implications of the Sichuan earthquake
[No links available]
News Posted: 19/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

The World Today

Linda Yueh interviewed to discuss corruption in China and the Sichuan earthquake.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service - The World Today programme on May 19, 2008
[No link available]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further interviews
Monday 12 May
CNBC Europe Tonight
Discussing the economic implications of the earthquake in China.
Monday 19 May
BBC News Channel (formerly News 24)
Discussing the Chinese Government's handling of the Sichuan earthquake
Tuesday 20 May
BBC World Service - Hewshour
Discussing the economic implications of the Sichuan earthquake
[No links available]
News Posted: 19/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Politics Today

ESRC: Closing the productivity gap in Ireland

The ESRC Public Policy Seminar research briefing ‘Sub-sectoral productivity in Nothern Ireland’ is funded jointly by the ESRC and the DETI (Northern Ireland). The briefing accompanied a one-day seminar that explored the issue of Northern Ireland’s productivity held in Belfast on 22 April 2008.
The briefing featured presentations by the two seminar speakers Dr Chiara Criscuolo (BSc, MSc, PhD), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Professor Richard Harris (BA, MA, PhD), Director of the Centre for Public Policy for Regions (CPPR) and the Cairncross Professor of Applied Economics at the University of Glasgow.

This article appeared in Politics Today on May 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Chiara Criscuolo webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Further press cutting
Wednesday 14 May
Genetic Engineering News (New Rochelle, NY, USA)
Closing the productivity gap in Northern Ireland
The briefing features presentations by the two seminar speakers Dr Chiara Criscuolo (BSc, MSc, PhD), Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.
News Posted: 13/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Reuters

Risks mount for stressed traders as markets gyrate

Two Citigroup workers , including a trader, fell from office blocks in London and Miami in 2006. ‘The pressure on traders when the market goes wrong is always huge,’ said Tim Leunig, a lecturer in the economic history department at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). ‘There will be a lot of bitten fingernails today. It is exactly the same, you can lose you job, your standard of living and you won't get it back, that's pressure.’

This article appeared in Reuters news on May 5, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also in
Birmingham Post
Rise in suicides as credit crunch stress gets to traders
News Posted: 05/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Royal Mail strategy to tackle sick days reaps big savings

Royal Mail has saved many times the cost of a 46m ($91m) investment in sickness absence management in a programme that could generate savings of 1.45bn a year if applied to the worst-affected parts of the economy, according to a new LSE report. Article includes comments from Professor David Marsden who conducted the research.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on May 2, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Royal Mail Report, ‘Value of Rude Health’ by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the CEP Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage
News Posted: 02/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Clinics at work cut sicknotes, says study

David Marsden, a professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said there would be a huge bonus for the economy if similar schemes could be introduced in the 13 industrial sectors with the poorest occupational health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on May 1, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage
News Posted: 01/05/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on China's new banking regulations.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on China's new banking regulations.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Visible measure that help reduce absenteeism

According to a London School of Economics' analysis of health and well-being policies across the group, such initiatives have saved the Royal Mail as much as Ł227m over three years by cutting absence across its 180,000 strong workforce from seven to just under five per cent between 2004 and 2007.

The article is referring to the Centre for Economic Performance Royal Mail study by David Marsden.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 17, 2008
[No working link available]

Related Publications
'Human Resource Practices and Employment Stability: Evidence from the European Structure of Earning Survey - ESES', by Simone Moriconi and David Marsden, work in progress
'Incentive Pay Systems and the Management of Human Resources in France and Great Britain', by Richard Belfield, Salima Benhamou and David Marsden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.796, May 2007

Related links
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Pay Inequalities and Economic Performance (PIEP) Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 17/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

ABC News online (Australia)

Cigarette price hike 'leads to more intense smoking'

Francesca Cornaglia spoke at the Australian National University in Canberra to challenge several policies aimed at reducing the harm associated with smoking.

This article appeared on ABC News online (Australia) on April 7, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Private versus Public Smoke Exposure', Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, work in progress
Taxes, Cigarette Consumption and Smoking Intensity by Jérôme Adda and Francesca Cornaglia, American Economic Review, Vol.96, Issue 4, September 2006

Related links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 07/04/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liberal Democrats - London, UK

Government must wake up to cost of mental health

Danny Alexander writes "Richard Layard’s report highlighted the cost of mental health four years ago, yet the Government is still commissioning reviews rather than tackling the problem."

This article appeared in Liberal Democrats - London, UK on March 17, 2008
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

Liberal Democrats - London, UK

Government must wake up to cost of mental health

Danny Alexander writes "Richard Layard’s report highlighted the cost of mental health four years ago, yet the Government is still commissioning reviews rather than tackling the problem."

This article appeared in Liberal Democrats - London, UK on March 17, 2008
Link to article.

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/03/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Is it worth it?

Researchers at the Centre for the Economics of Education have used data on earnings, social class and education to distinguish the effects of private schooling from other advantages that students at such schools may enjoy (such as having richer, better-educated parents). Francis Green, one of the researchers said “Private education is a consumption good, not just an investment. Long gone are the days of spartan dormitories and cold showers—kids in the private sector now have fabulous science labs and sports facilities, and access to a huge range of subjects and activities.”

This article appeared in the Economist on February 28, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for private and state school teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Kiddicare - Peterborough, UK

New research downplays impact of smokingi n pregnancy

In her research report, Emma Tominey, research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, conceded however that smoking is not completely harmless.

This article appeared in Kiddicare - Peterborough, UK on February 15, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Further press cutting
Thursday 14 February
Tobacco.org
Smoking during pregnancy hurts poor most
A British report suggests smoking while pregnant may be less damaging to a foetus than many people have been led to believe. Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said the effects are almost negligible if women stop smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, The Times reported Thursday.
News Posted: 15/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 14/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

We don't need any more immigrants, says Labour adviser

Adair Turner outlined his views in a speech to the Centre for Economic Performance last year and submitted them to the Lords economic affairs committee.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Adair Turner is an Associate of the Centre for Economic Performance Policy Committee
Adair Turner webpage
News Posted: 13/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Hard work ahead to promote apprenticeships

In an article co-written with Iain Vallance (former president of CBI), Professor Richard Layard says: "Now at last a government has acknowledged that for very many people the best way to learn is while earning - through apprenticeship. It is this, linked to part-time education relevant to the job, that is going to close our skills gap."

This article appeared in the Financial Times on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Little India

What price happiness?

Says Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics and author of the 2005 book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science: ‘People don't want to think they live in a world of ruthless competition where everyone is against everyone. Valuable things are being lost, such as community values, solidarity.’

This article appeared in Little India online on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

Further press cuttings
Monday 11 February
Daily Telegraph
Family holidays: the expert's advice
Holidays, according to Professor Richard Layard, author of Happiness: A New Science, are vital to personal wellbeing. They are also, he says, extremely important for families.
News Posted: 10/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

Little India

What price happiness?

Says Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics and author of the 2005 book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science: ‘People don't want to think they live in a world of ruthless competition where everyone is against everyone. Valuable things are being lost, such as community values, solidarity.’

This article appeared in Little India online on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

Further press cuttings
Monday 11 February
Daily Telegraph
Family holidays: the expert's advice
Holidays, according to Professor Richard Layard, author of Happiness: A New Science, are vital to personal wellbeing. They are also, he says, extremely important for families.
News Posted: 10/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Business

Job creation schemes

Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Business

Job creation schemes

Something that is part of the point of such schemes, as pointed out by Richard Layard who is the intellectual father of them.

