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News for Education and Skills

Press coverage involving Education and Skills staff or research is listed below.

Further Education Week

FE practitioner research movement gathers pace

Two research centres have also been established in recent years, looking specifically at post-16 education and training: the Centre for Vocational Education Research at the London School of Economics, and the Post-14 Education and Work Centre at the University College London Institute of Education, both founded in 2015.


Related Links:
Further Education Week - FE practitioner research movement gathers pace

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 13/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Employee Benefits

Property deposit saving challenge impinging on millennial wealth

According to research from the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance the average weekly earnings between 2002 and 2008 rose at an average rate of 4% a year and prices at just 2%. However, growth in real wages has become stuck at around 2% since September 2014, with any growth occurring mainly being due to a decrease in price inflation, rather than any significant increases in nominal wage growth.


Related Links:
Employee Benefits - Property deposit saving challenge impinging on millennial wealth

The Return of Falling Real Wages

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 08/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Korea Herald

[Noah Smith] Free college would help the rich more than poor

England, which used to provide tuition-free public universities, switched to a tuition system in 1998, and has raised fees several times since then. Economists Gill Wyness, Richard Murphy and Judith Scott-Clayton studied the impact of getting rid of free college. What they found might prove a shock to Sanders’ supporters


Related Links:
The Korea Herald - [Noah Smith] Free college would help the rich more than poor

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 02/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

The headmaster who banned mobile phones…and now wants to bring back textbooks

A growing body of evidence supports Mr Phillips’s stance. Schools where phones are banned saw scores improve 6.4 per cent for 16-year-olds and by 12.2 per cent for lower achieving students, according to a 2015 study by the London School of Economics. 


Related Links:
Daily Telegraph - The headmaster who banned mobile phones…and now wants to bring back textbooks

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 02/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

Herald and News

There’s a better way to cut costs than the one Sanders is promoting

Economists Gill Wyness, Richard Murphy and Judith Scott-Clayton studied the impact of getting rid of free college. What they found might prove a shock to Sanders supporters: The analysis shows that since the move from a free higher education system to a high-fee, high-aid system, university enrollment has increased substantially, with students from the poorest backgrounds experiencing the fastest increases in participation. Moreover, university funding per head has recovered dramatically since the introduction of fees.


Related Links:
Herald and News - There’s a better way to cut costs than the one Sanders is promoting

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 01/11/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Japan Times

Opinion: Free college helps the rich the most

England, which used to provide tuition-free public universities, switched to a tuition system in 1998, and has raised fees several times since then. Economists Gill Wyness, Richard Murphy and Judith Scott-Clayton studied the impact of getting rid of free college. What they found might prove a shock to Sanders supporters: “The analysis shows that since the move from a free higher education system to a high-fee, high-aid system, university enrolment has increased substantially, with students from the poorest backgrounds experiencing the fastest increases in participation. Moreover, university funding per head has recovered dramatically since the introduction of fees.”


Related Links:
The Japan Times - Opinion: Free college helps the rich the most

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 31/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

News Shopper

Do mobile phones have a place in the future of education?

Study in 2015 published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. showed that across multiple schools, when mobile phones were banned, tests scores went up an average of 6.4% in 16 year olds. Even more importantly, this ban helped those who were from the most disadvantaged backgrounds and were doing less well academically. This is evidence that cannot be ignored. 


Related Links:
News Shopper - Do mobile phones have a place in the future of education?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 31/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg View

Free college would help the rich more than the poor

England, which used to provide tuition-free public universities, switched to a tuition system in 1998, and has raised fees several times since then. Economists Gill Wyness, Richard Murphy and Judith Scott-Clayton studied the impact of getting rid of free college. What they found might prove a shock to Sanders supporters: ‘The analysis shows that since the move from a free higher education system to a high-fee, high-aid system, university enrolment has increased substantially, with students from the poorest backgrounds experiencing the fastest increases in participation. Moreover, university funding per head has recovered dramatically since the introduction of fees.’


Related Links:
Bloomberg View - Free college would help the rich more than the poor

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 30/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Francetvinfo.fr (France) blog

Universités : et si les étudiants payaient plus?/Universities : what if students pay more?

Yet, according to economists Gill Wyness, Richard Murphy and Judith Scott-Clayton, who have studied this British system, it does not work so badly. The authors focus on three dimensions: the accessibility of studies, inequalities and the quality of education. On the first point, they find that the proportion of an age group entering university has doubled since the reform. For the second, they note that this increased access has mainly benefited children from modest backgrounds. Regarding the quality of education, they find that the average expenditure on students has increased; universities used the extra money they received to improve the training given to students.


Related Links:
Francetvinfo.fr (France) blog - Universités : et si les étudiants payaient plus?/Universities : what if students pay more?

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 30/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Vox

The real costs of free university: Lessons from the UK

Article by Gill Wyness, Richard Murphy and Judith Scott-Clayton

The question of who should pay for higher education continues to be hotly debated across the world. This column uses the case of the English higher education system to examine whether it is possible to charge relatively high tuition fees and at the same time protect enrolments, access, and university quality. The analysis shows that since the move from a free higher education system to a high-fee, high-aid system, university enrolment has increased substantially, with students from the poorest backgrounds experiencing the fastest increases in participation. Moreover, university funding per head has recovered dramatically since the introduction of fees.


Related Links:
Vox - The real costs of free university: Lessons from the UK

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 21/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Life without strife

An LSE study two years ago found that schools that banned phones did 6.4 per cent better in exams.


Related Links:
The Times - Life without strife

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 21/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Ted.com

Talks – Helen Pearson: Lessons from the longest study on human development

Another summary is offered in the introduction to this report Bucking the Trend (Jo Blanden, 2006) "A prime motivation behind the Government’s child poverty reduction strategy is the belief that growing up in poverty leads to children experiencing poorer outcomes later in life. Several studies support this assertion, showing that poorer children have weaker educational attainment (e.g. Gregg and Machin, 1999), and are more likely to end up in poverty in adulthood (Blanden and Gibbons, 2006). However, all these studies present the difference in the average outcomes of poor and non-poor children; clearly there are many children raised in poor backgrounds who do well in later life."

Related publications

‘'Bucking the trend' : what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life?’, Jo Blanden: a report of research carried out by the Department of Economics, University of Surrey and the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions. [ Working paper ; no. 31 ], 2006

http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/7729/1/WP31.pdf

‘The Persistence of Poverty across Generations: A View from two British Cohorts’, Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons, published for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation by The Policy Press, 25 April 2006

https://www.jrf.org.uk/report/persistence-poverty-across-generations

 


Related Links:
Ted.com - Talks – Helen Pearson: Lessons from the longest study on human development

Cycles of Disadvantage

Child Development and Success or Failure in the Youth Labour Market

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Steve Gibbons webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 12/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education - THE

Subject cost data add fuel to England's variable fees debate

Gill Wyness, a senior lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said there might be logic in this approach given that universities were arguably being incentivised at the moment to provide more humanities courses and less science and technology. But she added that fees reflecting course cost were “probably not a great idea in terms of how that would affect students. You could speculate that the poorer students would end up choosing humanities and the richer students would end up choosing medicine. So I think it is a bad policy from that point of view.”


Related Links:
Times Higher Education - THE - Subject cost data add fuel to England's variable fees debate

The End of Free College in England: Implications for Quality, Enrolments and Equity

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 05/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Letters to the Editor: The wrong way to start a reading revolution

Evidence from a recent report by Stephen Machin and his colleagues at the London School of Economics, entitled “Teaching to Teach” Literacy, shows that synthetic phonics instruction has little to no effect on reading scores by the time children reach Key Stage 2 (age 11). Their data are consistent with higher-quality, experimental studies that have found that phonics has a modest impact on reading scores initially, but no lasting impact in later grades.

Jeff McQuillan, Los Angeles, California

 


Related Links:
Daily Telegraph - Letters to the Editor: The wrong way to start a reading revolution

in brief... Children's reading: evaluating a new teaching method

"Teaching to Teach" Literacy

CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 04/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Highlander (University of California, USA)

Banning cell phones at schools will only result in good

For instance, as reported by the Guardian, a 2015 study called “Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance” found that, after schools banned mobile phones, the test scores of students improved by 6.4 percent. According to the Centre for Economic Performance, which published the study, this is equivalent to adding five days of instruction to the school year.


Related Links:
The Highlander (University of California, USA) - Banning cell phones at schools will only result in good

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 02/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Huffington Post

Can We Talk? Schools Try to Wrest Cell Phones From Students' Hands

Another study, published by a journal of the London School of Economics and Political Science, found that student test scores rose in four schools that banned cell phones, with most of the rise occurring among the lowest-achieving students.


Related Links:
Huffington Post - Can We Talk? Schools Try to Wrest Cell Phones From Students' Hands

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 02/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

Telegram.com (Mass; USA)

Cellphones a tricky issue for school districts in Central Mass.

Whether students are better off under more lax phone rules is yet to be determined, according to some school officials who said their policies are still too new to properly evaluate. But some recent studies have concluded cellphone use is likely more of a hindrance in school. A University of Nebraska-Lincoln report, for instance, found students were checking their phones in class more than 11 times a day on average, while another study by the London School of Economics and Political Science revealed students’ test scores increased by more than 6 percent after their schools banned the devices, and that the improvement rate more than doubled that amount for lower-achieving students in particular.


Related Links:
Telegram.com (Mass; USA) - Cellphones a tricky issue for school districts in Central Mass.

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Bigger rewards and less risk are making crime more attractive

One of the leading authorities on the subject today is Stephen Machin, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He has analysed London Metropolitan police data over the decade to 2012 and scraped drug marketplaces on the dark web to show that criminals not only act rationally but operate sophisticated economic models, too…. “People with something to lose are less likely to view criminal participation as attractive, and crime reduction can therefore be achieved by influencing life opportunities,” Olivier Marie, Mr Machin’s colleague at the LSE, wrote recently.

Also in:

The Australian

Bigger rewards and less risk for crime

One of the leading authorities on the subject today is Stephen Machin, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. He has analysed London Metropolitan police data over the decade to 2012 and scraped drug marketplaces on the dark web to show that criminals not only act rationally but operate sophisticated economic models, too.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/the-times/bigger-rewards-and-less-risk-for-crime/news-story/afa3c758338785f3ffe75f3bd27b0202

 

The Times (Irish edition)

Bigger rewards and less risk are making crime more attractive

https://printmonitoringservice.vuelio.co.uk/file/displaypdf?articleid=309922&clientname=86099_LSE_PRINT&filename=402962453.pdf

 


Related Links:
The Times - Bigger rewards and less risk are making crime more attractive

The Economic Functioning of Online Drugs Markets

Lessons from the economics of crime

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Olivier Marie webpage


News Posted: 30/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

IlSole24ore (Italy)

Smartphone a scuola, sì on no? Come funziona all’estero/Smartphone at school, yes or no? How it works abroad

Effects would seem to be beneficial: a report from the Center for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, published in 2015, estimated 6.4% improvements following bans, a week more than "retrieved" lessons from carelessness generated by mobile phones.


Related Links:
IlSole24ore (Italy) - Smartphone a scuola, sì on no? Come funziona all’estero/Smartphone at school, yes or no? How it works abroad

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 14/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Blasting News (Italy)

Cellulari in classe? Arriva l’apertura della ministra Fedeli/Cell phones in class? The Minster of Faith opens

According to research by economists Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy published in 2015 on the British Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics in four English cities, combining school policies on smartphones and academic achievements of 130,000 pupils, concludes that in schools where mobile phones have been banned, the performance of 16-year-olds has risen by 6.4%.


Related Links:
Blasting News (Italy) - Cellulari in classe? Arriva l’apertura della ministra Fedeli/Cell phones in class? The Minster of Faith opens

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 13/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Evolve Politics

Academy Head blames parents for awful GCSE results and then introduces ridiculous new rules for kids

Great Yarmouth High isn’t the only school in the county stepping up its strictness in attempt to improve its reputation. Tim Gibbs, headteacher of Reepham High, hopes the school’s new ban on mobile phones will allow teachers to focus on learning. While it cannot be doubted that the use of mobile phones in classrooms can be distracting (and if you do have any doubt, a report by the Centre for Economic Performance proves it), there is also evidence to suggest that playing games on phones during breaktimes can improve pupils’ concentration and boost results in class. 


Related Links:
Evolve Politics - Academy Head blames parents for awful GCSE results and then introduces ridiculous new rules for kids

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 11/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Nelson Mail (New Zealand)

Golden Bay school challenging the norm over its wi-fi ban

A paper published by the London School of Economics in 2015 found banning mobile phones in schools resulted in a 6.41 per cent improvement overall in the school's' performance.


Related Links:
Nelson Mail (New Zealand) - Golden Bay school challenging the norm over its wi-fi ban

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 10/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Headteachers who resist teaching phonics are failing students, minister warns

Recent research published by the London School of Economics also found that teaching phonics led to greater improvements in reading among disadvantaged children compared with students taught using other systems.


Related Links:
The Telegraph - Headteachers who resist teaching phonics are failing students, minister warns

in brief... Children's reading: evaluating a new teaching method

"Teaching to Teach" Literacy

CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 09/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Spectator

Off days

Snippet: .Is using a smart phone at school really that bad? Schools with an embargo on mobiles saw the test scores of 16-year-olds improve by 6.4 per cent on average, while the results of lower-achieving students improved by 12,2 per cent, a study by the London School of Economics found in 2015.


Related Links:
Spectator - Off days

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 09/09/2017      [Back to the Top]

Education Week

Can Banning Phones in School Curb Cyberbullying?

There's some evidence that banning phones correlates with better academic outcomes: A 2015 study released by the Center for Economic Performance at the London School for Economics and Public Policy found that middle school test scores rose in schools that prohibited phone use in class.


Related Links:
Education Week - Can Banning Phones in School Curb Cyberbullying?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 31/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Helensburgh Advertiser

Parents back idea of mobile phone classroom ban

The Conservatives have called for a national ban following a 2015 study by the London School of Economics which found that schools which banned mobile phones saw an increase in test scores – with improvements particularly among lower achievers.


Related Links:
Helensburgh Advertiser - Parents back idea of mobile phone classroom ban

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 25/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

The Guardian view on the new GCSEs: missing the point

Editorial

The reforms are good ones, but the reformers have their priorities wrong. For too long ministers have focused on the country’s highest-achieving pupils. They should now pay attention to everyone else. Only about a third of 18-year-olds go to university; for the rest the road from education to work is uncertain and full of potholes.

Related publications

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017. DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002795011724000113


Related Links:
Guardian - The Guardian view on the new GCSEs: missing the point

Post-16 educational choices in England

Post-16 educational choices in England

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Claudia Hupkau webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Jenifer Ruiz-valenzuela webpage

Guglielmo Ventura webpage


News Posted: 24/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Gazette

Councils refuse to answer calls to ban mobile phones in primary schools

Academics at the London School of Economics found schools which restrict access to mobile phones “subsequently experience an improvement in test scores”. They also found banning phones “improves outcomes for the low-achieving students the most”.


Related Links:
The Gazette - Councils refuse to answer calls to ban mobile phones in primary schools

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 24/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Dumbarton and Vale of Leven Reporter

Schools impose ban on taking mobile phones into the classroom

But the Scottish Government seem intent on leaving the question of mobile phones in the classrooms up to head teachers. A spokesman said: “Head teachers can already ban phones in school if they wish to, however phones are now being used effectively in classrooms to aid learning. “We encourage local authorities and schools to think carefully about how to incorporate smart and mobile phones into learning and teaching.” The calls for a ban follows in the wake of research carried out by academics at the London School of Economics which explored the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restricted access to mobile phones “subsequently experience an improvement in test scores.”


Related Links:
Dumbarton and Vale of Leven Reporter - Schools impose ban on taking mobile phones into the classroom

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 24/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Kingdom FM

Kingdom FM [14:00:01]

Mention of LSE study that found banning mobile phones from classrooms improved test scores.

Click to open


Related Links:
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Call for mobile phone ban in Scottish primary schools

Mobile phones should be banned from primary schools, according to the Scottish Conservatives.

Scottish Conservative MSP Michelle Ballantyne urged the government to overhaul this guidance, calling for an outright ban on phones in primary schools and the introduction of restrictions on their use in secondary schools if head teachers deem it necessary. The South Scotland MSP highlighted research from academics at the London School of Economics into the impact of banning phones in high schools in England.


Related Links:
BBC News - Call for mobile phone ban in Scottish primary schools

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Scottish Daily Mail

Heads 'need to be able to ban phones'

Snippet: ...Scottish MSP Michelle Ballantyne highlighted research by academics at the London School of Economics into the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restrict access to mobile phones ‘subsequently experience an improvement in test scores’ and it ‘improves outcomes for the low-achieving students the most’.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

 


Related Links:
Scottish Daily Mail - Heads 'need to be able to ban phones'

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Scotsman

MSP wants headteachers to be allowed to ban mobiles in school

Headteachers should have the power to ban mobile phones in schools, a Tory MSP has said. South Scotland MSP Michelle Ballantyne has urged the Scottish Government to overhaul its 2013 guidance on the use of mobile devices in schools. She wants a ban on phones in primary schools and the introduction of restrictions on their use in secondary schools if headteachers deem it necessary. Ms Ballantyne highlighted research by academics at the London School of Economics which explored the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restrict access to mobile phones “subsequently experience an improvement in test scores”.


Related Links:
Scotsman - MSP wants headteachers to be allowed to ban mobiles in school

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 15/08/2017      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement - TES

More autonomy turned out to be mere rhetoric

The rise of academies promised more power for schools - but, with government still clinging to the reins, heads haven't been able to raise standards as expected. However, this system may yet deliver - if ministers ring the changes, writes James Croft.

The Academies Act of 2010 purported to take school autonomy to a new level. The jury is still out on whether this could make a difference for pupil outcomes, but doubts have, justifiably, begun to emerge. While there is evidence of a positive impact in pre-2010 sponsored academies, recent research from the London School of Economics finds no trace of post-conversion improvement in previously "good", "satisfactory" or "inadequate" converters, as well as a concerning degree of heterogeneity.


Related Links:
Times Educational Supplement - TES - More autonomy turned out to be mere rhetoric

Academy schools and pupil outcomes

Academies 2: The New Batch

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Olmo Silva webpage


News Posted: 28/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

RES (Royal Economic Society) Newsletter

Conference Report 2017 'Divided we fall'

Perhaps the public knew that Brexit would drain their wallets, but voted for it anyway. Sometimes it’s not the economy, stupid. But Simon Wren-Lewis, of Oxford University, rubbished this idea, pointing out that those who voted for Brexit said they were unwilling to pay to reduce immigration. Instead, people seemed misinformed. Not only did those who voted to leave the EU think that they would be no worse off as a result, they thought that lower immigration would improve their access to public services. The problem, Mr Wren-Lewis argued, was with the media. Dismissing a large fraction as producers of propoganda, he reserved most disappointment for the BBC. It failed to communicate the consensus among economists, he said, treating it as opinion rather than knowledge. Swati Dhingra, of the London School of Economics, agreed, saying that the BBC’s quest to generate balance gave the false impression that there was a meaningful debate between economists. (Depressingly, she noted that this false balance had oozed into policymaking, as select committees are being stacked with pro-Brexit voices.)

Breakfast means breakfast

Amid the pastries, the presentations and the self-flagellation, it might have been easy to forget what the point of it all. An article in The Independent, previewing the conference, and highlighted by Paul Johnson on the first day of the conference, provided a helpful reminder. ‘Economics research can really improve people’s lives’, wrote Hamish McRae. While the public associates economics with GDP and abstract equations, much of the research presented at the conference was focused on how to make people’s lives better. Examples I saw included a paper presented by Christine Farquharson of the IFS, which suggested that free school breakfasts are a cheap way to help children do better in school. A panel discussion on re-skilling the UK between Steve Machin, Kirabo Jackson, Richard Burgess and Sandra McNally tossed around tax credits for investment in skills and training, a plea for more thinking about teacher quality, and from Kirabo Jackson, to think about the education system as a whole, rather than separate, substitutable stages. Football scheduling was on the list too: boys perform worse in exams when they coincide with international football tournaments.


Related Links:
RES (Royal Economic Society) Newsletter - Conference Report 2017 'Divided we fall'

CEP Trade CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Monde (France)

Rythmes scolaires : « Le retour à la semaine de quatre jours risque de se faire aux dépens des femmes/School rythms : « The return to the four-day week may be at the expense of women

The two economists, Emma Duchini and Clémentine Van Effenterre, who speak in the "World", believe that this reform did not take into account the interest of parents, especially mothers.


Related Links:
Le Monde (France) - Rythmes scolaires : « Le retour à la semaine de quatre jours risque de se faire aux dépens des femmes/School rythms : « The return to the four-day week may be at the expense of women

CEP Education and Skills


News Posted: 27/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The UK in a Changing Europe (Kings College London)

Brexit and the skills challenge

Article by Sandra McNally

The UK’s productivity suffered a shock in 2008 from which it has not recovered, and the ‘skills problem’ needs to be addressed. Within the context of a broader industrial strategy, improving skills is part of the solution – but Brexit may well harm these efforts if the feared negative economic effects put additional pressure on public finances. Likewise, Brexit will not help if prolonged uncertainty discourages employer investment in skills; nor if employers substitute capital for labour as a response to migration barriers. However, Brexit does do is bring the skills problem into sharper focus.


Related Links:
The UK in a Changing Europe (Kings College London) - Brexit and the skills challenge

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 21/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Education Policy Institute

The impact of academies on educational outcomes

The Education Policy Institute (EPI) has published a new paper examining the impact of academies on educational outcomes. The comprehensive report brings together EPI’s own analysis, along with research undertaken by the London School of Economics.

Our principal finding through this extensive study is that academies do not provide an automatic solution to school improvement. As we demonstrate throughout this report, there is significant variation in performance at both different types of academies and Multi-Academy Trusts.

Related publications

The Impact of Academies on Educational Outcomes, Jon Andrews and Natalie Perera with Andrew Eyles, Gabriel Heller Sahlgren, Stephen Machin, Matteo Sandi and Olmo Silva, Education Policy Institute and London School of Economics and Political Science Report, July 2017

https://epi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/EPI_-Impact_of_Academies_Consolidated_Report.pdf

Primary Academies in England’, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 3, Winter 2016

Academy Schools and Pupil Outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015

 


Related Links:
Education Policy Institute - The impact of academies on educational outcomes

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

Academies 2: The New Batch

The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Gabriel Heller-sahlgren webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Olmo Silva webpage


News Posted: 19/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 84, Issue 3, July 2017

'High' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

Olivier Marie and Ulf Zölitz


Related Links:
The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 84, Issue 3, July 2017 - 'High' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

'High' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Olivier Marie webpage


News Posted: 02/07/2017      [Back to the Top]

Kashmir Observer

How Mobile Phones (Mis)Use Is Affecting Our Health and Social Fabric

There are other consequences of using mobile phones as well. A research published by London School of Economics argues that banning pupils from carrying mobile phones in schools showed a sustained improvement in exam results, with the biggest advances coming from struggling students.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015


Related Links:
Kashmir Observer - How Mobile Phones (Mis)Use Is Affecting Our Health and Social Fabric

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 25/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Time

The continuing urgency of the Grenfell Tower inferno

In the days since the fire, Grenfell Tower has been held up as a tragic symbol of the social ills facing Britain: a detached political class; nearly seven years of a government-led austerity program that has sliced through the country’s welfare state; rising socioeconomic disparities; and a hastening decline in living standards. The U.K. has seen the biggest drop in average real wages in OECD countries except for Greece, according to an analysis by the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance.

Related publications

‘Real wages and living standards in the UK’. Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 036, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf


Related Links:
Time - The continuing urgency of the Grenfell Tower inferno

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 23/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

UniteWorks – Unite the Union

Unite warns of deepening Tory ‘wage pain' as average wages continue to fall

Theresa May and the Tories’ ‘wage pain’ is leaving millions of people struggling to make ends meet warned Britain’s largest union, Unite as official figures out today (Wednesday 14 June) showed a deepening wage squeeze. Official labour market figures out today showed that average earnings, excluding bonuses, fell in real terms by 0.6 per cent compared to a year earlier. The figures follow an analysis by the London School of Economics of OECD data showing the UK had suffered the biggest drop in average wages between 2007 and 2015 of any developed country except austerity-ravaged Greece.

Related publications

‘Real wages and living standards in the UK’. Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 036, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf


Related Links:
UniteWorks – Unite the Union - Unite warns of deepening Tory ‘wage pain' as average wages continue to fall

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 14/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Geschichte der Gegenwart (Germany)

May will Regierung bilden – Brexit-Verhandlungen ab 19. Juni

In total, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain part of the EU’s common market.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
Geschichte der Gegenwart (Germany) - May will Regierung bilden – Brexit-Verhandlungen ab 19. Juni

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 10/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Frankfurter Rundschau (Germany)

Die schlechteste Variante

A year ago, in June 2016, the British voted on their country's EU membership. Economists and financial markets were in bright turmoil and warned of the consequences of a Brexit. Today, twelve months later, the markets are no longer afraid of the Brexit. They fear for him. Only two years are left to the EU and the United Kingdom to agree on the conditions of the withdrawal. And with each passing day there is a growing likelihood that the horror scenario will occur: there is no agreement, no deal--"for the British economy, this would be the worst of all results," warns the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

                                         


Related Links:
Frankfurter Rundschau (Germany) - Die schlechteste Variante

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Trade

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Berliner Zeitung (Germany)

Horrorszenario „No Deal': Keine Brexit-Einigung wäre für die britische Wirtschaft fatal/Horror scenario „No Deal' no Brexit agreement would be fatal for the British economy

erall, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain in spite of Brexit part of the EU's common market. This, too, would incur costs, but in the case of a no-deal scenario, these costs would double. The British trade with the EU would break by 40 percent over the next ten years. The overall effect amounted to just under three percent of British per capita income. Every household on the island would cost about 1 900 pounds.

Also in:

Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger

Furcht vor dem Desaster; BREXIT Großbritannien droht eine schwere Rezession, wenn es keine Einigung mit der EU gibt

In total, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain in spite of Brexit part of the EU's common market. This, too, would incur costs, but in the case of a no-deal scenario, these costs would double. The British trade with the EU would break by 40 percent over the next ten years. The overall effect amounted to just under three percent of British per capita income. Every household on the island would cost about 1900 pounds.

http://www.ksta.de/wirtschaft/brexit-furcht-vor-dem-desaster-27764024

 

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

                                         

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp


Related Links:
Berliner Zeitung (Germany) - Horrorszenario „No Deal': Keine Brexit-Einigung wäre für die britische Wirtschaft fatal/Horror scenario „No Deal' no Brexit agreement would be fatal for the British economy

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Professional Adviser

The evidence for Brexit and other key election issues - LSE

The London School of Economics (LSE) has published a report assessing all of the party manifestos and how respective policies will affect key voter issues.

Intended to be "objective, brief and non-technical", the report by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance looks at the evidence on the most-talked-about policies, including education, health, immigration, industrial strategy, living standards, regional policy and Brexit.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

 Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

                                        


Related Links:
Professional Adviser - The evidence for Brexit and other key election issues - LSE

CEP Education and Skills CEP Growth CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 08/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Economic Journal, Volume 127, Issue 602, June 2017

‘Adjusting Your Dreams? High School Plans and Dropout Behaviour'

Dominique Goux, Marc Gurgand and Eric Maurin

 

Related publications

‘in brief… What can be done to help low-Achieving teenagers?’ Dominique Goux, Marc Gurgand and Eric Maurin.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp499.pdf


Related Links:
Economic Journal, Volume 127, Issue 602, June 2017 - ‘Adjusting Your Dreams? High School Plans and Dropout Behaviour'

CEP Education and Skills


News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Manifesto economics

For the first time in years, UK voters have a real choice between economic models

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has published a series of election analyses, looking at wages and living standards, health and social care, education and skills, and inequality between UK regions.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

 

Related links

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

 


Related Links:
Financial Times - Manifesto economics

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Trade

Rui Costa webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Ralf Martin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Henry Overman webpage

Thomas Sampson webpage

Anna Valero webpage

Jonathan Wadsworth webpage

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 06/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

RT (Russia)

British wages in free fall, only crisis-hit Greece is worse in OECD

According to a London School of Economics (LSE) paper, Brits were the worst off when it came to their real wages, with pay falling by more than five percent between 2007 and 2015.

Researchers for the prestigious British university also found that all types of British earners, with the exception of pensioners and minimum wage workers, were no better off today than they were in 2008.


