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2017

24 November 2017
Globalisation and National Wellbeing: Views of top happiness researchers
Increasing international competition and openness to trade are unlikely to have a detrimental effect on national subjective wellbeing on average. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world.

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20 November 2017
The Brexit hit to living standards: New evidence on how much the referendum vote is already costing UK households
A new report, published by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) and based on research funded by 'The UK in a Changing Europe' programme says that UK households are already paying a high economic price for the vote to leave the European Union. According to the first detailed statistical analysis of how the referendum outcome has affected UK inflation, real wages and living standards, Brexit is costing the average household £7.74 per week through higher prices - which is equivalent to £404 a year.

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01 November 2017
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance highlighted in the Autumn 2017 CentrePiece Magazine
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Autumn 2017 CentrePiece magazine. Among the findings: UK INFLATION: First evidence that Brexit has pushed up prices, especially food; DARK WEB: The economic functioning of online drugs markets like Silk Road; WORK: How the rise of the service economy has narrowed the gender gap; UK HOUSING: Stamp duty stops people from moving to more suitable homes; JOB SATISFACTION: The roles of work and joblessness in shaping happiness; REFUGEES: No harmful effects on the wages or employment of native workers; UK BUSINESS GEOGRAPHY: An atlas of firms, productivity and innovation; SCIENCE INFRASTRUCTURE: The geographical impact on research output; GREAT DIVERGENCES: Growing inequality between firms in OECD countries.

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27 September 2017
National Wellbeing: Evidence of the impact of country size and social cohesion on happiness

Among the world’s rich countries, those that are smaller and more socially cohesive tend to have happier populations on average. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. But opinion is divided among the experts on whether the break-up of large, diverse countries into smaller, less diverse countries can be expected to increase national wellbeing.

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22 September 2017
WHERE BRITISH INDUSTRY IS STRONG AND WHERE IT'S WEAK: New CEP report lays out the key facts on the UK's business geography
A new 'atlas' of industry in Britain has been published today in a special report by Sandra Bernick, Richard Davies and Anna Valero at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). In the latest update from the LSE Growth Commission, the new study describes and maps ten key facts about the UK's business geography.

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31 July 2017
Work And Unemployment: Evidence of the impact on the wellbeing of men and women
Given a generally stronger social norm for men to be working in paid employment than for women, unemployment is typically worse for the wellbeing of men than women. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. But the experts are divided on whether unemployment is better for an individual’s happiness than being employed in a bad job.   

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26 July 2017
Wealthy Southern cities will be hit hardest by both a 'soft' or 'hard' Brexit - but are also best placed to adapt to economic shocks ahead
A new study published today by the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at LSE, analyses for the first time the potential impact of both a 'hard' and 'soft' Brexit on British cities in the ten years following the implementation of new trade arrangements with the EU.

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03 July 2017
New research findings from CEP highlighted in the Summer 2017 issue of CentrePiece magazine
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Summer 2017 CentrePiece magazine. Among the findings:
  • HOME OWNERSHIP: UK wealth inequality transmitted across generations
  • LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TV: Partly to blame for the rise of populist politicians
  • BUSINESS SUCCESS: US evidence that the quality of management matters
  • ‘FREE COLLEGE’: Not necessarily the way to improve access for all students
  • CAREER OPPORTUNITIES: The value of providing students with information
  • UK INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY: The need for stable policy frameworks
  • NEW ROADS: Economic benefits of investment in UK transport infrastructure
  • NEW AIRPORT CAPACITY: A significant boost to manufacturing output in China
  • SLEEP DEPRIVATION: Strongly negative effects on labour market performance


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07 June 2017
#GE2017Economists: The research evidence on key issues for voters in the 2017 UK General Election

Final policy briefing report from the Centre for Economic Performance: The unexpected UK general election of 2017 was intended to be all about Brexit, one that will give the incoming government a mandate to negotiate the terms of the UK’s exit from the European Union (EU). But many other public policy issues have been at the forefront of political and public debate during the campaign. The Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics has focused on eight key areas, producing a series of briefings summarising the research evidence and evaluating relevant policy proposals in the party manifestos. This report brings together those briefings - which draw on the work of many CEP researchers and other economists - into one single Election Analysis.

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05 June 2017
Brexit as Climate Policy: The Agenda on Energy and the Environment
The Great Recession and a sluggish economic recovery were instrumental in meeting the legally binding climate change targets that the Uk has set for itself. But without more drastic policy interventions, it is unlikely that future targets will be met - unless the more extreme forecasts for the impact of Brexit on economic activity are realised.

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02 June 2017
THE UK’s REGIONAL DIVIDE: Can policy make a difference?
Despite numerous efforts to do something about the big variations in economic performance across the cities and regions of the UK, little has been achieved in reducing long-run differences. Some Northern cities (such as Manchester) are doing well, but London and the South East continue to dominate in terms of population growth and private sector employment. The limited progress on tackling the UK’s regional divide is unsurprising: the economic processes that drive spatial differences are poorly understood by policy-makers, and evidence has historically played little part in the formulation of policy. While this is slowly changing, there remains confusion about what urban and regional policy can do, a confusion that is shared by all political parties. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.

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01 June 2017
EDUCATION AND SKILLS: The UK policy agenda
Education and skills play a key role in generating improved productivity growth, as the government’s industrial strategy recognises – yet on current trends, funding per pupil in primary and secondary schools is set to fall significantly. All parties promise a change in total expenditure that is actually far more modest when put in the context of rising pupil numbers. What’s more, the educational funding outlook for young people aged between 16 and 18 is much worse. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.

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31 May 2017
Brexit and the UK Economy
Leaving the European Union (EU) with no deal in place for future trading arrangements would be the worst-case Brexit scenario for the UK economy. What’s more, just because GDP growth has not declined since last year’s referendum, it would be wrong to think that Brexit is yet to have any economic effects: it has already lowered UK living standards by causing the value of the pound to decline, which has led to higher inflation and lower real wage growth. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election. The CEP report describes alternative post-Brexit futures for UK-EU relations and summarises the economic and political consequences of each option.