This article appeared in The Business on February 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
'Welfare to Work and the New Deal' by Richard Layard, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.15, January 2001
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 08/02/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.
News Posted: 29/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.
News Posted: 29/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

RBC Daily (Russia)

Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.
News Posted: 29/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.
News Posted: 18/01/2008      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Grammars 'need to open up'

According to latest research, a grammar school education can have "net positive effects", but selection systems are skewed hugely in favour of well-off families. One study by the Centre for Economic Performance — based on selective education in Northern Ireland — found that expanding the number of grammar school places in the late 1980s boosted GCSE grades across the province.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Too much social mobility in Britain

The common belief that Britain is socially immobile comes from a study published in 2005 by the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Too much social mobility in Britain

The common belief that Britain is socially immobile comes from a study published in 2005 by the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

New homes target 'not enough to avert crisis'

Government plans to build three million more homes by 2020 are nowhere near enough to avert a crisis that could see an entire generation unable to get on the property ladder, a report by the independent body – the National Housing and Planning Advice Unit - has warned. Stephen Nickell, one of the study's authors, said yesterday: "If we fail to act then a generation of buyers will be unable to get a foothold on the housing ladder, not just in London, but across large swathes of England."

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on October 29, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Stephen Nickell is an Associate of the Labour Markets Research Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Stephen Nickell webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

New homes target 'not enough to avert crisis'

Government plans to build three million more homes by 2020 are nowhere near enough to avert a crisis that could see an entire generation unable to get on the property ladder, a report by the independent body – the National Housing and Planning Advice Unit - has warned. Stephen Nickell, one of the study's authors, said yesterday: "If we fail to act then a generation of buyers will be unable to get a foothold on the housing ladder, not just in London, but across large swathes of England."

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on October 29, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Stephen Nickell is an Associate of the Labour Markets Research Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Stephen Nickell webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2007      [Back to the Top]

CareandHealth (press release)

Speech in the House of Commons, by Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP

Richard Layard’s argument for funding talking therapies mentioned in the House of Commons speech given by the Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP. [No working link]

This article appeared in Care and Health - London UK on September 13, 2007
[No link to article]

Related Publications
'The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders' by Richard Layard
Download

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Holy alliance

The government claims to be following parents' wishes in opening more religious schools: they tend to be popular and often have good exam results. Yet a study in 2006 by researchers at the London School of Economics showed that this apparent success was due to the social characteristics of the children they admitted, rather than to superior teaching or ethos.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006 by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva
In brief: 'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Labour and the unions - down tools, lads

Today’s unions are a shadow of those that humiliated James Callaghan’s government in the 1970s. A decade of steady economic growth, says Alex Bryson, has eroded the premium that unionised workers earn over their unorganised brethren.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues:  The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’.
Download
‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.768, December 2006.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Labour and the unions - down tools, lads

Today’s unions are a shadow of those that humiliated James Callaghan’s government in the 1970s. A decade of steady economic growth, says Alex Bryson, has eroded the premium that unionised workers earn over their unorganised brethren.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Press Release ‘Union Blues:  The Bleak Outlook for Most of Britain’s Trade Unions’.
Download
‘Accounting for Collective Action: Resource Acquisition and Mobilisation in British Unions’ by Alex Bryson and Paul Willman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.768, December 2006.

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Paul Willman is Professor in Employment Relations and Organisational Behaviour
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

ABC online

WorkChoices will demoralise employees: economist

Professor Richard Freeman, from Harvard University's [sic] Centre for Economic Performance, has told a Brisbane industrial relations conference that WorkChoices discourages efficient bargaining between employers and workers.

This article appeared in ABC online - Australia on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Sun

Workers are laziest on Fridays

A study from London’s Centre for Economic Performance found workers were sluggish on Mondays, perked up on Tuesday then became tired as the week went on

This article appeared in The Sun on September 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Bad Timing: Are Workers More Productive on Certain Days of the Week?', Manpower Human Resources Lab Briefing Paper, August 2007 Download
‘Are There Day of the Week Productivity Effects?’ by Alex Bryson and John Forth, Manpower Human Resources Lab Discussion Paper No.4, July 2007

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
John Forth webpage
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

Further press
The Daily Mail
On Tuesday we work on Friday we shirk
We work fewer hours on a Friday than any ohter day of the week, according to researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance.
News Posted: 08/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview
Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
Details
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview
Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
Details
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview
Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
Details
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

THES

'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage
News Posted: 07/09/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Cameron should count on happiness

Richard Layard, one of those responsible for coming up with the idea of the non-accelerating inflation rate of unemployment in the 1980s, has become a strong advocate of policies designed to maximise happiness.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Business

The economics of happiness: just state control with a smile

One of the key pieces of evidence that happiness economists rely upon are statistics spanning several decades in various countries showing increasing GDP but happiness flatlining. The reason for this, given by Lord Layard from the London School of Economics, and others, is the persistence of income inequality, which they claim offsets any happiness gained from a larger economy.

This article appeared in The Business on August 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Business

The economics of happiness: just state control with a smile

One of the key pieces of evidence that happiness economists rely upon are statistics spanning several decades in various countries showing increasing GDP but happiness flatlining. The reason for this, given by Lord Layard from the London School of Economics, and others, is the persistence of income inequality, which they claim offsets any happiness gained from a larger economy.

This article appeared in The Business on August 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

SmartMoney - Russia

Ñåìåéíûå öåííîñòè

Jose V. Rodriguez Mora, co-author with Maia Guell (Centre for Economic Performance) and Chris Telmer, was interviewed by a Russian journalist from SmartMoney regarding intergenerational mobility.

This article appeared in SmartMoney - Russia on August 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility and the Informative Content of Surnames’, Discussion Paper No.810, Centre for Economic Performance, July 2007 by Maia Guell, Jose V. Rodriguez Mora and Chris Telmer


Related links
Maia Guell webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

SmartMoney - Russia

Ñåìåéíûå öåííîñòè

Jose V. Rodriguez Mora, co-author with Maia Guell (Centre for Economic Performance) and Chris Telmer, was interviewed by a Russian journalist from SmartMoney regarding intergenerational mobility.

This article appeared in SmartMoney - Russia on August 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility and the Informative Content of Surnames’, Discussion Paper No.810, Centre for Economic Performance, July 2007 by Maia Guell, Jose V. Rodriguez Mora and Chris Telmer


Related links
Maia Guell webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 13/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Australian

Don't get sniffy at 'affluenza'

British economist Richard Layard has another solution that would please [Clive] Hamilton [director of the Australia Institute]. Slug the rich with high taxes until inequality is cured.

This article appeared in The Australian on August 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Further press cutting
The Australian
Promises that cannot be kept
Article refers to a series of lectures on Happiness given by Richard Layard, emeritus professor of economics at LSE.
News Posted: 01/08/2007      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

Burmese service - International Business Analysis

Linda Yueh discussed China's trade surplus and economic growth on the programme.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on July 30, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Cairns Post

Busting the myth

Andrew Charlton, on the other hand, is a renowned Australian economist working at the prestigious London School of Economics. He's eminently qualified to talk about the facts and forces driving our financial system and the markets and wealth swirling around within it. And he's got a message for everyone sucked in by the ‘myth of Australia's economic superheroes’. ‘The Howard Government has been carried from one election victory to another on the crest of an economic wave that it did not create’ Charlton writes in his new book Ozonomics.