Related Links:
RT (Russia) - British wages in free fall, only crisis-hit Greece is worse in OECD

Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Parents reduced to crowdfunding for whiteboards due to education cuts

Following years of government budget cuts, parents are now turning to crowdfunding websites in order to provide basic school supplies. Appeals have been launched on websites including Justgiving.com for online donations towards items such as whiteboards and computers, as well as to pay for crossing attendents. … Prime Minister has echoed this claim several times, stating in an interview with Andrew Marr: “The level of funding going into schools is at record level.”  However, Professor Sandra McNally from the School of Economics, University of Surrey, published an article​ fact-checking this “highest level on record” claim.  She explains that only the “per pupil expenditure” (the amount spent on each pupil) is relevant, rather than the total amount of money available. According to Professor McNally, current spending per pupil was “largely frozen in real terms” between 2010 and 2016.  And as onward spending is frozen in cash terms, this will likely lead to a “real terms reduction of around 6.5 per cent by 2019-2020”.

Related links

Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=mcnally


Related Links:
Independent - Parents reduced to crowdfunding for whiteboards due to education cuts

CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Independent

The chart that shows UK workers have had the worst wage performance in the OECD except Greece

The UK has suffered the biggest drop in average real wages of any OECD country except depression-wracked Greece, according to a pre-general election analysis published by the London School of Economics.

The LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) uses OECD data to show that average wages for British workers, when adjusted for inflation, fell by more than 5 per cent between 2007 and 2015..

Related publications

'Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK', Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, CEP Election Analysis Paper No' CEPEA036: , May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf

'The Return of Falling Real Wages' David Blanchflower, Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, CEP report, May 2017 

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/rwu006.pdf

 


Related Links:
Independent - The chart that shows UK workers have had the worst wage performance in the OECD except Greece

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 05/06/2017      [Back to the Top]

Market News

UK reality check: BOE wage growth forecasts implausible: CEP

Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee claims that nominal wage growth will return close to 4% by 2019 are "rather implausible and over-optimistic", according to two respected academics at the Centre for Economic Performance. Interviewed for the latest MNI Reality Check, Professor Stephen Machin, Director of the CEP, along with Rui Costa, a fellow researcher at the body, said that existing pressures would not alleviate enough over the near-term horizon to justify the MPC's prediction laid out in the Bank's latest Inflation Report, published earlier this month.


Related Links:
Market News - UK reality check: BOE wage growth forecasts implausible: CEP

Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 30/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Brighton and Hove News

Hundreds turn out for Save Our Schools rally

According to Sandra McNally, professor of economics at Surrey University, the Conservatives’ figures are misleading. This is because the “per pupil figure” was frozen from 2010 to 2011 and again from 2015 to 2016.

She argues that an increase in the core funding for schools is not the same as an increase in the amount per pupil. A freeze in cash terms is likely to result in a reduction in real terms of 6.5 per cent between 2010 and 2020. This reduction has not happened yet and school funding has doubled in the last 20 years

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: Education and Skills: The UK Policy Agenda, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness,June 2017 Paper No' CEPEA041. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea041.pdf

Related links

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
Brighton and Hove News - Hundreds turn out for Save Our Schools rally

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 27/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

ccrmagazine.com

Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards

Higher price inflation as a result of sterling’s depreciation following the vote to leave the EU, coupled with nominal wage growth stuck at a norm of 2% a year, means that once again the UK faces falling real wages, threatening family living standards.  A new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the first in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election – outlines what’s been happening to real wages and living standards, and considers relevant policies in the parties’ election manifestos.


Related Links:
ccrmagazine.com - Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards

Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK

CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Rui Costa webpage


News Posted: 22/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Lkm – The Education and Youth ‘think and action-tank' – The LKMco Podcast

#002 – Research Round Up: Social segregation and white Working Class boys

In episode #002  Dr Sam Baars talks to George Duoblys. They ask do faith schools perpetuate social social segregation? Is focusing on white working class boys helpful? Do Ofsted’s gradings for nurseries really measure the right things?  Centre for Economic Performance research by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Sandra McNally mentioned in the video.

Related publications

‘Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement’, Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1468, February 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1468.pdf


Related Links:
Lkm – The Education and Youth ‘think and action-tank' – The LKMco Podcast - #002 – Research Round Up: Social segregation and white Working Class boys

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 19/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

NIESR Blog

Britain's skills problem

Article by Sandra McNally

It is well known and acknowledged in the government’s Industrial Strategy that Britain has a skills problem: ‘We have a shortage of technical-level skills and rank 16th out of 20 countries for the proportion of people with technical qualifications’. As the Green Paper also says, ‘a bewildering complex array of qualifications, some of which are poor quality, makes the system hard to use for students and employers’. This shortage of ‘technical level skills’ is important because it impacts on economic growth, inequality and social mobility. It also affects a lot of people. Well over half of young people do not do A-levels each year. Furthermore, only about 35-40% of a typical cohort finishing their GCSEs can expect to go to university. The shortage of ‘technical skills’ mainly needs to be supplied by those who choose non-academic pathways. This is a major educational issue and all parties should be addressing it in their manifestos.

Related publications

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002795011724000113

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


Related Links:
NIESR Blog - Britain's skills problem

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 17/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Debrief

New report suggests there's bad news on the horizon for the UK job market

David Blanchflower, a former Bank of England policymaker and a London School of Economics professor, is saying that wages are likely to remain low for several years. He’s particularly critical of how the Bank of England is handling the situation, as their forecasting for wage growth consistently expects it to revert to around 4% within 18 months which, at least for the last 10 forecasts, just hasn’t happened.

 

Related publications

‘The Return of Falling Real Wages’, David Blanchflower, Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, Real Wages Update blog No.6, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/rwu006.pdf


Related Links:
The Debrief - New report suggests there's bad news on the horizon for the UK job market

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets

Rui Costa webpage

Stephen Machin webpage


News Posted: 15/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

Fiscal Studies

‘Academies 2: The New Batch - The Changing Nature of Academy Schools in England'

Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva

Accepted manuscript online: 27 May 2017

DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5890.2017.12146


Related Links:
Fiscal Studies - ‘Academies 2: The New Batch - The Changing Nature of Academy Schools in England'

Academy schools and pupil outcomes

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Olmo Silva webpage


News Posted: 14/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'

Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

Related publications

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


Related Links:
National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017 - ‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Claudia Hupkau webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Jenifer Ruiz-valenzuela webpage

Guglielmo Ventura webpage


News Posted: 12/05/2017      [Back to the Top]

SurreyBaby

‘Outstanding' nurseries may not be the best, says new research

Attending a nursery with an outstanding Ofsted rating has ‘limited benefits’ for children’s education, says new research from the University of Surrey. The report, published last month, showed that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if they had been taught by a qualified teacher or attended an outstanding nursery. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), looked at the information of 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.


Related Links:
SurreyBaby - ‘Outstanding' nurseries may not be the best, says new research

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 06/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! News

Phonics were being taught 350 years ago, one of world's oldest children's book reveals

Research has shown that phonics can boost children’s reading age by an average of 28 months by the time they turn seven. Boys benefit the most from the back-to-basics system and actually overtake girls after just two years of school, according to a study by Dr Marlynne Grant, an educational psychologist, who analysed the performance of pupils taught to read using synthetic phonics from the reception year upwards. The school had high levels of special educational needs. However, a study by London School of Economics last year found that while phonics help children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as their first language, it has had "no measurable effect on pupils’ reading scores at age 11".

 

Related links

Martina Viarengo webpage:  http://personal.lse.ac.uk/viarengo/


Related Links:
Yahoo! News - Phonics were being taught 350 years ago, one of world's oldest children's book reveals

in brief... Children's reading: evaluating a new teaching method

in brief... Children's reading: evaluating a new teaching method

"Teaching to Teach" Literacy

CEP Education and Skills

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 06/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

CEP Engagement/In politics

CEP and its research had a broad reach in Parliament during the month of February.

During the passage of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill in the Lords, research on the benefits from immigration at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) was mentioned.

Also, LSE research was picked up during debates on building more homes (Professor Cheshire)

pre-school education: teachers (Dr Jo Blanden, Professor Sandra McNally).

LSE has been particularly involved in the debate on Brexit through its submissions of written evidence in Parliament and academics appearing before select committees. LSE has responded to the Impact of Brexit on Higher Education and the Immigration inquiries.

Swati Dhingra and Professor Niamh Moloney gave their insights on UK Trade Options Beyond 2019

Professor Alan Manning and Philippe Legrain informed the Lords on Brexit and the Labour Market.

Related links

Community Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/Community/default.asp

 

 


Related Links:
CEP Urban and Spatial Programme CEP Education and Skills CEP Trade

Paul Cheshire webpage

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Swati Dhingra webpage

Alan Manning webpage


News Posted: 04/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

Government silent on adult skills behavioural research centre funding

The government is refusing to say whether more funding will be given to two “pioneering” FE research centres after their start-up grants end shortly.

Meanwhile, the Centre for Vocational Education Research is beginning to publish its own projects after being given a £3 million government grant in May 2015. Dr Sandra McNally leads the centre, and said that in the two years it has been running, her team has focused on “huge administrative data”, such as individual learner records, the national pupil database and longitudinal education outcomes data, in an attempt to process, code and apply it to their research.


Related Links:
FE Week - Government silent on adult skills behavioural research centre funding

CEP CVER CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Europe 1

Should we ban cell phones in school?

A brake to the concentration. Still, according to a study of 2015 to the United Kingdom by the London School of Economics, the use of the current mobile phone impair concentration. The study, which looked at the school results of 130,000 students 91 institutions of the country, shows that students enrolled in schools that have banned mobile phone have better results than those enrolled in institutions where the smartphone is not banned. And the students the less comfortable at the school who in would suffer the most, explain the researchers.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Related Links:
Europe 1 - Should we ban cell phones in school?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Repubblica.it

Irrinunciabile smartphone. 'Ma i divieti non servono'/Essential smartphone. 'But the bans are not needed'

Research by the London School of Economics in 2015 calculated that at maturity, in schools where the mobile phone is banned, the boys get ratings of 6.4% higher.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Related Links:
Repubblica.it - Irrinunciabile smartphone. 'Ma i divieti non servono'/Essential smartphone. 'But the bans are not needed'

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 03/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Le Huffington Post (France)

Macron veut durcir la loi qui encadre l'usage du portable à l'école, mais qu'en est-il aujourd'hui?/ Macron wants to tighten the law that oversees the use of the laptop to school, but what about today?

According to a study published in the journal of the London School of Economics in may 2015, the ban on mobiles in schools would be beneficial for the academic performance of students. Researchers have shown that in schools that forbid it, results improved by 6.4 percent compared to other schools. In the United Kingdom, more and more schools ban their speakers mobile: they were 50% in 2012 and 98% in 2012 to prohibit them or collect them earlier today, according to the Guardian.

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015.


Related Links:
Le Huffington Post (France) - Macron veut durcir la loi qui encadre l'usage du portable à l'école, mais qu'en est-il aujourd'hui?/ Macron wants to tighten the law that oversees the use of the laptop to school, but what about today?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 02/03/2017      [Back to the Top]

Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk

LSE research mentioned in Parliamentary Question on graduate nursery teachers

The question was tabled on 22 February by Lord Blencathra (Con):

"What is their response to the conclusions of a recent report by LSE and Surrey University that graduate nursery teachers for three- to five-year-olds make a small impact on children's attainment compared to non=graduates; and whether they have any plans to review their policy regarding requirements for nursery staff to be graduates."


Related Links:
Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 22/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gulf News

6 in 10 say ban children from social networks

A majority six of ten Gulf News poll respondents think children should be banned from using social media sites altogether. Their opinion is in line with the findings of a study by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, in the UK. Researchers found that banning mobile phones from school premises caused test scores of students to improve by 6.4 per cent — the equivalent of adding five days to the school year.


Related Links:
Gulf News - 6 in 10 say ban children from social networks

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 20/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Get Surrey

Attending ‘outstanding' nursery has limited benefit for children, university research reveals

University of Surrey's economics senior lecturer, Dr Jo Blanden, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief these are important for children's learning. "Our research finding that having a graduate working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us. "It is possible it is driven by the types of qualifications held by those working in private nurseries, they are not generally equivalent to the qualifications of teachers in nursery classes in schools."  The study was conducted by researchers at the Centre of Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London.

 


Related Links:
Get Surrey - Attending ‘outstanding' nursery has limited benefit for children, university research reveals

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 19/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Shropshire

Research from LSE says graduate nursery staff have little effect on children's attainment.

…and there's a good piece on the BBC news website if you have a look at it so the couple of days so it is very current and it says gradual nursery staff have little effect on children OK having a graduate teacher industry only has a limited impact on children's attainment this is new research from the Centre of Economic Performance at the London school of economics.


Related Links:
BBC Radio Shropshire - Research from LSE says graduate nursery staff have little effect on children's attainment.

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Day Nurseries

Charity disputes research which claims qualified nursery teachers have ‘tiny effect' on children's learning

Save the Children has disputed research which found nurseries with a qualified nursery teacher have only a “tiny effect” on children’s attainment.

Earlier this week, researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, found that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate had an Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP) score that was only around a third of a point higher than those whose nurseries did not employ a graduate. The total number of points available is 117. Lead author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at Surrey University, said: “Our research finding that having a member of staff qualified to graduate level working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us, given existing research that finds well-qualified staff have higher quality interactions with children.” However, Save the Children has claimed that children without an early years teacher are almost 10 per cent less likely to meet the expected levels of development when they start school compared to children who do have a teacher. This comes from its ‘Untapped Potential’ report last November.


Related Links:
Day Nurseries - Charity disputes research which claims qualified nursery teachers have ‘tiny effect' on children's learning

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 17/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Manchester Evening News

What do Ofsted know about three-year-olds? Parents at this ‘inadequate' nursery say it's nonsense

A university study says that inspectors are failing to spot the best and worst nursery schools by using 'traditional methods'

Parents have defended a pre-school rated ‘inadequate’ by Ofsted as a report shows the watchdog’s inspections don’t always reveal the best nurseries. The report published this week shows that sending children to an ‘outstanding’ nursery makes barely any difference to how well they develop in their early years. Researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Sussex and University College London, discovered that traditional measures used to evaluate nursery schools by inspectors failed to spot the best or worst schools.


Related Links:
Manchester Evening News - What do Ofsted know about three-year-olds? Parents at this ‘inadequate' nursery say it's nonsense

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 15/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Day Nurseries

'Outstanding' nurseries have 'tiny effect' on children's attainment

The report titled 'Nursery Quality: New evidence of the impact on children’s outcomes', found that staff qualifications and Ofsted ratings cannot predict the quality of early years education, arguing that conventional methods of testing quality do not have a significant influence on educational outcomes. Co-author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at the University of Surrey, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief that these are important for children’s learning.


Related Links:
Day Nurseries - 'Outstanding' nurseries have 'tiny effect' on children's attainment

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Phys.Org

New evidence of the impact of quality nurseries on children's outcomes

A report published today reveals that a child's educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or early years professional. Attending a nursery rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted, the regulator of educational quality in England, also has limited benefits. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, matches data on children's outcomes at the end of reception with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.

 


Related Links:
Phys.Org - New evidence of the impact of quality nurseries on children's outcomes

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Education

Graduate nursery staff have 'little effect' on children

Having a graduate teacher in a nursery has only a limited impact on children's attainment, new research suggests.

In England the government wants more graduate staff in nurseries in a bid to boost children's literacy and numeracy. But a study published by the London School of Economics (LSE) claims highly qualified staff had only a "tiny" effect on attainment. One early years group said the the report challenged "many of the assumptions" around current policy. The researchers, from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, Surrey University and University College London, looked at figures, drawn from the National Pupil Database, on about 1.8 million five-year-olds who started school in England between 2008 and 2011.


Related Links:
BBC News - Education - Graduate nursery staff have 'little effect' on children

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph (Print edition)

Pulling rank Top nurseries fail to raise prospects

Sending children to a nursery school rated “outstanding” by Ofsted makes barely any difference to how well they develop, researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London discovered.

[Link unavailable.]


Related Links:
Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 14/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

Nursery staff qualifications have little effect on pupils' achievement – study

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, Surrey University and University College London, compared data on children's results with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million youngsters born in England between September 2003 and August 2006. The findings showed that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate have a teacher assessment score around a third of a point higher, where the total number of points available was 117.


Related Links:
BT.com - Nursery staff qualifications have little effect on pupils' achievement – study

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 13/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

Nursery World

Graduate settings have little impact on children's outcomes

New research finds that attending an outstanding nursery, or one with graduate staff, has a limited benefit to children's educational attainment.

The study of 1.8 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006, reveals that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only ‘slightly’ higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or Early Years Professional (EYP).

It also found that attending a nursery rated outstanding by Ofsted had limited benefits.


Related Links:
Nursery World - Graduate settings have little impact on children's outcomes

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 13/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

TES

Qualified nursery teachers make little difference to attainment, study finds

Children with graduate nursery teachers achieve only slightly more by the end of Reception than children with unqualified teachers

Children who have access to a qualified teacher at nursery school do only slightly better at age 5 than those who do not, research suggests.

A new study concludes that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their Reception year is only very slightly higher if they have been taught in a nursery with a teacher trained to graduate level.

There was also little difference between those attending a nursery rated "outstanding" by Ofsted and others.

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, compared data on children's results with information about the nurseries they attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million people born in England between September 2003 and August 2006.


Related Links:
TES - Qualified nursery teachers make little difference to attainment, study finds

Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement

CEP Education and Skills

Jo Blanden webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 13/02/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 4

The Today Programme

Dr Hilary Steedman discusses IFS report criticising huge investment into apprenticeships.

0725
Is the way in which the Government will fund new apprenticeships a monumental waste of money? Dr Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow at LSE specialising in apprenticeships.

 


Related Links:
BBC Radio 4 - The Today Programme

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER


News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Apprenticeship levy and targets risk being poor value for money

Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at The London School of Economics, speaking on the BBC’s Today programme, said: “I think the IFS has really overstated their case here. We have a really serious skills problem in this country and we need to raise skills through apprenticeships in order to promote economic growth and improve our productivity levels, which are dire compared to Europe.”


Related Links:
Personnel Today - Apprenticeship levy and targets risk being poor value for money

CEP Education and Skills CEP CVER


News Posted: 31/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

20 Minutos blog

Perder el empleo baja la nota media de los hijos

La inestabilidad de los contratos y el desempleo de los padres tienen efectos negativos en el rendimiento educativo de sus hijos. Es una de las principales conclusiones de un estudio elaborado por la investigadra catalana Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, del Centre for Economic Performance, de la London School of Economics.

Read pdf of the article here


Related Links:
20 Minutos blog - Perder el empleo baja la nota media de los hijos

In brief...Parental job loss: the impact on children's school performance

Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain

CEP Education and Skills

Jenifer Ruiz-valenzuela webpage


News Posted: 23/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

Gainsborough Standard

Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

However another study from the London School of Economics suggests a ban on phones has the effect of an extra week of classes over a pupil’s school year.

 

Also in:

Retford Today

Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

 


Related Links:
Gainsborough Standard - Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 21/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Leeds

Snippet...

A recent study found a ban on phones generally helps classroom performance research by the London school of economics found that after schools outlawed mobiles test scores of pupils aged 16 improved by 6.4 %.


Related Links:
BBC Radio Leeds - Snippet...

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 19/01/2017      [Back to the Top]

New York Post online

The case against screens in schools

A 2015 London School of Economics study that looked at over 140,000 students across a decade found that when phones were removed from the classroom, test scores went up 6 percent. For students with special needs or those from challenged socioeconomic backgrounds, test scores went up a whopping 14 percent when distracting phones were eliminated.


Related Links:
New York Post online - The case against screens in schools

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 18/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

OUP blog

Academy schools and the transformation of the English education system

Article by Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin

Increasing the quality and quantity of an individual’s education is seen by many as a panacea to many social ills: stagnating wages, increases in inequality, and declines in technological progress might be countered by policies aimed at increasing the skills of those who are in danger of falling behind in the modern labour market.

Related publications  Academies, charter and free schools: do new school types deliver better outcomes?’, Andrew Eyles, Claudia Hupkau and Stephen Machin, Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, August 2016


Related Links:
OUP blog - Academy schools and the transformation of the English education system

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 14/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Economics of Higher Education blog

Grade prediction system means the brightest, poorest students can miss out on top university places

Article by Gill Wyness

With UK tuition fees now among the highest in the world, but benefits from having a degree remaining substantial, choosing the right university has never been more important for young people. The government has tried to make this easier by offering more and more information not just on the university experience but on the quality of the institution and even the potential wage return students could reap.


Related Links:
Economics of Higher Education blog - Grade prediction system means the brightest, poorest students can miss out on top university places

CEP Education and Skills

Gill Wyness webpage


News Posted: 09/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

Epcatalunya.es

La pérdida de trabajo del padre puede afectar hasta medio punto la nota media de los hijos

In the study’Job Loss at Home: Children’s School Performance during the Great Recession in Spain’, researcher Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, of the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, says that the loss of work of the father can lead to a "deterioration" of the educational performance of the children.


Related Links:
Epcatalunya.es - La pérdida de trabajo del padre puede afectar hasta medio punto la nota media de los hijos

In brief...Parental job loss: the impact on children's school performance

Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain

CEP Education and Skills

Jenifer Ruiz-valenzuela webpage


News Posted: 03/12/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Minister: Teachers should confiscate iPads as pupils use them to bully and harass

More than 90 per cent of teenagers have mobile phones, but a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where they were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6 per cent.


Related Links:
The Daily Telegraph - Minister: Teachers should confiscate iPads as pupils use them to bully and harass

In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?

Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance

CEP Education and Skills

Richard Murphy webpage


News Posted: 30/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Northern Echo (Darlington)

Failing the school test

WE were told that the drive to convert schools into academies would boost choice, results and quality.

However, a new study by the London School of Economics casts doubt on the Government’s determination to see all state schools in England pushed towards academy status.


Related Links:
The Northern Echo (Darlington) - Failing the school test

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 22/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

MailOnline

Primary schools' academy conversions ‘have not boosted pupil performance'

The conversion of primary schools into academies has not boosted pupils' performance, according to research. All primary and secondary schools in England were given permission to be run independently of local government in 2010 in an attempt to drive up standards. But a London School of Economics study has found no evidence to support a benefit to primary students' results during the first two years of "academisation".

Also in

Jersey Evening Post; Shropshire Star; Express & Star; Wiltshire Business


Related Links:
MailOnline - Primary schools' academy conversions ‘have not boosted pupil performance'

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 21/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Halstead Gazette

Study shows converting primary schools into academies has 'not boosted pupils' performance'

NEW research shows the conversion of primary schools into academies has not boosted pupils' performance.

All primary and secondary schools in England were given permission to be run independently of local government in 2010 in an attempt to drive up standards.

But a study by the London School of Economnics has found no evidence to support a benefit to primary students' resutls during the first two years of "academisation".

This article was published online by the Halstead Gazette on November 21, 2016


Related Links:
Halstead Gazette - Study shows converting primary schools into academies has 'not boosted pupils' performance'

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 21/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement

Academy conversion does not improve primary Sats scores

Pupils in primary academies do no better in key stage 2 tests than comparable local authority schools, study finds  

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics looked at the test performance of 270 primaries, which had converted between September 2010 and April 2012.

They compared pupils’ test scores in the academic years 2006/07 to 2013/14 in these schools with a control group of schools that converted in the 2014/15 or 2015/16 academic years.

The results showed pupils enrolled in a school prior to it becoming an academy did no better in their KS2 tests than those sitting the same exams at comparable schools, “irrespective of the Ofsted grade of the school before it converted”.

This article was published online by the Times Educational Supplement on November 21, 2016

Link to article here


Related Links:
Times Educational Supplement - Academy conversion does not improve primary Sats scores

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 21/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Making primary schools into academies does not boost results, says report

Pupils at early conversters to academy status did not outperform children at schools that converted later, according to LSE research.

“The results cast doubt on whether further expansion of the academies programme will be beneficial to English education,” said Andrew Eyles of the LSE’s centre for economic performance and one of the report’s authors.

This article was published by the Guardian on November 21, 2016

Link to article here


Related Links:
Guardian - Making primary schools into academies does not boost results, says report

Unexpected School Reform: Academisation of Primary Schools in England

CEP Education and Skills

Andrew Eyles webpage

Stephen Machin webpage

Sandra Mcnally webpage


News Posted: 21/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Polish Express

Polski dzieci poprawiaja wynicki w nauce swoich brytyjskich kolegow/Polish children improve the academic performance of their British colleagues

A study carried out by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics shows that these students have a positive effect on the English students.

"Data from the Catholic schools, which attend children Polish immigrants show that the presence of foreigners can have a positive effect on the children of natives of our country," said Prof. Sandra McNally of Surrey University. Prof. McNally said, too, that this may be due to better standards in schools in Poland as well as the ethics of their parents, who have left their homeland to seek employment in the UK.

This article was published online by Polish Express on November 13, 2016
Link to article here


Related Links:
Polish Express - Polski dzieci poprawiaja wynicki w nauce swoich brytyjskich kolegow/Polish children improve the academic performance of their British colleagues

In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Non-Native Speakers Of English In The Classroom: What Are The Effects On Pupil Performance?

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Shqiponja Telhaj webpage


News Posted: 13/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

Polish Express

Polski dzieci poprawiaja wynicki w nauce swoich brytyjskich kolegow/Polish children improve the academic performance of their British colleagues

A study carried out by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics shows that these students have a positive effect on the English students.

"Data from the Catholic schools, which attend children Polish immigrants show that the presence of foreigners can have a positive effect on the children of natives of our country," said Prof. Sandra McNally of Surrey University. Prof. McNally said, too, that this may be due to better standards in schools in Poland as well as the ethics of their parents, who have left their homeland to seek employment in the UK.

This article was published online by Polish Express on November 13, 2016
Link to article here


Related Links:
Polish Express - Polski dzieci poprawiaja wynicki w nauce swoich brytyjskich kolegow/Polish children improve the academic performance of their British colleagues

In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Non-Native Speakers Of English In The Classroom: What Are The Effects On Pupil Performance?

CEP Education and Skills CEP Labour Markets CEP Education and Skills

Sandra Mcnally webpage

Shqiponja Telhaj webpage


News Posted: 13/11/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Times Educational Supplement - TES

'The pen is mightier than the computer for learning'

Pupils make substantially more progress in literacy if they follow a pen-and-paper course than if they take a similar programme online, new research has found. Researchers working with pupils in 51 primary schools found that those following a paper-based literacy programme made 50 per cent more progress than those doing an identical course on a computer. ... Dr Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, an education researcher at the London School of Economics, who carried out the study for the Education Endowment Foundation, believes that it is not the medium of instruction that makes the difference. Instead, it is the teaching that goes along with it. ''In general, research finds very mixed results about the use of technology in school,'' she said. "There are studies that haven't found very big effects from the use of ICT in learning.

This article was published by The Times Educational Supplement on October 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website


News Posted: 28/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Larger bursaries 'boost students' chances of getting good degree

Study of 36,000 undergraduates identifies positive relationship between financial aid, retention and attainment
The larger the bursary a student receives, the more likely they are to get a good degree, according to a major study. Researchers found that each additional £1,000 of financial aid awarded to undergraduates at nine English universities increased their chance of getting top marks (a first or a 2:1) by 3.7 percentage points, with about half of this owing to improved retention, and the rest attributable to higher test scores. Significantly, students from the most deprived backgrounds benefited the most, with the estimated impact of larger bursaries on the poorer half of the sample being about six times greater than the cohort as a whole. Undergraduates with higher prior attainment derived two to three times greater benefit than their course mates with lower school grades, according to Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, and Richard Murphy assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.

This article was published by the Times Higher Education on October 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

AMEinfo.com

How is your smartphone distracting you and how to control it

Impact on academia
While technology has disrupted the educational system across the world, and with tablets and laptops replacing physical text books and the entire teaching and learning experience, smartphones remain to be the most controversial aspect in this regard.
Research conducted by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, and published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalence of an additional week of schooling for a pupil's academic year.

This article was published online by AMEinfo.com on October 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Education: The road to London

The capital's schools are the best in the country. Can they be copied?
According to a report last year by researchers at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the London School of Economics, one-sixth of the improvement in central London schools was the result of growing numbers of ethnic minority children, who everywhere in Britain tend to do better in exams and improve more while in school than white pupils. Some also suggest that inner London's startling gentrification has played a role, attracting better teachers to the capital and pushing out poor families, whose children tend to be less swotty.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Understanding the improved performance of disadvantaged pupils in London, Jo Blanden, Ellen Greaves, Paul Gregg, Lindsey Macmillan and Luke Sibieta, CASE Working Paper No.21, September 2015

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/10/2016      [Back to the Top]

indy100 Independent

Jeremy Corbyn is absolutely right about immigration. Here's why

3. Immigrants have not depressed the wages of UK workers
A report by the London School of Economics this year showed that there was no correlation between an increase in immigration and the recent dip in wages. While wages have fallen in recent years and immigration continued to rise, wages were also rising while immigration was rising.
Includes a figure from research published by the Centre for Economic Performance

This article was published online by indy100 Independent on September 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.05, May 2016
Technical Appendix to 'Brexit and the impact of immigration on the UK'
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

indy100 Independent

Jeremy Corbyn is absolutely right about immigration. Here's why

3. Immigrants have not depressed the wages of UK workers
A report by the London School of Economics this year showed that there was no correlation between an increase in immigration and the recent dip in wages. While wages have fallen in recent years and immigration continued to rise, wages were also rising while immigration was rising.
Includes a figure from research published by the Centre for Economic Performance

This article was published online by indy100 Independent on September 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.05, May 2016
Technical Appendix to 'Brexit and the impact of immigration on the UK'
See the whole series of CEP Brexit Analysis papers here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

The East Anglian Times

Will you harm your child's academic progress if you buy them a new iPhone 7?