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30 May 2017
Immigration and the UK Economy
Any reductions in UK immigration from the European Union (EU) are likely to lead to lower living standards for the UK-born. This is partly because immigrants help to reduce the deficit: they are more likely to work and pay tax; and they are less likely to use public services as, on average, they are younger and better educated than the UK-born. What’s more, to get anywhere near the Conservatives’ target of keeping annual net immigration numbers below 100,000 would mean large restrictions on students from both the EU and outside. Sectors of the economy that employ science professionals and workers in processing and elementary occupations (such as cleaning and bar work) would be most under pressure from attempts to reduce immigration. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.

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26 May 2017
The UK's New Industrial Strategy
Centre for Economic Performance report on UK's new industrial strategy - #GE2017Economists @CEP_LSE election analysis. All of the UK’s main political parties now highlight the importance of an ‘industrial strategy’ with the aim of improving economic growth and achieving more balance in how its gains are distributed. In addition, and in contrast to the 2015 election, all parties have made a manifesto commitment to raising the intensity of UK research and development. Both the Conservatives and Labour share a desire for more market intervention in some areas: promising energy price caps of some form, tightening up rules on takeovers, and – along with the Liberal Democrats – pushing company boards to consider the interests of workers. But major differences have emerged with respect to business taxes, and the extent of public investment and intervention. The most dramatic differences are that Labour would renationalise large parts of the privatised utilities, and would raise corporate (and other) taxes to fund higher public spending in a number of areas. These are among the conclusions of a new report from  CEP – the third in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.

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26 May 2017
The Mid-Life Crisis in Wellbeing
Wellbeing is U-shaped in age in Western countries, with reported satisfaction with life tending to drop between adolescence (around 15) and middle age (around 45) before rising again – and there doesn’t seem to be much we can do about it. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world.

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25 May 2017
The NHS and Social Care: Prospects for funding, staffing and performance into the 2020s
Centre for Economic Performance report on the NHS and social care - #GE2017Economists @CEP_LSE election analysis In election debate about the prospects for the NHS, it is generally agreed that there is a funding shortfall with additional money required to meet rising costs, demographic pressures, increased expectations, and changes in health technology and medical practice. And given that around 70% of NHS expenditure goes on staffing, it is no surprise that as expenditure tightens, staffing issues are a growing problem. The current government’s plans are to expand funding but to raise more real resource input essentially through efficiency savings. But the efficiency savings required to maintain NHS resources in line with rising demands and costs would have to be three to four times historical norms for these plans to work. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the second in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.

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19 May 2017
The Return of Falling Real Wages

Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards - #GE2017Economists @CEP_LSE election analysis

Since the global financial crisis of 2007/08, workers’ real wages and family living standards in the UK have suffered to an extent unprecedented in modern history. Real wages of the typical (median) worker have fallen by almost 5% since 2008, while real family incomes for families of working age have just about recovered to pre-crisis levels. But almost all groups of individuals and families - with the exception of pensioner households - are no better off on average than in 2008. In particular, there is an important generational shift, with young people doing considerably worse.



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28 March 2017
Improving National Happiness: Expert insights on the potential of public policy
Following the recent publication of the 2017 World Happiness Report, 28 leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world have expressed their views on the state of knowledge on public policies that can make a real difference to people's satisfaction with their lives - as well as whether we need more randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to test the wellbeing impact of a variety of policy options.

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20 March 2017
Norway takes top spot in 2017 World Happiness Report

The World Happiness Report 2017, released today with significant input from LSE's Professor Richard Layard, includes an analysis of happiness in the workplace for the first time.

Norway ranks as the happiest country, jumping three spots from last year, displacing Denmark and then followed by Iceland, Finland, The Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Sweden.

The World Happiness Report 2017 is available at worldhappiness.report

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07 March 2017
A Budget for Wellbeing? Happiness experts to respond to Chancellor's speech
The Chancellor’s budget speech on Wednesday will be scrutinised for its likely impact on the economy, public finances and household incomes – but how will it affect the wellbeing of the UK population? Happiness researchers associated with the What Works Centre for Wellbeing are available to respond on-air, online and in print immediately after the budget on its implications for wellbeing. Fuller information on the wellbeing impacts of anticipated announcements is already available, with further updates online tomorrow.

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06 March 2017
Transforming Technical Education in England: Analysis of promised budget proposals from the Centre for Vocational Education Research
Trails for the Chancellor’s budget speech on Wednesday promise big new plans for technical education in England. Professor Sandra McNally of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics, who is available for comment on the proposals, summarises the evidence and her view of what reforms are needed.

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01 March 2017
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance are highlighted in the Spring 2017 CentrePiece magazine

New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Spring 2017 CentrePiece magazine.

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28 February 2017
Sleep Deprivation and Employment: Evidence from the 'Children of the 90s'
Sleep deprivation has a strong negative effect on labour market performance, according to research by Joan Costa-Font and Sarah Fleche of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Analysing data on a representative sample of children born in and around Bristol in the early 1990s, they find that a one-hour reduction in parents’ sleep duration significantly decreases labour force participation, the number of hours worked and household income. In addition, they find that low-skilled mothers are more likely to opt out of the labour market and work fewer hours than high-skilled mothers when exposed to sleep deprivation. The researchers conclude that sleep is a major determinant of employment outcomes that needs more attention in economic analysis of time allocation and employment policies. They will present their study at the annual conference of the Royal Economic Society in April.

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27 February 2017
Wellbeing Effects of Anonymous Donation of Eggs and Sperm: expert analysis of the impact on donors, donor conceived children and wider society

Donating gametes (eggs and sperm) via clinics as an anonymous donor is not considered to be one of the highest return-to-effort things individuals can do to increase overall wellbeing. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world on the wellbeing implications of gametes donation.

On a key question of policy related to anonymous gamete donation, the panel of experts are divided on whether the right of a child to know who their donor was when they turn 18 outweighs the possibility that such a right will lead to a shortage of donors and reduce the number of donor-conceived children.

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13 February 2017
NURSERY QUALITY: New evidence of the impact on children's outcomes
A report published today reveals that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or early years professional. Attending a nursery rated as ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted, the regulator of educational quality in England, also has limited benefits. The research concludes that while there are important differences between the outcomes of children who attend different nurseries, we do not yet understand enough about what generates them.