This article appeared in The Cairns Post - Australia on July 14, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes (2007) by Andrew Charlton
Random House: Australia. Release – July 2007.
Details

Related links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Exduco.net - Tuscany, Italy

How productivity benefits from competition

Chad Syverson, associate professor of economics at the University of Chicago and a productivity specialist spoke to students and faculty at a Brown Bag lunch lecture hosted by The Becker Center of Chicago Price Theory and sponsored by Vishal Verma, ’07 (XP-76), May 10 at the Charles M. Harper Center. His lecture mentioned the Centre for Economic Performance study on productivity – how Nick Bloom’s and John Van Reenen’s research included interviewing managers at 750 medium-sized firms in the United States, United Kingdom, France and Germany. The study correlated high management evaluations with high productivity, Syverson said. Two factors influenced productivity: the amount of competition and “prima geniture,” in which a family-owned firm passes leadership down to the eldest son.

This article appeared online on Exduco.net - Tuscany, Italy
Link to article

Related Publications
Bloom, N. and Van Reenen, J. (2007), ‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2007      [Back to the Top]

Expansión, Spain

El día soñado de Brown

John Van Reenen, director del Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics, asegura, en cambio, que las críticas a Brown son ‘un poco injustas’. Según Van Reenen, quienes otorgan el mérito ‘a las reformas de Thatcher, al buen hacer del Banco de Inglaterra o a las importaciones baratas desde China’, olvidan que el Gobierno pudo oponerse a todo ello, pero no lo hizo.
(Source: Lexis Nexis News)

This article appeared in Expansión, Spain on June 26, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Blair's Economic Legacy. 'In brief' article by John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1, Summer 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Northern Echo

Milburn addresses housing problems

This week, a London School of Economics study found that British children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives than in most other wealthy countries. It said ten years of a Labour Government had done no more than prevent the decline in social mobility in the Seventies and Eighties from worsening.

This article appeared in the Northern Echo on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Northern Echo

Milburn addresses housing problems

This week, a London School of Economics study found that British children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives than in most other wealthy countries. It said ten years of a Labour Government had done no more than prevent the decline in social mobility in the Seventies and Eighties from worsening.

This article appeared in the Northern Echo on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Kansas City News

Pursuit of happiness

Recently, Lord Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, argued that happiness should be taught alongside core subjects such as English and math.

This article appeared in the Kansas City Star on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Schools need to get serious on teaching values

A Letter from Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 19, 2007
Link to published letter

Related Publications
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Political Affairs Magazine

Tony Blair's real legacy - minimum wage and union recognition

Tony Blair’s critics should not dismiss significant policy achievements of the past ten years. Recent research by Professor David Metcalf of LSE reveals the UK’s first national minimum wage has lifted out of poverty tens of thousands of low-paid workers with no detrimental impact on job creation.

This article appeared in Political Affairs Magazine on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment? by David Metcalf, CEP Discussion Paper No.781, April 2007

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

Public Finance Magazine

Faith primary schools no better than secular, study finds

Pupils in faith primary schools do no better than children in secular state primaries once covert selection has been eliminated, research from the London School of Economics has found.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils? by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece 12/1
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Trumpet

Schools flunk dropout test

The education system in Britain is failing. The London School of Economics labels the 1 million unemployed, non-student young people in Britain a “lost generation” that is proportionally twice the size of those in Germany and France.

This article appeared in The Trumpet on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Trumpet

Schools flunk dropout test

The education system in Britain is failing. The London School of Economics labels the 1 million unemployed, non-student young people in Britain a “lost generation” that is proportionally twice the size of those in Germany and France.

This article appeared in The Trumpet on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Parents 'buying' places at grammar schools

A report published this week by the London School of Economics said that a grammar school education could be very beneficial to children from poor backgrounds. But it warned that many could not get in because admissions procedures were skewed against them.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Schools urged to teach children how to be happy

Children should learn about moral values and the way to happiness from a new cohort of school teachers specifically trained for the job, according to new academic research by Richard Layard, of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/06/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Happiness tsar' warns of therapy funding shortage

Professor Richard Layard is concerned that patients suffering from anxiety and depression will not benefit unless cash is set aside for training up therapists.

This article appeared in The Independent on May 6, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Download

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
News Posted: 06/05/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The illusion of inclusion

According to The Cost of Exclusion by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, roughly one in five young people face a lifetime on benefits, running the risk of falling into crime and mental or physical ill-health.

This article appeared in The Independent on April 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Young People Now - April 11, 2007
Youth exclusion: Youth exlusion is costing the UK billions, say economists
Action to reduce youth exclusion could save the UK economy Ł3,650m a year, a report by the Centre for Economic Performance this week claims.
The Herald - April 11, 2007
A lesson for labour
Evening News 24 - April 11, 2007
the Ł62m cost of the jobless generation

Newsletter - April 11, 2007
Lack of jobs for young people 'is costing us millions'
Evening Chronicle - April 11, 2007
Huge cost of young jobless
Western Morning News - April 11, 2007
Ł5m cost of the lost generation
[No links available]
News Posted: 11/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

Birmingham Post

A workplace strategy focused on people

As a report from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE in October 2005 found, UK businesses have much to learn from their counterparts in the US in the way they use IT to improve productivity.

This article appeared in the Birmingham Post on April 3, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Toronto Star

Don't worry, be happy...or not?

An explosion in happiness research has consistently shown for some time now that the link between rising income and rising well-being has broken down. Leading British economist Richard Layard is among a fast-proliferating group of economists paying attention to this paradox at the centre of modern society.

This article appeared in The Toronto Star (Canada) on April 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Further press cuttings
The Sunday Telegraph - April 1, 2007
The real business
Some 15 per cent of the British population suffers from depression, and recent research from the London School of Economics says that this costs the economy more than pounds 17bn a year. Aim-listed Ultrasis hopes its Beating the Blues software will address this market and reward its 12,000 retail shareholders.
News Posted: 01/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Toronto Star

Don't worry, be happy...or not?

An explosion in happiness research has consistently shown for some time now that the link between rising income and rising well-being has broken down. Leading British economist Richard Layard is among a fast-proliferating group of economists paying attention to this paradox at the centre of modern society.

This article appeared in The Toronto Star (Canada) on April 1, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Further press cuttings
The Sunday Telegraph - April 1, 2007
The real business
Some 15 per cent of the British population suffers from depression, and recent research from the London School of Economics says that this costs the economy more than pounds 17bn a year. Aim-listed Ultrasis hopes its Beating the Blues software will address this market and reward its 12,000 retail shareholders.
News Posted: 01/04/2007      [Back to the Top]

AlterNet - San Francisco, CA

Why having more no longer makes us happy

In the words of the economist Richard Layard, "We now know that what people say about how they feel corresponds closely to the actual levels of activity in different parts of the brain, which can be measured in standard scientific ways."