Last year, a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where mobile phones were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6%. Perhaps a study should look at the gains such a move could make when it comes to children's emotional well-being. I can't help thinking it would be worth more than 6%.

This article was published by The East Anglian Times on September 25, 2016
Link to article here

Also in:
Ipswich Star
Will you harm your child's academic progress if you buy them a new iPhone 7?

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015"
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Brexit: True cost of UK leaving EU without trade deal revealed

EXCLUSIVE: An analysis by The Independent of official data suggests British exporters would face a cost of at least £4.5bn - and in all likelihood they would take a hit many times larger
A separate analysis by the London School of Economics suggested the welfare losses of moving to the WTO rules in a ''big bang'' would be up to 3.5 per cent of GDP per head instantly. ''The fact that the country is in some way being told to be prepared to face what we regarded as a very pessimistic outcome is quite discouraging in itself,'' said Gianmarco Ottaviano of the LSE. John Van Reenen, a former colleague of Ottaviano and now Professor of Economics at MIT in the US, said trading under WTO rules would be a ''truly dreadful outcome for British people''.

This article was published by The Independent on September 23, 2016
Link to article here

See Also
DigitalSpy
Brexit: True cost of UK leaving EU without trade deal revealed

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 23/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Handelsblatt

Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Times

Solas revamp brings overdue direction to adult education

There have been major changes to Ireland's apprenticeship system over the past few years, and now the overall number of apprentices is expected to increase to about 10,700. And, although Ireland's apprenticeship system is undergoing a much-needed and radical overhaul, to bring in more numbers, the old system couldn't exactly be described as broken. A 2010 report from researchers at the London School of Economics said that ''the duration and standard of apprenticeship training in Ireland is similar to the best European provision and intended to facilitate recognition as skilled craftsmen/women in other EU states''.

This article was published online by The Irish Times on September 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: The state of apprenticeships, Hilary Steedman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
The State of Apprenticeship in 2010. International Comparisons: Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland by Hilary Steedman, jointly published by CEP and the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network.

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website


News Posted: 13/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

May goes into battle for selective education

Prime minister champions grammar system but critics argue reforms will damage social mobility
But critics were quick to dismiss the reforms. Professor Sandra McNally, director of education and skills at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, said: ''Tests at age 11 are strongly associated with family income,'' she added. ''This change will probably increase social segregation.''

This article was published online by the Financial Times on September 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 09/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC 2

Newsnight

Sandra McNally interviewed about grammar schools

This programme was broadcast on 9 September 2016 Link

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 09/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

Treehugger

Why kids shouldn't take their cell phones to school

A 2015 research paper by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that student test scores improve by 6.4 percent when cell phones are banned at schools and that there are no significant academic gains when the ban is ignored.


News Posted: 06/09/2016      [Back to the Top]

WFSB-TV online

Local educators, parents torn on cellphone use in schools

A study by the London School of Economics showed schools that ban students from bringing phones to class see an improvement in test scores by an average 6.4 percent.

This article appeared on WFSB-TV on 25 August 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Herald Scotland

Agenda: Business has a key role to play in helping the next generation acquire the skills required to meet future challenges

...UK-wide, we have increased our school leaver intake by 47 per cent because we have already started to see the positive results that increased social mobility and diversity can have on both your bottom line and wider society. ... Recent research from the Centre for Economic Performance suggested that Britain has roughly the same levels of social mobility as the United States, but trails other nations with similar demographics and economic history, such as Canada, the Nordic countries and Germany. Even more concerning is the evidence that our standing in this field is heading in a downward trend.

This article was published online by the Herald Scotland on August 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America: A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Speical Report, April 2005
Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

This is Money

Tax-free childcare is on the way - but will your family be any better off and how will it compare to childcare vouchers?

The average cost of full-time childcare across the UK for a child under the age of two is £217.57 a week. Part-time care (25 hours, as opposed to the full 50) costs £116.77 a week. Assuming both parents work full-time and get 25 days holiday a year, the average annual bill for 47 weeks of full-time childcare is just over £10,200 and for part-time is close to £5,500. It's hardly surprising then that working mums in lower-paid jobs are being forced to substantially cut their hours or give up work altogether after having a second child, according to a new study from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by This is Money.co.uk on August 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


News Posted: 23/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement - TES

'Revolving door' warning

Thousands of 16-year-olds are stuck in an educational ''revolving door'', returning year after year to study low-level qualifications, a major new study has found.
The Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics tracked a cohort of 575,000 teenagers for four years to find out what progress they made after GCSEs. The researchers' findings were stark: among the learners who sat GCSEs at the age of 16 in 2009-10, about 10,000 were found to be working towards low-level qualifications for four consecutive years.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement (TES) on August 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.001, July 2016

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Guglielmo Ventura webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)

Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

CIPD

Government urges employers to make breastfeeding at work easier

New initiatives planned to end 'unacceptable and unlawful' discrimination against working women
Employers are being told to do more to help mothers breastfeed their babies at work, as part of the government's latest initiative to tackle workplace discrimination against pregnant women and new mothers. The government's plans aim to encourage organisations to take ''a more progressive approach'' towards female staff who return to their jobs after having children, such as by providing private spaces for breastfeeding mothers to express and store their milk, and places where they can feed their babies while at work. ... In a letter to MPs, James said she wanted pregnant women, mothers and ''all women'' to be able to work ''if they choose to do so''. Her comments follow a study released last week by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, which found that most mothers in low-skilled jobs were forced to give up work after the birth of their second child.

This article was published online by CIPD on August 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website
News Posted: 15/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Brexit: Economists put cost of UK losing European Union single market membership at £75bn

The IFS estimate that single market membership could be worth 4 per cent of GDP by 2030 - or £75bn in today's money
But the IFS estimates that retaining single market membership could be potentially worth 4 per cent of GDP permanently to the UK economy relative to WTO terms by 2030 - equal to two full years of trend growth. They based this figure on long-term estimates from other forecasting organisations such as the London School of Economic's Centre for Economic Performance and the National Institute for Economic and Social Research (NIESR) of the long-term negative impact of Brexit on UK growth.

This article was published online by the Independent on August 9, 2016
Link to article here

Also in
August 10, 2016
The Times of India
Brexit: Economists put cost of UK losing European Union singe market membership at £75bn

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Independent

Brexit: Economists put cost of UK losing European Union single market membership at £75bn

The IFS estimate that single market membership could be worth 4 per cent of GDP by 2030 - or £75bn in today's money
But the IFS estimates that retaining single market membership could be potentially worth 4 per cent of GDP permanently to the UK economy relative to WTO terms by 2030 - equal to two full years of trend growth. They based this figure on long-term estimates from other forecasting organisations such as the London School of Economic's Centre for Economic Performance and the National Institute for Economic and Social Research (NIESR) of the long-term negative impact of Brexit on UK growth.

This article was published online by the Independent on August 9, 2016
Link to article here

Also in
August 10, 2016
The Times of India
Brexit: Economists put cost of UK losing European Union singe market membership at £75bn

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

CIPD

Most mothers 'forced to give up work after second child'

Working mothers in low-skilled jobs are being forced to either considerably reduce their hours or give up work altogether after having a second child, according to a wide-ranging study that suggests lack of access to childcare has a profound effect on the labour market. While having one child has a relatively limited effect on workforce participation, women in low-skilled jobs reduced the amount they worked each week by an average of 18 hours after the arrival of their second child, according to the study from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article was published online by CIPD on August 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


News Posted: 08/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail online

Having a second baby forces women into poverty: Childcare costs see mothers in low-paid jobs give up work to look after children instead

The addition of a second child can put families under serious financial strain - and in the case of women on the lowest incomes - convince them to give up work altogether in the face of rising childcare costs, a new study has found. Economists Claudia Hupkau and Marion Leturcq compared women in skilled and low-skilled jobs before the birth of their first child and again after their second.

This article was published online by the Daily Mail on August 7, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


News Posted: 07/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

For UK women in low-paid jobs, a second child is a mixed blessing

A new study finds that, while the addition of a second child has little effect on the working hours of mothers in skilled jobs, it has a substantial and negative effect on low-skilled women who are forced to reduce their hours considerably or even give up their jobs altogether. The findings reinforce the view that there is a shortage of affordable childcare in the UK, despite successive government attempts to help women into work in recent years. The study, by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, to be presented at this month's annual congress of the European Economic Association in Geneva, examined a group of 3,000 women in the UK aged between 20 and 36 who had their first child between 2000 and 2001.

This article was published by the Guardian on August 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


News Posted: 06/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog

Reflections on the employer support for higher level skills report

Article by John Denham
For the past 20 years and longer, Ministers of all parties have wanted to see more employers support employees and apprentices to gain higher levels skills and higher education. With strong bi-partisan support in a relatively non-ideological area of policy it seems odd that employer supported higher skills have not become a more important part of the skills and education system. In a recent short project for the Institute of Public Affairs I wanted to examine why public policy had apparently failed. I have an interest: I was Secretary of State at the Department for Innovation and Skills from 2007 to 2009 and, more recently, had proposed radical reforms to higher education finance that depended heavily on the expansion of employer supported degrees.

This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) blog on August 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
In full: Employer Support for Higher Level Skills Report
CVER website


News Posted: 03/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

SchoolDash blog

Poverty of opportunity?

Education is not just a vital cornerstone of our culture and economy, it is also potentially one of the great social levellers. However rich or poor our parents, however supportive or dysfunctional our families, a high-quality education ought to give each of us the opportunity to live a fulfilling life limited only by our own talents and efforts rather than by the circumstances of our birth. Or so the theory goes. In this post we look at the question of economic deprivation among children, and in particular how different types of schools either enable or hinder opportunities for those from poorer families. ... The rest of this post looks at these trends in more detail. You may also be interested to see other related work such as the Sutton Trust's recent analysis of social selection in primary schools, Ofsted's 2013 report on underachievement among poor pupils, and the LSE's 2012 research into the effects of schools on house prices.

This article was published online by the SchoolDash blog on August 2, 2016
Link to article here

CEP research on Twitter
Lilian Greenwood @LilianGreenwood (Labour MP for Nottingham)
RT @emranmian: On grammar schools and social mobility ... @SchoolDash work from last week is pretty damning

Related publications
The link between schools and house prices is now an established fact, Stephen Gibbons, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, September 25, 2012
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market, EALE 2010 Pressidential Address, Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/08/2016      [Back to the Top]

Independent

It turns out that companies don't do better when bosses have very high pay - but this will have to change after Brexit

Brian Bell and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance have carried out a similar exercise looking at top bosses' pay at 500 large listed UK companies between 1999 and 2014. Unlike in the MSCI study, the two researchers did find that executive pay was correlated with stock market performance over the period.

This article was published online by the Independent on July 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Bankers and their bonuses, Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.35, February 2013
Extreme Wage Inequality: Pay at the Very Top, Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.34, February 2013

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Independent

It turns out that companies don't do better when bosses have very high pay - but this will have to change after Brexit

Brian Bell and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance have carried out a similar exercise looking at top bosses' pay at 500 large listed UK companies between 1999 and 2014. Unlike in the MSCI study, the two researchers did find that executive pay was correlated with stock market performance over the period.

This article was published online by the Independent on July 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Bankers and their bonuses, Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.35, February 2013
Extreme Wage Inequality: Pay at the Very Top, Brian Bell and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.34, February 2013

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

National Governors' Association

Research Matters - Are academies better? National Governors' Association

This finding is mirrored at least in part by a study of sponsored academies established under the previous Labour government, conducted by the London School of Economics, which argues that the impact of conversion should be analysed at pupil level because, on average, academies began admitting higher ability pupils after conversion. The academies did have a positive impact on pupils who were enrolled prior to conversion, however, and the evidence suggests that headteacher replacement, changes in management structure and curriculum change were the key factors underpinning this improvement.

This article was published online by the National Governors' Association on July 22, 2016 in the July/August issue of the NGA Magazine
Link to article here

Related publications
The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 22/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Admin5.com (China)

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

CVER blog

If A-Levels aren't for you, choices at age 16 could now get a whole lot simpler

Article by CVER Director, Sandra McNally, on some of the recommendations of the recent Sainsbury Report
The incoming British prime minister Theresa May has outlined a vision of a country that ''works not for the privileged few but that works for every one of us ... because we're going to give people control over their lives''. A good place for her to start would be to make sure that the government sticks to its promise to implement the 34 recommendations set out in a new report that aims to radically simplify the education choices available for people after age 16. The Sainsbury report, published on July 8, sets out a blueprint for technical education for young people and adults. The report is wide-ranging and ambitious, with recommendations that cover many aspects of the way education is provided. The government's Post-16 Skills Plan, published on the same day, says the Sainsbury recommendation will be accepted ''unequivocally where that is possible within existing budgets''.

This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education (CVER) blog on July 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
This article was originally published on The Conversation

Related publications
Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.001, July 2016

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Education Policy Institute

Reflections on 'Academies: 15 Years On' Conference

Yesterday the Education Policy Institute, in partnership with the Sutton Trust, hosted the 'Academies: 15 years on summit'. This was an opportunity for researchers, policy makers and system leaders to come together and consider the latest evidence on the impact of academies on pupil outcomes and what Government should do now.
Dr Olmo Silva presented the work that he, Professor Stephen Machin, and colleagues at LSE have carried out at a system level. This work, commissioned by EPI, looked at the impact of pre-2010 sponsored academies and provided the first robust analysis of the impact of post-2010 secondary converter academies. They found positive impacts for the early sponsored academies, with improvements that were equivalent to five grades across a pupil's GCSE subjects. They also identified positive effects for converter academies that had previously been rated as outstanding - equivalent to about two grades across a pupil's GCSE subjects. But they found no effect for converter academies previously rated as good or satisfactory. Given that such schools make up around two thirds of converters, this is a worrying finding.

This article was published online by the Education Policy Institute on July 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Academies 2: The New Batch, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Business Day Live

Are economists at fault for Brexit?

John van Reenen, the outgoing director of the London School of Economics’s Centre for Economic Performance, doesn’t think the profession should be too down on itself. Had economists engaged more "in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference".

This article appeared in Business Day Live on 13 July. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage
News Posted: 13/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

If A-Levels aren't for you, choices at age 16 could now get a whole lot simpler

Article by Sandra McNally, Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), LSE and Head of Education and Skills Programme, CEP
The incoming British prime minister Theresa May has outlined a vision of a country that works not for the privileged few but that ''works for every one of us ... because we're going to give people control over their lives''. A good place for her to start would be to make sure that the government sticks to its promise to implement the 34 recommendations set out in a new report that aims to radically simplify the education choices available for people after age 16. ... Nowhere is reform more necessary than in the options for 16-year-olds, after they finish their GCSE exams, as my colleagues and I have outlined in a new paper. As it currently stands, the system is obtuse - even for us ''experts''.

This article was published by The Conversation blog on July 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.001, July 2016

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The New Times (Rwanda)

Are phones a blessing or curse for students?

Research findings
A new study on students' test performance and smartphones found kids who attend schools with smartphone bans did better on tests - even more so if they were struggling academically before the ban was instituted. Researchers at the London School of Economics gathered test scores from thousands of 16-year-old between 2000 to 2012, studying the effects of cell phone bans on schools. They found that the bans boosted test scores by six per cent. If a child was previously academically under-performing, their scores improved up to 14 per cent. Dr Richard Murphy, the assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas and co-author of the study, said, ''Our conclusion is that unstructured use of phones in schools has a negative impact, mainly for kids at the bottom half of the class. Schools should consider having a policy restricting phone use''.

This article was published by The New Times (Rwanda) on July 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Schools Week

Experts News - Results are in: Academy status works for the best and worst schools, but that's about it

After years of debate over the effectiveness of academy status, the Education Policy Institute has now released data which it says shows the causal impact of academy status on school performance. Editor Laura McInerney explains what the researchers found.
Does academy status lift performance in schools? It's a vital question given the country is spending millions changing schools into academies. So far there had been no answer. But a new report, commissioned by the Education Policy Institute and published today, finally provides some.
To start with the conclusions:
1. It seems that Labour forcing badly performing schools to become academies before 2012 was a good thing.
Hurray for Labour.
2. It also seems that, after 2010, letting outstanding schools convert into becoming academies was also a good thing.
Well done the Coalition.

BUT
3. For everyone else after 2010, becoming an academy doesn't seem to have had much effect. In fact, it might have made things a tiny bit worse.

So, why is there a difference between pre-2010 and post-2010 academies?

This article was published online by Schools Week on July 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Andrew Eyles webpage
Gabriel Heller-Sahlgren webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Matteo Sandi webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

'No evidence' academy status improves grades at good or satisfactory schools

New research has found ''no evidence'' that academy status leads to better grades for pupils at schools rated good or satisfactory. The study, by the London School of Economics and the Education Policy Institute (EPI), found pupils' performance at schools already rated outstanding when they converted, totalling 390 institutions, saw a ''statistically significant'' rise in grades. The research also found that Coalition-era academies had a lower impact on performance than the Labour-style sponsored academies, which were introduced in 2002 to help struggling schools.

This article was published by The Independent on July 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Andrew Eyles webpage
Gabriel Heller-Sahlgren webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Matteo Sandi webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Sydney Morning Herald

We've hit peak panic – but the economy is still ticking over

But how worried should we be that political and financial uncertainty will feed through into the real economy? Stanford University economist Nicholas Bloom has been studying the impact of uncertainty on economies over the past decade and believes there is a link. He and colleagues have produced a neat set of "uncertainty trackers" for several countries that track mentions in articles of "uncertainty" or "uncertain" combined with references to the economy. The uncertainty index in Britain hit a record high during the Brexit debate and is at double the level of the Global Financial Crisis.

This article appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald on 8 July 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring Economic Policy Uncertainty Scott R. Baker, Nicholas Bloom and Steven J. Davis, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1379, October 2015
Fluctuations in Uncertainty Nicholas Bloom, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Volume 28, No.2, Spring 2014
Fluctuations in Uncertainty , Nicholas Bloom, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.38, December 2013


Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Telegraph

Take the path to healthy weight loss

Another from the London School of Economics found that people who regularly walked briskly for half an hour or more had smaller waists than those who went to the gym or did tougher sports such as jogging and rugby.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 July 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/07/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily News Egypt

LuxLeaks, law and justice all part of tax scandal trial in Luxembourg

The LuxLeaks papers clearly illustrate that Luxembourg’s most important export product is tax avoidance. That is why French economics researcher Gabriel Zucman says that Luxembourg is “the center of European tax evasion.” Zucman, who has lectured at the London School of Economics since 2014, describes the grand duchy as an “economic colony of the international financial industry.”

This article appeared in Daily News Egypt on 28 June 2016. Link to article

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

El Correo Gallego.es (Spain)

No hay prisa para salir

Parecidos resultados obtiene para los mismos escenarios el informe del Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics
In the three cases the fall of GDP in per cent, following the same order, would be 3.8, 6.2 and 7.5. Similar results obtained for the same scenarios the report of the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by El Correo Gallego (Spain) on June 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Forbes Online

Which Management Practices Are Most Beneficial To Firm Performance?

Along with colleagues Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, London School of Economics, Sadun challenges this view in a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Management as a Technology?

This article appeared in Forbes on 27 June 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Management as a Technology? Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, John Van Reenen, June 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1433

Related Links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 27/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Forbes Online

Which Management Practices Are Most Beneficial To Firm Performance?

Along with colleagues Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, London School of Economics, Sadun challenges this view in a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Management as a Technology?

This article appeared in Forbes on 27 June 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Management as a Technology? Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, John Van Reenen, June 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1433

Related Links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

News Posted: 27/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service - In the Balance

UK votes to leave EU

What does the UK's decision to leave the European Union mean for the future of the single market? Economists talk of sustained market turbulence, devaluations and an imminent recession, but will it be Britain or the EU suffering the worst effects long-term? And as eurosceptic political parties across the continent are buoyed by the UK's vote and call for their own referendums, what must the EU project itself do to survive? Ed Butler is joined by three guests from across the EU: Damien Lempereur from Debout La France, a political party which wants a French exit from the EU; Jens Zimmerman, a member of Germany's Social Democratic Party and part of Angela Merkels coalition government; and Swati Dhingra, from the London School of Economics.

This programme was broadcast on the BBC World Service Radio - In the Balance programme on June 26, 2016
Link to broadcast here [Swati Dhingra brought in to the interview 08:37]

Related publications
Full series of CEP Brexit Analyses can be seen here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Katadata (Indonesia)

Inggris Tinggalkan Uni Eropa, Pasar Keuangan Dunia Guncang

The decision left the United Kingdom society of the European Union does indeed have fueled new uncertainty. ''Businessmen reluctant to take new decisions or affect investments, because of the uncertainty for the future,'' said the Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, John Van Reenen, as reported by the New York Times, Friday (24/6).

This article was published online by Katadata News (Indonesia) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)

El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

ABC News (Australia)

Brexit would mean a UK recession, London School of Economics report finds

Research by the London School of Economics in the report ''Life After Brexit'' is warning Britain would most likely fall into recession if it leaves, as a myriad of agreements unravel over several years. French launch #Operationcroissant Parisians arrive in London, bearing croissants and love letters to convince their neighbours to stay in the EU. The co-author of the report, Professor Swati Dhingra, was the latest to agree with warnings from the British Treasury that a Leave vote would be a shock to the UK economy and rattle global financial markets.

This article was published online by ABC News (Australia) on June 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after BREXIT: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 2016
View the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis Papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Al Jazeera

Transcript: Norman Lamont on the Brexit and the EU

A study by the London School of Economics found that BREXIT could lead to a fall in national income equivalent to that of the financial crash of 2008. Facts?

This article appeared on Al Jazeera on 21 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Indian Express

Brexit: Beckham says remain

Leading economic institutions in Britain – the Institute for Fiscal Studies, NIESR, and the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance – have warned quitting the EU’s single market would make the UK “financially worse off"

This article appeared in The Indian Express on 21 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

Britain more prosperous 'IN'

The Telegraph

We are economists who care about Britain and its future. We feel compelled to speak out on the risks of Leaving and opportunities from Remaining in the EU. If Britain votes to Leave we believe that:

• A recession causing job losses will become significantly more likely due to the shock and uncertainty of Brexit. With interest rates near zero and debt still high, the Bank of England and Government would have limited ability to prevent such a recession.

• A drop in the pound and increased tariffs on imports will cause the costs of everyday goods to go up increasing inflation.

• Investment in the UK will drop harming innovation and future job growth.

• These impacts will fall most heavily on households with middle and low incomes.

• Less growth means less government revenue which means higher taxes and less to spend on services like the NHS.

Leave will say these points are 'Project Fear'. We say they are 'Project Reality'.

This open letter was published by The Telegraph on June 21, 2016
Link to the letter here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 21/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog

Scenarios of a new UK-EU relationship: A 'soft' Brexit

What consequences will Britain's EU referendum have for both the UK and the rest of Europe? In a series of papers published as a collaboration between EUROPP and CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs), LSE authors analyse the prospects for three scenarios - a Bremain, a 'soft' Brexit and a 'harsh' Brexit. Swati Dhingra discusses what would happen in the case of a 'soft' Brexit, which is defined as the UK exiting the EU without a significant deterioration in relations between Britain and other EU countries. The full papers are available here.

This article was published online by LSE's EUROPP - European Politics and Policy - blog on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.08, June 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog

Scenarios of a new UK-EU relationship: A 'soft' Brexit

What consequences will Britain's EU referendum have for both the UK and the rest of Europe? In a series of papers published as a collaboration between EUROPP and CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs), LSE authors analyse the prospects for three scenarios - a Bremain, a 'soft' Brexit and a 'harsh' Brexit. Swati Dhingra discusses what would happen in the case of a 'soft' Brexit, which is defined as the UK exiting the EU without a significant deterioration in relations between Britain and other EU countries. The full papers are available here.

This article was published online by LSE's EUROPP - European Politics and Policy - blog on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.08, June 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Financial Times

Brexiters' idea of unilateral free trade is a dangerous fantasy

Economists for Brexit, argues that such an alternative exists. It rejects post-exit deals with the EU and instead recommends unilateral free trade and reliance for market access on the rules of the World Trade Organisation. Does this make sense? The short answer is: no. The longer one is that unilateral free trade would not be economically superior to EU membership, would be less simple than imagined and would also be politically unacceptable. ...

Start with the economics. Patrick Minford of Cardiff University suggests that, under this option, UK economic welfare would rise by 4 per cent after Brexit. The economy would also end up specialising in services and lose manufacturing. In analysing the same option, economists at the London School of Economics reach a quite different conclusion: a reduction of 2.3 per cent in welfare, only marginally less than the 2.6 per cent reduction they believe would follow a Brexit without such unilateral reductions in tariffs.

This article was published by The Financial Times on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.6, May 2016
The complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series is available online here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

London Loves Business

5 reasons the UK leaving the EU would be a DISASTER

A report by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics released last week published similar findings. The report said that in an “optimistic” scenario, the UK leaving the EU would knock off £850 per household. In a “pessimistic” scenario with larger increases in trade costs, Brexit will lower average incomes by £1,700 per household.

This article appeared in London Loves Business on 6 June 2016. Link to article

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 06/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

The fatal contradictions in the Remain and Leave camps

Even aside from the economic consequences of a Leave vote (and read this LSE demolition of the Brexit case), the immediate future for Britain could be very ugly indeed.

This article was published by The Economist on June 3, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No. 6, May 2016
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/06/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review blog

How do ‘Economists for Brexit' manage to defy the laws of gravity?

The possibility of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) has generated an unusual degree of consensus among economists. Acrimony and rancour surrounded debates around austerity and joining the euro, but analysis from the Bank of England to the OECD to academia has all concluded that Brexit would make us economically worse off. The disagreement is mainly over the degree of impoverishment (for example, Dhingra et al, 2016a; OECD, 2016; HM Treasury, 2016; PWC, 2016; NIESR, 2016). Perhaps the one exception is the recent and much publicised work of 'Economists for Brexit' (2016). Since any coherent economic case for leaving the EU was been largely 'missing in action', it is refreshing to get some clarity over the Leave campaign's vision of the UK's post-Brexit economic arrangements. The only modelling details provided by Economists for Brexit come from Professor Patrick Minford of Cardiff University (Minford, 2015; 2016; Minford et al, 2016). He argues that Brexit will raise the UK's welfare by 4% as a result of increased trade.

This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on May 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.06, May 2016
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Education: Free childcare 'has made no improvement in primary school exam results', research shows

Free nursery care for three year olds has made little or no improvement in primary school exam results, a nine-year study has revealed as academics say the Labour policy has had 'no impact'. ... However, the first and largest study on how effective the policy has been has shown there has been little in the way of academic improvement for children age 7 and 11. ... Dr Jo Blanden, one of the researchers and senior lecturer in economics at the University of Surrey, said the policy was not effective because free care was of lesser quality than private one.

This article was published by The Telegraph on May 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Universal Pre-School Education: The Case of Public Funding with Private Provision, Jo Blanden, Emilia Del Bono, Sandra McNally and Birgitta Rabe, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1352, May 2015

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Sajid Javid: Brexit warnings are 'not a conspiracy' - it will cost 500,000 UK jobs

Responding to Hilton’s article, Javid said: “Steve is entitled to his view … the central issue here is that economically, we are far better off being part of this single market … Now you have the Bank of England, the IMF [International Monetary Fund], the OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development], the London School of Economics, the OBR [Office for Budget Responsibility], the IFS [Institute for Fiscal Studies], every one of our allies, every one of our trading partners and that is not a conspiracy, that’s a consensus about what would happen if we left the EU.”

This article appeared in City AM on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times of Malta Online

What's at stake in the UK's EU vote

The claim, however, that migration is a drain on the welfare state is false. EU migrants for the most part move to Britain to work, and a study by the London School of Economics has shown that they are net contribu¬tors to the economy as a result of the taxes they pay.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta Online on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Economic and Social Research Council News

School ban on mobile phones helping pupils

Research for the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE examines the impact of mobile phone bans on pupils' academic achievement in subsequent years. The researchers, Louis Philippe Beland at Louisiana State University, and Richard Murphy at the University of Texas at Austin, surveyed schools in Birmingham, Leicester, London and Manchester about their mobile phone policies since 2001 and combined it with results data from externally marked national exams.