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30 January 2017
FEWER LEVELS OF MIDDLE MANAGEMENT WOULD IMPROVE WORKERS WELLBEING: New survey of happiness researchers
Workers’ satisfaction with their job is, on average, higher in a flatter organisation than in a hierarchical organisation. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world on the impact of different organisational structures on workers’ wellbeing.

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2016

21 December 2016
More public holidays would boost national wellbeing: New expert survey

On average, people are happier during festive seasons like Christmas and New Year celebrations. What’s more, increasing the number of mandatory public holidays would improve a country’s overall wellbeing. These are the consensus findings of a new survey from leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. The wellbeing research group at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics is launching the World Wellbeing Panel with a ‘Christmas edition’, bringing together the views of economists, philosophers, psychologists and sociologists on the impact of public holidays on national wellbeing.

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13 December 2016
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance (LSE) highlighted in the Winter 2016 issue of CentrePiece
The new issue of CentrePiece magazine is Volume 21, Issue 3, Winter 2016. Among the research findings: the expansion of higher educaton boosts regional economic growth; Brexit risks a close and mutually beneficial relationship between Spain and the UK; triggering Article 50 by March 2017 would be a mistake; taking triple science at school encourages students to do STEM degrees; the pros and cons of fracking; there is no improvement in pupils' outcomes when a primary school becomes an academy school; there is regional variation in opportunities available to disadvantaged kids.  

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12 December 2016
ORIGINS OF HAPPINESS: The latest evidence on what promotes wellbeing and reduces misery

Experts from around the world will assess the research evidence on wellbeing over the life course and the policy implications for how best to reduce misery and promote wellbeing at a landmark conference being held today and tomorrow (12 - 13 December) at the London School of Economics (LSE).  Lord Richard Layard and his LSE team will present for the first time the results of their monumental study of the Origins of Happiness, analysing survey data from four countries.

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21 November 2016
Academy status fails to raise standards in primary schools, new study finds

Pupils in primary academies do no better in Key Stage 2 (KS2) tests than those at comparable schools, a new study has found. Although primary schools that converted to academies gained extra income, they spent little of it on frontline services such as extra teachers or learning resources. Until recently the government planned to make all schools into academies by 2022. Ministers have now reversed that policy but the Education Secretary, Justine Greening, still hopes all schools will convert voluntarily and sees academisation as a key tool for raising standards.

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics used data from the National Pupil Database – a census of all pupils at state schools in England – to examine the test performance of 270 primaries which became academies between September 2010 and April 2012. Andrew Eyles, one of the report's authors, said: “The results cast doubt on whether further expansion of the academies programme will be beneficial to English education.

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26 October 2016
Four principles for the UK’s Brexit trade negotiations
Dr Thomas Sampson explains that to achieve its post-Brexit objectives, the government needs a negotiating strategy based on a clear-eyed understanding of how trade agreements work. The fact that negotiations are a bargaining process between countries with conflicting goals suggests four principles that the UK should use to guide its trade negotiation strategy.

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05 October 2016
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance highlighted in the Autumn 2016 CentrePiece magazine
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science are highlighted in the Autumn 2016 CentrePiece magazine.   

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04 August 2016
The Olympics made us happy, but was it worth it?
CEP research by Professor Paul Dolan and colleagues concludes “Overall, many cities spend substantial resources attracting and then hosting the Olympic Games, but the evidence to date suggests that the Olympics do not have a significant economic benefit to the host city. This paper presents the first causal evidence of a positive wellbeing effect of the Olympic Games on local residents during the hosting of the Games. The effects do not last very long, however, and the Games show no effect on subjective wellbeing a year later. The host with the most. But not for long.”

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22 June 2016
Britain more prosperous "IN"

We are economists who care about Britain and its future. We feel compelled to speak out on the risks of Leaving and opportunities from Remaining in the EU.
In a statement published by The Telegraph today, Tuesday 21 June 2016, 12 Nobel Prize winners and over 150 economists from across the UK issue a warning on the risks of Brexit. 

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21 June 2016
Leave economics "built on dangerous fantasies". It is time for "project reality"

We are economists who care about Britain and its future. We feel compelled to speak out on the risks of Leaving and opportunities from Remaining in the EU.
In a statement published by The Telegraph today, Tuesday 21 June 2016, 12 Nobel Prize winners and over 150 economists from across the UK issue a warning on the risks of Brexit. 

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20 June 2016
Leaving the EU would almost certainly damage our economic prospects
In a joint piece published today, Jagjit Chadha, director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, Paul Johnson, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies and John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics bring together the conclusions from research on the likely consequences of Brexit, and reflect on some of the claims made.

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09 June 2016
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance highlighted in the Summer 2016 issue of CentrePiece Magazine

New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Summer 2016 CentrePiece magazine – a special issue devoted largely to the potential consequences for trade, investment, immigration, productivity and incomes of a referendum vote by the UK electorate to Leave the European Union (EU): so-called ‘Brexit’.

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02 June 2016
SQUEEZING THE POOR, NOT JUST THE RICH The costs of Brexit would be evenly distributed across people of all UK income levels
The economic pain of Brexit would be widely shared, with the middle classes being only slightly harder hit than the richest and poorest...This is because prices rise across the board, particularly for transport, alcohol, food and clothing.

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27 May 2016
‘ECONOMISTS FOR BREXIT’: A critique
The latest in a series of #CEPBrexit reports, published by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, explains how the ‘Economists for Brexit’ fail to grasp basic facts about the nature of regulation, product standards and international trade. 

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16 May 2016
Centre for Economic Performance Press Release: Appointment of the new Director of CEP

We are delighted to announce that Stephen Machin will become the new Director of the ESRC Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London school of Economics and Political Science (LSE) from September 1st 2016. Professor Machin will move from University College London to take up a Chair in the Department of Economics at LSE. Steve has been Research Director at the CEP since 2003 and is one of the world’s leading economists in fields as diverse as education, labour, inequality, crime and firm performance. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Society for Labour Economics.  