This article appeared in AlterNet - San Francisco, CA on March 22, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Race to close productivity gap

Britain has been slowly but steadily catching up in productivity to the US. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance points out: “Since the mid-1990s, American productivity growth has been exceptionally strong, so we have done well even to keep up.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further Press Cuttings
The Financial Times, Wednesday 22 March
The quest for improved productivity
Quote by John Van Reenen used again in article by Scheherazade Daneshkhu discussing the latest Budget announcement from Gordon Brown.
Link to article
News Posted: 21/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Race to close productivity gap

Britain has been slowly but steadily catching up in productivity to the US. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance points out: “Since the mid-1990s, American productivity growth has been exceptionally strong, so we have done well even to keep up.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further Press Cuttings
The Financial Times, Wednesday 22 March
The quest for improved productivity
Quote by John Van Reenen used again in article by Scheherazade Daneshkhu discussing the latest Budget announcement from Gordon Brown.
Link to article
News Posted: 21/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Race to close productivity gap

Britain has been slowly but steadily catching up in productivity to the US. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance points out: “Since the mid-1990s, American productivity growth has been exceptionally strong, so we have done well even to keep up.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further Press Cuttings
The Financial Times, Wednesday 22 March
The quest for improved productivity
Quote by John Van Reenen used again in article by Scheherazade Daneshkhu discussing the latest Budget announcement from Gordon Brown.
Link to article
News Posted: 21/03/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Wellbeing is not about the individual - it's about relationships

While starting from urgent and appropriate concerns, both Oliver James and Richard Layard, cited by Madeleine Bunting as key players in the "politics of wellbeing", risk promoting the very individualism they identify as being the cause of 'social recession'.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related publication
The Depression Report by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

For a full list of articles in the Politics of Wellbeing debate click here


News Posted: 22/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

La Tribune

Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
[No direct link to article available.]

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
Details

‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
Details

Related link
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage
Richard Jackman webpage
News Posted: 20/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

La Tribune

Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
[No direct link to article available.]

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
Details

‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
Details

Related link
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage
Richard Jackman webpage
News Posted: 20/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

It's a mad world

Richard Layard's Happiness Forum meetings and his research into 'wellbeing' featured in the column by Oliver James.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report by Richard Layard
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Socialist Worker

Downwardly mobile

A Report from the Centre for Economic Performance for the Sutton Trust published in 2005 is cited in this article in the Socialist Worker (Issue 2037, 10th February). The article says that it is harder for disadvantaged people to progress in society now than it was when the present Prime Minister came to office.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker online on February 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

Socialist Worker

Downwardly mobile

A Report from the Centre for Economic Performance for the Sutton Trust published in 2005 is cited in this article in the Socialist Worker (Issue 2037, 10th February). The article says that it is harder for disadvantaged people to progress in society now than it was when the present Prime Minister came to office.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker online on February 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2007      [Back to the Top]

News-Medical.net

Money cannot buy you happiness

"For example, as Professor Richard Layard of the LSE emphasises, improving health, particularly mental health, would be an effective way of making people ...
This artical featured in News-Medical.net on 29 January, 2007. Link to article

Related Links
The Depression Report Click to download
Richard Layard's webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Stub it out

Article mentions new research on the effects of the smoking ban in Scotland, co-authored by Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Economist online on January 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Short-Run Economic Effects of the Scottish Smoking Ban’, by J. Adda, S. Berlinski and S. Machin, International Journal of Epidemiology, December 2006. Link to abstract

Related Links
Stephen Machin's webpage
News Posted: 04/01/2007      [Back to the Top]

Radio Singapore

FOCUS 2006 - Economic Trends

Linda Yueh was recorded for ‘FOCUS 2006 - Economic Trends’ broadcast by Radio Singapore.

This broadcast featured on Radio Singapore on December 22, 2006
Link to transcript.

Related links
Linda Yueh's webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva of the Centre for Economic Performance shows.

This article appeared in the The Daily Mail on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg Radio

Bloomberg on the economy

John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance interviewed on Bloomberg Radio's 'Bloomberg on the Economy' programme.

Radio programme broadcast on December 6, 2006
Link to bloomberg radio website for archive programmes

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
News Posted: 06/12/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Revolutionary' economist wins Nobel Prize

Article about US economist Edmund Phelps who has won a Nobel Prize, officially called the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences. Includes quote from Professor Christopher Pissarides, of the Centre for Economic Performance: ‘The prize was richly deserved and long overdue. He revolutionised our way of thinking about the inflation-unemployment trade-off, which has influenced policymakers since the 1960s.’

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article.
News Posted: 11/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

EasyBourse

EU will fail to meet 2010 Innovation, RandD goals - Study

The European Union has no hope of meeting its targets for boosting innovation by 2010, and may never achieve its goals without wide-ranging reform, LSE said Tuesday. In 2000, the EU agreed on a strategy - known as the Lisbon Agenda - for closing the productivity gap with the US by the end of this decade. But according to a report by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, ‘progress has been poor.’

This article appeared in EasyBourse on 10 Ocotober 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
CEP Policy Analysis pageThe Lisbon Agenda
News Posted: 10/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Airbus's role as a business model is in question

When the head of Arcelor was trying earlier this year to fend off the take-over bid from Mittal, he described his company as the Airbus of European steel - a symbol of Europe's unity and its ability to compete with all comers in strategic industries.

A few weeks ago Christopher Mohn, German head of Lycos Europe, called for the creation of an Airbus of the internet, a counterpart to US rivals such as Google and Ebay. Mr Mohn was referring to Quaero, the search engine project backed by the French and German governments and several big companies. Catching up with Google might take a long time, he said, but the attempt was worth making...

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 9 October 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Links
Sir Geoffrey Owen's webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Airbus's role as a business model is in question

When the head of Arcelor was trying earlier this year to fend off the take-over bid from Mittal, he described his company as the Airbus of European steel - a symbol of Europe's unity and its ability to compete with all comers in strategic industries.

A few weeks ago Christopher Mohn, German head of Lycos Europe, called for the creation of an Airbus of the internet, a counterpart to US rivals such as Google and Ebay. Mr Mohn was referring to Quaero, the search engine project backed by the French and German governments and several big companies. Catching up with Google might take a long time, he said, but the attempt was worth making...

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 9 October 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Links
Sir Geoffrey Owen's webpage
News Posted: 09/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

THES

Data no help in campaign for better pay

Academics earn more per hour than most other highly qualified workers, but they put in more overtime than most other professionals in the public sector, a report has revealed. The report’s authors are Dr Vignoles, reader in the economics of education at the Institute of Education and lecturer at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE and James Walker.

This article appeared in the THES on 6 October, 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Publications
Higher Education Academic Salaries in the UK, Anna Vignoles with James Walker & Mark Collins, Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website
News Posted: 06/10/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

UK children the unhappiest in Europe, says study

Britain's 12 million children and teenagers are the unhappiest and unhealthiest of any wealthy European country, a major new study has revealed. These findings are seen as evidence for an independent inquiry into what makes a good childhood, being launched next week by the Government's ‘happiness tsar’, the economist Lord Layard.

This article appeared in The Independent on September 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
The Good Childhood Inquiry Details
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing research programme webpage
The Happiness programme webpage
News Posted: 11/09/2006      [Back to the Top]

Charlotte Observer (N Carolina)

Why aren't we happier?

We have more money and more stuff; now we just want more joy
Though the US has had increasing prosperity and economic security there has been no corresponding increase in contentment. This happiness flatline, prominent British economist Richard Layard calls a "plateau of happiness," a disconnect between what we have and how we feel. Layard's critically acclaimed book, "Happiness: Lessons from a New Science," was recently published in paperback.

This article appeared in the Charlotte Observer, N. Carolina news online on August 19, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness research webpage
News Posted: 19/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC

Today Programme

Nick Bloom, Programme Director of the Productivity and Innovation Research Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance spoke on 'IT and Productivity' in a broadcast for the BBC Today Programme.