This article was published online by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

This article was originally published in the ESRC's Britain in 2016 magazine. See here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Project Syndicate

The economic consequences of Brexit

The London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance calculates that the long-term costs to Britain of lower trade with the EU could be as high as 9.5% of GDP, while the fall in foreign investment could cost 3.4% of GDP or more. Those costs alone dwarf the potential gains from Brexit. Britain's net contribution to the EU budget amounted to only 0.35% of GDP last year, and scrapping EU regulation would bring limited benefits, because the UK's labor and product markets are already among the freest in the world.

This article was published online by Project Syndicate on May 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Spectator - 'Coffee House' blog

EU immigration hasn't hurt jobs or wages. Here's why:

Article by Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen
This morning's national insurance figures have further stoked the debate about immigration, and the extent to which leaving the EU would make a difference. Many British people are concerned that high levels of immigration have hurt their jobs, wages and quality of life. ... So it does make sense that many people believe this immigration wave has hurt UK workers and think that leaving the EU would make things better. To investigate this we crunched the most recent data and scoured the evidence in our new report. The bottom line is that EU immigration has not significantly harmed the pay, jobs or public services enjoyed by Britons. In fact, for the most part it has made us better off. Far from EU immigration being a 'necessary evil' that we must bear in order to gain access to the greater trade and foreign investment generated by the EU Single Market, immigration is at worst neutral and at best another economic benefit of membership.

This article was published online by The Spectator 'Coffee House' blog on May 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Jonathan Wadsworth, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series No.5, May 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Students who use digital devices in class 'perform worse in exams'

Research published last year by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones affected school pupils according to their ability. ''Banning mobile phones improves outcomes for the low-achieving students ... and has no significant impact on high-achievers,'' it concluded.

This article was published by the Guardian on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill communication: technology, distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg

Speech: PM speech on the UK's strength and security in the EU: 9 May 2016

The overwhelming weight of independent opinion - from the International Monetary Fund to the OECD, from the London School of Economics to the Institute for Fiscal Studies - also supports the fact that Britain will suffer an immediate economic shock, and then be permanently poorer for the long-term.

This article appeared on Bloomberg on 9 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement (TES)

'Phonics, decoding and whole-word recognition are a waste of time unless you then develop children as real readers'

Learning to decipher the squiggles on the page well enough to pass the key stage 1 Sats does not make you a reader, says author Susan Elkin
Teaching reading in itself is pointless. All the phonics, decoding skills and whole-word recognition in the world are a waste of time unless you then develop children as real readers. ... The trouble with learning the mechanics - of almost anything - is that if you don't immediately and continuously apply what you've learned, you lose the skills. That is probably why The Centre for Economic Performance recently reported that by the age of 11, having been exposed to phonics at an earlier age makes no difference to a child's reading. It also explains the alarming recent observation from the University of Sheffield that many undergraduates are unable to read whole books. We are failing to develop readers.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement (TES) on May 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

familygolive.com

Phonics not necessarily the best way to teach reading, says study

Although phonics - breaking words down into their constituent parts - has been one of the main ways in which parents and teachers teach children to read for many years, new research from the London School of Economics (LSE) has shown that the method is not demonstrably better than other ways of learning to read. ... However, the study did find that the use of phonics could help particular groups of pupils who may be more likely to be disadvantaged in learning to read, such as those from deprived backgrounds or children who have English as a second language. The study also gave phonics as a teaching method its broad approval, noting that it was a simply and cost-effective way of teaching children to read.

This article was published by familygolive.com on May 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

Teacher

Teaching reading with synthetic phonics

A large-scale study tracking the progress of more than 270 000 students has concluded that teaching reading through a synthetic phonics programme has long-term benefits for children from poorer backgrounds and those who do not speak English as a first language. The analysis, from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, also found the teaching method has large initial benefits for all students at age five and age seven.

This article was published online by Teacher on May 4, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/05/2016      [Back to the Top]

loveMONEY.com

Brexit would cost UK workers up to £5,000 a year - OECD

''Leaving the EU would impose a Brexit tax on generations to come,'' says OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria. ''Instead of funding public services, this tax would be a pure deadweight loss, with no economic benefit.''

This article was published online by loveMONEY.com on April 28, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 28/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Hechinger Report

Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

Although empirical evidence about the effects of phone access on learning seems to be scarce, the findings of a recent study on student phone access and the achievement gap by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy for the London School of Economics and Political Science echoed our concerns. ''We find that mobile phone bans have very different effects on different types of students,'' the authors wrote. ''Banning mobile phones improves outcomes for the low-achieving students ... the most, and has no significant impact on high achievers.''

This article was published online by the Hechinger Report on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Channel 4

News

Mention of OECD Brexit event hosted by CEP.

The news item was broadcast by Channel 4 News on April 27, 2016
Link to news broadcast here

See also
BBC Radio 4
Today
Angel Gurria (OECD) interviewed. [Link no longer available.]

Related event
To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question: Download audio file here
CEP Public Lecture, 27 April 2016
Speaker: Angel Gurria; Discussant: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Atlantic

Do smartphones have a place in the classroom?

From middle schools to colleges, cellphones' adverse effects on student achievement may outweigh their potential as a learning tool.
The findings of a recent study on student phone access and the achievement gap by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy for the London School of Economics and Political Science echoed my concerns. ''We find that mobile phone bans have very different effects on different types of students,'' the authors wrote. ''Banning mobile phones improves outcomes for the low-achieving students ... the most, and has no significant impact on high achievers.''

This article was published online by The Atlantic on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The New York Times

OECD's Gurria-No Economic Upside for UK from Brexit

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Wednesday that he saw no potential benefits for the British economy if voters decide to leave the European Union at a referendum in June. Angel Gurria said a new OECD report showed a hit to British economic growth under all scenarios if the country left the EU compared with a decision to stay in the bloc. ''The best outcome is still worse than remaining and the worst outcomes are very bad indeed,'' he said in a speech at the London School of Economics as the OECD published its report on the impact of a so-called Brexit.

This article was published online by The New York Times on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Brexit would cost UK households £2,200 by 2020, says OECD

Thinktank predicts leaving EU would lead to damaging trade barriers and immigration slowdown, with limited economic benefits
Angel Gurria, secretary-general of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, said future generations would pay the price of Brexit as he launched a report showing that departure would impose a ''persistent and rising shock'' on the economy. ''The UK is much stronger as a part of Europe, and Europe is much stronger with the UK as a driving force'', Gurria said in a speech at the London School of Economics. ''There is no upside for the UK in Brexit. Only costs that can be avoided and advantages to be seized by remaining in Europe. No one should have to pay the Brexit tax.''

This article was published by the Guardian on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Phonics is fair to all

SIR - I noted with interest the research from the London School of Economics into the use of synthetic phonics in schools.

Phonics is a highly effective method of helping children who are behind with reading to catch up. However, I strongly believe that this teaching method should be employed for all children, not just those ''at risk of struggling''. It is great if all children end up at the same stage by the age of 11 - but waiting until disadvantaged children have been identified might put that at risk.

Furthermore, phonics should continue to be taught beyond the age of 11. When children begin secondary school it is expected that they are able to read, when in fact all they have done so far is master the primary curriculum. I worry they are often underprepared to deal with unfamiliar, academic language independently.

Advanced phonics equips children with the skills to decode these words and gain a proper understanding of language.

Katy Parkinson
Founder, Sound Training
Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire

This letter to the Editor was published in The Daily Telegraph on April 26, 2016
Link to the opinion page here

Related publications
''Teaching to Teach'' Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Children and Young People Now

Phonics - A hit or a miss?

Here are two newspaper headlines from 25 April 2016:
The Guardian: Reading boosted by phonics, study says
The Daily Telegraph: Phonics test 'does not improve reading'

If ever there was evidence needed for education in the interpretation of media messages, this coverage would be really useful!

The London School of Economics study looked at the progress of 270,000 children across 150 local authorities which introduced phonics at different times. As such, it is really powerful research - I am a fan of such large cohort studies, which in many ways are the gold standard of educational research. (Randomised Control Trials are much more difficult to implement in education - health is easier, where you can have a white pill that might be a placebo or an active medicine, and no-one knows, even the doctor administering the pill, but in education, everyone knows what method is being used.)

This article was published online by Children & Young People Now on April 26, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Daily Express

Important to trust teachers

Experienced teachers who’d been perfectly content with their old methods were forced to jettison their tried and trusted methods and embrace phonics. A new study at the London School of Economics, however, shows those taught to read by other methods achieve the same standard as synthetics phonics pupils by the age of 11.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 26 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo, April 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1425

Related Links
Stephan Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 26/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Ulster

Evening Extra

Sandra McNally interviewed for the drivetime show, discussing recently published research on teaching reading with 'synthetic phonics'.

This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio Ulster's Evening Extra programme on April 26, 2016
Link to the broadcast here. [Segment begins at 01:24.57]

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 26/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph online

Teaching phonics does not improve children's reading skills, landmark study shows

Traditional teaching methods championed by Government do not improve children's reading skills, a landmark London School of Economics (LSE) study shows. Teaching children in a way in which words are broken down into their constituent parts, also known as phonics, does help those children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who don't have English as their first language. However, the method has had 'no measurable effect on pupils reading scores at age 11', the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) said. But the Government has defended phonics as a previous analysis of the results had shown that children taught using phonics are two years ahead of the national average.

This article was published by The Telegraph online on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Schools Week

'Inexpensive' phonics trial improves disadvantaged pupils' literacy

An ''inexpensive trial'' policy improved all pupils' literacy in the early years and had long-term effects on children who struggle with reading, a major new study has found. The ''teaching to teach'' literacy study, which sent phonics consultants to support primary school teachers and tracked 270,000 primary school children from reception to year 6, showed persistent effects on non-native English speakers and pupils eligible for free school meals. Study author Sandra McNally, Director of the Education and Skills Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, said the ''inequality-reducing impact'' of the intervention alone justified the cost of implementation, which was ''much lower'' compared to other proven strategies such as reducing class size.

This article was published online by Schools Week on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
''Teaching to Teach'' Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Reading boosted by phonics, study says

The study by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics (LSE) is the first large-scale analysis of the effects of using the method, which teaches children to read by identifying and pronouncing sounds rather than individual letters.

This article appeared in The Guardian on 25 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo, April 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1425

Related Links
Stephan Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Times

New way to teach reading is no better than the old

The phonics system used in all schools to teach children to read has no long-term benefits for the average child, a major study finds today. Government policy requires every primary school to use phonics as a way of teaching literacy to young children. They are taught the sounds made by letter groups and how to blend these together, allowing them to decode words. However, the universal benefit of the programme is called into question in a large-scale study, which tracked the progress of more than 270,000 pupils.

This article appeared in The Times on 25 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo, April 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1425

Related Links
Stephan Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Johns Hopkins University School of Education

Best evidence in brief: the long-term impact of phonics instruction

Welcome to the latest issue of Best Evidence in Brief, brought to you by the Johns Hopkins School of Education's Center for Research and Reform in Education and the Institute for Effective Education at The University of York. Every two weeks we provide a round-up of items of interest related to education research.
A working paper from the UK's Centre for Economic Performance considers the impact of the introduction of synthetic phonics in English schools.

This article was published online by Johns Hopkins University School of Education on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Capita

Synthetic phonics can improve reading skills, study claims

Using synthetic phonics to teach children how to read can have considerable long-term benefits for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as a first language, according to a new study by the Centre for Economic Performance(CEP).
Researchers at the CEP, which is based at the London School of Economics (LSE), tracked the progress of more than 270,000 children in 150 local authorities. They found that children taught to read using phonics made better progress by age seven than those taught using other methods. However, those lagging behind would catch up later.

this article was published online by Capita on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Mail

Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 25/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Tim Harford: How politicians poisoned statistics

The frustrating thing is that politicians seem quite happy to ignore evidence - even when they have helped to support the researchers who produced it. For example, when the chancellor George Osborne announced in his budget last month that all English schools were to become academies, making them independent of the local government, he did so on the basis of faith alone. The Sutton Trust, an educational charity which funds numerous research projects, warned that on the question of whether academies had fulfilled their original mission of improving failing schools in poorer areas, ''our evidence suggests a mixed picture''. Researchers at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance had a blunter description of Osborne's new policy: ''a non-evidence based shot in the dark''.

This article was a published press release (online) by The Sutton Trust on April 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
FT Magazine, April 14, 2016
How politicians poisoned statistics

Related publications
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
Academies 2: the New Batch, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Benefits Canada

How would Brexit impact the financial industry?

Whether Britain loses access to the single market depends on the terms of any exit. Under the optimistic scenario, Britain would join the European Economic Area as non-member countries like Norway and Switzerland have done, says Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. Membership in that area provides full single-market access. Under the pessimistic scenario, Britain wouldn't join the European Economic Area. ''Then there would be bilateral negotiations between Britain and the EU over what kind of access Britain has,'' says Sampson.

This article was published online by Benefits Canada on April 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Chicago Tribune Online

Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

FT Magazine

How politicians poisoned statistics

The frustrating thing is that politicians seem quite happy to ignore evidence - even when they have helped to support the researchers who produced it. For example, when the chancellor George Osborne announced in his budget last month that all English schools were to become academies, making them independent of the local government, he did so on the basis of faith alone. The Sutton Trust, an educational charity which funds numerous research projects, warned that on the question of whether academies had fulfilled their original mission of improving failing schools in poorer areas, ''our evidence suggests a mixed picture''. Researchers at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance had a blunter description of Osborne's new policy: ''a non-evidence based shot in the dark''.

This article was published in the FT Magazine on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
Academies 2: the New Batch, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 12/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

The 'neglect' of Britain's young middle achievers: Government accused of ignoring needs of those who don't go to university

A generation of young, 'middle achievers' are being left behind by the Government because they do not go to university, a damning report has claimed. Most youngsters - 53% - do not go on to university or do A levels, yet their needs are often ignored by the Government, a Lords committee has concluded. This 'missing middle' of youngsters who take up jobs or vocational education are allowed to drift through life. They are often given poor career advice and locked into low paid jobs, the House of Lords committee on social mobility warned.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility Report of Session 2015-16. 'Overlooked and Left Behind: improving the transition from school to work for the majority of young people' (PDF)
Key suggestions from oral witnesses include those from Professor Sandra McNally, Director of CVER.
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), LSE written evidence: Response to the House of Lords Call for Evidence on ''Transitions from School to Work''

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Hilary Steedman webpage
CVER website
All CEP Responses to Government Inquiries and Consultations webpage


News Posted: 08/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

www.parliament.uk

Governments have failed a generation of young people, say Lords

53% of young people do not follow the 'traditional' academic route into work. This majority of young people are significantly overlooked in their transition for work by the education system and the focus on apprenticeships is not suitable for everyone, the House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility has found.

This article was published on the www.parliament.uk website on April 8, 2016
Link to the article here

Related publications
House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility Report of Session 2015-16. 'Overlooked and Left Behind: improving the transition from school to work for the majority of young people' (PDF)
Key suggestions from oral witnesses include those from Professor Sandra McNally, Director of CVER.
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), LSE written evidence: Response to the House of Lords Call for Evidence on ''Transitions from School to Work''

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Hilary Steedman webpage
CVER website
All CEP Responses to Government Inquiries and Consultations webpage


News Posted: 08/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE Business Review

Students' university degree classification affect their pay later in life

There is a wage premium for getting a first or upper second, find Shqiponja Telhaj and colleagues
Since the early 1960s, with developments in the field of human capital research, analysis of the returns to education has established robust evidence of a strong positive association between earnings and years of schooling or level of qualification attained. But there has been little analysis of how returns vary according to the level of academic performance - for example, what US universities measure as students' 'grade point average' - conditional on the level of qualification.

This article was published by the LSE Business Review blog on April 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK', Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1392, November 2015
In brief... The rewards for getting a good degree, Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 3, Winter 2015/16

Related links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/04/2016      [Back to the Top]

Caledonian Trust PLC

Half yearly Report

In phase three, after the negotiated settlement, the economic effects are the subject of wide and varying analysis and speculation, based largely on the eventual outcome of the settlement. Put simply, there are two main variables: what will the settlement be and what are the effects of such a settlement? Most economic studies report that Brexit would damage the UK economy. Three recent reports from Centre for Economic Performance, the CBI/PWC and Oxford Economics all consider that in the worst case scenario the long-term effects would average about minus £4,000 per annum per household, while the best outcome would vary from minus £680 to plus £70. Martin Wolf, associate editor and chief economic commentator of the FT, forthright as usual, says: ''A vote for Brexit is a leap into the abyss''. UK Industry and Financial ''establishment'' figures are prominent amongst those predicting an unfavourable outcome for Brexit.

This Report was published by the Caledonian Trust PLC on March 31, 2016
Link to the Report here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Caledonian Trust PLC

Half yearly Report

In phase three, after the negotiated settlement, the economic effects are the subject of wide and varying analysis and speculation, based largely on the eventual outcome of the settlement. Put simply, there are two main variables: what will the settlement be and what are the effects of such a settlement? Most economic studies report that Brexit would damage the UK economy. Three recent reports from Centre for Economic Performance, the CBI/PWC and Oxford Economics all consider that in the worst case scenario the long-term effects would average about minus £4,000 per annum per household, while the best outcome would vary from minus £680 to plus £70. Martin Wolf, associate editor and chief economic commentator of the FT, forthright as usual, says: ''A vote for Brexit is a leap into the abyss''. UK Industry and Financial ''establishment'' figures are prominent amongst those predicting an unfavourable outcome for Brexit.

This Report was published by the Caledonian Trust PLC on March 31, 2016
Link to the Report here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Caledonian Trust PLC

Half yearly Report

In phase three, after the negotiated settlement, the economic effects are the subject of wide and varying analysis and speculation, based largely on the eventual outcome of the settlement. Put simply, there are two main variables: what will the settlement be and what are the effects of such a settlement? Most economic studies report that Brexit would damage the UK economy. Three recent reports from Centre for Economic Performance, the CBI/PWC and Oxford Economics all consider that in the worst case scenario the long-term effects would average about minus £4,000 per annum per household, while the best outcome would vary from minus £680 to plus £70. Martin Wolf, associate editor and chief economic commentator of the FT, forthright as usual, says: ''A vote for Brexit is a leap into the abyss''. UK Industry and Financial ''establishment'' figures are prominent amongst those predicting an unfavourable outcome for Brexit.

This Report was published by the Caledonian Trust PLC on March 31, 2016
Link to the Report here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 31/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

EU Referendum - Reality check: would Brexit cost every household £850?

The UK leaving the European Union would knock £850 off the average UK household's income, according to a report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics. And that's its conclusion taking an ''optimistic'' view. The pessimistic conclusion from the report is £1,700 per household.

This article was published online by BBC News on March 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, March 2016
Download the accompanying Technical Paper here
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Budget 2016: highly questionable whether the academisation of all schools is good policy

All schools will become academies, announced George Osborne in his 2016 Budget speech. But the impact of such mass rollout on students' performance is uncertain, explain Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin.

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Academies 2: the New Batch', Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
'The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education', Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2 Autumn 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Times

We should ban smartphones from schools

Last year a London School of Economics study found that banning phones from school boosts exam results and benefits low-achieving and low-income pupils the most.

This article was published by The Times on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Times

We should ban smartphones from schools

Last year a London School of Economics study found that banning phones from school boosts exam results and benefits low-achieving and low-income pupils the most.

This article was published by The Times on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 16/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

WZVN-TV Online

Ban smart phones, improve student grades?

Technology certainly has its place in the classroom, but not when as a smartphone. According to a new study from the London School of Economics, banning smartphones was linked to improved test scores among students in the U.K. As researchers Richard Murphy and Louis-Philippe Beland told CNN, ''We found the impact of banning phones for these students equivalent to an additional hour a week in school, or to increasing the school year by five days.''

This interview was conducted by WZVN-TV Online on March 10, 2016
Link to story here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

theguardian.com

Fomo, stress and sleeplessness: are smartphones bad for students?

London School of Economics and Political Science recently produced a report that found that grades improved in schools that banned mobile phones. This effect was most pronounced for struggling students; however, trying to enforce this is a contentious issue for many students, parents and teachers.

This article was published online by theguardian.com on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Nouse

Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Nouse

Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 08/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

U.S. News and World Report

Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Life after Brexit: the UK's options outside the EU

Article by Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson
In June, UK voters will decide whether to remain part of the EU. This column explores the UK's options if a majority votes in favour of Brexit. One possibility is for the UK, like Norway, to join the European Economic Area and thereby retain access to the European Single Market. An alternative would be to negotiate bilateral treaties with the EU, as Switzerland has done. All options, however, involve a trade-off between political sovereignty and economic benefits.

This article was published online by the Vox blog on March 4, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after BREXIT: What are the UK's options outside the European Union, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.01, February 20016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 04/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Nottingham

Dr Swati Dhingra interviewed on freetrade

Dr Swati Dhingra interviewed on freetrade
This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio Nottingham on March 3, 2016
Link to broadcast here

Also on various other local BBC regional stations

Related publications
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.2, March 2016

Related Links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

News

Dr Swati Dhingra discusses the concept of free trade.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 5 Live News on March 3, 2016
Link to recorded interview here

Also on eight other local BBC radio stations.

Related Links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage

News Posted: 03/03/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC News

Are billionaires more likely to be graduates?

And a study published this week by the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE showed the link between degree grade and subsequent earning power in the UK.

This article was published online in BBC News on February 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... The rewards for getting a good degree, Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 3, Winter 2015/16
Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK, Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith, Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1392, November 2015

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 24/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Leverhulme Trust grant winners

Reference to Olma Silva from LSE winning £234,029 Leverhulme Project research grant to identify causal effect of accelerator programmes

This article appeared in Times Higher Education on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 18/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

Student Times

Better Degrees Really Do Help You Earn More

The study shows that those who get a first or a 2:1 - earn more than those getting a 2:2 or a third. It looked at graduates who were born in 1970 and graduated in 1991, and found those with first of 2:1 degrees earned 7-9 per cent more five years after graduation. The study, published by the London School of Economics, also found that the gap between earnings according to university performance is also widening as more people opt for a university education.

This article appeared on Student Times on 16 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith, Shqiponja Telhaj, November 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1392

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Why it really does pay to get a good degree: you earn more

The study, Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK, published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, finds that, five years after university, graduates who qualified with a 2:1 or higher can expect to earn 7%-9% more than their counterparts with inferior degrees.

This article was published in The Observer on February 14 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK', Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1392, November 2015

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

More buyers wanted

Yet for all the ministerial airmiles and silver goblets, the country’s exports have remained fairly flat, and have been getting worse since 2012, certainly compared with those of the other big rich economies in the G7. The value of Britain’s exports fell by 1.5% in 2014 from 2013—the only G7 country where exports dropped—and last year’s figures were hardly inspiring, with a 1.5% fall in the three months to November compared with a year earlier. “It has been a disappointment, especially after the devaluation of sterling in 2008-09,” says John Van Reenen, head of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 5 February 2016. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage
News Posted: 05/02/2016      [Back to the Top]

La Reppublica

Padre licenziato? I figli vanno male a scuola

C'è un costo addizionale della disoccupazione dei padri: il crollo del rendimento scolastico dei figli. Lo sostiene un'economista spagnola, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, del Centre for Economic Performance - London School of Economics: sulla base di una lunga indagine condotta su 358 studenti che frequentavano la scuola dell'obbligo nella provincia di Barcellona, e che ha coperto cinque anni scolastici, dal 2007-2008 fino al 2011-2012, Valenzuola è arrivata alla conclusione che la perdita del lavoro del padre si traduce in una diminuzione del rendimento scolastico pari al 13% rispetto alla deviazione standard. "Quest'effetto - spiega l'economista sul sito "Nada es gratis" - varia a seconda del sottogruppo considerato: si concentra, e l'ampiezza è anche maggiore, tra gli studenti i cui genitori hanno un livello d'istruzione più basso e soffrono maggiori periodi di disoccupazione".

This article appeared in La Reppublica on 28 January 2016 Link to article

Related Publications
Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, July 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1364

Related Links
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education webpage
News Posted: 28/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Politikon

El impacto intergeneracional de la pérdida de trabajo parental durante la crisis, by Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela

Las noticias sobre el mercado laboral, y en particular sobre la evolución de la tasa de paro, han ocupado telediarios y no pocos artículos de prensa desde el inicio de la crisis en España. Cómo resumía en esta entrada en NEG, la evidencia empírica ha mostrado efectos desfavorables de la pérdida de trabajo para el propio trabajador (v.g., pérdidas salariales a corto plazo que parecen persistir en el largo plazo, mayor riesgo de divorcio o peor salud mental y física).

This article appeared in Politikon on 26 January 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education webpage
News Posted: 26/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Nada es Gratis (Spain)

¿Afecta la pérdida de trabajo de los padres a las notas de los niños?

Jeni Ruiz-Valenzuela's blog article on the negative effect of fathers' unemployment on their children based on Spain's great recession.

This article was published by The Nada es Gratis blog (Spain) on January 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief...Parental job loss: the impact on children's school performance, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
'Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain', Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1364, July 2015

Related links Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio 5 Live

Phil Williams show

Guy Michaels discusses his study of the economic impact of floods and likelihood of people moving from flooding areas.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Radio 5 Live on January 5, 2016
Link to interview here
(43 mins in)

Related publications
'Flooded Cities', Adriana Kocornik-Mina, Thomas K.J. McDermott, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1398, December 2015

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Personnel Today

Linking work and health: the What Works Centre for Wellbeing

Cross-cutting capabilities: This project is being led by Professor Lord Richard Layard of the London School of Economics and will assess and develop methods of understanding how policy and practice can affect wellbeing. It will look at the effect of different factors on wellbeing, analyse the impact of wellbeing on other outcomes and develop a framework for cost effectiveness analysis with wellbeing as the measure of benefit. It will also carry out a “life course” analysis, looking at how important early life is to wellbeing in later years.

This article appeared on Personnel Today on 5 January 2016 Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 05/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News

Departure of Sir Nicholas Macpherson GCB, Permanent Secretary to the Treasury, announced

Nick is a visiting Professor at King’s College London, and chairs the Policy Committee at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Bloomberg on 4 January 2016. Link to article

Related links
Centre for Economic Performance Policy Committee info.
News Posted: 04/01/2016      [Back to the Top]

Health Affairs Blog

Making sense of price and quantity variations in U.S. health care

A recent study by Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor, and John Van Reenen has documented the remarkable variations across regions and age groups, and within regions, in U.S. health care spending. Previously, the Dartmouth Atlas project studied variations using Medicare data on people over 65, and the 2013 Institute of Medicine study showed no association between spending and quality in both over-65 Medicare and under-65 private insurance markets.

This article was published online by the Health Affairs Blog on December 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Health Management.org

Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

DonnaD

Cellulare a scuola, sì o no? I consigli per usarlo nel modo giusto

A survey conducted by two researchers from the London School of Economics on a hundred high schools revealed that in schools where it is permissible for mobile students lose the equivalent of a week of school because of the constant distractions.

This article was published by DonnaD (Italy) on December 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

KABC-AM

News

...phones see clear improvement in test scores according to a study by the London School of Economics quote we found the impact of banning...

This news item was broadcast by KABC-AM on December 13, 2015
Link to programme here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times Educational Supplement

Social mobility prospects remain bleak, academic warns

The prospects for improving social mobility for future generations remain bleak, an author of a key social study released a decade ago will warn. Stephen Machin, professor of economics and research director at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), will say today that an ''ever-escalating educational arms race'' has meant the middle classes have continued to find new ways to retain the upper-hand. Prof Machin was one of the authors of a seminal study in 2005, which concluded that social mobility in Britain, alongside the United States, was lower than any other developed country. The study, supported by the social mobility charity the Sutton Trust, warned that many young people would remain stuck where their parents were if improvements were not made.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News online - Education and Family

Norwegian school funds UK youth charity

'Bleak' prospects
A seminar on social mobility in the UK, to be held at the London School of Economics on Thursday, will hear that too little progress is being made.
It will be addressed by Prof Stephen Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance and author of a landmark report in 2005 highlighting the lack of social mobility.

This article was published online by BBC News on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

'Middle classes have found new ways to retain their upper hand in the educational arms race'

Article by Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin
Private tutoring is booming and elite universities remain preserve of middle classes; something must change, say Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin
Social mobility is too low in Britain. Too many people are stuck from one generation to the next in the same income bracket or social class group. Too much talent goes unfulfilled at great social and economic cost to the nation. We know this from a seminal study published by the Sutton Trust and produced by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics 10 years ago.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on December 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

The i

Winter walks to warm the soul

... published last month, walking is better for you than hitting the gym. The London School of Economics found people who...