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12 May 2016
UK IMMIGRATION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE NUMBERS: Comment by the Centre for Economic Performance
Today’s report from the Office for National Statistics on differences between the National Insurance number estimates of EU migrants inflows and those produced by the International Passenger Survey (IPS) confirms that much of the difference is due to short-term movements in and out of the UK that are not picked up by the IPS in its survey design. Professor Jonathan Wadsworth, a former member of the government’s Migration Advisory Committee and co-author of yesterday’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) report on Brexit and the impact of immigration on the UK, comments:
‘It is useful to know how many people are coming in and going out each year. But to study the effects of immigration on UK citizens, it is important to know how many immigrants there are in the UK in total. This immigrant stock depends on the inflows and outflows from this year and previous years. Neither the IPS nor the National Insurance numbers are designed to measure this immigrant stock.’


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11 May 2016
Brexit and the impact of immigration on the UK

The fifth in a series of #CEPBrexit reports analyses the impact of EU immigration in the UK.

A reduction in immigration from the European Union (EU) following a vote for Brexit would not lead to any improvement in living standards for those born in the UK. Cuts in EU immigration would not offset the big fall in UK living standards caused by the reduction in trade and investment that would result from Brexit. These are among the conclusions of new research published in the series of #CEPBrexit reports. 

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25 April 2016
Phonics can help the disadvantaged but has no long-term benefits for the average child, major study finds
Teaching reading through 'synthetic phonics' helps children from poorer backgrounds or those who do not have English as a first language, according to a large-scale study from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics. But on average, a government policy that requires all primary schools to use the method has had no measurable effect on pupils' reading scores at age 11.

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21 April 2016
True long-run costs of Brexit likely to be higher than Treasury estimates - Commentary from the Centre for Economic Performance
Overly cautious assumptions in the Treasury's recent report on the long-run consequences for the UK economy of leaving the European Union (EU) mean that it has probably underestimated the economic costs. That is one of the conclusions in a commentary on the Treasury's analysis published today by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

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15 April 2016
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK - New analysis by the Centre for Economic Performance
Leaving the European Union (EU) would reduce flows of foreign direct investment (FDI) into the UK by more than a fifth, damaging productivity and lowering people's incomes. Cars and financial services - two important UK industries - would receive less investment from foreign firms that use the UK as a base to access EU markets. And the UK's ability to negotiate concessions from regulations on EU-related transactions would be seriously eroded. Overall, incomes could fall by about 3.4% just from lower foreign investment.

These are among the findings of new research by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics. The third in a series of #CEPBrexit reports examines how leaving the EU would affect UK incomes through changes in foreign investment in the UK.

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07 April 2016
Dr Swati Dhingra shortlisted in public service category of Asian Women of Achievement Awards
Swati Dhingra, Assistant Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Senior Lecturer with the Trade Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance (LSE), is among the final shortlist for the 2016 Asian Women of Achievement Awards. She has been nominated in the public service category. The Awards - now in their 17th year - cut across UK business, entrepreneurs, sports and community, recognising both high-achieving and high-potential women.

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21 March 2016
The Economic Effects Of Brexit Through Trade - New blog post from the Centre for Economic Performance
This press release refers to the second in the CEP BREXIT Analysis Series - Swati Dhingra and John Van Reenen - will present the findings at a special session of the Royal Economic Society’s annual conference at the University of Sussex, Tuesday 22 March. And, in a new blog post today, the CEP team reiterate how they have addressed the issues raised by critics of their analysis.

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18 March 2016
The Consequences Of Brexit For UK Trade And Living Standards - New BREXIT analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance
This press release refers to the second in the CEP BREXIT Analysis Series - 'The Consequences Of Brexit For UK Trade And Living Standards'. The authors conclude that "there is a serious cost for real wages and pensions from leaving the EU. Even ignoring any chilling effect on foreign investment and productivity from Brexit, the income losses from lower trade are clear".

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16 March 2016
Effects of Mass Rollout of Academies Programme Remain Uncertain - New Report from the Centre for Economic Performance on Academy Schools
Two reports from the Centre for Economic Performance use administrative data on pupil performance in England to assess the extent to which academy schools improve educational performance. They find that while early sponsored academies seem to improve performance at failing schools it is very unclear what the effects of giving better performers academy status will be.

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11 March 2016
WITHOUT TAX BREAKS, UK BUSINESS R&D SPENDING WOULD BE 10% LOWER - new report from the Centre for Economic Performance
The UK spends over £1 billion a year on tax breaks that aim to encourage firms to do more research and development (R&D). A new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) shows that this is money well spent and should not be cut back in the Chancellor's Budget on 16 March. Abolishing these tax breaks would significantly reduce R&D, damaging innovation and productivity.

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04 March 2016
The Current 2% UK Wage Growth Norm - new report from the Centre for Economic Performance
The current UK wage growth norm for average wages of around 2% a year is here to stay, at least for the short term, and maybe for longer. Moreover, the current norm for median wage growth is at an even lower level, and may be as low as 0%. These are among the conclusions of the latest UK wages report from Professor David Blanchflower and CEP's research director, Professor Stephen Machin.

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18 February 2016
Equity Crowdfunding: A new model for entrepreneurship
In recent years, the UK has become a leader in fostering an entirely novel mechanism for raising capital for small business enterprises. Writing in an article for CEP's CentrePiece magazine, Saul Estrin and Susanna Khavul explain how 'equity crowdfunding' works - and the benefits that online financial marketplaces provide for large networks of investors and entrepreneurs. Their research suggests that equity crowdfunding can solve the persistent market failures in funding entrepreneurial ventures. What's more, this financial innovation reduces the biases in traditional forms of early stage entrepreneurial finance.

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12 February 2016
Life after Brexit: New report on the UK's options outside the EU
This press release refers to the first in the CEP BREXIT Analysis Series - 'Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?' by Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson. To make an informed decision on the merits of leaving the European Union (EU), UK voters need to know more about what the government would do following Brexit. Just as the parties put forward policy manifestos in the run-up to an election, they should publish their plans for a post-Brexit world before the referendum.

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02 February 2016
Slowing wage growth in the UK: new report from the Centre for Economic Performance
The modest recent growth in UK real wages has come about only because of inflation falling below its 2% target level. Nominal wage growth remains weak and given the continuing slack in the labour market, there is little prospect of a significant upturn. These are among the conclusions of the latest UK wages report from Professor David Blanchflower and CEP's research director, Professor Stephen Machin.