Radio interview on the BBC Today Programme online on August 11, 2006
Link to broadcast

Related Publications
It Ain't What You Do, It's the Way that You Do I.T. - Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related Links
Nick Bloom's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview
News Posted: 09/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview
News Posted: 09/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

British children among Europe's 'unhappiest and unhealthiest'

Research comparing children's wellbeing across 25 countries paints a picture of dysfunctional British families failing to talk to each other or eat together. Government adviser Lord Layard has already announced an inquiry into the wellbeing of British children.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on August 6, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
The Good Childhood Inquiry
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing research programme webpage
News Posted: 06/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Express

Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research
News Posted: 05/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Financial Express

Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research
News Posted: 05/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Bay Windows

Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Bay Windows

Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

Bay Windows

Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage
News Posted: 03/08/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Wall Street Journal

Why executives speak out

The columnist refers to a letter in which he is directed to look at work the LSE has done in evaluating happiness. Richard Layard, an LSE expert on happiness ponders what happiness is anyway, channelling evidence from neuroscience, psychology and surveys.

This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
July 28, 2006
Seychelles Nation
Happy Planet Index (HPI) -Islands are homes of happy people

The Seychellois are the second happiest people in Africa after Sao Tome and Principe, another island nation, according to the Happy Planet Index (HPI) designed by the British think tank New Economics Foundation (NEF). Richard Layard, director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, said that the index was an interesting way to tackle the issue of modern life’s environmental impact. ‘It reminds us that it is not good enough to be happy today if we are impoverishing future generations through global warming. Over the last 50 years, living standards in the West have improved enormously but we have become no happier’.
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

THES

There's more than one way to satisfy curiosity

The article looks at the rising academic stars in different subjects including Professor John Van Reenen, the director of the LSE Centre for Economic Performance. His study of 730 companies in the UK, US, France and Germany found that the caricature of the UK being badly managed is accurate.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Educational Supplement on July 28, 2006
[No link available.]

Related Publications
The joint McKinsey Group/CEP Report, Management Practices across Firms and Nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen published in June 2005.
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen published the article Management Practices; the Impact on Company Performance in the Summer 2005 issue of CentrePiece Magazine.

Related Links
John Van Reenen’s webpage
The Productivity and Innovation research programme at CEP
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

THES

There's more than one way to satisfy curiosity

The article looks at the rising academic stars in different subjects including Professor John Van Reenen, the director of the LSE Centre for Economic Performance. His study of 730 companies in the UK, US, France and Germany found that the caricature of the UK being badly managed is accurate.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Educational Supplement on July 28, 2006
[No link available.]

Related Publications
The joint McKinsey Group/CEP Report, Management Practices across Firms and Nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen published in June 2005.
Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen published the article Management Practices; the Impact on Company Performance in the Summer 2005 issue of CentrePiece Magazine.

Related Links
John Van Reenen’s webpage
The Productivity and Innovation research programme at CEP
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Why lesbians may enjoy better wages

Authoritative new research highlights a "gay pay effect", which means that lesbians can earn 35% more than comparable straight women.

This article appeared in the BBC News on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

Further press cuttings:
BBC, Business, July 28, 2006
Lesbians 'earn bigger salaries'
Lesbians in couples earn more than heterosexual women in relationships - but for gay men the opposite is true, findings indicate. Academic research says gay women in couples earn 35% more than their straight counterparts.
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Why lesbians may enjoy better wages

Authoritative new research highlights a "gay pay effect", which means that lesbians can earn 35% more than comparable straight women.

This article appeared in the BBC News on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

Further press cuttings:
BBC, Business, July 28, 2006
Lesbians 'earn bigger salaries'
Lesbians in couples earn more than heterosexual women in relationships - but for gay men the opposite is true, findings indicate. Academic research says gay women in couples earn 35% more than their straight counterparts.
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Why lesbians may enjoy better wages

Authoritative new research highlights a "gay pay effect", which means that lesbians can earn 35% more than comparable straight women.

This article appeared in the BBC News on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

Further press cuttings:
BBC, Business, July 28, 2006
Lesbians 'earn bigger salaries'
Lesbians in couples earn more than heterosexual women in relationships - but for gay men the opposite is true, findings indicate. Academic research says gay women in couples earn 35% more than their straight counterparts.
News Posted: 28/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Be afraid of the happy brigade

The author of the article refers to Professor Richard Layard’s theories about how people can become happier: ‘Consider just three findings from the ‘new science of happiness’ as Richard Layard, the economist and Labour peer, describes it. Above about Ł15,000, increasing your income adds little to your happiness. Believing in God makes you happy. Getting divorced makes you unhappy. These facts explain why Westerners are no happier now than 50 years ago; our increased wealth has been accompanied by more divorce and less belief in God.’

This article appeared in the Times on July 27, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Be afraid of the happy brigade

The author of the article refers to Professor Richard Layard’s theories about how people can become happier: ‘Consider just three findings from the ‘new science of happiness’ as Richard Layard, the economist and Labour peer, describes it. Above about Ł15,000, increasing your income adds little to your happiness. Believing in God makes you happy. Getting divorced makes you unhappy. These facts explain why Westerners are no happier now than 50 years ago; our increased wealth has been accompanied by more divorce and less belief in God.’

This article appeared in the Times on July 27, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, says Sholto Byrnes

If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, comments Sholto Byrnes.

This article appeared in the Times on July 12, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group website

Further media item:
Saturday 8 July
ABC Radio (US)
Richard Layard gave an interview relayed across the US discussing how money cannot buy happiness.
[No link]
News Posted: 12/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, says Sholto Byrnes

If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, comments Sholto Byrnes.

This article appeared in the Times on July 12, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group website

Further media item:
Saturday 8 July
ABC Radio (US)
Richard Layard gave an interview relayed across the US discussing how money cannot buy happiness.
[No link]
News Posted: 12/07/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Searching for a cure for google envy

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance suggests that British groups have benefited greatly from US R&D spending simply by placing offices in Silicon Valley and paying attention to what is going on.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 20, 2006
[No link available]

Related Publications
How Special is the Special Relationship? Using the Impact of R&D Spillovers on UK Firms as a Test of Technology Sourcing, by Rachel Griffith, Rupert Harrison and John Van Reenen. CEP Discussion Paper No.659, November 2004

Further information
Rachel Griffith is a Deputy Director at the Institute for Fiscal Studies
Rupert Harrison is a Research Economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London
John Van Reenen's CEP webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Searching for a cure for google envy

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance suggests that British groups have benefited greatly from US R&D spending simply by placing offices in Silicon Valley and paying attention to what is going on.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 20, 2006
[No link available]

Related Publications
How Special is the Special Relationship? Using the Impact of R&D Spillovers on UK Firms as a Test of Technology Sourcing, by Rachel Griffith, Rupert Harrison and John Van Reenen. CEP Discussion Paper No.659, November 2004

Further information
Rachel Griffith is a Deputy Director at the Institute for Fiscal Studies
Rupert Harrison is a Research Economist at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and University College London
John Van Reenen's CEP webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 20/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Herald

'More therapists needed' to eradicate joblessness

Long-term unemployment would be more quickly eradicated if the government employed more psychotherapists, according to academics at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Herald on June 20, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard’s webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group, programme overview

Further press cuttings
Morning Star, June 20, 2006
Government urged to help mentally ill return to work
Professor Richard Layard of the London School of Economics says the government should make options for psychiatric treatment available to employees suffering from depression as this could help them get back to work.