This article was published online by The i on December 5, 2015
(no link available)

Also in:
The Northern Echo (Darlington)
The Independent

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

European Politics and Policy Blog

Debunking the myths about British science after an EU exit

“Our current assessment is that leaving the EU would be likely to impose substantial costs on the UK economy and would be a very risky gamble.” Analysis by economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)

This article appeared in the European Politics and Policy Blog on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/12/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mail online

How many calories can YOU burn by walking between subway stations?

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by the MailOnline on November 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

FEWEEK.CO.UK

Good news in Budget - but what does it mean for learners?

Sandra McNally, Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research, considers the possible impact of Chancellor George Osborne's November 25 Budget.

This article was published in FEWeek.co.uk on November 27, 2015
Link to article here. See p.14.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Gavin Kelly blog

The debate on social mobility is stuck: time for a city perspective

Social mobility plays a curious and sometimes tortuous role in our national political psyche. We love talking about it even if we can't, or won't, do much about it. Greater mobility is a goal lionised by all politicians - along with the NHS it's perhaps the closest thing to a secular faith that you will find at Westminster. Our media lap up story after story on it. And research on the issue has undergone a mini-boom in our top universities, dominating the work of some of our finest scholars over the last decade or so.

This article was posted online on the Gavin Kelly blog on November 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America: A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009
Abstract | Full Paper
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Abstract | Full Paper

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Sharper elbows

Poor students have been protected by a generous maintenance grant and relaxed terms for the repayment of loans. Their participation rate has grown at a faster rate than that of their richer peers since the reform, finds Gill Wyness of the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Higher Education Gill Wyness, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA026

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Sharper elbows

Poor students have been protected by a generous maintenance grant and relaxed terms for the repayment of loans. Their participation rate has grown at a faster rate than that of their richer peers since the reform, finds Gill Wyness of the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Higher Education Gill Wyness, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA026

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

Adjacent Government

Raising academic standards in UK schools

In May, the London School of Economics (LSE) found that banning mobile phones from classrooms, could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in Adjacent Government on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

Artificial intelligence: ‘Homo sapiens will be split into a handful of gods and the rest of us'

Recent research led by Guy Michaels at the London School of Economics looked at detailed data across 14 industries and 17 countries over more than a decade, and found that the adoption of robots boosted productivity and wages without significantly undermining jobs.

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 08/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Voz de Galicia

Lo que Albert Rivera esconde, clave del éxito de Ciudadanos en las generales

Conscientes de qué es lo que realmente preocupa a los españoles, los de Rivera han desplegado todo su encanto en un puñado de medidas orquestadas por el célebre economista Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in La Voz de Galicia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Dot

Spring Valley proves there's one device that should never be banned from schools

The primary focus of this incident is on police brutality and the disproportionate levels of school discipline that put young Black girls across America at risk every day. But those who explain the incident away, such as The View co-host Raven-Symone, say that the incident wouldn't have happened if the student didn't bring her phone to school and hadn't used it in class. Earlier this year, report after report praised the idea of banning cell phones in schools, citing a study that a strict cell phone policy improves students' test scores. According to research published by the London School of Economics, which looked at how cell phone policy changes since 2001 have affected more than 130,000 pupils in schools across England, learning environments without cell phones were tied to a 6.4 percent increase in national exam scores - on average. For so-called ''underachieving'' students, specifically, scores rose by 14 percent.

This article was published online by The Daily Dot on October 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Variation in value of student bursaries ‘exacerbates inequality'

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that students from relatively wealthy backgrounds can receive more aid than those from poor families simply because of the university they attend. In a paper presented at the institute last week, she analyses the financial support available at 22 universities over a five-year period and finds that bursaries awarded by Russell Group institutions were twice as generous as those provided by others.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education in 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist (online)

How academies are changing British education

This meant that schools in poorer areas were likely to become one: according to research by Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, under Labour a ten percentage point increase in the number of pupils eligible for free school meals (a measure of poverty) resulted in a 75% increase in the probability of a school becoming an academy

This article appeared in The Economist Online on 28 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Humberside

Morning Show

Olmo Silva discusses Academies.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Humberside on 27 October 2015. Link

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 27/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Humberside

Morning Show

Olmo Silva discusses Academies.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Humberside on 27 October 2015. Link

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 27/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

IQ

Notre cerveau nous trompe lorsque nous parlons à des robots

Pour le découvrir, des scientifiques de la London School of Economics ont conduit une expérience durant laquelle une personne normale devait dire des choses suggérées par un ordinateur

This article appeared in IQ on 26 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Estado de Minas

Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Rioja

Ciudadanos deja el copago en manos de las autonomías

El encargado de aclarar la propuesta fue Luis Garicano, responsable económico de la formación y mano derecha de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in La Rioja on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

La Rioja

Ciudadanos deja el copago en manos de las autonomías

El encargado de aclarar la propuesta fue Luis Garicano, responsable económico de la formación y mano derecha de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in La Rioja on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BT.com

195 MPs, peers and staff attend mindfulness classes

To date, 115 parliamentarians and 80 of their staff have undergone mindfulness training since January 2013, after former Labour MP Chris Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster.

This article appeared on BT.com on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

West Sussex Gazette - Online

School says there's 'no cause for alarm' over mobile phones in classrooms

The success flew in the face of research by the London School of Economics, published earlier this year, which found schools which restricted the use of mobile phones experienced an improvement in test scores.

This article appeared in the West Sussex Gazette on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 16/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News 24

Hour News

Sandra McNally interviewed on the topic of grammar schools following reports that the Kent ‘satellite’ school has been approved.

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 on 15 October (no link available)

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Why Tech Execs Don't Rush to Get Their Children Smartphones

The Huffington Post

Considering that teens use their phones almost solely for entertainment, it's not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that a ban on smartphones at school considerably improved kids' test scores. The formula is simple: Putting phones away makes for better schools.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Not all academies are the same – don't assume they will all boost results, article by Stephen Machin, Andrew Eyles and Olmo Silva

Our new research shows that many of the schools that have become academies since the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government came to power are fundamentally different in nature from those that became academies under Labour. Because of this, their conversion is unlikely to generate the same positive results in raising students' attainment.

This article appeared in the Conversation on 14 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
News Posted: 14/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Not all academies are the same – don't assume they will all boost results, article by Stephen Machin, Andrew Eyles and Olmo Silva

Our new research shows that many of the schools that have become academies since the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government came to power are fundamentally different in nature from those that became academies under Labour. Because of this, their conversion is unlikely to generate the same positive results in raising students' attainment.

This article appeared in the Conversation on 14 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
News Posted: 14/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Academic research cuts through Theresa May's immigration claims

In her address to the Conservative party conference, the home secretary delivered a pointed speech saying that ''there is no case, in the national interest, for immigration of the scale we have experienced over the last decade''. But are her claims supported by academic research? ... Although immigration increases the number of people living in the UK, it is up to the government to decide whether to build more infrastructure and housing. A 2014 study by Diego Battiston shows that, while immigrants are slightly more likely to live in social housing, the main reason why Britons find it hard to find places is the scarcity of property. A 2012 paper by Charlotte Geay presents evidence that, prima facie, the proportion of non-native English speakers in a year group has a detrimental impact on the educational attainment of native speakers at the end of primary school. However, this impact is modest and reflects factors including that immigrant children tend to go to less prestigious schools. Finally, in 2012 Jonathan Wadsworth showed that immigrants in the UK tend to use GP services and hospitals at roughly the same rate as the native born population, and are just as likely to self-report poor health.

This article was published by the Financial Times on October 6, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Immigration and the access to social housing in the UK', Diego Battiston, Richard Dickens, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1264, April 2014
'Non-native speakers of English in the classroom: what are the effects on pupil performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012
'Musn't grumble. Immigration, health and health service use in the UK and Germany', Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1166, September 2012
'The impact of immigration on the structure of male wages: Theory and evidence from Britain', Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006
The impact of immigration on the structure of wages: Theory and evidence from Britain, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Journal of the European Economic Association, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp120-151, February 2012.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 06/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV

This Morning

CEP study on the use of mobile phones in the class room mentioned

This programme was broadcast on 2 October 2015 on ITV. Link

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Friday Magazine

Happy cafés

Lord Richard Layard, founder of Action for Happiness, a professor at the London School of Economics and international expert on health and well-being, says: ‘We all want to be happy and we want the people we love to be happy.‘ Happiness means feeling good about our lives and wanting to go on feeling that way. Unhappiness means feeling bad and wanting things to change.’ The best society then is one in which there is the least misery and the most happiness, he says. ‘We wanted to spread more happiness in the community and the world.’

This article appeaerd in Friday Magazine on 2 October. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Express

Teacher faces sack after clash with boy over phone

A recent study by the London School of Economics found test scores rose by an average of six per cent when mobiles were banned from the classroom.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 2 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 02/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mother Jones

Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mother Jones

Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

Mother Jones

Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/10/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Suffolk

News

Debate on banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE [CEP] research.

The news item was broadcast by BBC Radio Suffolk on September 30, 2015
Link to broadcast here

See also
BBC Radio Shropshire
News
Discussion of LSE research on banning mobile phones from classrooms

BBC Hereford and Worcester
News
Discussion of banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE research

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

'London effect' in schools due to gradual improvements not policies, says report

LSE report says primaries improving since 90s and abolition of Inner London Education Authority led to pupils' success
One of the researchers, Jo Blanden of the University of Surrey, said: ''London's schools have become extremely good at helping poor children succeed. This is despite the incredible diversity of their pupils. ''This success is likely to lead to better jobs and more social mobility among those educated in the capital.''

This article was published by the Guardian on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Brand Republic

My Media Week Sue Todd

First is the up and coming Spark event, where, among other things, we will be revealing some new research around the evolving role that premium content experiences play in consumers’ lives. We discuss the role that Paul Dolan, professor of Behavioral Science at the London School of Economics, will play at the event and how the panel and interactive elements will work.

This article appeared in Brand Republic on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Quartz

This school has banned all technology in the classroom--and at home

A study by the London School of Economics suggests that banning mobile phones at school is worth the equivalent of an extra week of classes in terms of students’ development.

This article appeard in Quartz on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

The EU should pay cash to areas to compensate them for high immigration, says Labour

Research by the London Schools of Economics and Centre for Economic Performance published earlier this year found that mass immigration to Britain had had no overall negative effect on wages or unemployment. The study found no connection between how much immigration an UK county had seen between 2004 and 2012 and the area’s level of unemployment or changes in wage patterns.

This article appeared in the Independent on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Can a smartphone be a tool for learning?

Ministers pointed to research by the London School of Economics, which suggested a ban on phones could make a significant difference to the most disadvantaged children by reducing distraction from learning.

This article appeared on BBC Online on 29 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Essex

Dave Monk show

Richard Murphy interviewed about research into effect in schools of banning mobile phones.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Essex Radio on September 29, 2015
Link to interview here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Teaching Times

Impact of smartphones on behaviour in lessons to be reviewed

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article was published online by Teaching Times on September 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 29/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

On the Wight

Medina College bans all use of mobile phones: Here's one parent's view

In the Spring of this year, Medina College headteacher, Richard Williams, asked parents what they thought about introducing a ban on mobile phones in school. He quoted research which shows that banning mobile phones from schools improves GCSE results. Even used outside of lessons there is the pressure of social media, which can bring up cyber-bullying issues.

This article appeared in On the Wight on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 28/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Essex Chronicle on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sowetan Live

Cellphones turning kids into zombies - Schools must nip scourge in the bed

In fact, a study was done in Britain by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy of the London School of Economics that proved phone-less classrooms improve performance.

This article appeared in Sowetan Live on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article was published online by the Essex Chronicle on September 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 27/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle Media Group

Head resists calls to ban phones in class

Article on mobile phone use by children cites LSE report.

This article appeared in the Essex Chronicle on 24 September (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

SecEd - Online

Mobile devices: research and inspiration

A similar study undertaken by the London School of Economics found that test scores increased by six per cent after mobile phones were banned from the classroom. Good research and obvious conclusions.

This article appeared in Sec Ed on 23 September 2015 link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 23/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Inverse

Teens' test scores go up when their schools ban cell phones

Schools that ban mobile phones see a boost in student’s grades, a large-scale U.K. study has found. And European schools are following suit. The research published by the London School of Economics examined 91 schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester, and Manchester, and found that a no-phone zone generated improvements equivalent to students getting five good passes on General Certificates of Secondary Education. That bump — roughly 6 percent across the board — was greater even than schools that allowed students to keep their phones so long as they were switched off.

This article appeared in Inverse on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Copenhagen Post.dk

Public school bans mobile phones

A public school in Skægkær north of Silkeborg has decided to ban the use of mobile phones during classes in order to reduce distractions. … Research by the London School of Economics revealed that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones showed a sustained improvement in exam results.

This article appeared on The Copenhagen Post.dk on 21 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV News Anglia

News

There was a great piece of research from the London School of economics which said that in schools that have a hard ban on mobile phones, the results go up, on average, by 6%.

This programme was broadcast on ITV Anglia on 18 September 2015 Link

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 18/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Cambridge News

Cambridgeshire headteacher explores banning mobile phones

The new Cottenham principal said research by the London School of Economics found that on average schools that have a ''hard ban'' on mobile phones see a 6 per cent increase in their results.

This article was published by the Cambridge News on September 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Cambridge News

Cambridgeshire headteacher explores banning mobile phones

The new Cottenham principal said research by the London School of Economics found that on average schools that have a "hard ban" on mobile phones see a 6 per cent increase in their results.

This article appeared on Cambirdge News on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV1 Anglia West

News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ITV1 Anglia West

News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 17/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Confidencial Colombia

La economia de la felicidad

En los 70, el economista neoyorkino Richard Easterlin concluyó que, una vez superado un determinado nivel de renta en las naciones más ricas, la felicidad no se incrementaba como consecuencia de mayores ingresos. Hoy sabemos por investigaciones científicas, y por los hallazgos del economista inglés Richard Layard, que la renta actúa como un poderoso factor correlacionado con la felicidad, pero que es un tipo de felicidad momentánea, que se agota porque se cae en un círculo vicioso de insatisfacción por querer siempre tener algo mejor que 'el de al lado' y porque una vez alcanzado un ingreso mayor, se genera pronto una adaptación a este nivel de vida más alto en donde se pierde rápidamente la mayor felicidad obtenida. Como respuesta a esta problemática humana, la economía del desarrollo personal florece. De ésta se derivan dos líneas principales: los servicios a particulares y los servicios a organizaciones e instituciones.
In the 70's, the New Yorker Richard Easterlin Economist concluded that, once past a certain level of income in the richest nations, happiness not increased as a result of higher revenues. Today we know for scientific research and the findings of the English economist Richard Layard, the rent acts as a powerful factor correlated with happiness, but that is a kind of momentary happiness, which runs out as falls into a vicious cycle of dissatisfaction by wanting to always have something better than ' the of to the side ' and because once achieved one higher income soon generated an adaptation to this higher standard of living where the greatest happiness obtained is quickly lost. In response to this human problem, the economy of personal development flourishes. This entails two main lines: services to individuals and services to organizations and institutions.

This article appeared in Confidencial Colombia on 16 September 2015 link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Irish Times

Information technology and schools

Sir, – At last the penny is dropping among educationalists that technology in the classroom can be a hindrance to learning. A study by the London School of Economics in 2014 found that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones to school showed a sustained improvement in exam results, compared to schools that allowed students to carry mobile phones. The improvements in education standards, by eliminating the distraction of phones, was most pronounced in disadvantaged schools.

This article appeared in the Irish Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Clean energy cheaper than coal? Yes we can

......of Royal Meteorological Society, Dr Fatima Denton African Climate Policy Centre, Denys Shortt CEO, DCS Group, Adair Turner Former chairman, Financial Services Authority, Gus O'Donnell Former cabinet secretary, Richard Layard London School of Economics, Professor John Shepherd, Martin Rees Astronomer royal and five others

This article appeared in the Guardian on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 16/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Israel Herald

Britain mulls ban on smartphones, iPads in classrooms

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 15 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Israel Herald

Britain mulls ban on smartphones, iPads in classrooms

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 15 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 15/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Wiltshire

News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Wiltshire

News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ORF.at

Vom Lernen in der 'smarten' Schule - news.ORF.at

Für ein Verbot spricht eine Studie zum Thema, mit der die London School of Economics im Mai aufhorchen ließ. Wie die BBC berichtete, erhöhten sich die Leistungen der Schüler nach dem Verbot der Smartphones um sechs Prozent. Besonders schwache Schüler aus ärmeren Familien profitierten laut der Studie von der Verbotsmaßnahme. Die fehlende Ablenkung habe den Fokus der Schüler wieder vermehrt auf den Unterricht gelenkt, so die Forscher.
A study on the issue of the London School of Economics in may prick up their ears had talks for a ban. As the BBC reported that the student increased after the ban of smartphones by six percent. According to the study, particularly weak students from poorer families have benefited from the prohibition. Missing distraction have again increasingly directed focus of the students on teaching, according to the researchers.

This article appeared on ORF.at on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

ORF.at

Vom Lernen in der 'smarten' Schule - news.ORF.at

Für ein Verbot spricht eine Studie zum Thema, mit der die London School of Economics im Mai aufhorchen ließ. Wie die BBC berichtete, erhöhten sich die Leistungen der Schüler nach dem Verbot der Smartphones um sechs Prozent. Besonders schwache Schüler aus ärmeren Familien profitierten laut der Studie von der Verbotsmaßnahme. Die fehlende Ablenkung habe den Fokus der Schüler wieder vermehrt auf den Unterricht gelenkt, so die Forscher.
A study on the issue of the London School of Economics in may prick up their ears had talks for a ban. As the BBC reported that the student increased after the ban of smartphones by six percent. According to the study, particularly weak students from poorer families have benefited from the prohibition. Missing distraction have again increasingly directed focus of the students on teaching, according to the researchers.

This article appeared on ORF.at on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

NDTV India - online

UK orders probe into classroom disruption by smartphones

In a recent study, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The LSE report also found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared on NDTV India online on 14 September 2015. link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Planning and Building Control

Investigation into the impact of smartphones on behaviour in lessons

The government recognised technology can expand the learning experience when used appropriately. However, the growth of personal devices is hindering teaching. A report from the London School of Economics found banning mobile phones from the classroom could significantly benefit learning. The study, undertaken in May, could add as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year.

This article appeared in Planning and Building Control on 14 September 2015 link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Huffington Post

Phones and tablets could be banned in classrooms

A recent study published by the London School of Economics showed that schools where such technology was banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6%. The study also revealed that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit student’s learning as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over the academic year.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

News

Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

Also on:
BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

News

Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

Also on:
BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Nigeria Sun

British classroom-disruption by smart phone users faces major probe - Nigeria Sun

A study by the London School of Economics found that banning devices from class could benefit pupils by as much as an extra week of learning over a school year.

This article appeared in the Nigeria Sun on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

i (The paper for today)

Kidz wiv mobys do me ed in (no LOL)

There is ample evidence that academic results improve when phones are banned from schools. Research by Louis-Phillipe Beland and Richard Murphy at the London School of Economics proved that a phone-less classroom improves performance, most of all for those from low income families. Last month, Michael Wilshaw, head of Ofsted called for omnipresent, blasted phones to be barred in all schools.

This article appeared in I (the paper for today) on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

i (The paper for today)

Phones could be barred from class to help behaviour

In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results. In Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy wrote: “The results suggest that low-achieving students are more likely to be distracted by the presence of mobile phones, while high achievers can focus in the classroom regardless of whether phones are present. … banning mobile phones could b a low-cost way for schools to reduce educational inequality.”

This article appeared in I (the paper for today) on 14 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Inquiry looks at mobile phones' effect on how children behave

A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning phones from the classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Government considers classroom ban on smartphones and tablets

A recent London School of Economics study suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve school results.

This article appeared in the Independent on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

A child can't learn with a mobile phone in the classroom

There is ample evidence now that academic results improve when phones are banned from schools. A research study by Louis-Phillipe Beland and Richard Murphy at the London School of Economics proved that a phone-less classroom improves performance, most of all for those from low-income families.

This article appeared in the Independent on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Smartphones could face ban from classes

Ofsted, the schools inspectorate, has raised concerns about secondary pupils using their phones at school. LSE academics released a study in May suggesting that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article was published by The Times (main) on September 14, 2015
Link to article here and subscribe for full access.

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! News (UK)

Smartphones and tablets could be banned from classrooms

Behaviour expert Tom Bennett is to look into the impact of devices used by pupils under an expansion of his investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor behaviour, Schools Minister Nick Gibb said. It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. Mr Bennett said: ''Technology is transforming society and even classrooms - but all too often we hear of lessons being disrupted by the temptation of the smartphone. ''Learning is hard work and children are all too aware of this. So when they have a smartphone in their pocket that offers instant entertainment and reward, they can be easily distracted from their work. ''This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue, and behaviour challenges more broadly, to uncover the real extent of the problem and see what we can do to ensure all children focus on their learning.'' In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article was published online by Yahoo! News (UK) on September 13, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Irish Independent – online

Britain to consider a ban on smartphones in the classroom

Britain could ban smartphones and other personal electronic devices, like tablets, from the classroom over fears that they cause too much disruption to lessons. In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester, which suggested that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

24 heures online

Corbyn peut plomber le futur électoral du Labour

Most of the currents of the party had indeed indicated during the previous weeks that they thought Jeremy Corbyn ineligible in 2020 and that they did not support any policy that was very left. "The economic plan of Corbyn does not commit to eliminate the deficit", said John Van Reenen, Professor at the London School of Economics. "Moreover, since his return to power in 1997, Labour had curbed the power of the unions and put an end to its ambition to nationalize all the tools of production. Jeremy Corbyn wants to question these advances."

This article appeared on 24 heures online on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Gloucester Citizen

Should mobile phones be banned from schools entirely?

A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

This article apperaed in the Gloucester Citizen on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Solihull and Warwickshire Guardian - online

Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from Birmingham classrooms

Mr Gibb said ministers needed to be sure the advice given to teachers “is fit for the 21st century when even primary school pupils may be bringing in phones or tablets.” It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. And a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester in May by the London School of Economics suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared in the Solihull and Warwickshire Guardian (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times Online (Education)

Schools ponder classroom ban on ‘distracting' mobile phones

Behaviour expert Tom Bennett is to look into the impact of devices used by pupils under an expansion of his investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor behaviour, Schools Minister Nick Gibb said. It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. Mr Bennett said: "Technology is transforming society and even classrooms - but all too often we hear of lessons being disrupted by the temptation of the smartphone. "Learning is hard work and children are all too aware of this. So when they have a smartphone in their pocket that offers instant entertainment and reward, they can be easily distracted from their work. "This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue, and behaviour challenges more broadly, to uncover the real extent of the problem and see what we can do to ensure all children focus on their learning." In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared on Yahoo News on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Telegraph (web)

Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

This article appeared in the Telegraph (web) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

MSN UK

Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

This article appeared on MSN UK on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Express

New move to ban mobiles in all schools

In May, the London School of Economics found banning mobiles from classrooms could benefit learning by as much as an extra week of schooling over an academic year. The report found a ban, sought by chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw, would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Sunday Express on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sunday Mirror

Bid to ban use of mobiles in class

"We will now probe deeper into behaviour more generally to ensure that no child has to put up with having their education disrupted by misbehaviour." A study by the London School of Economics found that banning devices from class could benefit pupils by as much as an extra week of learning over a school year.

This article appeared in the Sunday Mirror on 13 September 2015. No link is available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sun (UIster)

Kids' mobile ban in every school

Mr Bennett added: "This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue." The London School of Economics study said low-achievers and children from poor families would benefit most from a clampdown. Schools minister Nick Gibb said: “Our aim is to ensure that no schoolchild has to put up with having their education disrupted by misbehaviour.”

This article appeared in the Sun (Ulster) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

Smartphones and tablets could face classroom ban

More than 90 per cent of teenagers have mobile phones, but a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where they were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6 per cent. There is currently no Government policy about mobile phone use in schools.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times

Behave, class, your mobiles are at risk

According to the DfE, a 2013 survey found that a third of schools banned mobile phones outright, with a further fifth limiting their use in lessons. In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could boost students' learning by an extra week's worth of schooling over an academic year.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Business Magazine (Romania)

Analysts: Greece will remain in 'intensive care' for a long time, in the absence of substantial aid

Christopher Pissarides, London School of Economics, the winner of a Nobel Prize, said that Greece still has structural problems such as low productivity and lack of competitiveness. Greece is likely to need international aid for a longer period of time than the 3 to 4 years.

This article was published in Business Magazine (Romania) on September 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macroeconomics Programme webpage


News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Lancashire Telegraph

Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?

However, according to a recent study published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the test scores of students aged 16 improved by 6.4 per cent after schools banned mobile phones.

This article appeared in the Lancashire Telegraph on 11 September 2015
Link to article here

Also in:
Lancaster and Morecombe Citizen online
Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?
Asian Image
Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Gloucestershire

News

...the role of smart phones in the classroom its after research from the London school of economics suggested exam results improve in schools...

This broadcast was made by BBC Radio Glouchestershire on September 3, 2015
Link to interview here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

LBC Radio

James O'Brien

Mention of research from London school of economics about mobile phones in the classroom.

The research was mentioned on LBC Radio's James O'Brien show on September 2, 2015
Link to the broadcast here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Hamburger Abendblatt

Handyverbot an immer mehr Schulen

A recent study by the Centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics is quite the supporters of cell phone bans. The authors Louis-Philippe BELAND and Richard Murphy had compared student performance before and after a cell phone ban was issued at their schools. Therefore improved the test results for 16 years without a Smartphone to 6.41 percent. The conclusion of scientists: Less distraction promotes the learning progress and beneficiary audit services. In particular previously underachieving students from financially weak conditions would have benefited. Their benefits increased by 14 percent.

This article was published by Hamburger Abendblatt on September 1, 2015
Link to article here Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC Radio Newcastle

News

Mention of research on mobile phones in the classroom.

Broadcast on BBC Radio Newcastle on September 1, 2015
[No link available]

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

theguardian.com

Keep mobile phones out of the classroom

A recent large-scale study found that banning mobile phones improved exam results by 2%, even when gender and class had been accounted for. At first glance it seems an insignificant rise but the impact is equivalent to one extra week of school a year. The researchers from the London School of Economics centred their work on 91 schools and the exam results from 130,000 pupils since 2001. For those entitled to free school meals or with special educational needs the ban was doubly effective. Investigations such as this throw into question whether mobile phones could, in fact, intensify inequality.

This article was published online by theguardian.com on September 1, 2015
Link to article here

Also in:
MSN UK
Keep mobile phones out of the classroom

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

Sky News

Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity and employment in a variety of countries between 1993 and 2007 to see if the trepidation about the increased use of robots has been well founded. The pair examined data on the use of robots provided by the International Federation of Robotics. They also studied economic performance indicators across 14 industries and 17 countries, including the United States, Australia, South Korea and many European nations. The professors found that ''industrial robots increased both labour productivity and value added''.

This article was published online by Sky News on September 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 01/09/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Hiding in plain sight

In any recession, young people tend to suffer first. Moreover, unemployment among 16-24-year-olds was edging up even before the financial crisis. Youngsters have since faced a ''double whammy'' of scarcity of work and falling real wages, says Stephen Machin of the London School of Economics (LSE). Those who are unskilled, a group of which Britain has a larger share than most, were particularly badly hit.

This article was published in The Economist on August 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?, Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece 20 (1) Summer 2015 pages: 2-5
'Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals', by Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1284, July 2014

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Anna Bindler webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Hiding in plain sight

In any recession, young people tend to suffer first. Moreover, unemployment among 16-24-year-olds was edging up even before the financial crisis. Youngsters have since faced a ''double whammy'' of scarcity of work and falling real wages, says Stephen Machin of the London School of Economics (LSE). Those who are unskilled, a group of which Britain has a larger share than most, were particularly badly hit.

This article was published in The Economist on August 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?, Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece 20 (1) Summer 2015 pages: 2-5
'Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals', by Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1284, July 2014

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Anna Bindler webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 20/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Herald Sun (Australia)

Male teacher drought may hurt boys

THERE'S plenty to be said for life as a primary school teacher: ... A study by the London School of Economics found male students were more ...

This article was published by The Herald Sun (Australia) on August 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Students' Perceptions of Teacher Biases: Experimental Economics in Schools' by Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 133, January 2012
Pupils' progress: how children's perceptions influence their efforts, Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2011/2012

Related links
Amine Ouazad webpage
Amine Ouazad CEP publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
News Posted: 16/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Daily catch-up: in other, non-Corbyn, news, here be idiots and other research findings

More evidence of the success of the academy schools programme was published yesterday. A new paper by Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE finds that ''the first round of academy conversions that took place in the 2000s generated significant improvements in the quality of pupil intake and in pupil performance''.