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13 January 2016
The rich getting richer is more depressing than a rise in unemployment shows research
The persistent rise in the share of income held by the top 1 per cent in many countries round the world is damaging the wellbeing of the other 99 per cent, with worrying implications for public health and national productivity, new research has shown. A 1% increase in the share of taxable income held by the top 1 per cent hurts life satisfaction as much as a 1.4% increase in the country-level unemployment rate. These findings are published in a Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discussion paper, Top Incomes and Human Well-being Around the World, by Richard V. Burkhauser (Cornell University), Jan-Emmanuel De Neve (Saïd Business School, University of Oxford), and Nattavudh Powdthavee (London School of Economics), and in a Harvard Business Review blog article by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nattavudh Powdthavee.

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05 January 2016
The Economics of Floods
The misery that floods are inflicting on residents of northern England and Scotland is part of a major global problem. Over the past 30 years, floods worldwide killed more than 500,000 people and displaced over 650 million people. In a new study published by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), Dr Guy Michaels and colleagues examine why so many people are hit by floods year after year. In particular, the research examines whether urban populations respond to large floods by moving to safer areas.

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2015

15 December 2015
'Mindboggling' price differences between US hospitals even within the same city
A new study published today by the Centre for Economic Performance, Yale and Carnegie-Mellon Universities reveals enormous variation in hospital prices in the 306 areas ('Health Referral Regions') of the United States. These price differences are the primary driver of variation in healthcare spending on the privately insured. The researchers find, for example, that hospital prices for lower-limb MRIs, are 12 times higher in the most expensive area (the Bronx in New York) compared with the cheapest area (Baltimore, Maryland). Hospitals in monopoly markets have prices that are 15% higher than those in markets with four or more providers.

10 December 2015
Prospects for improved social mobility remain bleak, warns author of key Sutton Trust social mobility study
Prospects for improving social mobility for future generations remain bleak ten years after a ground-breaking report showed how mobility had declined for those educated in the seventies and eighties, and if they do not improve many young people will remain stuck where their parents were, limiting the country's future economic growth and prosperity. This stark warning will be made by Professor Stephen Machin, Professor of Economics and Research Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, one of the authors of the seminal 2005 study, at a seminar on social mobility hosted by LSE.

26 November 2015
Autumn Statement 2015: Long term questions remain
The Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Professor John Van Reenen, gives his reaction to the 2015 Autumn Statement.

6 November 2015
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science are highlighted in the Autumn 2015 issue of CentrePiece magazine

6 October 2015
LSE recommendations behind UK government's new Infrastructure Commission
The UK government's new Infrastructure Commission, unveiled at the Conservative Party Conference yesterday (Monday 5 October), was one of the key recommendations of the LSE Growth Commission, which reported in the autumn of 2013.

5 October 2015
Becoming an Academy School: New evidence of contrasting experiences under Labour and the coalition government
Schools in England that have gained academy status differ significantly depending on whether their conversion was before or after the 2010 Academies Act. Schools that became sponsored academies under the Labour government had low levels of attainment and high levels of disadvantaged pupils prior to conversion. The opposite is true for schools that became academies after the coalition government came to power in May 2010. Similarly, while 'Labour' academies enrolled higher ability pupils post-conversion, there has been little change in the intake of 'coalition' academies. These are among the findings of new research by Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva on differences between the pre- and post-2010 academy programme.

13 August 2015
Labour's Academy Schools: New evidence of their positive impact on pupils' performance
Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin studied the first wave of academy schools, established in England between the 2002/03 and 2008/09 school years, which achieved better test scores for their pupils than comparable schools under state control.

29 July 2015
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science are highlighted in the Summer 2015 issue of CentrePiece magazine

09 July 2015
LSE faculty urge both sides in the Eurozone/Greek drama to find a solution by acting in a more economically responsible manner
A group of economists from the London School of Economics have written an open letter to all the parties concerned in the Greek debt crisis, urging them to be ''economically more responsible''.
Co-signees include academic and research staff from CEP: Professors John Van Reenen, Francesco Caselli, Silvana Tenreyro, Henrik Kleven and Christopher Pissarides along with Dr Swati Dhingra, Dr Ethan Ilzetzki, Dr Veronica Rappoport, Dr Johannes Spinnewijn and Dr Gabriel Zucman.

15 June 2015
Centre for Economic Performance Co-Founder, Stephen Nickell, honoured by Queen
CEP congratulates Professor Stephen Nickell who received a knighthood in the Queen's Birthday Honours for services to economics. The Centre also congratulates Sir Nicholas McPherson who received the Knight's Grand Cross Order of the Bath for public services. Professor Nickell was one of the founders of CEP in 1992, alongside Professor Lord Richard Layard and Sir David Metcalf. Sir Nicholas McPherson is Chairman of the Policy Committee of the Centre.

01 May 2015
A New Priority for Mental Health: New #ElectionEconomics policy briefing from the Centre for Economic Performance
The final report in the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) series of background briefings on key policy issues in the May 2015 UK general election calls on the three main political parties to commit themselves to raising dramatically the coverage of Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT), the service that provides psychological therapies for depression and anxiety disorders.

30 April 2015
#ElectionEconomics: The research evidence on key issues for voters in the 2015 UK General Election - final report from the Centre for Economic Performance
Latest report from CEP outlining the research evidence underlying some of the major choices facing the electorate and posing key questions that voters should be asking the leaders and local candidates of the political parties.

24 April 2015
Britain's Housing Crisis - and the fake solutions on offer
Housing affordability is a key concern of an ever-larger fraction of UK voters who are crammed into artificially limited space. At the same time, a lot of wealth lies in housing assets and there are many vested interests in keeping things this way, such as current homeowners and private landlords. Substantive reforms could solve the housing crisis, but politicians of all stripes back away from such reforms out of fear of being demonised by the vested interests. Instead, proposed policies tend to tackle the symptoms - rather than the causes - of the UK's housing affordability crisis. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)

23 April 2015
Policies To Combat Climate Change
The UK's main political parties have all pledged to combat climate change whatever the result of the general election. Yet according to a new report from the CEP, much of the discussion is largely rhetoric, with limited focus on actionable policy commitments. The report's author, Dr Ralf Martin, explains how UK climate policy consists of a patchwork of instruments addressing greenhouse gas emissions from a variety of sources and resulting in a diverse menu of carbon prices. And while the country's recent record on cutting carbon emissions seems impressive at first glance, much of it has been a result of the reduction in economic activity in the Great Recession.