News Posted: 20/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Therapy could 'cut benefits bill'

The UK incapacity benefit bill could be cut by spending more on psychotherapy, a group of economists says. The team from the London School of Economics says expanding therapy services would even pay for itself. The Depression Report, published on Monday, says a course of psychotherapy costs Ł750 - the same as a month's incapacity benefit and lost tax.

This article appeared in the BBC News online on June 19, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard’s webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4: The Today Programme

Richard Layard - The Depression Report

Interview with Richard Layard, the author of The LSE's Depression Report – published on Monday 19 June 2006. The report urges that psychological therapy should be made available to all people suffering from depression, chronic anxiety and schizophrenia.

This interview was broadcast on The Today Programme, BBC Radio 4 on June 19, 2006
Listen to the broadcast (MP3)

Related Publications
THE DEPRESSION REPORT: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders

Related Links
Mental Health Group webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Focus: Which Cameron really means business?: Why we are richer but no happier

Economists, used to dealing with hard numbers, have started to study happiness. Lord Richard Layard, the London School of Economics’ professor and Labour peer, is the most prominent British economist to turn his attention to happiness

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on May 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness research webpage
News Posted: 28/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

Noticias

Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme
News Posted: 17/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Buy, buy, buy: consumers fuel £1 trillion spending boom

Richard Layard said with regard to the figures about increased consumer spending in Britain: "The sad fact is that in the last 50 years people have not become happier...despite a huge increase in their consumption".

This article appeared in The Guardian on May 12, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness research webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

Further press cuttings
The Guardian, May 9, 2006
Another way ahead

TES, May 12, 2006
I'm happy to annoy the right-wing
News Posted: 12/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Making the apprenticeship work

How to help the 'forgotten half'. Rigid teaching styles are preventing the 'forgotten half' from attaining necessary skill levels, writes Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow in the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on May 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Hilary Steedman's webpage
The Education and Skills Programme
News Posted: 03/05/2006      [Back to the Top]

United Press International

Canadian study looks at urban sprawl

Researchers from the University of Toronto and London School of Economics are using satellite data and aerial photography to track the evolution of land use in the continental United States. The research is detailed in the May isse of The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

This article appeared in United Press International on April 26, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 121, Issue 2 - May 2006

Related Links
Henry Overman's webpage
The Globalisation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

Common Dreams Newswire

Study finds widening wage gap between immigrant and US-born workers

A new report by economists John Schmitt and Jonathan Wadsworth finds that the earnings gap between immigrant and US-born workers increased substantially between 1980 and 2000. The report, Changing Patterns in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the United States, 1980-2000, was written by John Schmitt, economist at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and Jonathan Wadsworth, economist at the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in Common Dreams Newswire Washington DC online on April 18, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Changing Patterns in the Relative Economic Performance of Immigrants to Great Britain and the United States, 1980-2000
by John Schmitt and Jonathan Wadsworth
CEP Election Analysis, April 2006, by Jonathan Wadsworth Immigration: the Evidence from Economic Research

Related Links
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 18/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Feel the benefits of foreign ownership

A joint LSE/McKinsey study found that French and German companies were even better than US ones at running shopfloor operations. Meanwhile, Nick Bloom, at the Centre for Economic Performance, said with regard to the reservations against foreign takeovers: "The French seem to think foreign takeovers and Anglo-Saxon practices are bad but things that work in the UK work there, too."

This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 10, 2006
Link to article

Further reading
Joint CEP/McKinsey Report, Management Practices Across Firms and Nations by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen

Further link
Productivity and Innovation Programme
News Posted: 10/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

Business Spotlight online

Does a minimum wage destroy jobs?

Is a minimum wage socially and economically meaningful or does it only increase unemployment?
Professor Stephen Machin of the Centre for Economic Performance answers in a 'Head-to-Head'.

This article appeared in Business Spotlight: Global Business, April 2006 Issue
Audio link


Further Reading
Minimum Wages and Firm Profitability
by Mirko Draca, Stephen Machin, John Van Reenen
Discussion Paper No 715, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, February 2006

The Effects of Minimum Wages on Employment: Theory and Evidence from Britain
by Richard Dickens, Stephen Machin, Alan Manning
Discussion Paper No 183, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, January 1994


Further links
Richard Dicken's webpage
Mirko Draca's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage
Alan Manning's webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage

The Labour Markets Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/04/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Family-run businesses 'perform poorly'

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group has found that objective assessments of managerial performance are important in explaining why UK companies tend to have lower productivity and profitability.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 15, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links: Nick Bloom’s webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage
CEP’s Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

Letters to the FT in response to CEP research results
Increase family directors' degree of accountability
Letter in response to research by the Centre for Economics Performance at LSE in "Family-run businesses perform poorly".
What matters is how the family business is handed on
Five years of research... (No direct link.)
“Sir, Five years of research by the Centre for Economics Performance at the London School of Economics and McKinsey is an expensive way to say "clogs to clogs in three generations.”
News Posted: 15/03/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'Red tape as bad, if not worse, in America' claims study

Research by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen discussed in article about the difference in productivity between UK and US firms.

This article appeared in The Independent on February 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Link
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.
News Posted: 28/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Education reforms risk widening social gap

The government's plans to increase "choice" in education risk widening social divisions rather than bringing about improvement in attainment. A report from the Centre for Economic Performance casts doubt on many of Labour's highest profile education policies.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related media articles [no link available]
School plan 'fails' The Times online 23.02.06
Has Labour's Ł17bn extra done any good for schools? The Daily Mail 23.02.06
New concession over schools as Blair faces key test of authority The Evening Standard 23.02.06
News Posted: 22/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Education reforms risk widening social gap

The government's plans to increase "choice" in education risk widening social divisions rather than bringing about improvement in attainment. A report from the Centre for Economic Performance casts doubt on many of Labour's highest profile education policies.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related media articles [no link available]
School plan 'fails' The Times online 23.02.06
Has Labour's Ł17bn extra done any good for schools? The Daily Mail 23.02.06
New concession over schools as Blair faces key test of authority The Evening Standard 23.02.06
News Posted: 22/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/02/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The best way back to work

Professor Richard Layard has said that spending on mental-health provision is desperately underfunded.

This article appeared in the Guardian on January 25, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage

The CEP's Wellbeing research programme
News Posted: 25/01/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

A productivity prescription: how the US has pulled away from Europe and Japan

Professor John Van Reenen offers insight into the differences in productivity between individual UK and US companies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 25, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain’t What You Do, It’s the Way that You Do I.T. – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Work Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.
News Posted: 25/01/2006      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Work-life balance called into question

Providing employees with a good work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, according to research published today. The study by three academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics finds that the evidence for "the win-win view, espoused by the government, that better work-life balance will improve productivity is rejected" and that "there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for".

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 10, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.
News Posted: 10/01/2006      [Back to the Top]

Business Day, South Africa

Only sacrifice and compromise can prevent a Hong Kong flop

Comments from former World Bank chief economist Joseph Stiglitz and Andrew Charlton of LSE on the liberalisation of European agriculture and the World Trade Organisation talks in Hong Kong.

This article appeared online in Business Day (South Africa) on December 14, 2005
Link to article

Further Reading
CEP Policy Analysis, The Doha Round: Freer and Fairer Trade? by Andrew Charlton, a Research Officer with the CEP Globalisation Programme.
News Posted: 14/12/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Copper bottom

Dr Linda Yueh quoted regarding the credibility of China as a trading partner.

This article appeared in The Observer on 20 November, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh's staff biography page.

Further Information
News Posted: 20/11/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Is everyone a winner?