This article was published online by The Independent on August 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education', Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 14/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Unknown variables

In a recent discussion paper for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, Stephen Machin, professor of economics at University College London, and Richard Murphy, assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin, found that the fees paid by growing numbers of overseas postgraduates studying in the UK have helped to subsidise additional places for domestic learners.

This article was published by The Times Higher Education on August 13, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers, Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
'Paying Out and Crowding Out? The Globalisation of Higher Education' by Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1299, September 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 13/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Essex Chronicle

Go back to school

It's a well-known fact that Essex is blessed with an excellent choice of schools, in both the public and private sectors. And thanks to some research published a couple of years ago by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the link between schools and house prices is now a proven fact.

This article was published by the Essex Chronicle on August 12, 2015
[No link available]

Also in
Brentwood Gazette
Go back to school
[No link available]

Related publications
Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Journal of Urban Economics, Volume 75, May 2013, Pages 15-28
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume Autumn 2012
'Valuing School Quality Using Boundary Discontinuities', Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.132, January 2012
'Houses and Schools Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market. EALE 2010 Presidential Address', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Universities can learn from schools when it comes to improving teaching quality

Article by Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy
Rather than reinventing the wheel, universities should pay careful attention to what has already been learned in schools around effective teaching.

This article was published by The Guardian on August 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Economics of Higher Education website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog

Industral robots have boosted productivity and growth but their effect on jobs remains an open question

Robots and automated processes have become a feature of many modern workplaces, but what impact do such innovations have on productivity and jobs? Using a new dataset, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels present an analysis of the economic effects of robots since the early 1990s, noting that they have made a substantial contribution to productivity and aggregate growth. They also write that while fears of robots destroying jobs on a large scale have proven unfounded, there is evidence that they may reduce the employment of low and middle-skilled workers.

This article was published online by LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog on August 5, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog

Industral robots have boosted productivity and growth but their effect on jobs remains an open question

Robots and automated processes have become a feature of many modern workplaces, but what impact do such innovations have on productivity and jobs? Using a new dataset, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels present an analysis of the economic effects of robots since the early 1990s, noting that they have made a substantial contribution to productivity and aggregate growth. They also write that while fears of robots destroying jobs on a large scale have proven unfounded, there is evidence that they may reduce the employment of low and middle-skilled workers.

This article was published online by LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog on August 5, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/08/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Abolishing student grants and raising fees above £9,000 heaps more debt on poorest students

Article by Gill Wyness
There were a surprising number of announcements relating to higher education in George Osborne's budget this week. One of the most controversial was the announcement that university maintenance grants for lower-income students in England and Wales are to be scrapped from September 2016 and replaced with loans. The £9,000 annual fees that universities charge students will also be allowed to increase by inflation for those universities ''offering high teaching quality''.

This article was published online by The Conversation on July 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015

Related videos
CEP #ElectionEconomics 'Higher Education' video interview with Gill Wyness.
View video here.

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 10/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Market Mogul

Consequences of a Brexit

The Centre of Economic Performance (known as the CEP) claim that Britain could have its GDP fall by 8%. In essence, the CEP claim that in a worst case scenario Britain could face loses similar to the ones that were experienced during the global financial crisis. From an optimistic view point and under ideal conditions, the CEP claim that the British GDP will only fall by 2.2%. Essentially, an EU exit could potentially cause the UK economy to contract. EU skeptics argue that this contraction is only temporary and that the elimination of strict regulations in the financial sector will outweigh the transitory contraction of the UK economy.

This article was published online by The Market Mogul on July 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

Related CEP videos/podcasts
Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson.
View the video here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/07/2015      [Back to the Top]

VG Nett

Mobil-forbud ga bedre karakterer

Texas-universitetet om studien som er publisert av Centre for Economic Performance ved London School of Economics and Political Science. - Mobiltelefoner kan være forstyrrende, legger han til ...
Mobile prohibition gave better grades
A large study from the University of Texas in the United States shows that for those schools who have practiced a ban on cell phones during school hours, its students produce better exam grades.

This article was published online by VG Nett on June 24, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 24/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

The divide is growing between what employers and ministers want students to study

Article by Sandra McNally
From this September, all pupils at secondary school will have to study English, a language, maths, science and history or geography at GCSE. This is the English Baccalaureate, or Ebacc, which education minister Nicky Morgan has insisted are core academic subjects that should be taken by all children. The director of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), John Cridland, does not approve: he has called for GCSEs to be phased out and replaced with an exam system that gives equal value to vocational subjects.

This article was published by The Conversation online on June 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 23/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

New 'data driven' BIS Vet research centre hits the spot

The new aims and role of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) has become clearer since a consultation event this month, as Andrew Morris explains.
The new Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), funded by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) was the focus of attention at a major gathering of college leaders and researchers this month. Directed by Professor Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the new research centre will be developing much needed evidence aimed at improving the delivery of vocational programmes and involvement of employers. A clearer picture of routes to employment and better information about their value should be the result.

This article was published by FE Week on June 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage
News Posted: 22/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Stern

Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage


News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Evening Standard

Reading volunteer, 80: I'm proof of an old dog can help young people learn some very useful tricks

This month marks four years since we launched our award-winning Get London Reading initiative to improve literacy in primary schools. So far more than 800 Evening Standard readers have become one-to-one reading volunteers with our campaign partner Beanstalk, helping over 2,370 pupils in 300 schools. Here, Robert Cassen, a professor at the London School of Economics, shares his experience as a reading volunteer raw recruit.
Article by Robert Cassen
Making a Difference in Education: What the Evidence Says, by Robert Cassen, Sandra McNally and Anna Vignoles, was published by Routledge in May.

This article was published in The Evening Standard on June 18, 2015
[No link available]

Related publications
Making a Difference in Education: What the Evidence Says, Robert Cassen, Sandra McNally and Anna Vignoles, Routledge, May 2015 Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage
News Posted: 18/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

NewsRT.co.uk

Which universities offer the most financial support?

One of the reasons for this, according to Gill Wyness, a researcher in education policy at the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics and a lecturer at the University College London Institute of Education, is that students simply don't have enough information. ''There has never been a way for students to compare what they are entitled to'', she says. ''It's only through trawling through individual university websites that they can find the information.''

This article was published online by NewsRT.co.uk on June 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Jersey Post

To text, or not to text in the classroom...?

In fact, according to academics at the London School of Economics, the effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week's schooling across the academic year.

This article was published by the Jersey Evening Post (USA) on June 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Jersey Post

To text, or not to text in the classroom...?

In fact, according to academics at the London School of Economics, the effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week's schooling across the academic year.

This article was published by the Jersey Evening Post (USA) on June 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Which universities offer the most financial support?

Universities spend huge amounts of money on bursaries and scholarships - over £400m in 2014. Yet there is no evidence that the level of financial support offered to students by institutions has any impact on their choice of where to study. One of the reasons for this, according to Gill Wyness, a researcher in education policy at the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics and a lecturer at the University College London Institute of Education, is that students simply don't have enough information.

This article was published in The Guardian on June 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Spiegel online

Handys im Unterricht: Lehrer bringt Störsender mit - und wird suspendiert

That a ban on mobile phone use by pupils in schools may be quite useful, has now been proven by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy on behalf of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. The scientists compared the performance of students in four English towns with a ban on mobile phones in their schools.

This article was published by Spiegel online on June 4, 2015
Link to article here

Also in
Watson.ch
Lehrer geht mit Störsender gegen Handys im Unterricht vor – und wird suspendiert

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 04/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Daily Kos

'We managed to put a man on the moon. Now we need to put clean energy on Earth.'

''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

This article was published online by the Daily Kos on June 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 03/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

New Scientist

New Apollo programme wants moonshot budget to boost renewables

''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

This article was published by the New Scientist on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

New Scientist

New Apollo programme wants moonshot budget to boost renewables

''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

This article was published by the New Scientist on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Global Apollo programme seeks to make clean energy cheaper than coal

Lord Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics and member of the Apollo group, said it was barely believable that the world only spent 2% of its R&D money on its ''most pressing problem'' of climate change and clean energy. He said: ''We do not think this problem can be conquered unless we reduce the cost of renewable energy below the cost of dirty energy.''

This article was published online by the Guardian on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC World Service

News

Interview with Lord Layard regarding launch of the 'Apollo' programme to make renewables cheaper than fossil fuels.

The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service News on June 2, 2015
[No link available.]

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


News Posted: 02/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

World Magazine

Study: Cellphones in schools hurt low-performing students

Last month, a study from the London School of Economics for the first time provided hard evidence that banning phones in school boosts student achievement. ''Mobile phones now are a ubiquitous part of a teenager's life'', said Richard Murphy, an economist with the London School of Economics' Center for Economic Performance and one of the co-authors of the study. ''Practically all teenagers now own a mobile phone, but there's been no academic study looking at what impacts this new technology has had on students' academic attainment.''

This article was published by World Magazine on June 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 01/06/2015      [Back to the Top]

Oldham Chronicle

School phone ban boosts test results

BANNING mobile phones in the classroom can boost test scores by more than 6 per cent, according to a new study. Researchers at the London School of Economics looked at secondary schools in four English cities, including Manchester, and surveyed test scores before and after the ban. It found low-achieving and low-income students improved the most. Report authors Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy said that despite the benefits of new mobile technology, phones caused distractions, reduced productivity and were detrimental to learning.

This article was published by the Oldham Chronicle on May 26, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 26/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

CBC News (Nova Scotia, Canada)

School cellphone bans raised grades says researchers

About 85 per cent of Canadian high school students have a mobile phone, but two economics researchers have concluded cellphones are distracting in class. Their research paper concludes high school students score higher marks when cellphones are banned. The research began in England when Richard Murphy was at the London School of Economics. Murphy is now an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.

This article was published online by CBC (Nova Scotia, Canada) on May 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 25/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why French school curriculum and timetable reforms forced teachers onto the streets

Article by Camille Terrier
French teachers went on strike on May 19 to voice their disapproval of two major reforms that have been proposed by Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, the French education minister. The two reforms are very different: one centres on changes to the history and language curriculum and the other on schools' autonomy to manage the organisation of teaching. Yet both have sparked criticisms from teachers, unions and French intellectuals. Reforming secondary education has emerged as a recent priority in France. The most recent results of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which rank countries around the world based on tests of 15-year-olds and released last December, highlight increasing inequalities in achievement between low and high achievers in France. More disturbing is the fact that, among OECD countries, France is one of the countries where a pupil's social background is one of the strongest predictors of his or her subsequent achievement.

This article was published online by The Conversation on May 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Camille Terrier webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 22/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian - teacher network

Let the kids use their phones in class

The London School of Economics showed that test scores of 16-year-old students were 6.4 percent higher after schools banned students from using mobile phones.

This article was published by the Guardian - Teacher Network on May 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 20/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

HoHoLinks.com

Education: Banning mobile phones could lead to better academic results, research suggests

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has released research that suggests the banning of mobile phones at school could lead to better academic results. The research paper, titled Ill Communication: The Impact of Mobile Phones on Student Performance, investigated the impact of banning mobile phones on student test scores. LSE surveyed schools in four UK cities of Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester and found that student performance in high stakes exams significantly increased post mobile phone ban.

This article was published online by HoHoLinks.com Education on May 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 20/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

MTV News

Did your school ban your iPhone? Here's why that actually isn't so bad

It may seem like common sense that keeping smartphones away from kids would improve their performance at school. Now a study by the London School of Economics has the data to back it up. ... ''By surveying schools in four English cities regarding their mobile phone policies and combining it with administrative data, we find that student performance in high stakes exams significantly increases post ban,'' authors Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy wrote in the study's abstract. ''Our results indicate that these increases in performance are driven by the lowest-achieving students.''

This article was published online by MTV News on May 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


News Posted: 20/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

WFXG FOX 54

Study: No cell phones at school equals higher test scores

The study by the London School of Economics found a link between banning smartphones in schools and increased test scores.

This article was published online by WFXG FOX 54 on May 19, 2015
Link to article here

Also in: KPLC TV, Fox Toledo, Live 5 WCSC, WDAM-TV, MyFox Birmingham, KOBI TV 5, MyFox Memphis, UTV44

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 19/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

WSOC-TV

Kids do better when schools ban smartphones

Schools that have banned students from carrying smartphones have seen an improvement in the children's test stores, reported CNN Money on a new study from the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by WSOC-TV on May 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 19/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

How smart is it to allow students to use mobile phones at school?

Article by Richard Murphy and Louis-Philippe Beland
How does the presence of mobile phones in schools impact student achievement? This is an ongoing debate in many countries today. Some advocate for a complete ban, while others promote the use of mobile phones as a teaching tool in classrooms. So, the question is: Should schools allow the use of mobile phones?

This article was published online by The Conversation on May 12, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 12/05/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Paying for higher education - what are the parties proposing?

University financing has again emerged as a key battleground issue in the 2015 General Election. Should fees be regulated lower and if so, how will the cost be financed? Gill Wyness explores these questions.

Published online as a blog article by LSE British Politics and Policy on April 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015

Related videos
CEP #ElectionEconomics 'Higher Education' video interview with Gill Wyness.
Video link.

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 21/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Observer

What would happen if Britain left the EU?

One of the main arguments employed by those in favour of remaining in the EU is simply how difficult it would prove to leave. We are deeply integrated with our European allies - economically, militarily and culturally. It's likely that Brexit (and what an ugly neologism it is) would lead to plummeting stock markets and an economic recession, with losses to GDP calculated by the Centre for Economic Performance at up to 9.5% - worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

This article was published in The Observer on April 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

Related CEP videos/podcasts
Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson
View video here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


News Posted: 19/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Weighing up four theories on the UK's productivity gap

Theories abound over the causes of the UK's slump in productivity since the financial crisis;

Some economists, including John Van Reenen at the Centre for Economic Performance, believe the productivity puzzle is a consequence of Britain's slow recovery.

This article appeared the Financial Times on 19th April 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Joao Paolo Pessoa's webpage
See related publication - CEP Special Report - The UK Productivity and Jobs Puzzle: Does the Answer Lie in Labour Market Flexibility?


News Posted: 19/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: the Liberal Democrat's top policies

Article by Ian Preston, Andrew Street, Claudia Hupkau, David Chivers, Peter Beresford and Simon Burgess
The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics subject each party's election manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny. Here is what our experts had to say about the Liberal Democrats' top policies.

Claudia Hupkau, Research Associate at the LSE
The Liberal Democrats have announced their vision for skills policy over the next parliament in their election manifesto. The proposals mainly focus on increasing the number of apprenticeships, and on the future funding for the skills sector.

This article was published in The Conversation on April 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 17/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: Conservatives hold the course with schools plan

Article by Sandra McNally
The Conservative Party manifesto makes the following commitments in the area of school-age education:

    •A good primary school place for your child with zero tolerance for failure.
    •Turn every failing and coasting secondary school into an academy and deliver free schools for parents and communities that want them.
    •Help teachers to make Britain the best country in the world for developing maths, engineering, science and computing skills.

The party's ''plan of action'' revolves around the curriculum, school structures (academies and free schools), funding and teachers.

This article was published by The Conversation on April 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Schools: the evidence on academies, resources and pupil performance', Sandra McNally, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
Link to policy briefing here

Related video/podcast
'School Spending'
Spending on schools needs to be protected - in real terms - as research shows that spending matters for a child's education. Sandra McNally interviewed.
View video here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research webpage
News Posted: 16/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: Lib Dems commit to skills, but some policies miss the mark

Article by Claudia Hupkau
The Conversation's Manifesto Check deploys academic expertise to scrutinise the parties' plans.
The Liberal Democrats have announced their vision for skills policy over the next parliament in their election manifesto. The proposals mainly focus on increasing the number of apprenticeships, and on the future funding for the skills sector.

This article was posted online by The Conversation on April 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 15/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: Conservatives fudge the numbers on apprenticeships

Article by Hilary Steedman
Welcome to The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics from across the UK subject each party's manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny.
The Conservative manifesto skates over some uncomfortable truths about the development of apprenticeship during their last five years in office. True, as stated in the manifesto, 2.2 million new apprenticeships (apprenticeship starts) were registered between 2009/10 and 2013/14. However, of those starting an apprenticeship in this period, 850,000 were adults aged 25 or over.

This article was posted by The Conversation on April 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Teacher bias helps girls to do better at maths


News Posted: 15/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: the Conservatives' top policies

Article by Andrew Street, Catherine Harris , Hilary Steedman , Iain Clacher, Sandra McNally, Susan Milner and William Tayler

The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics subject each party's election manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny. Here is what our experts had to say about the Conservative's top policies.

Hilary Steedman, Senior Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science

The Conservatives' manifesto skates over some uncomfortable truths about the development of apprenticeship during their last five years in office. True, as stated in the manifesto, 2.2 million new apprenticeships (apprenticeship starts) were registered between 2009/10 and 2013/14. However, of those starting an apprenticeship in this period, 850,000 were adults aged 25 or over.

In fact, the coalition government presided over and encouraged a huge increase in adult apprenticeships while numbers of 16-18 year olds in apprenticeship barely changed year on year. Most of those on adult apprenticeships were already in employment and a House of Commons Select Committeefound that many adult apprenticeships offered poor value for money. It is, therefore, depressing to see a bland promise of apprenticeship numbers trumpeted in the manifesto - 3 million over the next five years - with no preference for young people and no commitment to higher quality.

Read more here.

Sandra McNally, Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science

On the curriculum, the Conservatives emphasise learning of the basic skills of literacy and numeracy in primary schools, and in secondary schools (where this fails). They are right to prioritise these areas. Inadequate literacy and numeracy is a problem for about a fifth of the adult population, and those aged 16-24 perform worse than those aged 55-65 (unlike in most other countries). Partly as a result, establishing basic literacy and numeracy leads to a high earnings return in later life.

Whether or not changing the curriculum will actually improve in these basic skills is another matter.

Read more here.

This article was published in The Conversation on 14 April, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website

News Posted: 14/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

BBC News Online

Marking bias boosts girls' maths in French schools'

Girls in French secondary schools are benefiting from a marking bias by maths teachers, finds research. The girls were given 6 percent higher marks than boys for similar work, says the study by the London School of Economics and Paris School of Economics.

This article was published by BBC News online on April 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Giving a Little Help to Girls? Evidence on Grade Discrimination and its Effect on Students' Achievement', Camille Terrier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1341, March 2015

Related links
Camille Terrier webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: Labour's top policies

Article by Maria Goddard, Anand Menon, Christine Merrell, Claudia Hupkau, Hilary Steedman, Ian Preston, Jonathan Perraton and Steve Higgins
Welcome to The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics subject each party's election manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny. Here is what our experts had to say about Labour's top policies. Follow the links for further analysis.

Hilary Steedman, Senior Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science
Labour's election manifesto promises four initiatives in the area of skills and apprenticeships; the Compulsory Jobs Guarantee, the Apprenticeship Guarantee, the Youth Allowance, and the Technical Baccalaureate. It is not clear whether the party's priority is to cut the benefits bill and take young people off the unemployment register, or to ensure that all young people gain the skills and experience they need to make the transition to a job with a future. Ultimately, Labour's skills policy is a disappointing muddle.

Claudia Hupkau, Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science
In its manifesto, Labour proposes a Technical Baccalaureate - but actually, this already exists. It was announced in 2013 by the Department for Education and then-Skills Minister Mathew Hancock. But rather than being a separate qualification it was designed as a measure to use in performance tables.

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Manifesto Check: 'Labour's skills policy is a disappointing muddle'

Article by Hilary Steedman and Claudia Hupkau

Hilary Steedman, London School of Economics and Political Science
Labour's election manifesto promises four initiatives in the area of skills and apprenticeships; the Compulsory Jobs Guarantee, the Apprenticeship Guarantee, the Youth Allowance, and the Technical Baccalaureate. It is not clear whether the party's priority is to cut the benefits bill and take young people off the unemployment register, or to ensure that all young people gain the skills and experience they need to make the transition to a job with a future. Ultimately, Labour's skills policy is a disappointing muddle.

Claudia Hupkau, Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science
In its manifesto, Labour proposes a Technical Baccalaureate - but actually, this already exists. It was announced in 2013 by the Department for Education and then-Skills Minister Mathew Hancock. But rather than being a separate qualification it was designed as a measure to use in performance tables.

This article was posted online by The Conversation on April 13, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 13/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Repeat After Me

To revivify England's schools, the coalition embarked on a colossal structural reform. Soon after coming to power it changed the law to allow many schools to become ''academies'', giving them much greater say over how they spend their budgets and deploy staff. ... A study by two academics at the London School of Economics found a rapid - if small - improvement in test results at secondary schools that became academies.

This article was published by The Economist on April 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Academy Schools: Who Benefits, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
A Note on Academy School Policy, CEP Policy Analysis No.11, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

Repeat After Me

To revivify England's schools, the coalition embarked on a colossal structural reform. Soon after coming to power it changed the law to allow many schools to become ''academies'', giving them much greater say over how they spend their budgets and deploy staff. ... A study by two academics at the London School of Economics found a rapid - if small - improvement in test results at secondary schools that became academies.

This article was published by The Economist on April 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Academy Schools: Who Benefits, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
A Note on Academy School Policy, CEP Policy Analysis No.11, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 09/04/2015      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

Election questions from across the FE and skills sector

As the election period officially begins FE Week spoke to figures across the sector to ask them what three FE and skills questions they'd like answered by the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats in the run up to the general election on May 7 - as well as a bonus question on a subject of their choice.

Dr Sandra McNally, director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research at the London School of Economics:

What three FE and skills questions would you like politicians to answer before the election?
  • By how much would you cut the adult skills' budget?
  • What measures will you introduce to improve basic skills in the working age population?
  • How do you think the quality of apprenticeship programmes should be monitored?
What else?
  • What measures would you take to improve UK productivity?
Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website

News Posted: 30/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Four concerns about schools at the top of the election agenda

Article by Sandra McNally
With education policy set to play an important part in the May general election campaign, debates around the future direction of the school system will take place against the backdrop of fast-paced reforms made during the coalition's time in office.
These four key issues are likely to face scrutiny when it comes to schools policy:
    •How the UK measures up
    •Academies
    •School budgets
    •Helping disadvantaged children
This article was published by The Conversation on March 24, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Schools: the evidence on academies, resources and pupil performance, Sandra McNally, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015

Related video
#ElectionEconomics video - 'School Spending'. Sandra McNally interview.
Spending on schools needs to be protected - in real terms - as research shows that spending matters for a child's education.
View video here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

FE Week

London School of Economics to host new Centre for Vocational Education Research

A new £3m project aimed at researching new ideas for FE will be based at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Skills Minister Nick Boles will today announce that a new Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) will be led by Dr Sandra McNally from the LSE and based at its Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published in FE Week on 24 March 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Profile of Sandra McNally in FE Week
'New vocational research centre 'won't clash' with Education and Training Foundation, FE Week
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website

News Posted: 24/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

Related links
Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 02/03/2015      [Back to the Top]

Adam Smith Institute blog

Peer effects: they exist but they're not very big

A paper newly published in the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics tests the size of these effects on achievement by looking at the random component of sorting that occurs when most British children transition from primary to secondary school at age 11. 'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, finds that although having brighter peers raises someone's grades a bit, the effect size is very small.

This article was published in the Adam Smith Institute blog on February 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, in progress
Details here
Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England, by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.63, May 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 16/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Telegraph

Playing with political fire

Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics says it is Syriza that has misjudged badly, both by teaming up in coalition with a virulently anti-German party, and by violating Troika terms across the board – halting privatisation, raising the minimum wage to €750 a month, re-hiring 10,000 civil servants, and blocking mortgage foreclosures. “Tsipras is slapping the Germans in the face: it is almost as if he wishes to be thrown out of Europe. I can’t see any political support for Syriza from any government in southern Europe. They are all terrified of their own populist movements,” he says.

This article appeared in The Telegraph on 2 February 2015 link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 02/02/2015      [Back to the Top]

Parliamentary business online

Select committees: Academies and free schools

Select Committee publications: education
3. The growth in the number of academies and free schools and the significance of their impact on the educational landscape in England led us to decide that it would be timely to undertake a major inquiry into this area. We therefore put out a call for evidence on the following aspects of the academies and free schools programme:
• The effectiveness of academisation in narrowing the gap for disadvantaged children, and what further steps should be taken within the academies system to bring about a transformational impact on student outcomes;
• The process for approving, compelling and establishing academies and free schools, including working with sponsors;
• The role of the Secretary of State in intervening in and supporting failing academies, and how this role will work as the programme expands;
• The functions and responsibilities in relation to academies and free schools of local authorities and other organisations operating between the Secretary of State and individual schools; what these functions and responsibilities should be; and what gaps there are in support for schools at this level;
• What role academy chains play or should play in the new school landscape; how accountable they are; and what issues they raise with regard to governance arrangements;
• The appropriateness of academy status for primary schools and what special factors apply; and what evidence there is that academy status can bring value for money either for individual primary schools or for the system as a whole;
• What alternatives to sponsored academy status should be offered to failing primary schools.
5. We have benefitted from the expertise and assistance of two special advisers appointed specifically for this inquiry (Professor Becky Francis and Professor Stephen Machin) and of our standing adviser on education matters (Professor Alan Smithers).[5]

This article was published online by Parliamentay Business on Tuesday 23 June. Link to article here

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 28/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Only one in ten education reforms analysed for their impact: OECD

Only a tenth of education reforms carried out around the world since 2008 have been analysed by governments for the impact they have on children's education. A new report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) think-tank looked at 450 education reforms carried out by its 34 member countries between 2008 and 2014. It found that only one in ten of these reforms were scrutinised for impact.

Peter Dolton, professor of economics at the University of Sussex, who has recently carried out research on the cost-effectiveness of education systems, said the OECD was ''right to suggest that there needs to be more rigorous evaluation of new education policy initiatives''.

This article was published online by The Conversation on January 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Educational efficiency: value for money in public spending on schools, Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro Gutierrez and Adam Still. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 3, Winter 2014/15
The Efficiency Index: Which Education Systems Deliver the Best Value for Money? by Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Adam Still, published by GEMS Education Solutions, September 2014.

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial

La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
Link here

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

El Confidencial

La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
Link here

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/01/2015      [Back to the Top]

International New York Times

Along with art and jewels, the rich now collect passports

“These programs bring huge benefits to the Russian oligarchs or the various Chinese wanting to benefit from the rule of law, good educations and robust capital markets,” said David Metcalf, chairman of the British government’s Migration Advisory Committee and a professor emeritus at the London School of Economics. “But the fundamental question is, What does everyone else get out of it?”

This article appeared in the International New York Times on 15 December 2014 link to article

Also in:
CNBC
Latest rich collectible: Passports link to article

Weekly Voice
Collecting passports is the new fad for those with the money link to article

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets webpage
David Metcalf CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 15/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

Vox

We don't need no (management) education?

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Schools with greater autonomy often perform well, but there is disagreement over whether this is due to better management or cherry-picking of students. Based on interviews with over 1,800 head teachers, this column finds that management quality is strongly correlated with pupil performance. Autonomous schools have better management, and this result does not appear to be driven by pupil composition or other observable factors. However, autonomy for head teachers is not enough - accountability to school governors is also needed.

This article was published online by Vox on December 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Management Matter in Schools?', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1312, November 2014

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

Vox

We don't need no (management) education?

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Schools with greater autonomy often perform well, but there is disagreement over whether this is due to better management or cherry-picking of students. Based on interviews with over 1,800 head teachers, this column finds that management quality is strongly correlated with pupil performance. Autonomous schools have better management, and this result does not appear to be driven by pupil composition or other observable factors. However, autonomy for head teachers is not enough - accountability to school governors is also needed.

This article was published online by Vox on December 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Management Matter in Schools?', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1312, November 2014

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

What should we do with private schools?

Over the last decade or so, however, it has been from economists at the London School of Economics, notably Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, that the highest-profile and most influential findings on social mobility have come. This has been, above all, through their use of two birth cohort studies – one of them tracking the lives of all children born in Britain in one week in 1958, the other doing the same for the children of one week in 1970. In essence, they have found that the economic status of the 1970 cohort is, compared with the earlier cohort, more dependent on family background – and that accordingly, social mobility in early 21st century Britain is in decline.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 6 December 2014 link to article

Related Publications
A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility? Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin, October 2008 Paper No' CEPCP263
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin, January 2002 Paper No' CEPDP0517

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 06/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Chancellor's Autumn Statement: the experts respond

The chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, has delivered the financial package he hopes will convince voters to deliver a Conservative majority in May 2015. Here, a team of academic experts [that includes the Centre for Economic Performance's Director Professor John Van Reenen and Research Associate Dr Jo Blanden] responds to the contents of the Autumn Statement.

This article was published online by The Conversation on December 3, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

World Economic Forum

How to conduct social science

[Joshua] Angrist, the Ford Professor of Economics, has long been one of the leading advocates of research that uses ''ceteris paribus'' [other things being equal] principles. Now, along with Jorn-Steffen Pischke of the London School of Economics, Angrist has written a book on the subject for a general audience, Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect, published later this month by Princeton University Press.