22 April 2015
Fighting Crime: Can the Police do more with less?
The coalition government's austerity programme has resulted in some sizeable reductions in the police workforce, yet crime has continued to fall. A key question for the next Parliament is whether further real-terms reductions in police budgets can occur without more deleterious effects on crime. A new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) explores the evidence on the trends in crime and the police workforce, and factors that may have led to the continued fall in reported crime.

17 April 2015
Inequality: Are we really 'all in this together'?
A new #ElectionEconomics policy briefing finds inequality of pre- and post-tax income has risen remarkably in the UK since the late 1970s. And while inequality of net income fell in the aftermath of the financial crisis, there are signs that it is rising once again. The tax and benefit changes since 2010 have been largely regressive, with people in the bottom half of the income distribution losing more than they have gained. The main cleavage is between pensioners who have done well compared with those of working age, especially the young and households with children.

16 April 2015
The Top Rate of Income Tax
The main political parties disagree about the appropriate rate of income Tax on the highest incomes. The latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the May 2015 UK general election lays out the economic principles surrounding the top rate of income tax, and considers the evidence that high earners respond to higher tax rates by working less or by taking steps to avoid tax.

14 April 2015
Is Happiness a Predictor of Election Results?
New cross-national evidence suggests voters hold incumbent governments to account for national levels of wellbeing. This is the central finding of a new discussion paper from CEP.

10 April 2015
The NHS after the election: the evidence on future resources, competition and organisation
The latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the May 2015 UK general election considers how the parties' intention of protecting the NHS from major public sector expenditure cuts - and proposed expansion in some areas - can be achieved.

01 April 2015
Gender gaps in the UK labour Market
Differences in the labour market experiences of men and women have fallen over the last 20 years, but there are still sizeable 'gender gaps' in employment and wages. The latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the May 2015 UK general election explores the evidence on the key drivers of gender gaps and the effectiveness of 'family-friendly' policies to address them.

27 March 2015
Higher Education: How to pay for university?
The latest in a series of background briefings on key issues in the May 2015 UK general election explores the evidence on the demand for university students, the impact of the fees hike and potential for cuts.

26 March 2015
Britain's North South Divide: Policy should focus on people not places
In a new #ElectionEconomics policy briefing, Professor Henry Overman suggests we should be asking why other big cities do not offer similar economic opportunities as London does.

25 March 2015
Real Wages and Living Standards: the latest UK evidence
A new #ElectionEconomics policy briefing from CEP by Stephen Machin says that since the global financial crisis, workers' real wages and family living standards in the UK have suffered to an extent unprecedented in modern history.

24 March 2015
#ElectionEconomics policy briefing EA023 by Sandra McNally on Schools: the evidence on academies, resources and pupil performance
England's performance in international tests of student achievement continues to be disappointing. Further improvement is essential not only for students' themselves but also for economic growth.

21 March 2015
Latest #ElectionEconomics policy briefing - THE EUROPEAN UNION: Should we stay or should we go?
CEP researchers - Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson - note that the economic consequences for the UK from leaving the EU (so-called 'Brexit') are complex. But reduced integration with EU countries is likely to cost the UK economy far more than is gained from lower contributions to the EU budget.

18 March 2015
Low Productivity: Policies to tackle Britain's number 1 problem
The latest #ElectionEconomics policy briefing from CEP's Isabelle Roland and Anna Valero, wonders whether government can meet the challenge of UK's low productivity.

11 March 2015
Austerity: Post-election rax rises in prospect to meet deficit reduction targets
The new #ElectionEconomics policy briefing from CEP written by the Centre's director, Professor John Van Reenen.

26 February 2015
Immigration and the UK Labour Market
The first in a new series of CEP Election Economics policy briefings on key policy issues in the May 2015 UK General Election published today.

29 January 2015
Public hospitals: Higher competition results in better management and higher performance levels
A new study published online in The Review of Economic Studies shows that stronger competition results in better management quality and higher hospital performance in the English public hospital sector. Adding a rival hospital increases an index of management quality by 0.4 standard deviations and increases heart attack survival rates by 8.8 percent.

19 January 2015
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science are highlighted in the Winter 2014/15 issue of CentrePiece magazine.


2014

8 December 2014
LSE's Centre for Economic Performance is pleased to announce three big events this week
1) Lionel Robbins Memorial Lectures 2014: On three consecutive days (Tuesday 9 December, Wednesday 10 December and Thursday 11 December), Professor Angus Deaton (Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of Economics and International Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Economics Department at Princeton University) will discuss his work on health and poverty.
Details

2) Honouring Professor Lord Richard Layard - Celebrating 50 years at the London School of Economics and Political Science
CEP is hosting this event being held on Thursday 11 December, that is joint sponsored by the Department of Economics, CEP and STICERD, all of LSE.
Details

3) Trade Unions, Inequality and Pay Stagnation Conference
An invitation only workshop, being held on Friday 12 December and Saturday 13 December 2014.
Details

10 November 2014
Happy Children Become Satisfied Adults, Successful Children Less So
Research published in the Economic Journal challenges the basic assumption of educational policy - that academic achievement matters more than anything else.

4 November 2014
Climate Change Policies Promoting 'Clean Innovation' Can Boost Growth: New Evidence from the Transport and Energy Industries
Policies on climate change that encourage 'clean innovation' while displacing 'dirty innovation' could have a positive impact on short-term economic growth while avoiding the potentially disastrous reductions in GDP that could result from climate change over the longer term. That is the central conclusion of new research summarised in a Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), which looks at innovation in the car industry related to electric, hybrid and hydrogen vehicles ('clean patents') versus the internal combustion engine ('dirty patents') - and innovation in electricity generation related to renewables versus fossil fuels.

8 October 2014
Business Cycle Blues: New Evidence of the Psychological Effects of Economic Recession and Recovery
People do not psychologically benefit from economic expansions nearly as much as they suffer from recessions. That is the central finding of new research published today by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and his colleagues find evidence that the life satisfaction of individuals is between two and eight times more sensitive to periods when the economy is shrinking than at times of growth. Their results suggest that policy-makers seeking to maximise wellbeing should focus more on preventing busts than promoting booms.