The Department for Work and Pensions has demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy may be effective in stopping people leaving work because of mental illness and in getting people back to work. Richard Layard quoted as saying that there are more people on incapacity benefit with a mental health problem than there are unemployed, and that 90 per cent of those do not have a severe mental illness.

This article appeared in The Times Online on October 29, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard is Director of the CEP Wellbeing Programme.

Richard Layard's webpage.
News Posted: 29/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Is everyone a winner?

The Department for Work and Pensions has demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy may be effective in stopping people leaving work because of mental illness and in getting people back to work. Richard Layard quoted as saying that there are more people on incapacity benefit with a mental health problem than there are unemployed, and that 90 per cent of those do not have a severe mental illness.

This article appeared in The Times Online on October 29, 2005
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard is Director of the CEP Wellbeing Programme.

Richard Layard's webpage.
News Posted: 29/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

EU set for clash on 'Anglo-Saxon' versus 'social' welfare models

Before the summit of the European Union at Hampton Court, the journalist Nicholas Timmins poses the question 'Does much of mainland Europe need to break up its "social model" welfare state in favour of an "Anglo-Saxon" model along UK and US lines? Richard Layard replies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 21 October, 2005
Link to article


News Posted: 21/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

IT Week.com

IT's Business Value Endorsed

Technology investment has a subtantial, quantifiable impact on business productivity according to Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in a report published with the Office of National Statistics (ONS).

This article appeared on the IT Week website
Link to article

Related Publication
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates
News Posted: 12/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Richard Layard: Head start to happiness

Huw Richards interviews Richard Layard, who says the economy will benefit if money is spent on mental health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 11 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Links The Wellbeing Research Programme
News Posted: 11/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

It's the way you do it

Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen of CEP suggest that the greater use of information technology by US subsidiaries and a higher return from their IT investment attribute to the difference in output of US-owned plants in Britain and British-owned ones: output per hour in US-owned plants was almost 40 per cent higher than in British-owned plants.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 10 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publication
It's not what you do, it's the way that you do I.T. - testing explanations of productivity growth using U.S. affiliates

Related Links
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme

Also mentioned in EGovMonitor.com, PublicTechnology.net, Tenders Direct, FinFacts Business News, What PC, El Pais, and Silicon.com


News Posted: 10/10/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

"We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.
News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Full text: David Davis at the IPPR

The Tory leadership hopeful stakes his claim to being a 'compassionate conservative' including his concern over social mobility in Britain

With reference to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517


News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Full text: David Davis at the IPPR

The Tory leadership hopeful stakes his claim to being a 'compassionate conservative' including his concern over social mobility in Britain

With reference to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517


News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Full text: David Davis at the IPPR

The Tory leadership hopeful stakes his claim to being a 'compassionate conservative' including his concern over social mobility in Britain

With reference to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517


News Posted: 14/09/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

A short walk beats the school run

Reference to a study by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin that has estimated that in Britain, a home near the best school in a catchment area can be worth almost 20 per cent more than a similar property adjacent to what is perceived as the 'worst' school.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on August 07, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Paying for primary schools: supply constraints, school popularity or congestion? Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin, December 2004, Paper No' CEEDP0042
News Posted: 07/08/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Education Secretary Ruth Kelly and Dr Tessa Stone, director of the Sutton Educational Trust, discuss how children from deprived backgrounds can be prevented from chronic underachievement.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This interview was broadcast on The BBC Radio 4 Today Programme
on July 26, 2005.
Link to Today Programme.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
News Posted: 26/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

International Herald Tribune

2 Cents worth: Never too rich or too happy

This article reports research into the state of happiness. Richard Layard, professor of economics at the LSE, said in a 2003 lecture at the school that GDP is an inaccurate measure of happiness.

This article appeared in The International Herald Tribune
on July 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 23/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

International Herald Tribune

2 Cents worth: Never too rich or too happy

This article reports research into the state of happiness. Richard Layard, professor of economics at the LSE, said in a 2003 lecture at the school that GDP is an inaccurate measure of happiness.

This article appeared in The International Herald Tribune
on July 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 23/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times Online

Doctors' surgeries to offer jobs help

According to a paper by Richard Layard of the London School of Economics fort the Downing Street strategy unit, more people receive incapacity benefits due to mental problems than unemployment benefits, and the cost of benefits for the mentally ill adds up to about £10 billion per year.

This article appeared in The Times Online on July 17, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP
News Posted: 17/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education Supplement

BA Fellows

The British Academy has elected LSE's Anthony Venables as a fellow. Professor Venables is Director of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in The Times Higher Education Supplement on July 15, 2005.
No link.

Related links
Tony Venables Research Site
News Posted: 15/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

CEP Special Event

The Politics of Happiness

Should happiness be at the centre of government policy? Does having more really do anything for our well-being? Can legislation raise national contentment?
Date:Tuesday 5 July 2005
Time:6:30 pm
Venue:Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE  - See Map
Speakers:Professor Lord Layard and Dr Raj Persaud

A debate at the London School of Economics between one of Britain's leading economists, Lord Layard, and one of the country's foremost psychiatrist, Dr Raj Persaud.

Related Links
See the CEP Special Events pages for further details
News Posted: 05/07/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

A Good Week

An article which refers to research by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen of the CEP plus Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin of McKinsey & Company which suggests that US firms are on average the world's best managed while the UK's are the worst.

This article appeared in The Times
on June 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Management Practices Across Firms and Nations' by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen
News Posted: 23/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Times

A Good Week

An article which refers to research by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen of the CEP plus Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin of McKinsey & Company which suggests that US firms are on average the world's best managed while the UK's are the worst.

This article appeared in The Times
on June 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Management Practices Across Firms and Nations' by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen
News Posted: 23/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme


News Posted: 19/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme


News Posted: 19/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

International Herald Tribune

Vote taken in stride outside Continent

Professor Richard Layard, economist from LSE, has recently published a book in which he examines the effects of government tax, employment and other policies on the personal happiness of ordinary people.

No link

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 06/06/2005      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Challenge of 'Hidden Unemployed'

Inactivity is one of the biggest problems the Welsh economy faces, yet it has not become a major issue in this general election campaign.

Giulia Faggio of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE comments.

This article appeared in BBC News Online
on May 03, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Giulia Faggio and Stephen Nickell, Inactivity Among Prime Age Men in the UK, CEP Discussion Paper No' 673, February 2005.
News Posted: 03/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Western Mail

Education, education, education - what rubbish!

"According to research by the London School of Economics, Britain and the United States have the worst social inequality in a sample of eight rich nations."

Letter published in The Western Mail, with reference to Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This Letter appeared in The Western Mail May 02, 2005.
Link to letter.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
News Posted: 02/05/2005      [Back to the Top]

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

'Bachelor senkt Qualifikationsniveau'; Vergleichende Studie über verkürzten Hochschulabschluß in Großbritannien und Deutschland

Ein Vergleich mit Großbritannien zeigt, daß die Einführung des Bachelorabschlusses das Qualifikationsniveau der Hochschulabsolventen verringert. Gemeinsam mit der "London School of Economics" hat die Fachhochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft in Berlin 90 Unternehmen in Großbritannien und Deutschland befragt. Darunter waren Banken, Handel, Automobilindustrie und Softwareentwicklung. Grundlage der Befragungen war ein strukturierter Fragebogen - für den Vergleich der Hochschulbildung wurden die Informatikstudiengänge gewählt.