This article was published online by the World Economic Forum blog on December 1, 2014
Link to article here.

Related publications
Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke, Princeton University Press, December 2014
Details

Related links
Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/12/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

We should not let universities decide how to spend money on poor students

Article by Gill Wyness
Decentralising forms of financial support may harm access and increase inequality says Gill Wyness. ... Universities are becoming more active in offering financial support to poor students, over and above what is provided by the government in maintenance loans and grants. The problem is, these decentralised forms of support - in which universities themselves decide who to support and how - may actually do more harm than good.

This article was published in the Guardian on November 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief...Economics of higher education, Richard Murphy and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2014

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

Prospect Magazine

Will Britain get a payrise?

What if in our relatively deregulated flexible labour market-where the balance of workplace power favours bosses, many people are engaged on flexible performance-based contracts, and new technology is sweeping away jobs that once paid well-there will never be a return to the days when workers of every type could always rely on a pay rise? Economists such as David Blanchflower, one-time member of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee, and Stephen Machin, who currently sits on the Low Pay Commission which makes recommendations on the level of the hourly minimum wage, point to the experience of the United States, which gave us the blueprint for labour market de-regulation. The real median weekly wage for full-time US employees has more or less flatlined since the 1970s, proving that pay stagnation is not beyond the realm of possibility. ...

As two of Britain's leading labour market economists Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin outlined in a report published by the Resolution Foundation, a think tank, far less unemployment is now needed to bear down on inflationary wage and price pressures. ...

A flexible labour market that favours jobs over pay during tough times is clearly preferable to one that results in the economic and social pain of mass unemployment. Better still, if the economic recovery is sustained long enough to combine a continued fall in unemployment with strengthening productivity growth, we could be on the verge of the kind of labour market scenario George Osborne must dream of: full employment and rising real living standards. However, this positive picture doesn't necessarily translate into an equally rosy outlook for pay. One reason, as research by John van Reenan, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has shown, is that even when productivity rises employers are nowadays more likely to improve non-wage elements of reward packages-which include contributions to staff pensions and health insurance, plus employers' national insurance contributions-at the expense of pay increases.



This article was published by Prospect Magazine on November 13, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
What a drag: the chilling impact of unemployment on real wages, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Resolution Foundation Report, September 2012
'Decoupling of wage growth and productivity growth? Myth and reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Magazine, Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 13/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Journal of Turkish Weekly

The effect of immigration on public finances

Much attention of researchers and policy-makers has been directed at the effects of immigration on the wages and employment of natives in the host country (for example, Friedberg and Hunt 1995; Manacorda et al 2012; Dustmann et al 2013). But most empirical studies have failed to find any convincing evidence of substantial negative impact. ... Research in several countries suggests that immigrants are typically healthier than natives when arriving (unsurprisingly if the economic gains from migrating for work are greater for the more healthy), but they assimilate to native health levels over time. It would therefore be odd if burdens on health spending were very much different to those from comparable UK-born. Wadsworth (2013), for example, shows no difference, which is compatible with what has been found for other countries. The potential impact of immigration on crime rates is sometimes cited as an issue. But again, empirical work across several countries offers little to confirm such fears. Bell et al (2013) and Jaitman and Machin (2013), for example, show that the most recent wave of UK immigration has had no evident impact on crime rates.

This article was published by The Journal of Turkish Weekly on November 5, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Bell, B, F Fasani and S Machin (2013) Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves, Review of Economics and Statistics 95: 1278-1290.
'Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves', Brian Bell, Francesco Fasani and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.984, June 2010
Geay, C, S McNally and S Telhaj (2013) Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?, Economic Journal 123: F281-307.
In brief: Language barriers: The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?' by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012
Jaitman, L and S Machin (2013) Crime and Immigration: New Evidence from England and Wales, IZA Journal of Migration 2(19).
'Crime and Immigration: New Evidence from England and Wales', Laura Jaitman, Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1238, September 2013
Machin, S and R Murphy (2014) 'Paying Out and Crowding Out: The Globalisation of Higher Education', Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 1299, September 2014.
Manacorda, M, A Manning and J Wadsworth (2012) The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain, Journal of the European Economic Association 10: 120-51.
'The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain', Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006
Wadsworth, J (2013) Musn't Grumble: Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany, Fiscal Studies 34: 55-82.
'Musn't Grumble. Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and German', Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1166, September 2012

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


News Posted: 05/11/2014      [Back to the Top]

Mail Online UK

High speed rail 'tsar' to spark fresh controversy with new HS2 route and stations recommendations

A panel of academic experts told the Treasury select committee that the report overstated the benefits by six to eight times. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who is to give evidence to the committee on Tuesday, said findings used a procedure that was 'essentially made up'.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on October 24, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
HS2: assessing the costs and benefits Henry Overman, February 2012 Paper No' CEPCP361 in CentrePiece Vol. 16 Issue. 3 Winter

Related Links
Henry Overman webpage
SERC webpage
Globalisation webpage
News Posted: 24/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Low pay is breaking Britain's public finances: the evidence can't be denied

Permanent low pay threatens to overtake us, with the Treasury, hit by lower tax receipts, facing an ever-rising benefits bill.
On Wednesday Steve Machin, research director at the LSE's centre for economic performance, laid out to a meeting of economists the collected evidence on the nature of falling pay - and warned that this is beginning to look not like a slow recovery in wages, but a permanent, structural feature of the UK economy. He showed how the group-think of economic forecasters has consistently and wildly over-estimated an expected increase in wages: the OBR forecast for March this year was a wage rise of 4.3 percent. What happened has been a continuing real fall.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 23, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Real wages continue to fall in the UK, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin, CEP Real Wages Updates No.001, September 2014
Falling real wages, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Low pay is breaking Britain's public finances: the evidence can't be denied

Permanent low pay threatens to overtake us, with the Treasury, hit by lower tax receipts, facing an ever-rising benefits bill.
On Wednesday Steve Machin, research director at the LSE's centre for economic performance, laid out to a meeting of economists the collected evidence on the nature of falling pay - and warned that this is beginning to look not like a slow recovery in wages, but a permanent, structural feature of the UK economy. He showed how the group-think of economic forecasters has consistently and wildly over-estimated an expected increase in wages: the OBR forecast for March this year was a wage rise of 4.3 percent. What happened has been a continuing real fall.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 23, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Real wages continue to fall in the UK, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin, CEP Real Wages Updates No.001, September 2014
Falling real wages, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 23/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

X factor over evidence: the failure of early years education

Article by Jo Blanden
As free nursery places for three year olds fail to deliver lasting educational benefits, Dr Jo Blanden argues we need to see a sensible approach to early years policy.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on October 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP Publications webpage
News Posted: 22/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Britain News.Net

Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and films
Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 16/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Economist

The new school rules

The academies programme has transformed England's educational landscape. ... A separate study by Professor Machin and Andrew Eyles at the London School of Economics identified ''beneficial effects'' in schools becoming academies.

This article was published in The Economist on October 11, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Clarin

No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Le Plus

Des ados partent faire le djihad en Syrie : comme le suicide, un comportement de fuite

Some researchers have studied the characteristics of happy people. They identified six factors which only concern the economy (unemployment), the others being: divorce rate, the level of trust between the people, the number of participants in non-religious organizations, the number of believers and the quality of government. (Reference: Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2005).

This article was published by Le Plus on October 8, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage
News Posted: 08/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Domestic postgraduate places 'aided by overseas expansion'

Fees paid by growing numbers of overseas postgraduates studying in the UK have helped to subsidise additional places for domestic learners. That is among the findings of a new paper by Stephen Machin, professor of economics at University College London, and Richard Murphy, assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin, which analyses correlations between the increases in the numbers of British-born and overseas students in UK higher education institutions. ...The full research is detailed in a discussion paper from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and is summarised in article published today in CentrePiece, the Centre's quarterly magazine.

This article was published by Times Higher Education on October 3, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers, Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
'Paying Out and Crowding Out? The Globalisation of Higher Education', Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1299, September 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/10/2014      [Back to the Top]

The McKinsey Quarterly

Why management matters for productivity

Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

The McKinsey Quarterly

Why management matters for productivity

Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage
News Posted: 30/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 19/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

Financial Times

Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 19/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

Spiralling costs of dementia 'being unfairly picked up by carers'

LSE professor of social policy Martin Knapp said many people with dementia and their families are essentially paying out £21,000 a year through the unpaid care provided by carers and covering the costs of social care.

This article appeared in the Independent on 10 September 2014 link to article

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 10/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why Finland, Korea and Czech Republic get the most bang for their educational buck

Article by Peter Dolton
There are around 1.3 billion children enrolled in primary and secondary schools worldwide. Each year, governments spend trillions of dollars on their education systems with the objective of educating children to the highest possible standard. Some governments use available budgets more efficiently than others. A new report which I co-authored called the Efficiency Index, published by London-based education consultancy GEMS Education Solutions, has highlighted which countries are using these most effectively to produce the best educational outcomes for their young people. Finland, Korea and the Czech Republic come out on top of the 30-country list.

This article was published online by The Conversation on September 5, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
The Efficiency Index: Which Education Systems Deliver the Best Value for Money? by Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Adam Still, published by GEMS Education Solutions, September 2014.

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/09/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Tiger moths lift children's exam results before birth

Tiger mothers predestine their children to do well at school even before they are born, research has suggested. Babies born to highly competitive women who believe that they have the power to shape their children's prospects go on to achieve better GCSE results, academics found. The research, by academics at the London School of Economics, was based on a study that tracks more than 10,000 children born in and around Bristol from 1991. Early in their pregnancy mothers were asked questions such as ''Do you believe things happen no matter what you try to do to stop them?'', and ''Does planning ahead make things turn out better?'' They were then interviewed annually until their children were five. Using their answers, the women were grouped by a psychological measure known as locus of control, which reflects whether people think outcomes are influenced by their own actions. The research plotted the GCSE results of teenagers whose mothers had shown high internal control tendencies in their twelfth week of pregnancy. Francesca Cornaglia, an economist at Queen Mary University, London, said: ''Other things constant, children whose mothers ranked in the top 25 per cent of the internal locus of control scale tended to obtain GCSE scores about 17 per cent higher than children of mothers in the bottom 25 per cent.''

This article was published in The Times on August 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

Related Links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Nele Warrinner webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

EurAsia Review

Is there a 'taste for discrimination'? - Analysis

Article by Alex Bryson and Arnaud Chevalier
This column presents evidence from a new test of taste-based discrimination. Examining hiring decisions in the English Fantasy Premier League, the authors do not find that employers discriminate based on race. One explanation for this is that good productivity measures minimise the opportunities for statistical discrimination, which according to studies drives the racial difference in market outcomes.

This article was published online by the EurAsian Review on August 18, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'What happens when employers are free to discriminate? Evidence from the English Barclays Premier Fantasy Football League', Alex Bryson and Arnaud Chevalier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1283, July 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

LSE News

Psychology of parenting: mother's personality measured during pregnancy predicts how well children perform in GCSEs

Babies born to mothers who hold a stronger belief that their fate is in their own hands and not down to luck tend to perform better in their GCSE exams 16 years later. That is the central finding of new research by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

This article was published by LSE News online on August 18, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

Related Links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Nele Warrinner webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News Posted: 18/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

News

BBC Radio 4

Hilary Steedman discusses apprenticeships in Britain

This interview appeared on BBC Radio 4 on 8 August 2014 link to programme

Also on: BBC Radio Coventry and Warwickshire and BBC Northampton

Related Links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 08/08/2014      [Back to the Top]

LSE News online

Internet speed closely linked to property values

Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
Link to press release here

Related publications
'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
SERC website

News Posted: 31/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Times (Scotland)

Freedom fighters offer a pig in a poke for the neediest of Scots

The SNP has been in government in a devolved Scotland for more than seven years. During that time it has had control over most of the levers of social justice, from education to healthcare, from local authority spending to housing. The fact that the party has chosen to concentrate on constitutional reform rather than, to take one example, school reform, is their decision and not Westminster's. If anything is instrumental in turning around people's lives it is education - proof of which is now being seen in England's inner cities. Here, there are no plans for the revolution that is rescuing failing schools south of the border, and there remain ''deep levels of inequality... particularly between pupils from different socio-economic groups'', claims the LSE study 'Education in a Devolved Scotland'.

This article was published in The Sunday Times (Scotland) on July 27, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013.
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 27/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Independent

If Hadza nomads get by on 14 hours' work a week, why can't we?

A substantial literature already surrounds the UK ''productivity puzzle'', whereby post-recession output and employment have risen while national productivity markedly drops: $42.1 contribution to GDP per hour worked in 2013, compared with a eurozone average of $43.7 and a G7 rate of $48.4. Explanations for the plunge range from the misallocation of resources and the post-crash investment famine to, in several studies, the long-term fall in real wages. Professor John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics argues in a paper that ''low wages and weak investment mean a big fall in the amount of effective capital per worker and this accounts for most of the fall in labour productivity''.

This article was published in The Independent on July 26, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
The UK Productivity and Jobs Puzzle: Does the Answer Lie in Labour Market Flexibility?, Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.31, June 2013

Related Links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage
News Posted: 26/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

libcom.org

Authoritarianism, work and therapy

Yesterday the Independent featured an interview with British economist Richard Layard. The article's headline features Layard proclaiming ''that money is not the only thing affecting peoples happiness''. Layard has written two books in which he claims that not enough is done for the mental wellbeing of citizens despite the massive costs to the economy. Layard is one of the champions of the happiness index that David Cameron has previously voiced support for.

This article was posted online by libcom.org on July 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness and Public Policy research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Telegraph

Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Dagen

Debattinnlegget er skrevet av Kåre Eriksen, kommunikasjonsrådgiver i Digni

Men det finnes grenser. Professor Richard Layard ved London School of Economics har funnet ut at tilfredshet og lykke stiger dramatisk med okt kjopekraft - inntil man nar en arsinntekt pa rundt 20.000 dollar, eller rundt 120.000 kroner. Etter dette gir ikke okte inntekter saerlig utslag pa lykkeskalaen.
But there are limits. Professor Richard Layard at the London School of Economics has found that contentment and happiness rises dramatically with increased purchasing power-until one reaches an annual income of around 20,000 dollars, or around 120,000 dollars. After this, it does not provide any increased revenues, in particular, reflected on the happiness index.

This article was published online by Dagen on July 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition, 2011
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 07/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Express

'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

News Posted: 06/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

David Nicholsons Blob

Ambitious about autism employment summit speech 3rd of July 2014

According to research from the London School of Economics published in June of this year in the Journal of American Medical Association of Paediatrics the cost of autism to the UK economy is £32 billion.

This article was published online in the David Nicholsons Blog on July 3, 2014
Link to blog piece here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 03/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Conversation UK

Drop the negative spin on kids who start school bilingual - they are a rich resource for the future

There are now more than 1.1 million children in our schools whose first language ''is known or believed to be other than English'' according to the latest government figures. ... Chinese students are our highest performing group and the presence of so many Polish students has helped improve the position of many of our Catholic schools in the league tables, as shown by a study carried out by the LSE in 2012.

This article was published online by the Conversation on July 1, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
Thursday 3 July
Epoch Times
Drop the negative spin on kids who start school bilingual - they are a rich resource for the future

Related publications
CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website
News Posted: 01/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Express

Why Prince Charles has got it right on grammar schools

“Comprehensive schools are a social experiment which went so horribly wrong that no party is quite brave enough to confess to its error. An LSE study revealed that people born in 1958, most of whom went to secondary school when grammar schools were still around, were more likely to move up the earnings ladder relative to their parents than were people born in 1970, most of whom went to comprehensives.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 1 July 2014 link to article

Related publications
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility Jo Blanden, in CentrePiece 13 (3) Winter 2009
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Full paper here from CentrePiece 10 (1) Spring 2005
More details on the research discussed here are in Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin - a report supported by the Sutton Trust


Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

The scandal of common mental illnesses left untreated

The crisis in question is one of mental health, yet what our politicians propose to do about it remains unclear. If they’re in need of help, they could always start with a careful reading of a new book by the economist Richard Layard and clinical psychologist David Clark. At the heart of Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies is a bewildering conundrum. Mental illness is extremely common: one in three people will experience a problem at some point during their lifetime; in any one year, 19% of us will suffer from an anxiety disorder, 13% from a substance problem, and 7% from depression. If personal misery on this scale isn’t sufficient to move politicians to action, an annual cost to the exchequer of approximately £28bn (not counting NHS costs) might be expected to do the trick. Yet most people receive no medical help for their conditions, and of the minority that do get treatment, very few receive the most effective form.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 1 July 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
David Clark webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 01/07/2014      [Back to the Top]

Vox.Eu

Through the looking glass: CEO pay in China's listed companies

Publicly traded companies are the engine behind China's growth, which raises the question of how CEO compensation works under an interventionist state. This column presents an analysis of executive compensation in China and a comparison to the West. Chinese listed firms have incentive structures similar to those of the US; in this case, effective compensation policies seem to transcend political boundaries.

This article was published online by Vox.Eu on June 24, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'CEO Incentive Contracts in China: Why Does City Location Matter?', Alex Bryson, John Forth and Minghai Zhou, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1192, February 2013

Related Links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 24/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

Daily Mail

Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Autism costs UK £32bn a year, analysis shows

Autism costs the US and UK economies $175bn (£104bn) and £32bn a year respectively, more than any other medical condition and greater than the cost of cancer, strokes and heart disease combined, according to an economic analysis of the condition's impact. Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics who co-authored the study, said: ''Autism is more common than perhaps people realise - it's more than 1 percent of the population. Also the impact that it has is across the lifespan, particularly for people with autism and learning difficulties, also known as low-functioning autism. Those individuals would need quite a lot of care and support from a pretty early age. You're talking about 60 to 70 years of support for people with this level of need.''

This article was published by The Guardian on June 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC (Web)

Most teachers 'back pay by results'

However Richard Murphy, a researcher at the LSE's Centre for the Economics of Education, said evidence suggested "a teacher who is consistently raising the test scores of pupils is much more likely to be a highly effective teacher".

This article appeared in the Guardian on 6 June 2014 link to article

Related Links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 06/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

City AM

Britain's housing crisis will morph into catastrophe if politicians don't change, by Paul Cheshire

THE HOUSING crisis – worst in London, but bad across Britain – is fundamentally driven by lack of supply. For the past five years, we have been building fewer houses than in any peacetime period since before World War One. But house building has been on a downwards trend since the 1960s. Reasonable estimates suggest the shortfall in England has been 1.6m to 2.3m houses between 1994 and 2012. Moreover, too many of those we have built have not been in locations where demand is highest. We persistently build houses where they are relatively most affordable and job prospects are relatively worst.

This article appeared in City AM on 4 June 2014 link to article

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 04/06/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Talking therapies are better than pills, but you have to find the right one

When the Depression Report was published by the Centre for Economic Performance's mental health policy group in 2006, it quantified the effects of that over-medicalisation for the first time. Talking therapies, particularly CBT, could be shown to be more effective than medication in cases of mild to moderate depression, both in getting people back to work and preventing recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines already stated that talking therapies should be offered before drugs; the problem was that there weren't enough qualified therapists. The Depression Report showed clearly that investment in making CBT and similar therapies more widely available would be better for the economy in the long run than handing out pills.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28 May 2014 link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
Mental Illness and Unhappiness Dan Chisholm, Richard Layard, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, September 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1239

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 28/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Talking therapies are better than pills, but you have to find the right one

When the Depression Report was published by the Centre for Economic Performance's mental health policy group in 2006, it quantified the effects of that over-medicalisation for the first time. Talking therapies, particularly CBT, could be shown to be more effective than medication in cases of mild to moderate depression, both in getting people back to work and preventing recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines already stated that talking therapies should be offered before drugs; the problem was that there weren't enough qualified therapists. The Depression Report showed clearly that investment in making CBT and similar therapies more widely available would be better for the economy in the long run than handing out pills.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28 May 2014 link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
Mental Illness and Unhappiness Dan Chisholm, Richard Layard, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, September 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1239

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 28/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

UK University funding: don't copy the Australians

Doubling the monthly repayment for those likely to be struggling to save for a deposit on a home or to pay for the rise in their rail season ticket is hardly likely to be a popular policy. And creating such a ''cliff edge'' in repayments is likely to create a range of perverse incentives and distortionary effects in the labour market, suppressing wages. These seem pretty desperate measures to adopt. As London School of Economics researchers Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy stated in The Guardian last month in response to Hepi's report, if the UK government really wants to lower the RAB charge, it could do so by lowering fees, or it could reduce it to zero by abolishing fees altogether. As the Hepi report points out, a significant factor in Australia's lower RAB charge (around 25 per cent) is its lower tuition fees, which result in lower student debt.

This article was published in The Times Higher on May 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage

News Posted: 22/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

i (the paper for today)

The right choice: pros and cons of further study

A higher qualification comes with lots of benefits, but weigh up the costs first to make sure it will be worth the investment. A Bachelors degree is no longer a passport to a career in some employment sectors. As an increasing number of graduates chase a limited number of jobs, a higher qualification is often expected or demanded by employers at entry level. The Postgraduate Premium, based on research by the Sutton Trust - led by the London School of Economics and University of Surrey - shows that 11 per cent of the UK workforce aged 26-60, hold a postgraduate qualification.

This article was published in i (independent) on May 21, 2014
Link to pdf of the article here.

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin, Sutton Trust Report, February 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin
webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

‘4,000 down, 20,000 to go' – the academies drive gathers pace

Meanwhile, justification for rapid academisation is scant. A 2009 report by LSE academics Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson signals there was little proof that New Labour's academies raised the attainment of poorer students more than similar schools.

This article was published online by the Conversation on May 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Academy schools and pupil performance, Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson. Article in CentrePiece 14 (1) Spring 2009
This article summarises 'Public and Private Schooling Initiatives in England' by Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson, a chapter in School Choice International: Exploring Public-Private Partnerships edited by Rajashri Chakrabarti and Paul E. Peterson, MIT Press, 2008. Details

Related Links
Steve Machin webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 14/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Enough is enough, we need higher interest rates now

In the 1970s and 80s, some 4.3m new homes were built in Britain. In the subsequent two decades, the numbers plummeted to 2.7m. To stabilise affordability in the areas of the country people have to live and work — twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley, where prices have been falling steeply, in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge, where prices are rising strongly — requires return to previous levels of house building. As an economy, we’ve not been building enough housing for 30 years or more. I take these statistics from an article by Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, in the LSE’s CentrePiece magazine.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 May 2014 link to article

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 13/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

EU elections 2014: Is immigration good for Britain?

Last year, the Centre for Economic Performance, a think-tank, found that the arrival of Polish children in British schools had helped lift their native classmates’ results. The researchers said one explanation is that Polish children’s stronger work ethic encourages their British peers.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 12 May 2014 link to article

Related Publication
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance? by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012


Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage
News Posted: 12/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

Yahoo! Notizie (Italy)

Romania, mobilità e capitali in Europa

La mobilita dei lavoratori in Europa e notevolmente aumentata dal 2010, dopo un brusco calo dovuto alla crisi. Sono i Paesi del sud Europa che stanno facendo registrare un vero e proprio esodo. Gran parte dei migranti in cerca di lavoro sono giovani con alti livelli d'istruzione. Un fenomeno che crea problemi nei rispettivi Paesi di provenienza. Cosi, esaminate le recenti ricerche sulla migrazione qualificata e l'impatto sui paesi di origine e di destinazione, ecco cosa ci racconta Marco Manacorda, professore di Economia alla Queen Mary Univeristy. ''Quando guardiamo gli effetti della mobilita qualificata rispetto al mercato del lavoro locale, contrariamente alle teorie economiche standard, che prevedono un danno per i nativi, cio non accade. Viene registrato invece un costo per i paesi di origine, soprattutto se questi hanno investito nell'educazione''.
Romania and Capital Mobility in Europe
The mobility of workers in Europe has significantly increased from 2010, after a sharp drop due to the crisis. Are the southern European Countries that are making a real exodus. Most of the migrants in search of work are young people with high levels of education. A phenomenon that creates problems in their countries of origin. So, you look at recent research on migration and the impact on countries of origin and destination, here's what Marco Manacorda, Professor of Economics at Queen Mary University says: "When we look at the effects of the qualified mobility compared to the local labour market, contrary to standard economic theory, involving damage to the natives, this doesn't happen. A cost is recorded for the countries of origin, especially if they have invested in education ". This article was published online on Yahoo!Notizie (Italy) on May 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Marco Manacorda CEP Publications webpage
News Posted: 10/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

Planning resource

Housing affordability crisis blamed on green belt policy

Green belt polices that aim to keep ''the urban unwashed out of the Home Counties'' are causing a housing affordability crisis, according to a London School of Economics (LSE) professor. Britain's booming house prices have been caused by ''decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land'', according to a study by Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published by Planningresource online on May 2, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website
News Posted: 02/05/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Guardian

Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage
News Posted: 28/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

Macleans.ca

Italy's stay-at-home kids

48 per cent of European adults between 18 and 30 now live with their parents, an increase from 44 per cent at the onset of the economic crisis in 2007. But the highest number is in Italy, with 79 per cent. That's up from about 60 per cent a few years ago, according to a separate report. ... In a 2005 paper written for the Centre for Economic Policy Research [sic] in the UK, economists Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti wrote that while high youth unemployment (now at 42 per cent) plays a role in these living arrangements, the main factor is that Italian parents want their children to live with them. The parents essentially bribe their children to stay home by feeding them, doing their laundry and giving them money in exchange for care and companionship.

This article was published online by Macleans.ca (Canada) on April 27, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure. Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents?, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.536, June 2002
Mamma's boys? Why most young Italian men live with their parents, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005
Why Do Most Italian Youths Live with their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, Journal of the European Economic Association, 4: 800-829, June 2006

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

News Posted: 27/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Business

Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
UK Wired News

Related publications
'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
Link to report here
Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Nicholas Oulton webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC News - Business

Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
UK Wired News

Related publications
'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
Link to report here
Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Nicholas Oulton webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

Canberra Times

ECB to blame for eurozone

Professor Luis Garicano, from the London School of Economics, said the economic models used to predict inflation seem to be breaking down, leading to serial misjudgments. ''They need to take very serious action,'' he told the Financial Times.

This article was published online by the Canberra Times (Australia) on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in:
Sydney Morning Herald Link to article here
Melbourne Age Link to article here
Republica.com Link to article here

Related publications
El dilema de Espana, Luis Garicano. Book published in January 2014.
Details.

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 03/04/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Economist (Online)

Happy Now?

The commission’s authors (who include Richard Layard, an academic who has long supported more use of well-being indices in policy), favour the second measure of general satisfaction with life. More comprehensive cross-country measurements, they suggest, might help governments adopt useful innovations from other countries. Many considerations turn out to be widely shared across cultures. Work matters more for psychological reasons than pecuniary ones. Trust in one’s local community figures highly as a source of mental ease. Physical environments and good urban planning also figure highly . Emotional health might be enhanced by inculcating virtues like resilience more energetically at school.

This article appeared in the Economist on 27 March 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Wellbeing and Policy, Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, March 2014 Link to report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Gus O'Donnell webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 27/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Bloomberg News

Modern Rosie the Riveter a path to women's higher pay

In the UK, the majority of new apprentices in 2012 were women. Still, much of the growth for women in the UK system has been in lower-wage levels of apprenticeships, which include service occupations, said Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''It's a bit discouraging at the moment,'' she said. ''If women were moving into higher-level apprenticeships, their earnings would be much higher.''

This article was published by Bloomberg News on March 26, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
HeraldNet on March 27, 2014
Women move into trades in search of higher pay
NorthJersey.com on March 30, 2014
Modern Rosie the Riveter a Path to U.S. Women's Higher Pay

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 26/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Free Malaysia Today

Study: ‘Mid-life crisis' is real

The study was completed with assistance from the University of Warwick and the London School of Economics, and published as a working paper by the German-based Institute for the Study of Labor. Researchers analyzed data from “nationally representative” surveys in Australia, Britain and Germany. “What is interesting is the consistency of the results in all of the three countries we examined. Human happiness hits the lowest point around the ages of 40 to 42,” Dr Cheng said. “Indeed all the more intriguing is that the U-shape pattern has been recently observed in research on great apes. Perhaps we are more similar than we think?”

This article appeared on Free Malaysia Today on 21 March 2014 link to article

Also in:
Huffington Post Canada link to article
New York Daily News link to article
CNBC link to article

Related Publications
Nattavudh Powdthavee’s CEP Publications

Related Links
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 21/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Free Malaysia Today

Study: ‘Mid-life crisis' is real

The study was completed with assistance from the University of Warwick and the London School of Economics, and published as a working paper by the German-based Institute for the Study of Labor. Researchers analyzed data from “nationally representative” surveys in Australia, Britain and Germany. “What is interesting is the consistency of the results in all of the three countries we examined. Human happiness hits the lowest point around the ages of 40 to 42,” Dr Cheng said. “Indeed all the more intriguing is that the U-shape pattern has been recently observed in research on great apes. Perhaps we are more similar than we think?”

