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Lionel Robbins Memorial Lectures 2009

Designing Policies for Growth

Speaker: Professor Philippe Aghion, Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Dates: Monday 19, Tuesday 20, Wednesday 21 January 2009

Time: 18.30pm 


Lecture Summaries and Recordings:

Lecture 1: The Layers of Growth Policy Design

Chaired by Professor Danny Quah

This lecture will lay down the framework to think about growth policy design. It will argue that growth policy should involve several layers of intervention: (i) knowledge; (ii) market reforms (with the issue of industrial policy); (iii) culture and trust to secure market reforms; (iv) growth-compatible macroeconomic policy over the cycle.

  • Lecture I: The Layers of Growth Policy Design (19 Feb 2009)
    Listen to Podcast: MP3 | Watch Videocast: Vodcast

Lecture 2: Growth and the Environment

Chaired by Mr Christopher Johnson

Lecture 2 will discuss how policies that induce directed technical change can be designed so as to maximize sustainable growth in a world with environmental constraints

  • Lecture II: Growth and the Environment (20 Feb 2009)
    Listen to Podcast: MP3 | Watch Videocast: Vodcast

Lecture 3: Growth and Culture: Regulation and Trust

Chaired by Sir Howard Davies

The final lecture will focus on the relationship between market reforms and trust. It will try to explain: (i) why countries with higher levels of trust and social capital tend to be countries with less regulated product and labor markets; (ii) why countries with lower levels of social capital are also countries with higher demand for more regulations; (iii) why fast deregulation in a low-trust country leads o further reductions in trust.

  • Lecture III: Growth and Culture: Regulation and Trust (21 Feb 2009)
    Listen to Podcast: MP3 | Watch Videocast: Vodcast

About the Speaker: Philippe Aghion is Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics at Harvard University. His main research areas are growth economics and the theory of organizations. With Peter Howitt he published “Endogenous Growth Theory” (1998, MIT Press), which develops the so-called Schumpeterian growth paradigm. His more recent work analyzes the relationship between growth and market structure (“Competition and Growth”, with Rachel Griffith, 2005, MIT Press), growth and education (“Higher Education and Growth”, Gorman Lectures), and between growth and organizations.

For more information, please contact Jo Cantlay on 020 7955 7285 or by email at j.m.cantlay@lse.ac.uk.