With reference to 'The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison' by Jim Foreman, Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner, June 2003

This article appeared in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung April 25, 2005.
No direct link to article

Related Links
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Online Paper

Related Publications
The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison, CEP DP 0575
News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

'Bachelor senkt Qualifikationsniveau'; Vergleichende Studie über verkürzten Hochschulabschluß in Großbritannien und Deutschland

Ein Vergleich mit Großbritannien zeigt, daß die Einführung des Bachelorabschlusses das Qualifikationsniveau der Hochschulabsolventen verringert. Gemeinsam mit der "London School of Economics" hat die Fachhochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft in Berlin 90 Unternehmen in Großbritannien und Deutschland befragt. Darunter waren Banken, Handel, Automobilindustrie und Softwareentwicklung. Grundlage der Befragungen war ein strukturierter Fragebogen - für den Vergleich der Hochschulbildung wurden die Informatikstudiengänge gewählt.

With reference to 'The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison' by Jim Foreman, Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner, June 2003

This article appeared in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung April 25, 2005.
No direct link to article

Related Links
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Online Paper

Related Publications
The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison, CEP DP 0575
News Posted: 25/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

ESRC Tender

RLAB wins tender to run ESRC Review of International Data Resources and Needs.

The Review of International Data Resources and Needs is a major, new ESRC project, the findings from which will form the basis for a range of potential new initiatives to support and encourage international and comparative research.

The scope of the review is wide ranging, assessing the international data needs of the research community from all disciplines and institutions from academic bodies and government departments to charities and private consultancies.

The 8 month project will focus upon the nature of the resources required to undertake international and comparative research, in terms of the resources currently available, the quality of such resources and their accessibility.

Winning the tender for the review is a significant recognition of the very high level of international data expertise within the RLAB, its excellence in collaborative research and the quality of the joint research centres' overseas contacts.


News Posted: 11/04/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Education Quandary

Are we losing sight of what schools are for? The Government tells them to teach children to be nice to each other. Professor Richard Layard, of the LSE, says they should teach children how to be happy. Is this just more mumbo-jumbo?

Reference to the work of Professor Richard Layard, LSE, that despite growing prosperity, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago. He argues that schools have a role in building individual self-advancement at an early age in people.

This article appeared in The Independent - Education section March 17, 2005.
Link to article.
News Posted: 17/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Winners and Losers in the Happiness Stakes

The fascinating new book by Richard Layard, the British economist, argues that we should make happiness, not growth, the object of our economic policies. At first sight, there is not a lot of difference - the countries with the highest productivity are also the happiest. But on closer inspection, there are interesting differences.

This article appeared in The Financial Times March 15 2005.

No Direct Link
News Posted: 15/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Students of the revolution thriving in France

Eric Maurin, of Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques and Sandra McNally, LSE, investigate the long term effects of 1968 revolutions. Dr McNally and Dr Maurin conclude: "Our study suggests very positive effects of the '1968 events' for affected cohorts and is of contemporary relevance given the current debate in many countries about widening access to higher education."

This article appeared in The Guardian March 09, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Vive la Révolution! Long Term Effects of 1968 to the Angry Students , Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Seminar Paper to be presented on Friday 11 March at the DfES.

For further details see the CEE Seminars page.
News Posted: 09/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Eastern Daily Express

So how happy are we really?

Review of 'Happiness: Lessons From A New Science', the book by LSE Professor Richard Layard in which he argues that, in spite of higher levels of income, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago.

This article appeared in the Eastern Daily Press March 08 2005.
News Posted: 08/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Blair's Green antidote to beating the blues

The Government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is planning to compile a wellbeing index, which includes a number of factors other than income (neighbourhood, mental health, access to green areas etc.) A book recently published by LSE professor Richard Layard argues that we are no happier now than 50 years ago.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 08, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 08/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Life, Labour and the pursuit of happiness

Happiness is all the rage. The year kicked off with a big conference in the United States on the subject, then Professor Richard Layard, LSE, published a book on it and now the government is getting into it. Professor Layard thinks happiness should become the biggest goal for the government. He suggests things such as compulsory parenting classes and lessons in emotional intelligence from the age of five onwards.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 07, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 07/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Life, Labour and the pursuit of happiness

Happiness is all the rage. The year kicked off with a big conference in the United States on the subject, then Professor Richard Layard, LSE, published a book on it and now the government is getting into it. Professor Layard thinks happiness should become the biggest goal for the government. He suggests things such as compulsory parenting classes and lessons in emotional intelligence from the age of five onwards.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 07, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 07/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Life, Labour and the pursuit of happiness

Happiness is all the rage. The year kicked off with a big conference in the United States on the subject, then Professor Richard Layard, LSE, published a book on it and now the government is getting into it. Professor Layard thinks happiness should become the biggest goal for the government. He suggests things such as compulsory parenting classes and lessons in emotional intelligence from the age of five onwards.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 07, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.
News Posted: 07/03/2005      [Back to the Top]

Radio Free Europe

World: Signs Grow Of Dollar Losing Favor As World's Reserve Currency

Gianluca Benigno, LSE, states "The euro is an alternative reserve currency that the central banks are considering is becoming more liquid and important"

This article appeared on the Radio Free Europe website, February 24, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Gianluca Benigno and Pierpaolo Benigno, Designing Target Rules for International Monetary Policy Cooperation, Paper No' CEPDP0666, December 2004.
News Posted: 25/02/2005      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Why the culture of failure has been hard to break

Assessing Labour's promises for education. Reference to research published in July 2004 by the Institute of Education and LSE on educational opportunity expanding.

This article appeared in The Guardian, February 01, 2005.
Link to article

Related news articles
Class gap widens under Blair
The class divide in UK higher education widened during Tony Blair's first term in office as the children of Middle England reaped the benefits of university expansion, new research reveals. Anna Vignoles of the IoE, who conducted the research with Fernando Galindo-Rueda and Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez of the LSE, said: 'The message is that things are getting better, everybody is more likely to go into higher education, but the gap between rich and poor is widening.'

This article appeared in THES July 2, 2004.
Link to article (subscription needed)

This article appeared in The Times July 2, 2004.
Link to article

This article appeared in BBC News Online July 3, 2004.
Link to article

Related publications
Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Anna Vignoles, The Widening Socio-economic Gap in UK Higher Education in the National Institute Economic Review, No' 190, October 2004

Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Anna Vignoles, Class Ridden or Meritocratic? An Economic Analysis of Recent Changes in Britain, Paper No' CEEDP0032, May 2003


News Posted: 01/02/2005      [Back to the Top]

LSE News and Views

Richard Layard awarded WW Leontief Medal

The Russian Academy of Science has awarded Professor Richard Layard, emeritus professor of economics and founder of the Centre for Economic Performance, the WW Leontief for contributions to progress in economics.

See the latest edition of the LSE's News and Views

Related Publications
Richard Layard, George Lucas, Investment Prospects In Russia, Paper No' CEPSP04, February 1997, available as hard copy only. Richard Layard, Can Russia Control Inflation?, Paper No' CEPDP0170, September 1993 available as hard copy only.

Richard Layard, Ansgar Richter, How Much Unemployment is Needed for Restructuring?: The Russian Experience, Paper No' CEPDP0238, April 1995 available as hard copy only.

Richard Layard, Ansgar Richter, Who Gains and Who Loses from Russian Credit Expansion, Paper No' CEPDP0200, July 1994 available as hard copy only.
News Posted: 31/01/2005      [Back to the Top]