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CEP/STICERD Applications Seminars


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The Applications Seminar brings together research at the frontier of applied microeconomics in the fields of labour and development economics, public finance and social policy

These seminars are held on Mondays at 12:00-13:30 in room 32L 1.04 (1st floor, 32 Lincolns Inn Fields, London), unless specified otherwise.

For further information please contact Tajender Sagoo, either by email: t.sagoo@lse.ac.uk or telephone: +44(0)-7955-6648.

This seminar is organised by
Guy Michaels, email: g.michaels@lse.ac.uk, tel: 44(0)20 7852 3518 

and Jeremiah Dittmar, email: j.e.dittmar@lse.ac.uk, tel: 44(0)20 3486 2881 



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Monday  18 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Scaling Up Agricultural Policy Interventions: Theory and Evidence from Uganda

Benjamin Faber (University of California, Berkeley)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  04 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

What do Nudges Really Do? New Evidence from Over 100 Trials

Stefano DellaVigna (Berkeley)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  11 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Allocative Efficiency in Firm Production: A Nonparametric Test Using Procurement Lotteries

Dave Donaldson (MIT)

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  18 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Scaling Up Agricultural Policy Interventions: Theory and Evidence from Uganda

Benjamin Faber (University of California, Berkeley)

Interventions aimed at raising agricultural productivity in developing countries have been a centerpiece in the global fight against poverty. Much of the recent evidence in this space has been based on randomized control trials (RCTs), with the well-known limitation that findings from local interventions generally do not speak to the general equilibrium (GE) effects if the policy were to be scaled up. In this paper, we study these forces through the lens of a quantitative GE model of farm production and trade that we develop to capture several stylized facts in this setting. We propose a new solution approach in this environment that allows us to study high-dimensional GE counterfactuals at the level of individual households in the macroeconomy. We then bring to bear rich administrative microdata to calibrate the model to the roughly 6 million households populating Uganda. We use these building blocks to explore the average and distributional implications of small-scale interventions compared to policies at scale, and quantify the underlying mechanisms.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  25 November 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Trade and Informality in the Presence of Labor Market Frictions and Regulations

Gabriel Ulyssea (Oxford)

Motivated by recent work on the labor market effects of trade, we build a model of trade with labor market frictions and regulations that are not perfectly enforced by the government. Heterogeneous firms decide whether to operate formally or informally, allowing for a link between globalization, informality and unemployment. We estimate the model using several data sources from Brazil, including matched employer-employee data from formal and informal firms and workers. We perform counterfactual analyses to understand how increasing trade openness affects informality, unemployment and welfare under different scenarios of labor market regulations and levels of enforcement. Our results suggest that domestic policies leading to a reduction in informality have the potential to strongly increase aggregate productivity and welfare, at the expense of modest increases in unemployment. These policies have a much larger effect on welfare relative to policies aiming to reduce international trade costs. The informal sector works as a buffer in the event of negative economic shocks. However, the welfare gains from eradicating informality are so significant that it is hard to justify lenience toward the informal sector on the basis that it works as a buffer following negative economic shocks.


32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  02 December 2019  12:00 - 13:30

Gangs, Labor Mobility and Development

Maria Micaela Sviatschi (Princeton )

32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
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Monday  09 December 2019  12:00 - 13:30

The Roots of Health Inequality and the Value of Intra-Family Expertise

Petra Persson (Stanford)

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32L 1.04, 1st Floor Conference Room, LSE, 32 Lincoln's Inn Fields, London WC2A 3PH
There are also future events listed for this series. Please see LSE Applications Seminar listed for Next Term