3 October 2014
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance are highlighted in the Autumn 2014 issue of CentrePiece magazine.

29 September 2014
Real Wages in the UK: New report from the Centre for Economic Performance
Real wages in the UK continue to fall and the prospects of significant increases for typical workers remain bleak. That is the central message of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), the first in a series of Real Wages Updates by Professors David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. They argue that the absence of any improvement in the UK's productivity performance - together with evidence that nominal wage growth is flatlining and real wage growth is falling - make it highly unlikely that wage growth is about to explode upwards.

23 September 2014
'Clean Innovation' Boosts Growth: New evidence from the transport and energy industries. New research from Ralf Martin et al concludes that policies on climate change that encourage 'clean innovation' while displacing 'dirty innovation' could have a postive impact on short-term economic growth while avoiding the potentially disastrous reductions in GDP that could result from climate change over the longer term.

23 September 2014
Let's Make Mental Health a National Priority: New short film from the Centre for Economic Performance. In a short online film, Professor Richard Layard explains why treating mental illness should be high on the public agenda, especially as proven psychological therapies effectively cost nothing.

18 August 2014
Psychology of Parenting: New study finds that mother's personality measured during pregnancy predicts how well children perform in GCSEs. CEP study finds that babies born to mothers who hold a stronger belief that their fate is in their own hands and not down to luck tend to perform better in their GCSE exams 16 years later.

22 July 2014
The 2014 EIB Prize for Excellence in Economic and Social Research awarded to the economists Nicholas Bloom and John Van Reenen. The Luxembourg-based European Investment Bank Institute honours Professor Nicholas Bloom (Stanford University and CEP) and Professor John Van Reenen (Director of CEP and Professor of Economics, LSE) whose research is of specific relevance to the 2014 prize topic: 'Innovation, Market Structure and Competitiveness'.

01 July 2014
MPs urged to double psychological therapy in the NHS. At a meeting in Parliament on Tuesday 1st July, MPs will be urged to double the provision of psychological therapy in the National Health Service. Professors Richard Layard and David Clark will present data that irrefutably prove the economic case for increased access to psychological therapy in the NHS, demonstrating that the savings to the taxpayer of providing treatment greatly outweigh the cost of the treatments themselves.

29 May 2014
Give taxpayers a voice: New experimental research shows how to make people feel better about paying taxes and cheat less. If people are given the opportunity to express a preference on how their taxes are spent (but not actually make the final decisions), they are much less likely to cheat on their taxes. That is the central finding of an experimental study published today by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance and Harvard Business School.

16 May 2014
Brexit or Fixit? The Trade and Welfare Effects of Leaving the European Union. The latest report from the Centre for Economic Performance has been published today as part of the CEP Policy Analysis series.

15 May 2014
Immigration, the European Union and the UK Labour Market. A new report from the Centre for Economic Performance has been published today in the Centre's series of Policy Analysis.

8 May 2014
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Spring 2014 issue of CentrePiece magazine.

6 May 2014
UK Income and Wealth Inequality: new films from the Centre for Economic Performance. CEP's director Professor John Van Reenen discusses the key findings in an accompanying film to Inequality in the UK, the infographics film that was released on May 1, 2014.

1 May 2014
UK Income and Wealth Inequality: new film from the Centre for Economic Performance. Income and wealth inequality in the UK are higher than most people think they are and higher than they think they should be. These are among the messages of a new online infographics film released today by CEP.

20 March 2014
Report calls for wellbeing to be at the heart of public policy design. Professor Lord Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance is part of an independent commission established by The Legatum Institute, proposing a radical reform of public policy-making, targeted at ?wellbeing?, or life satisfaction, not simply economic growth.

11 March 2014
Recessions increase racial prejudice and inequality in the UK. New research from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science looks at changes in self-reported racial prejudice over 27 years and finds the proportion of people who said they were at least a ?little prejudiced? towards those from other races increased slightly whenever the economy took a turn for the worse.

6 March 2014
New research shows how technology squeezes middle skilled workers. Published in The Review of Economics and Statistics, Volume 96, Issue 1, March 2014.

5 February 2014
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science are highlighted in the Winter 2013/14 issue of CentrePiece magazine.

2013

12 December 2013
'Tough choices for a troubled euro': tonight's inaugural lecture by the first Regius Professor of Economics, Professor Sir Christopher Pissarides

10 December 2013
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Autumn 2013 issue of CentrePiece magazine.

5 December 2013
Employees in the UK are not being denied their fair share of economic growth, according to research by Joao Paulo Pessoa and Professor John Van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE.

23 September 2013
Pupils who rank higher in primary school perform better in secondary school, but not only because they are smarter but because their previous success inspires confidence. That is the central finding of a new study by Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

2 September 2013
LSE's Growth Commission publishes a new book - Investing for Prosperity: A Manifesto for Growth. Edited by Professors Tim Besley and John Van Reenen.

22 July 2013
A new CEP Discussion Paper titled 'Unmet Aspirations as an Explanation for the Age U-Shape in Human Wellbeing' by Hannes Schwandt was published today. Dr Schwandt finds that young people strongly overestimate their future life satsifaction while the elderly tend to underestimate it.

28 June 2013
The End of Affirmative Action: New evidence of the impact on miniorities in US public universities. Esteban Aucejo predicts that the impact of 'less aggressive' affirmative action policies may be less harmful for minorities than many people expect.

27 June 2013
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Summer 2013 issue of CentrePiece magazine.

26 June 2013
Professor John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, gives his verdict on Chancellor George Osborne's Spending Round.

5 June 2013
Falling Real Wages and the UK's Flexible Labour Market Help Explain the Productivity and Employment Puzzle from John Van Reenen and Joao Paulo Pessoa

1 June 2013
Neighbors, Knowledge, and Nuggets: Two Natural Field Experiments on the Role of Incentives on Energy Conservation from Paul Dolan and Robert Metcalfe

30 May 2013
University Exam Results Matter from Andy Feng and Georg Graetz

21 May 2013
Pay at the Top: New evidence on high earners in the UK from Brian Bell and John Van Reenen

15 May 2013
The UK labour market: CEP director John Van Reenen comments on the latest unemployment figures

23 April 2013
Making Sense of Falling UK Crime: Evidence from Economic Research from Mirko Draca

21 February 2013
Bankers Bonuses - New evidence on income inequality in the UK from Brian Bell & John Van Reenen

31 January 2013
A Manifesto for Growth
The LSE Growth Commission calls for a new focus on investment for future prosperity - in skills, infrastructure and innovations.

