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News and Press

CEP Press Releases

2017

See also press releases for 2016, 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007.

31 July 2017
Work And Unemployment: Evidence of the impact on the wellbeing of men and women
Given a generally stronger social norm for men to be working in paid employment than for women, unemployment is typically worse for the wellbeing of men than women. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world. But the experts are divided on whether unemployment is better for an individual’s happiness than being employed in a bad job.   
26 July 2017
Wealthy Southern cities will be hit hardest by both a 'soft' or 'hard' Brexit - but are also best placed to adapt to economic shocks ahead
A new study published today by the think tank Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at LSE, analyses for the first time the potential impact of both a 'hard' and 'soft' Brexit on British cities in the ten years following the implementation of new trade arrangements with the EU.
03 July 2017
New research findings from CEP highlighted in the Summer 2017 issue of CentrePiece magazine
New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Summer 2017 CentrePiece magazine. Among the findings:
  • HOME OWNERSHIP: UK wealth inequality transmitted across generations
  • LIGHT ENTERTAINMENT TV: Partly to blame for the rise of populist politicians
  • BUSINESS SUCCESS: US evidence that the quality of management matters
  • ‘FREE COLLEGE’: Not necessarily the way to improve access for all students
  • CAREER OPPORTUNITIES: The value of providing students with information
  • UK INDUSTRIAL STRATEGY: The need for stable policy frameworks
  • NEW ROADS: Economic benefits of investment in UK transport infrastructure
  • NEW AIRPORT CAPACITY: A significant boost to manufacturing output in China
  • SLEEP DEPRIVATION: Strongly negative effects on labour market performance
07 June 2017
#GE2017Economists: The research evidence on key issues for voters in the 2017 UK General Election

Final policy briefing report from the Centre for Economic Performance: The unexpected UK general election of 2017 was intended to be all about Brexit, one that will give the incoming government a mandate to negotiate the terms of the UK’s exit from the European Union (EU). But many other public policy issues have been at the forefront of political and public debate during the campaign. The Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics has focused on eight key areas, producing a series of briefings summarising the research evidence and evaluating relevant policy proposals in the party manifestos. This report brings together those briefings - which draw on the work of many CEP researchers and other economists - into one single Election Analysis.

05 June 2017
Brexit as Climate Policy: The Agenda on Energy and the Environment
The Great Recession and a sluggish economic recovery were instrumental in meeting the legally binding climate change targets that the Uk has set for itself. But without more drastic policy interventions, it is unlikely that future targets will be met - unless the more extreme forecasts for the impact of Brexit on economic activity are realised.
02 June 2017
THE UK’s REGIONAL DIVIDE: Can policy make a difference?
Despite numerous efforts to do something about the big variations in economic performance across the cities and regions of the UK, little has been achieved in reducing long-run differences. Some Northern cities (such as Manchester) are doing well, but London and the South East continue to dominate in terms of population growth and private sector employment. The limited progress on tackling the UK’s regional divide is unsurprising: the economic processes that drive spatial differences are poorly understood by policy-makers, and evidence has historically played little part in the formulation of policy. While this is slowly changing, there remains confusion about what urban and regional policy can do, a confusion that is shared by all political parties. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.
01 June 2017
EDUCATION AND SKILLS: The UK policy agenda
Education and skills play a key role in generating improved productivity growth, as the government’s industrial strategy recognises – yet on current trends, funding per pupil in primary and secondary schools is set to fall significantly. All parties promise a change in total expenditure that is actually far more modest when put in the context of rising pupil numbers. What’s more, the educational funding outlook for young people aged between 16 and 18 is much worse. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.
31 May 2017
Brexit and the UK Economy
Leaving the European Union (EU) with no deal in place for future trading arrangements would be the worst-case Brexit scenario for the UK economy. What’s more, just because GDP growth has not declined since last year’s referendum, it would be wrong to think that Brexit is yet to have any economic effects: it has already lowered UK living standards by causing the value of the pound to decline, which has led to higher inflation and lower real wage growth. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election. The CEP report describes alternative post-Brexit futures for UK-EU relations and summarises the economic and political consequences of each option.
30 May 2017
Immigration and the UK Economy
Any reductions in UK immigration from the European Union (EU) are likely to lead to lower living standards for the UK-born. This is partly because immigrants help to reduce the deficit: they are more likely to work and pay tax; and they are less likely to use public services as, on average, they are younger and better educated than the UK-born. What’s more, to get anywhere near the Conservatives’ target of keeping annual net immigration numbers below 100,000 would mean large restrictions on students from both the EU and outside. Sectors of the economy that employ science professionals and workers in processing and elementary occupations (such as cleaning and bar work) would be most under pressure from attempts to reduce immigration. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the latest in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.
26 May 2017
The UK's New Industrial Strategy
Centre for Economic Performance report on UK's new industrial strategy - #GE2017Economists @CEP_LSE election analysis. All of the UK’s main political parties now highlight the importance of an ‘industrial strategy’ with the aim of improving economic growth and achieving more balance in how its gains are distributed. In addition, and in contrast to the 2015 election, all parties have made a manifesto commitment to raising the intensity of UK research and development. Both the Conservatives and Labour share a desire for more market intervention in some areas: promising energy price caps of some form, tightening up rules on takeovers, and – along with the Liberal Democrats – pushing company boards to consider the interests of workers. But major differences have emerged with respect to business taxes, and the extent of public investment and intervention. The most dramatic differences are that Labour would renationalise large parts of the privatised utilities, and would raise corporate (and other) taxes to fund higher public spending in a number of areas. These are among the conclusions of a new report from  CEP – the third in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.
26 May 2017
The Mid-Life Crisis in Wellbeing
Wellbeing is U-shaped in age in Western countries, with reported satisfaction with life tending to drop between adolescence (around 15) and middle age (around 45) before rising again – and there doesn’t seem to be much we can do about it. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world.
25 May 2017
The NHS and Social Care: Prospects for funding, staffing and performance into the 2020s
Centre for Economic Performance report on the NHS and social care - #GE2017Economists @CEP_LSE election analysis In election debate about the prospects for the NHS, it is generally agreed that there is a funding shortfall with additional money required to meet rising costs, demographic pressures, increased expectations, and changes in health technology and medical practice. And given that around 70% of NHS expenditure goes on staffing, it is no surprise that as expenditure tightens, staffing issues are a growing problem. The current government’s plans are to expand funding but to raise more real resource input essentially through efficiency savings. But the efficiency savings required to maintain NHS resources in line with rising demands and costs would have to be three to four times historical norms for these plans to work. These are among the conclusions of a new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the second in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election.
19 May 2017
The Return of Falling Real Wages

Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards - #GE2017Economists @CEP_LSE election analysis

Since the global financial crisis of 2007/08, workers’ real wages and family living standards in the UK have suffered to an extent unprecedented in modern history. Real wages of the typical (median) worker have fallen by almost 5% since 2008, while real family incomes for families of working age have just about recovered to pre-crisis levels. But almost all groups of individuals and families - with the exception of pensioner households - are no better off on average than in 2008. In particular, there is an important generational shift, with young people doing considerably worse.

28 March 2017
Improving National Happiness: Expert insights on the potential of public policy
Following the recent publication of the 2017 World Happiness Report, 28 leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world have expressed their views on the state of knowledge on public policies that can make a real difference to people's satisfaction with their lives - as well as whether we need more randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to test the wellbeing impact of a variety of policy options.
20 March 2017
Norway takes top spot in 2017 World Happiness Report

The World Happiness Report 2017, released today with significant input from LSE's Professor Richard Layard, includes an analysis of happiness in the workplace for the first time.

Norway ranks as the happiest country, jumping three spots from last year, displacing Denmark and then followed by Iceland, Finland, The Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Sweden.

The World Happiness Report 2017 is available at worldhappiness.report

07 March 2017
A Budget for Wellbeing? Happiness experts to respond to Chancellor's speech
The Chancellor’s budget speech on Wednesday will be scrutinised for its likely impact on the economy, public finances and household incomes – but how will it affect the wellbeing of the UK population? Happiness researchers associated with the What Works Centre for Wellbeing are available to respond on-air, online and in print immediately after the budget on its implications for wellbeing. Fuller information on the wellbeing impacts of anticipated announcements is already available, with further updates online tomorrow.
06 March 2017
Transforming Technical Education in England: Analysis of promised budget proposals from the Centre for Vocational Education Research
Trails for the Chancellor’s budget speech on Wednesday promise big new plans for technical education in England. Professor Sandra McNally of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics, who is available for comment on the proposals, summarises the evidence and her view of what reforms are needed.
01 March 2017
New research findings from the Centre for Economic Performance are highlighted in the Spring 2017 CentrePiece magazine

New research reports from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics are highlighted in the Spring 2017 CentrePiece magazine.

28 February 2017
Sleep Deprivation and Employment: Evidence from the 'Children of the 90s'
Sleep deprivation has a strong negative effect on labour market performance, according to research by Joan Costa-Font and Sarah Fleche of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Analysing data on a representative sample of children born in and around Bristol in the early 1990s, they find that a one-hour reduction in parents’ sleep duration significantly decreases labour force participation, the number of hours worked and household income. In addition, they find that low-skilled mothers are more likely to opt out of the labour market and work fewer hours than high-skilled mothers when exposed to sleep deprivation. The researchers conclude that sleep is a major determinant of employment outcomes that needs more attention in economic analysis of time allocation and employment policies. They will present their study at the annual conference of the Royal Economic Society in April.
27 February 2017
Wellbeing Effects of Anonymous Donation of Eggs and Sperm: expert analysis of the impact on donors, donor conceived children and wider society

Donating gametes (eggs and sperm) via clinics as an anonymous donor is not considered to be one of the highest return-to-effort things individuals can do to increase overall wellbeing. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world on the wellbeing implications of gametes donation.

On a key question of policy related to anonymous gamete donation, the panel of experts are divided on whether the right of a child to know who their donor was when they turn 18 outweighs the possibility that such a right will lead to a shortage of donors and reduce the number of donor-conceived children.

13 February 2017
NURSERY QUALITY: New evidence of the impact on children's outcomes
A report published today reveals that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or early years professional. Attending a nursery rated as ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted, the regulator of educational quality in England, also has limited benefits. The research concludes that while there are important differences between the outcomes of children who attend different nurseries, we do not yet understand enough about what generates them.
30 January 2017
FEWER LEVELS OF MIDDLE MANAGEMENT WOULD IMPROVE WORKERS WELLBEING: New survey of happiness researchers
Workers’ satisfaction with their job is, on average, higher in a flatter organisation than in a hierarchical organisation. That is the consensus finding of a survey of leading researchers on wellbeing from around the world on the impact of different organisational structures on workers’ wellbeing.