This article appeared on Free Malaysia Today on 21 March 2014 link to article

Also in:
Huffington Post Canada link to article
New York Daily News link to article
CNBC link to article

Related Publications
Nattavudh Powdthavee’s CEP Publications

Related Links
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 21/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC online

Vicar or publican - which jobs make you happy?

A report out on Thursday from the former head of the civil service, Sir Gus O'Donnell commissioned by the Legatum Institute, explains the impact wellbeing research is already having on policy and argues for more of it in the future.It confirms what the chancellor must know - that economic growth is indeed good for social wellbeing. But there are other areas of state activity that might be given greater priority if politicians want to improve the nation's happiness. An emphasis on improving mental health is one, ensuring towns and cities include plenty of places where residents can meet and interact is another. There is evidence that an "active" welfare system encouraging people into work is better for wellbeing than a "passive" safety-net approach.

This article appeared on BBC Online on 20 March 2014 link to article

Related Publication
Wellbeing and Policy Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, March 2014 link to report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Gus O'Donnell webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 20/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Budget 2014: experts respond

Chancellor George Osborne has unveiled his fourth budget. As the day develops, our panel of experts here give their take on what this budget means for the economy, healthcare, education, the environment and, of course, ordinary members of the public.

Jo Blanden, Senior Lecturer in Economics and Deputy Head of School, University of Surrey and Associate of the Centre for Economic Performance
The BBC has summarised today's budget as about ''pensions, savings and bingo'' and indeed there does seem to be a strong focus on the older generation. Politically this makes sense for the Conservatives as older, wealthier groups are more likely to consider voting Tory. But economically the group which has lost out most in the aftermath of the recession is the young with 20 percent unemployment among the 18-24 year olds and average earnings reduced by 8 percent for those in their 20s.

Ironically intergenerational inequalities were eloquently identified by Conservative Minister David Willets even before the recession started in his well-received book The Pinch. The new pension arrangements are set to net the Treasury a tidy sum, the hope is it will spend it on programmes to ease the squeeze on Generation Y.

John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics
George Osborne boasted of Britain's economic strength with raised growth forecast of 2.7 percent this year. But the budget small print admits that this growth only gets national income up where it was in 2008. Under the Chancellor we have suffered the worst squeeze on wages and the slowest recovery for over a century. The government made a huge policy error by accelerating austerity four years ago. Slashing public investment when output was depressed derailed the recovery - it is still a third lower than before the crisis.

Measures on housing policy create a feel-good factor for homeowners that might help boost the Tory vote, but it puts the taxpayer on the hook for huge debts in the decades to come. And Budget benefits to pensioners are good for grabbing the grey vote, but they have been relatively shielded from the turmoil of the last 5 years. The increases in personal allowances are welcome, though the main beneficiaries will not be the very poor. The budget has some tinkering with taxes to stimulate investment in a desperate attempt to deal with the fact that business investment remains depressed. But the cause is again Osborne-omics: the slashing of government investment, depressed demand due to austerity and the failure to sort out the banks.

For decent growth, jobs and pay, we deserve much better than this.

This article was published online by The Conversation on March 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

News Posted: 19/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Il Sole 24 Ore

Davos, ecco i 214 giovani leader del futuro. La metà sono donne. Solo due gli italiani

Era andata meglio nel 2013, quando il Forum di Davos aveva incluso tra gli Young Leader quattro ''italians'': Fabrizio Campelli di Deutsche Bank, Silvia Console Battilana della Stanford University, l'allora vice-ministro del Lavoro e delle Politiche Sociali Michel Martone, Martina Viarengo del Graduate Institute di Ginevra ed London School of Economics. Mentre, nel 2012, tra i (due) connazionali in lista compariva un ''major of Florence'' sulla buona strada per altre cariche: Matteo Renzi.
Davos, here are the young leaders of the future 2014. Half are women. Only two Italian
Had gone better in 2013, when the Forum in Davos had included among the Young Leaders four ''italians'': Fabrizio Campelli of Deutsche Bank, Silvia Console Battilana at Stanford University, the then Deputy Minister of labour and Social Affairs Michel Martone, Martina Viarengo of the Graduate Institute in Geneva and London School of Economics. While, in 2012, of the (two) fellow in the list appeared a ''major of Florence'' on track for other offices: Matteo Renzi.

This article was published by Il Sole 24Ore on March 12, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Martina Viarengo webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Martina Viarengo CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 12/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

LSE British Politics and Policy blog

Towns and cities can be trapped in wrong locations

When thinking about policy responses, it is worth looking at the past to see how historical events can leave cities trapped in locations that are far from ideal. We have done that in a study that compares the evolution of two initially similar urban networks following a historical calamity that wiped out one, while leaving the other largely intact.

This LSE British Politics and Policy blog was posted online on March 6, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related publications
Can cities be trapped in bad locations?, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch. Artice in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2013/14
'Resetting the Urban Network 117-2012', Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1248, November 2013
Can history leave towns struck in places with bad locational fundamentals?, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Vox, 08/12/2013

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 06/03/2014      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

University education: at £9,000 per year, parents begin to question its value

Parents are struggling to reconcile conflicting views about the value of higher education for their children: more than half believe that fees of up to £9,000 a year represent poor value for money, yet a majority still regard a traditional university education as the best route to a chosen career, according to a YouGov poll. Dr Gill Wyness, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said the YouGov poll highlighted ''a lot of scepticism for forgivable reasons from parents'', but also pointed to the ''surprising'' level of support for university study for its own sake and not merely as a step to a career. She said: ''There are a lot of near contradictions, where people are saying they can't afford for their children to go to university and yet they are expecting them to go. It's a puzzling time for people.''

This article was published by the Guardian on February 26, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education website
News Posted: 26/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC2

Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

BBC2

Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Economic Voice

Favoured management strategy of UK businesses ‘fatally flawed'

A top crop of UK managers voted for the best article, as the must-read piece of research to come out of British business schools over the last year. An article by Professors Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen - all of the Centre for Economic Performance - had their research, asking whether management really works, shortlisted.

Articles were submitted to the competition by academics which were then reviewed and rated online by CMI members. Those with the highest ratings were then assessed by CMI's Academic Advisory Council, a committee of leading UK academics, who selected the following as the top five. 'Does Management Really Work? How three essential practices can address even the most complex global problems' by Professor Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics at Stanford University, Professor Raffaella Sadun, Assistant Professor at Harvard Business School, Professor John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article was published by The Economic Voice on February 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Management Really Work? How Three Essential Practices Can Address Even the Most Complex Global Problems', Nicholas Bloom, Raffaela Sadun and John Van reenen. Article in Winning Ideas. The Management Articles of the Year. CMI - Chartered Management Institute, February 2014.

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

New Republic.com

The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 14/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

New Republic.com

The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage
News Posted: 14/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Conversation

Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

SERC Conference: 15th-16th May 2014 LSE

Call for Papers from Postgraduate Research

The Spatial Economics Research Centre was launched in April 2008 to provide high quality independent research on why some regions, cities and communities prosper more than others. It mobilises international expertise and provides information for policy makers to enhance their capacity to diagnose and tackle existing spatial inequalities.

One significant part of its mission is to contribute to capacity-building in this field by working and networking with young researchers. To pursue this aim, the Centre’s annual conference in May is held over two days, with the first half of the programme devoted to presentations based on current / recent PhD research, and the second to papers by SERC staff and affiliates, relating to the Centre’s own research. These sessions have been very successful in the past in terms of participation and feedback.

Submissions are invited now for papers to be presented in the PhD / young researcher sessions. Topics should reflect SERC’s broad research agenda and relate to one (or more) of its five programme areas:

• The scale and nature of UK spatial disparities
• The causes of place-based effects
• Housing and land markets
• The structure and evolution of the spatial economy
• Spatial economic policy


Successful applicants will be invited to attend both days of the conference. Financial support for authors of those papers selected for presentation (covering economy travel and budget hotel) will be provided by SERC. The choice of papers will be based on 500 word abstracts which should be sent via email by 28th February to Linda Cleavely [l.f.cleavely@lse.ac.uk], together with information about the author’s affiliations, status and date of PhD submission (if awarded in the last three years). Each presenter will also be expected to serve as a discussant. Authors will be notified of decisions by 10th March. If your paper is accepted, deadline for full paper submissions is 2nd May.

If you require further information please contact Teresa Schlueter [T.J.Schlueter @lse.ac.uk]

For more information about SERC and the Annual Conference see http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk
News Posted: 07/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

The Melbourne Newsroom

Lottery wins make people lurch to the right

— was conducted by Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee (University of Melbourne and the London School of Economics and Professor Andrew Oswald (University of Warwick), and released as a Warwick Working...

This article appeared in The Melbourne Newsroom on 6 February 2014 link to article

Related Links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage
News Posted: 06/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

All About Living With Life

Pursuit of happiness

.....things like this can really improve our lives. The movement, founded by LSE professor Richard Layard and Dr Anthony Seldon, aims to create positive social change, and comes as the government prepares to publish findings this autumn on its proposed...

This artilce appeared in All about Living with Life on 6 February 2014 link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

News Posted: 06/02/2014      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Lessons from the economics of crime

Article by Stephen Machin and Olivier Marie
In many settings, criminal behaviour can be analysed just like any other economic decision-making process, namely - as the outcome of individual choices influenced by perceived consequences. This column explains the advantages of adopting an economic approach to understanding crime. Furthermore, criminal law and crime-prevention programmes can be evaluated using the same normative techniques applied to health, education, and environmental regulation.

This article was published online by Vox on January 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Lessons from the economics of crime, Philip J. Cook, Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie and Giovanni Mastrobuoni. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2013/14
This paper has been published as: Lessons from the Economics of Crime (2013) edited by Philip J Cook, Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie and Giovanni Mastrobuoni. Published by MIT Press, October. Details

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Olivier Marie webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
News Posted: 30/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News

‘Wind turbines are slashing house prices by 20% in St Enoder parish'

property trickier to sell.” A nationwide study published last week by the London School of Economics (LSE) reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year period, and found their property values fell by 11 per cent...

This article appeared in National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News on 30 January 2014 link to article

Related Links
Draft report link
Steve Gibbons webpage
News Posted: 30/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

British Politics and Policy at LSE

Blog - Does school spending matter? Early years investment may offer higher returns – but the returns erode unless topped up during later phases of childhood

Would increasing the share of Britain's national income devoted to education make much of a difference? And what is the ideal balance of spending between early years, primary and secondary education? Steve Gibbons and Sandra McNally review the research evidence on the causal effects of school resources on pupil outcomes.

The article was published in the British Politics and Policy at London School of Economics blog on January 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Does school spending matter?, Steve Gibbons and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence', Stephen Gibbons and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1226, June 2013

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 22/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

guardian.co.uk

Education in brief: the disappearing headteacher and other mysteries

Meanwhile, the DfE document still quotes approvingly from the 2010 report by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit from the London School of Economics, which highlighted improvements in academies opened under Labour, even after Machin has called on ministers to stop using it in reference to academies under this government.

This article was published online by theguardian.com on January 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education', Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.123, April 2011
Note on Academy School Policy, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Policy Analysis, July 2010
Academy schools: who benefits? by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. In CentrePiece 15 (2) Autumn 2010

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

News Posted: 16/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

AOL UK

UK visa 'auction' for well-off foreigners planned

the Government's Migration Advisory Committee, said "it may very well be that we should be letting people in if they endow a Cambridge college, a major teaching hospital or the London School of Economics with 10 million". Not popular More than 500 'investor' visa were approved in the second quarter of 2013. A recent poll, the British Social Attitudes Survey

This article appeared on AOL.co.uk on 9 January 2014 link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf link
Labour Markets webpage link
News Posted: 09/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

City A.M.

As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?

Luis Garicano's response to the question: ''As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?'' is ''NO''
Management is not about to disappear. As long as decisions need to be taken to steer companies and business units, there will be two choices: endless meetings, or assigning the decision to a boss. Think of Apple's decision to introduce the iPhone in 2007. From 2004, it had to decide where to focus its resources. A new TV? A tablet computer? Or a phone? Making such a decision without a boss is extremely hard. It involves multiple units, from design to sales, and means changing the jobs of thousands of people. Making such a decision by committee would involve endless lobbying and politicking. Even some of the practices that seem most rigid and bureaucratic, such as endless approval chains for new projects, often make sense. Rather than eliminating management, companies should work on ensuring that promotions are made on merit and eliminate politicking, preening and credit-hogging throughout.

This article was published by City A.M. on January 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

City A.M.

As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?

Luis Garicano's response to the question: ''As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?'' is ''NO''
Management is not about to disappear. As long as decisions need to be taken to steer companies and business units, there will be two choices: endless meetings, or assigning the decision to a boss. Think of Apple's decision to introduce the iPhone in 2007. From 2004, it had to decide where to focus its resources. A new TV? A tablet computer? Or a phone? Making such a decision without a boss is extremely hard. It involves multiple units, from design to sales, and means changing the jobs of thousands of people. Making such a decision by committee would involve endless lobbying and politicking. Even some of the practices that seem most rigid and bureaucratic, such as endless approval chains for new projects, often make sense. Rather than eliminating management, companies should work on ensuring that promotions are made on merit and eliminate politicking, preening and credit-hogging throughout.

This article was published by City A.M. on January 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 09/01/2014      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Out of the blue, into the red?

In a recent book, Browne and Beyond, Gill Wyness, a researcher at the London School of Economics, speculates that removing the cap would result in an escalation of what we have already seen among the mini-league of elite institutions under AAB/ABB. Students would ''trade up'' as their grades permit, with each rank of institutions taking students from the rank below, she writes. This would continue until excess demand was absorbed.

This article was published by the Times Higher Education on December 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 12/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

BBC (web)

Ego-boosts 'drive up boys' results'

Boys are much more likely than girls to be influenced by where they stand in ability in school, research suggests. A study from the London School of Economics indicates being seen as a high flyer in primary school, regardless of actual ability, can be a strong motivator for boys' performance in secondary school. ''Boys were four times more affected by being top of the class than girls.'' The study was based on results of more than two million pupils in England. The research, from Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, examined how much pupils might be affected by comparisons with others in primary school and how these perceptions might become a factor in raising or lowering confidence.

This article was published online by BBC News on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

See also
UK Wired News
Boys 'improve in school from feeling top of class'

Related publications
In brief...Top of the class, Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


News Posted: 10/12/2013      [Back to the Top]

Nottingham Post

Best schools are good for property prices

The link between popular locations for housing and the best schools has long been acknowledged...But does this increase in desirability lead to an increase in house prices? A series of studies have been undertaken by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and, they believe that people are prepared to pay the price for a good state school.

This article was published in The Nottingham Post on November 28, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Big ideas - Valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17 Issue 2, Autumn 2012
Housing valuations of school performance, Sandra Black and Stephen Machin, in Handbook of the Economics of Education, Volume 3 edited by Eric Hanushek, Stephen Machin and Ludger Woessmann, North Holland, 2010, pp.485-519.
Valuing English primary schools (2003) Stephen Gibbons and Stephen Machin, in Journal of Urban Economics 53: 197-210
'Valuing primary schools', Stephen Gibbons and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.15, August 2001
'Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities', Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.132, January 2012
'Houses and schools: valuation of school quality through the housing market', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website
News Posted: 28/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Education policy and research are linked in online

An online network aims to bring policymakers together with academics studying higher education, potentially stimulating new research on neglected areas such as the effectiveness of access spending. The ''Economics of Higher Education'' network, which officially launched on 20 November, is being led by two London School of Economics academics, with sponsorship from Universities UK and the Economic and Social Research Council. One of the academics behind the project, Gill Wyness, research officer at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said it was ''not always easy'' for researchers and policymakers to connect, and that better links could ''spark off ideas for research''. She argued that there was a lack of research on important areas such as the ''impact of tuition fees on participation''. Another area of weakness was research on the effectiveness of the widening access measures chosen by universities in their agreements with the Office for Fair Access, added Dr Wyness, who will work on the network with her LSE colleague Richard Murphy, a research economist at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published in The Times Higher Education on November 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education network webpage
News Posted: 21/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Times

Should the Church end 'pay or pray'?

For ambitious - and even atheist - parents, faith schools are still the best alternative to private schools. Is it time for a crackdown?
Faith-based academies have boomed and it is important to note that these are generally new secondary schools in more deprived areas that admit far fewer children based on faith. This is why the Bishop of Oxford was yesterday keen to emphasise that church secondaries are not socially divisive compared with the national average, although if you compare the intake of church secondaries to their local areas the figures show that they still take 13 per cent fewer children eligible for free school meals than other state schools. For primaries, the segregation is more marked. In 2011 Olmo Silva from the London School of Economics examined all 11,000 state primaries in England and found that children at church school were more likely to have English as a first language and be white and were less likely to have special educational needs or be eligible for free school meals.

This article was published in The Times on November 20, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?', Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006
In brief: Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?, Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
'School Structure, School Autonomy and the Tail', Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No. 29, March 2013

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
SERC website

News Posted: 20/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Businessgreen.com

Sir David King calls on business leaders to embrace 'drivers for change'

Former chief scientist urges businesses to challenge impression that low carbon transition is a 'hair shirts and sandals' programme
King argued these drivers should manifest themselves through new technologies and changed behaviours. In particular, he highlighted the campaign he recently launched alongside Lord Richard Layard for a Sun Power Programme, modelled on the Apollo programme that would accelerate and co-ordinate research and development efforts to make solar power cost competitive with fossil fuels. ''The aim is to target funding at any blockage points that are stopping the solar power becoming cheaper than fossil fuels'', he explained. ''Solar is already cheaper in many off grid communities... But the question is how do we make it cheaper everywhere? One of the main blockage points is energy storage. At the moment energy storage R&D is the Cinderella of the energy industry. If we can overcome that challenge we can make solar the standard choice for energy generation.''

The article was published by Businessgreen.com on November 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Businessgreen.com

Sir David King calls on business leaders to embrace 'drivers for change'

Former chief scientist urges businesses to challenge impression that low carbon transition is a 'hair shirts and sandals' programme
King argued these drivers should manifest themselves through new technologies and changed behaviours. In particular, he highlighted the campaign he recently launched alongside Lord Richard Layard for a Sun Power Programme, modelled on the Apollo programme that would accelerate and co-ordinate research and development efforts to make solar power cost competitive with fossil fuels. ''The aim is to target funding at any blockage points that are stopping the solar power becoming cheaper than fossil fuels'', he explained. ''Solar is already cheaper in many off grid communities... But the question is how do we make it cheaper everywhere? One of the main blockage points is energy storage. At the moment energy storage R&D is the Cinderella of the energy industry. If we can overcome that challenge we can make solar the standard choice for energy generation.''

The article was published by Businessgreen.com on November 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 05/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

LSE Politics and Policy blog

Social mobility matters, and government can affect the mechanisms which promote it

In response to arguments that the 'social mobility problem' has been overstated and that social mobility as a policy aim is futile, Jo Blanden reviews research that her and colleagues have conducted into intergenerational mobility in the UK. She argues that there is good evidence that relative intergenerational income mobility declined over time in the UK and that governments can indeed affect the mechanisms which can promote social mobility. To do so they must take a close look at the overall shape of society.

The piece was published by LSE politics and policy blog on November 4, 2013
Link to blog here

Related publications
Blanden, J., A. Goodman, P.Gregg and S.Machin (2004) ''Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain'' in Corak, M. (ed.) Generational Income Inequality in North American and Europe, Cambridge University Press. Details.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin - a report supported by the Sutton Trust, April 2005
This paper has been published as: Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, 'Educational Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility' in Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles (eds.) What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK, Princeton University Press, 2005. Details.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 04/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sunday Business Post (Ireland)

Siptu proposes apprenticeship system for young people

The Department of Education is understood to have established the review group because it was concerned about a significant collapse in employer demand for apprentices, particularly in construction-related trades. Statistics reported by this newspaper in May showed a massive fall-off in the number of new apprentice registrations supplied by troubled state training agency F ¡s, which was replaced last week by Solas, a new further education and training authority. The review group, headed by Labour Court chairman Kevin Duffy, is consulting widely with training providers, trade unions and employer representatives. It is focusing on work-based learning and establishing a closer alignment of the apprenticeship system with the current needs of the labour market. The review group also includes Dr Hilary Steedman, a senior research fellow from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and Dr Tony Dundon, head of management discipline at the School of Business and Economics in NUI Galway. The group also contains representatives from industry, Ibec and Ictu.

The article was published in The Sunday Business Post on November 3, 2013
[Subscription needed to view the article]

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 03/11/2013      [Back to the Top]

Times Higher Education

Rich-poor higher education gap 'wider than in 1963'

Increasing the number of poorer students in higher education has not proved to be the ''great social leveller'' that it was expected to be in the Robbins era. That was the argument set out by Anna Vignoles, professor of education at the University of Cambridge, at a conference to mark the 50th anniversary of the Robbins report held at the London School of Economics on 22 October. Lord Robbins was head of the economics department at the LSE at the time his report was published.

The article was published in The Times Higher Education on October 31, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website
Anna Vignoles CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 31/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Lancashire Telegraph

Warning of mixed ability classes

TEACHING mixed ability groups could damage the confidence of pupils who believe they are in the bottom half of their class, a study suggests. Researchers from the London School of Economics claim that children who achieved high grades in primary school, then perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smart but because their previous success in class had boosted their confidence. Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt analysed test data of more than two million pupils in England and carried out a survey on the confidence of 15,000 young people.

This article was published by the Lancashire Telegraph on October 29, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Lancashire Telegraph

Warning of mixed ability classes

TEACHING mixed ability groups could damage the confidence of pupils who believe they are in the bottom half of their class, a study suggests. Researchers from the London School of Economics claim that children who achieved high grades in primary school, then perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smart but because their previous success in class had boosted their confidence. Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt analysed test data of more than two million pupils in England and carried out a survey on the confidence of 15,000 young people.

This article was published by the Lancashire Telegraph on October 29, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 29/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

guardian.co.uk (web)

Student loans: what would Robbins do?

Article by Gill Wyness
Ever tried filling out a student loan form? A simpler system would benefit students as much as better advice, says Gill Wyness, researcher in education policy at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by guardian.co.uk online on October 28, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

guardian.co.uk (web)

Student loans: what would Robbins do?

Article by Gill Wyness
Ever tried filling out a student loan form? A simpler system would benefit students as much as better advice, says Gill Wyness, researcher in education policy at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by guardian.co.uk online on October 28, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 28/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

ILOTV

Hilary Steedman: Apprenticeships and productivity of small and medium-sized enterprises

Hilary Steedman, a Research Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics talks about how apprenticeships can help small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) improve their productivity, and their importance for young employees, both women and men.

The item was first broadcast on ILOTV on October 24, 2013
Link to item here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage
News Posted: 24/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

How it pays to be in the catchment area

...children to expensive public schools in the area, such as New Hall School, with fees of up to £5,800 per term. Research supports Pratt: ''a study published by the London School of Economics last year shows that good results do push up house prices.''

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on October 19, 2013
[No link available]

Related publications
Big ideas: Valuing Schooling through House Prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Vol 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
'Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market'. EALE 2010 Presidential Address. Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webapge
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 19/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Lebanon Daily Star

U.S. may join 1933 Germany in default pantheon

Reneging on its debt obligations would make the U.S. the first major Western government to default since Nazi Germany 80 years ago. Germany, staggering under the weight of 132 billion gold marks in war reparations and not permitted to export to the victors' markets, was a serial defaulter from 1922, according to Albrecht Ritschl, a professor of economic history at the London School of Economics. That forced the country to borrow to pay its creditors, in what Ritschl calls a Ponzi scheme. ''Reparations were at the heart of the issue in the interwar years'', Ritschl said in a telephone interview. ''The big question is why anyone lent a dime to Germany with those hanging over them. The assumption must have been that reparations would eventually go away.''

The article was published in the Lebanon Daily Star on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

See also
HotNews.md
SUA ar putea deveni prima tara occidentala care intra in default dupa Germania nazista in 1933
Albrecht Ritschl, profesor de istorie a economiei la London School of Economics. Daca o companie care nu-si poate plati datoriile intra in faliment, este divizata, vanduta unui competitor sau se restructureaza, default-ul unei...
Link to article here

Monday 14 October
Gandul.info
SUA ar putea deveni prima tara occidentala care intra in default dupa Germania nazista in 1933
...din 1922, a declarat Albrecht Ritschl, profesor de istorie a economiei la London School of Economics. Daca o companie care nu-si poate plati datoriile intra in faliment, este divizata, vanduta unui competitor sau se restructureaza, default-ul unei...
Link to article here

Related publications
The German Transfer Problem, 1920-1933: A Sovereign Debt Perspective, Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1155, July 2012
Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany, Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Yam (China)

Later business success from confidence in early years

According to a study by the London School of Economics, the loss of confidence due to low class rank can have serious long-term implications for students.

This article was published by Yam (China) on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 15/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Sutton Trust - blog

The lost generation

Blog by Lee Elliot Major (Director of Development and Policy for The Sutton Trust)
The Sutton Trust's seminal study in 2005 by top economists at the LSE catapulted the problem of low and declining social mobility in Britain into a major public and political debate that continues to this day. It found that mobility was lower for the generation born in 1970 compared with that born in 1958. Children who grew up in poorer homes in the 1970s were even more likely than the previous generation to end up poor as adults. And when compared with other developed nations, the UK alongside the US were bottom of the mobility rankings. We had become a less mobile society.

This blog article was posted online on October 11, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust', Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Special Report, April 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 11/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Yorkshire Post

Speed may not be all as rail experts remain divided over staying on track

Professor Richard Layard from the London School of Economics and Political Science has done pioneering research into what really makes us happy. In his landmark book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, he argues that it's not wealth, possessions and extravagant lifestyles that make us happy. It's more the strength of relationships, friends and family, supportive communities, security and a feeling of contributing to society. Long distance travel is not on the list. Perhaps more important, could a world in which mobility becomes ever greater, still give us the things that apparently really matter? ''Some people might place a question mark over whether ever increasing movement makes sense'', notes Prof Layard.

This article was published in The Yorkshire Post on October 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition, 2011.
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 10/10/2013      [Back to the Top]

Quartz

High-achieving students are better off in worse schools

There is an assumption that children perform better among highly achieving peers. High class achievement might be thought to indicate better teaching, or to induce academic competition between students. However, new research counters (pdf) this common assumption. Felix Weinhardt and Richard Murphy, from the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, analyzed administrative data of over 2.3 million British schoolchildren. This data was used to assess how primary school rank affected later exam results. Pupils were compared on leaving primary school at KS2 (age 11) and at secondary school KS3 (age 14).

This article was published by Quartz.com on September 26, 2013
Link to article here


Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 26/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

i (The paper for today)

Letters

STANLEY LUCKHURST READING What schools are for
The LSE study rightly warns parents to be wary of primary school ranking, but more significantly exposes the folly of ranking children at all at such young ages...

The letter was printed in i (the paper for today) on September 25, 2013
[No link available]

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

The Daily Telegraph

There's much more to life than being top of the class

With a sharp yank on the tail of every Tiger parent, researchers at the London School of Economics claimed this week that children might do better at a ''worse school'' than an academic one. Far from encouraging less intelligent pupils to achieve, being surrounded by ferociously intellectual classmates can destroy their confidence - whereas being top of the year in a school with lower standards can boost self-esteem and performance.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on September 25, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 25/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Guardian

Confidence, not peer pressure, is key to success at school, say researchers

A paper, from two academics at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, claims that pupils who rank higher in primary school perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smarter but because their previous success inspires confidence.

This article was published in the Guardian on September 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 21/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Vox

Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Are children who are non-native speakers making education worse for native speakers? Presenting new research on England, this column by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj uses two different research strategies showing that there are, in fact, no spillover effects. These results support other recent studies on the subject. The growing proportion of non-native English speakers in primary schools should not be a cause for concern.

This article was published by Vox online on September 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 14/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Guardian - blog

Are London campuses a good or bad thing for UK universities?

More UK universities are setting up shop in the capital, reports Gill Wyness - is this healthy competition or centralised power?

The blog article was published in the Guardian on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Sky News (web)

Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Sky News (web)

Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Sky News (web)

Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
News Posted: 12/09/2013      [Back to the Top]

Times of Oman

Oman among happiest countries in the world

Oman ranks among the top 25 list of the ''happy countries'' in the world. The Sultanate has been ranked 23rd among 156 nations and second in the Gulf region in the World Happiness Report 2013 released yesterday. The report was edited by Professor John F. Helliwell of the University of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; Lord Richard Layard, Director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE's Centre for Economic Performance; and Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Director of the SDSN, and Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General.

The article was published in The Times of Oman on September 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2n