2012

19 December 2012
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Winter 2012 issue of CentrePiece magazine:
The latest issue is available to download.

12 December 2012
Immigration and the UK Labour Market - Article by MAC Chair, David Metcalf, in forthcoming CentrePiece.

7 November 2012
A Rational Victory - Comment on the US Election Result by Professor John Van Reenen - Professor Van Reenen looks at why President Obama's victory and re-election was important for many reasons.

24 October 2012
US Election Analysis No.3
Healthcare Reform: The US Policy Debate - The latest publication in the CEP US Election Analyses concludes that the ability of the next US president to rein in spending on healthcare and improve the productivity of the healthcare system is largely going to determine the country's fiscal future.

23 October 2012
US Election Analysis No.2
Economic Recovery and Policy Uncertainty - In the second of the CEP US Election Analyses series, Nicholas Bloom, John Van Reenen and colleagues assess the damaging impact of policy uncertainty on the US economic recovery.

16 October 2012
US Election Analysis No.1
Recession and Recovery: the US Policy Debate on Taxes, Spending and Public Debt - On the eve of the second US presidential debate, CEP is launching its first series of US Election Analyses. In our first report, Ethan Ilzetzki covers the key issue of taxes, spending and public debt, a major point of disagreement between the two candidates, President Obama and Governor Romney.

02 October 2012
Reforming Apprenticeships and Vocational Education - Research evidence from the Centre for Economic Performance sheds light on the longstanding weaknesses of vocational education and apprenticeships in Britain - and suggests how to remedy them.

20 September 2012
Education, Earnings and Economic Crisis - New research evidence from the Centre for Economic Performance in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012

24 August 2012
School Students' Views on Going to University - CEE research finds that a 'light-touch' information campaign about the value and affordability of going to university can have a big positive effect on the attitudes of pre-GCSE school students towards staying in education.

28 June 2012
Economists' Manifesto Challenges Wisdom of Austerity - published today in all editions of the Financial Times and on the following website, where supporters can join: www.manifestoforeconomicsense.org

25 June 2012
Immigration and the UK Labour Market: the Latest Evidence from Economic Research - CEP Policy Analysis published today

15 June 2012
Shocking Discrimination Against Mental Illness Within the NHS - CEP Mental Illness Report Published

13 June 2012
Flawed design of Europe's flagship climate policy costs taxpayers billions of euros

21 May 2012
Jobs, Growth, Pay and Pollution - New research evidence from the Centre for Economic Performance in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012

04 May 2012
Executive Pay: share ownership by institutional investors improves the link to corporate performance

22 March 2012
Wanted: A real budget for growth

19 March 2012
Non-Native English Speakers in the Classroom

05 March 2012
Britain Needs a Cabinet Minister for Mental Health

20 February 2012
Competition between NHS Hospitals Improves Efficiency; Impact of private sector competition is ambiguous

01 February 2012
Industrial Policy to Boost Jobs - New research suggests government grants should target smaller firms

20 January 2012
Launch of LSE Growth Commission

2011

14 December 2011
Apprenticeship Policy - The need to increase skills and boost young people's job prospect

14 November 2011
Growth, Jobs and Productivity - assessment of the UK's economic performance since 1997

4 November 2011
Top Pay in the UK - Evidence that CEO remuneration is linked to firm performance

19 October 2011
Lobbyist Connections to Cabinet Ministers Could be Worth up to 112k per year

19 August 2011
Police Patrols Highly Effective for Cutting Crime

27 July 2011
Hospital Competition in the NHS Saves Lives

11 May 2011
The Labour Market in Winter - assessing the UK's performance on jobs and inequality...

16 March 2011
Youth Unemployment: Today's Figures in Context and what can be done

15 March 2011
Explaining the Rise in Wage Inequality in the UK

17 February 2011
From Plan B to Plan V - What the UK Economy needs to reboot and rebalance growth

31 January 2011
NHS Reform - will the governement's plans make a difference to Britain's healthcare performance?

2010

2 December 2010
Improving British Management is Vital for Economic Recovery

26 October 2010
Management in Healthcare - Good management really makes a difference

11 October 2010
Professor Christopher Pissarides Wins Economics Nobel

7 September 2010
Apprenticeships - Employers in England Lag Behind

13 July 2010
Top Health Economists Comment on the NHS White Paper

30 June 2010
Competition Makes NHS Hospitals More Efficient

24 May 2010
Europe's Emissions Trading System - How European taxpayers are losing out to the industry lobby

2009

27 August 2009
CEP Director wins Europe's Top Prize for Economic Research

12 February 2009
Two Cheers for Anglo-Saxon Financial Markets? Institutional investors are good for industrial innovation

2008

30 October 2008
IZA Prize 2008 goes to British Economists Richard Layard and Stephen J. Nickell

29 October 2008
Low Income Families are now more able to work their way out of poverty

1 September 2008
Research on Mobile Termination Charges - Vodafone has warned that 40 million mobile phone users in Europe might switch off handsets because of proposed EU reforms...

6 August 2008
Idle Youth? It's bad, but maybe not as bad as you think

4 February 2008
Hospitals that Rely on Agency Nurses have Worse Health Outcomes for Patients

11 January 2008
New Research on Independent Schools - Their effects on teacher supply and the returns to private education

2007

17 September 2007
The Microsoft Decision - comment from the Centre for Economic Performance

10 September 2007
Union Blues - The bleak outlook for most of Britain's Trade Unions

12 July 2007
Managment Practices - New survey compares firms in the UK, Europe, United States and Asia

2 May 2007
Specialists are Needed to Teach Values says Richard Layard

27 April 2007
Americans Do IT Better - explaining the US productivity miracle, and why Europe hasn't kept up

21 March 2007
The European Union at 50 - prospects for jobs, innovation and productivity growth